Sponsors

FacebookTwitterGoogle Bookmarks

Anyway, the point of this Editorial is not to give way to a bout of self-indulgence but to reminisce over the changes l've seen in just three years with Amiga Computing (and three years is a relatively short time in the lifespan of Amiga). I started back in October 1993, complété with shiny shoes and spoddy suit The first magazine! Worked on was the lanuary 1994 issue and in the news it was announced that despite Commodore substantially stashing its operating costs, it still continued to lose money. Several Européen offices were closed and a financial statement said that the firm's financial position and operating resuits raised concerns about its ability to continue as a going concern. Joint Commodore MD, Colin Proudfoot said however, that he was confident the success of the CD32 would put the company back into profit... This was not to be, as we soon discov- erect. Although the CD32 captured 38 per cent of the CD market its success was short lived. Our games team discovered that many CD32 releases were merely port-overs from their disk counterparts. During this period, I was quite happily ripping apart games like Allô Allo (a decidedly unfunny license from the decidedly unfunny TV sériés) as well as doing screen grabs for Amiga dassics such as Mortal Kombat and Cannon Fodder. The Commodore saga continued and soon the company was filing for liquidation. The uncertainty went on for some time and it wasn't until 1995 that a final solution was announced. Or so we thought, because Escom had beaten ail other contenders to get hold of the Amiga technology. Amiga owners could breathe a sigh of Fond Fareweü Tina Hackett reminisces over the changes she's seen in her three years with Amiga Computing relief. Whilst ail this was happening Europress, publishers of Amiga Computing, had sold the publishing side of its business to the International Data Croup. I, mean- while, was meeting up with the Stockport County Football Team to meet head-to-head in a Sensible Soccer tournament. I lost, and went back to the office, shame-faced. Mohr, Mr Vost, Mr Maddock (Junior) and Mr Poynton. The magazine also saw various redesigns to keep it up-to-date in three years our games section has been Cames, then System and now Amiga Action. In May J996 Mr Vost left us and I took over at the helm of the good ship Amiga Computing. It was also another exciting period in the Amîga's turbulent history. American company, VIScorp, had stated that it wanted to buy the Amiga and a Letter of Understanding had been signed with Escom - unfortunately, Escom went bust before the deal was ever

Click image to download PDF

Document sans nom Full working demo _ * Requires Hard drive, W83 ssional ‘Smi tfWEDal'l® SaO ..wmnre mvmna ph tffljtfs jirj/lrir-j!] z IpO'dgijJaiW Requires Hard drive, WB3 Demo o/ the ultimate PC Emulator /or the Amiga aMPEG - Fast Amiga Mpeg player MUIExchange* - Handy Exchange replacement WBStartup* - Enhance Workbench startup control IXG - New Amiga hyper text system CtaasAction - Latest and greatest version Relnboot - Add llashy startups Jon'jl - Make your Amiga juggle User Interface required 9 770959 963084 Cinema 4D v3 • Voyager NG • DiskMagic • Web Explosion TOTAL MEMORY EXPANSIONS A1200 trapdoor fining
memory expansions feature a battery backed clock and a socket for an accelerator FPU. Unlike other memory expansions that conflict with the PCMCIA port, our TOTAL memory expansions include unique software that will enable the maximum amount of mem¬ ory to be used even with a PCMCIA fitting device.
S NEARLY DOUBLES THE SPEED OF THE A1200 4MB MEMORY EXPANSION £69.99 33MHZ 68882 FPU (PLCC) 8MB MEMORY EXPANSION £89.99 purchased v DISCOLOGY DATAFLYER SCSI+ Now indudes ROM drivers and instructions.
Oiscology is the ultimate in disk copying power for the Amiga. The package com¬ prises the Discology Disk, manual and Discology cartridge for making copies of heavily protected programs with an external disk drive.
Discology will also format disks, check disks for errors etc. Anti Virus Professional is the most powerful tool for detecting and removing virus¬ es. Anti Virus pro will check and device bard drives, floppy disks and even CD ROM drives for viruses. Very straight forward to use. Includes a full 50 page manual.
ORDER NOW BEFORE A VIRUS DESTROYS YOUR SYSTEM!!!
PLEASE PHONE FOR A FULL INFORMATION SHEET MODEMS Our highly rated, top quality feature packed modems are idea! For Amiga users. All modems include our FREE MODEM ACCESSORIES PACK (worth ) which includes a cable to connect the modem to the Amiga. NCOMM i comms software. Amiga Guide to Comms and a list of Bulletin Boards from which you will be able to download vast amounts of free soft¬ ware as well as have access to E-MAIL facilities.
• MNP 2-4 Error Correction • MNP 5 Data Compression • Fax Class I
and II compatible, Group 3 * Hayes Compatible • Full l 80 page
manual • 12 Months guarantee V A V 14400 MODEM £69.99 33600
MODEIVljJ £109.99 NET AND WEB SOFTWARE Dataf Iyer is a 16 bit
—_____ ¦ SCSI it controller that converts the signals^ on the
Internal IDE interface to also run SCSI devices at the same
time as the IDE hard drive.
The Dataflyer SCSI+ will operate up to 5 SCSI devices such as CD-ROMS, hard drives, Syquest removable drives, tape back up drives etc. Unlike other SCSI interfaces, the Dataflyer SCSI+ is com¬ patible with all known accelerators etc and it does not stop you from utilising any of the important expansion ports on your A1200/A600. The Dataflyer SCS1+ easily installs into the A1200/A600 (simply pushes in, no need to remove the metal shield) and provides a 25 way D connector through the blanking plate at the back of the A1200. Full instructions and software sup¬ plied.
DATAFLYER ONLVW|j»|P|or Wl when purchsed with a SCSI device SQUIRREL ONLY I when | a SCSI device SURF SQUIRREL or when purchsed with a SCSI device ALSO AVAILABLE EXTERNAL FLOPPY DRIVE £49.99 A600/A1200 INTERNAL FLOPPY DRIVE £44.99 A500 INTERNAL FLOPPY DRIVE £49.99 MOUSE £12.99
3. 5* HARD DRIVE CABLE £17.50
2. 5' HARD DRIVE CABLE £9.99 FRESH FONTS CD £19.99 PHOTO
CD-MANAGER £19.99 AMIGA POWER SUPPLY £34.99 CLOCK CARTRIDGE
£19.99 CACHE CDFS £44.99 EPIC ENCYCLOPEDIA CD (full ‘97
version) £19.99 50mhz FPU (for blizzard 1230) £44.99 WORLD OF
A1200 CD and TOP 100 A1200 GAMES CD £7.49 EACH or FREE with
every CD ROM drive!!!
Highly rated SCSI drive wilt store c lOOmb per car ^ tridge. Comes Complete with power supply. SCSI cable, instructions and cartridge ZIP DRIVES £159.99 OR £199.99 with Squirrel JAZ DRIVE £439.99 OR £479.99 with Squirrel APOLLO 1240/40 APOLLO 1260/50 4MB SIMM £19.99 8MB SIMM £39.99 OR 16MB SIMM £79.99 WHEN 32MB SIMM £169.99 WHEN PURCHASED WITH AN APOLLO ACCELERATOR All the features you asked for at an affordable price! High per¬ formance 68030 with FPU and MMU running at 40rnhz. Two 72pin SIMM sockets can take upto 32mb each. Simms can be mixed (i.e. a 4mb and 8mb will give 12nib) and can be
sin¬ gle or double sided. Fully PCMCIA compatible regardless of how much memory is fitted. Easy trapdoor fitting with battery backed clock APOLLO 1240/1260 9 WM 68040/68060 + MMU .. . £ based A1200 accelerator. ¦ Features battery backed clock N-’ ' r and a 72 pin socket for a standard 72 pin '< SIMM (up to 128mb|. Fully teatured, fan cooled trapdoor Fitting accelerator.
V- r isiii-- J High quality low cost 68030 :i ^'ffbB accelerator with MMU and FPU all running at 25mhz. Built in battery backed clock.
Easy trapdoor fitting. Amazing performance for such a low price. Will take a 4mb or 8mb SIMM. Wot PCM¬ CIA compatible with 8mb fitted.
APOLLO 1230 PRO £149.99 Alb VXV\t APOLLO 1240/25 £l99.9<> APOLLO 1230 LITE £99.99 TWIN SIMM
2. 5” HARD DRIVES Our high speed 2.5' IDE hard drives for the
Amiga A1200 & A600 computers come complete with fitting cable,
screws, par¬ titioning software, full instructions and 12
months guarantee.
Ail drives supplied by us are formatted, partitioned and have Workbench (WB2 for the A600 and WB3 for the A12D0i installed for immediate use. Fitting is incredibly simple: if you can plug the mouse into 1he mouse socket, you can plug the bard drive into tjie hard drive socket.
• FREE WHILE-YOU-WAJT FITTING ^ • SERVICE FDR PERSONAL CALLERS.
PLEASE PHONE WmggF FOR APPOINTMENT.
FREE •HOW TO FIT YOUR HARDDRIVE’ video and Stakker disk to increase the drive's capacity with every hard drive ordered TOTAL SCSI CD-ROM DRIVE Fully featured SCSI CD- ROM drive for use with the A1200 or A600, \ Jus Features include 1 superb metal enclo- t sure with in-built mains power supply. Includes all software, cables and instructions for immediate use.
Full CD32 emulation and Audio CD player software included. No extras needed! Just plug in and go. Choose either PCMCIA fit¬ ting Squirrel interface or internally fitting Datatlyer SCSI inter¬ face.
MEDIAVISION RENO CD-ROM + SQUIRREL £114.99 Superb top quality CD ROM DRIVE complete with Squirrel for immedi¬ ate use on the Anuga A1200 or a600. Includes CD32 emulation, audio CD player etc as well as its own CD power supply, cables etc. Can also be used as a personal audio yr • includes stereo ^ TOTAL CD-ROM DRIVES 2 speed £129.99 4 speed £159.99 6 speed £209.99 8 speed £249.99 Prices include Squirrel.
Add £30.00 for Dataflyer or Surf Squirrel RENO CD WITH SQUIRREL £114.99 I Hard Drive headphones!
540mb £139.99 810mb £164.99 it/switch card sales only) for enquiries tel: 0161 796 5279 fax: 0161 796 3208 Send cheques or postal orders (made payable to Siren Software) or credit card details to:- SIREN SOFTWARE, 178 BURY NEW RD WHITEFIELD, MANCHESTER M45 6QF, ENGLAND Access, Vise, Switch, Delta, Connect etc accepted OPEN: Monday to Friday 9am to 6pm Saturday Sam to 12pm Personal callers welcome.
Please phone first to check availability of any item.
DIRECTiONS: From the M62 Junction 17 head towards Bury.
We are 50 yards on the right hand side after the third set of lights.
The door to our premises is next to Polar opposite the Masons Pub.
AH p-iitT: IfiilMSB VAT. Fw.te?f: e-,3 ptskirg will ug &A#3 e. {?¦ so pur era* turo.
£7.fiti fxiit*4t ri-|-; it p.eo rcit tit His v/.vti. FOR AMIGA IN MANCHESTER Order NOW for immediate despatch FOR MAIL ORDER siren <c Action news Some Amiga mags boast one page of news, some two. Not us - we have four packed pages The macc lads 64 They don't know Sweat Betty but they have produced a new 3D fantasy tank game. Hugh Poynton finds out more.. Testament 66 Tina Hackett goes head to head with grotesque slimy eyeballs in Islona’s new 3D shoot-'em-up Tiny troops 68 rhey're Tiny and they're troops, Not much nore to say really... Kargon 69 Hugh ’Dragonslayer of the Grove of Hazel and
warrior of Tess Kowz’ Poynton reviews Islona's magical 3D spell 'em-up Super Leagues 70 They're back. Check out the best Amiga games old and new with our revamped superleagues Burnout 72 Mirror. Signal. Mutilate. Hugh Poynton tries out Vulcan's new crash'em-up Guildhall goodies 74 We take a look at Guildhall's excellent retro¬ spective flight sim, FI9 Epic 75 Hugh Poynton peruses Epic's new label, Islona, and its exciting new plans for the future Mutation 76 Amiga Action talk to Adrian Cummings, head honcho of Mutation Software EVIEWS Sun, sea & text_ m Voyager ng Mr Mohr takes a look at some
welcome extra extensions for Cinema AD The latest Amiga web browser with frames support - but is it any good?
Disk magic_SI Get yourself organised with Hi- Soft's new file manager Cinema 4d v3_ED The latest version of Hi-Soft's acclaimed ray-tracing package is reviewed Web explosion Tina Hackett adds glamour to her web pages Spiral Bali va^ ^ B»u# 4 Blue BftM a Vmow Owg« uj& ig) feSi Purple 4 Grew Purple a Y*tawr R< EATURES Midi madness_ ID Freebie Amiga EH Cheapskate Gareth Lofthouse shows you how to get the best software for free ‘C COMPILER_I m Tiling Paul Overraa brings you more handy hints on "C Programming Paul Overraa reveals how to create backdrops Amiga Computing Plus: PC TASK 4 DEMO E3
EGULARS News_ED Public sector S3 No new owner yet - but plenty of news from the net Dave Cusick scrounges off us to eek out his grant by writing this month's peedee Acas ____13 Neil waves his wand over your Amiga and says the magic words, "Work, you b”*ard" Letters_ ED Your retreat readers - write in on whatever takes your fancy Turbo Print 5 Amiga Computing brings you the full working demo of the revolutionary print enhancement program Class Action • WB Set-Up 2.8
• AmiPeg t MUI Exchange • iXG
• Rainboot MIGA (JUIDE COVER STORY Lightwave 5 E3 It's here, it
really is. The moment you've all been waiting for - a new
version of Lightwave for the Amiga. AC bring you the definitive
review.... Amiga Computing Ot's a sad day - I'm off into the
big wide world and leaving Amiga Computing. Don't get me wrong
-
- it's not because of the magazine ENT or anything to do with
the Amiga market (although believe me, the current situation
with the Amiga has certainly tried my patience). I'm off to
find my fortune in the big smoke along with Jerry Lighthouse
(or whatever his name is).
Don't worry though - in the Editor's chair will be Neel Morhe (or however you spell it) who I'm sure will take care of you all.
Anyway, the point of this Editorial is not to give way to a bout of self-indulgence but to reminisce over the changes I've seen in’just three years with Amiga Computing (and three years is a relatively short time in the lifespan of Amiga).
I started back in October 1993, complete with shiny shoes and spoddy suit The first magazine ! Worked on was the January 1994 issue and in the news it was announced that despite Commodore substantially slashing its operating costs, it still continued to lose money. Several European offices were closed and a financial statement said that the firm’s financial position and operating results raised concerns about its ability to continue as a going concern. Joint Commodore MD, Colin Proudfoot said how¬ ever, that he was confident the success of the CD32 would put the company back into profit...
This was not to be, as we soon discov¬ ered. Although the CD32 captured 38 per cent of the CD market its success was short lived. Our games team discovered that many CD32 releases were merely port-overs from their disk counterparts. During this period, I was quite happily ripping apart games like Alio Alio (a decidedly unfunny license from the decidedly unfunny TV series) as well as doing screen grabs for Amiga classics such as Mortal Kombat and Cannon Fodder.
The Commodore saga continued and soon the company was filing for liquidation.
The uncertainty went on for some time and it wasn’t until 1995 that a final solution was announced. Or so we thought, because Escom had beaten all other contenders to get hold of the Amiga technology.
Amiga owners could breathe a sigh of Fond Farewell Tina Hackett reminisces over the changes she's seen in her three years with Amiga Computing relief. Whilst all this was happening Europress, publishers of Amiga Computing, had sold the publishing side of its business to the International Data Group. I, mean¬ while, was meeting up with the Stockport County Football Team to meet head-to-head in a Sensible Soccer tournament. I lost, and went back to the office, shame-faced.
Mohr, Mr Vost, Mr Maddock (Junior) and Mr Poynton. The magazine also saw various re¬ designs to keep it up-to-date - in three years our games section has been Gamer, then System and now Amiga Action.
In May 1996 Mr Vost left us and I took over at the helm of the good ship Amiga Computing. It was also another exciting peri¬ od in the Amiga's turbulent history, American company, VIScorp, had stated that it wanted to buy the Amiga and a Letter of Understanding had been signed with Escom
- unfortunately, Escom went bust before the deai was ever
completed. At the time of writ¬ ing, still no saviour for the
Amiga has appeared - although QuikPak is still in the running.
Before I sign off though I would just like to say a big thanks to all the people I have worked with and of course, to you dear read¬ ers. Oh, and obviously, my Mum, Dad (who've read every issue!!), cat, hamster, The Magic Pack appeared and proved a disappointment. Life continued at Amiga Computing and I reported on the Amiga being used at Eureka, the Children's muse¬ um, and also get to go to the Imperial War Museum - who says the job has no perks?
Development of the Walker (which would have looked something between a toaster and a radio) was announced but doesn't see the light of day.
The staff at AC change-over time - Stevie Kennedy, Paul Austin, Adam Phillips and Gareth Lofthouse all move over to our sister magazine, The Web, and we welcome in Mr The AC team EDITOR Tina Hackctt DEPUTY EDITOR Neil Mohr ART EDITOR Graham Parry, Tym Leckey PRODUCTION EDITORS Justine Bowden, Alan McLachlan STAFF WRITER Hugh Poynton REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS Dave Cusick Katherine Nelson Paul Overaa Phil South CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Gareth Lofthouse AD SALES Sue Horsehtld AD PRODUCTION Barbara Newall MARKETING MANAGER Steve Tagger PRODUCTION MANAGER Alan Capper DATABASE MANAGER Victoria Quinn Harkin
List Rental Enquiries 0171 331 9252 CIRCULATION DIRECTOR DmidWren MANAGING DIRECTOR Ian Bloomfield DISTRIBUTION COMAG (01 if 5) 444055 SUBSCRIPTION 0151-357 M6I Member of (he Audit Bureau of Circulations We regret Amigo Computing cannot offer technical help on a personal basis either by phone or in writing. All reader enquries should be submit¬ ted to the address in this panel.
Amiga Computing is an independent puMcotkw and Amigo Technologies is not responsible for ony of the articles in this cue or for ony of the opinions expressed ©1996 IDG Media. No material may be reproduced in whole or in part without written per¬ mission!While every care is taken, the publishers cannot be held legally reponsible for any errors in articles, listings or advertisements.
E 22,051 jui-jtn 1996 Published by IDG Medii. Media House,AdSngtcn Part, Macclesfield SKI04NP Tel:01025 B7888B ,Fa*:0!625 079966 Email contacts: Editorial edit@acomp.demon.co.uk Advertising adi@acomp.dBtton.co.uk All prices listed in the editorial content of this magaiine are inclusive of VAT unless stated 12 issue tubs crip lion £49.99 (UK), £49.99 (EEC) £34.99 (WoridJ Ongoing quarterly direct debit1 £13.99 (UK o/ifyj Printed and bound by Duncan Webb Offset (Maidstone) Ltd US yearly subscription rate: USA Gold .
USA Standard For eight years Amiga Computing has been die leading magaiine for Amiga enthusiasts. Amiga Computing promises to inform, educate and entertain its readers each month with the most dedicated coverage of the Amiga available Amiga Computing i at >?cn r= "fi£® 41
* “ O n. i i -fc’- ff iuZuc i_=So ¦ S DC g ^ !00|« ™a 1> . O S 5
i
• = w w w w CL 5 Shf LU 'JJ S u ' -'• : o « “¦ UJ CC
CL. > m ^ „ XJ J3 £^22 _ 2 2 <o eg <J "f ffi r- n u-> a> _ CM <£>
1- CO 5* u u Q cj Uj Su £“ I £3 _ rtJ Q_ Q_ -9 <>><>* — -D —
X?
W nj « W O ^ O ^ m ^ m n ^ U ^ to =¦ <n 3.
. C O c 2-9 2 .9 173 co ^ c/) UJ Uj O 05
- J (D (/) CD < 00 < CO i Z i 2s _ TJ < T> r~; to co © ID CD ID
—J CL X CL CL 00 CO C/) Q- x O x
Q) 03 --w t M (0 M
o n LU UJ HJ ? “ CD O 0 N N q g Q “5 -3 d CC DC
• j h h h x c C £T C LU — < < < O O O ssaag m m T t t CD CD CD CD
CD
o o o CJ O c c t; c
* -9 = ,S ra in — m OIU u CD *5
u) r'
o 9= CO N CD CD 2 2
o o l— TD -t-XJ fn CD rr IL J" 0, o a, a CL < CL
- Jen pen T' x z: x O ’T X oo z Oi o> 0i O} 9 © TT a) C) — r- t-
eg U U U U u CJ T- I- 1— Po“ Ills ?|I8 cc£ « 3 ui fe*o a zocg
(5 fc.
5) 4e'S III S O ¦-
o = 5?
<* g «.« £- a> u) | — t0 cQ ! S CM CO Ik ' W ¦ : M 1-5 ¦ «>. | 0= 00 ( p CM _ . T .01 r; o tn C r= N CJ> q5 m __: ' ^ x O O -1x1 0- O «8 LL — (0 _ r* 03 CO . = < c
- - jo : ¦ j- ? S ; | : 0- O S a «I ra £ Q D D D D D
o g o a o t- I-: cvi cvi co ra J5 o)
- d- °! T- m 03 co ii t*j Vs!) O ,,x!§ o o I -g CM CO 1 CO . O
.CM q 00 ¦" iT (D
• 10^ = . 1 *“ T3 =3 ¦ i&S o OIUJ s 0 i'_- £ -Q ’ T C ra — b ri
'(flora o»l| r c.? O . — -f- JD ,l' 3 «0 Crt ;co — < O iV,E 1
CM 1 O O!o £J !
O - CO ; O OI CM .? (hD S-S2 O ® m (M <D “ Q.CO S £ 2? 2 (O - o ^ = •- a> X 3 01-a Q> nl® « S - 3 0 aj 5 I n £! « "5 ¦*“ ¦D g | O 03 ” E CO ra Z « ™ r-r- 1—1 1 - CO i Od2 10® <0 :;i8 CM § T“ '.¦§ ‘ 1 CM Q; co Ccg' O f,!; H:i CO OC” W s. CQ i o £J (U iL 5X0) m tc -D O 2 t? A> ¦9 « 0 = . 03 - ® o (II O g fc < rt ® ts ‘ 1 n ; N j uj ^ i- N N o 1 1 o 5 5_ 00 — mi-
o d“ § S w O ^ « = ^ ^ S -L ° iia
o z| 2 CO c-~ o ° li »! E '¦= = 03 -g l-M'Soi O | T3«jO-nO<U0^C
’j iE | CO CO 03 (0 ! O o u o ¦ C*f W W gj 0-1 ^ o 'p
o O 5 w ^ CJ 5 < Q 3 a q f | 5 7^ ® .2 5 11 1- O U .3 ^ i£ 2
°c.gS| U- O ¦*- o C -Bi aB o
o Q. O o. 5 Q- O _ r n l2 s ^ g 5 3 CO O > Q .&E" S«o Si » P J2 1
3 m Cj-r £• iis!afM8K n: 3 s£ |>I ¦'• 5 S': I S ° ai 2 9 I c O
?- to P £ i o o ^ u v t:G ^ p wmff M raE 2
o E P 3 > CO Q O 00 ^ r“ £.0 CD
S. o 2 «-s S ci 501 i
S. s E S v
o J2 11 O -s ^ ~ W o'c 8i2Qtigi9?xc,OT- co/?^ £ c S-rS s.j? 5 3 -
l|ipliSl!t|l!!
— gj ro iQ *£ .2 o o w *- £ (/j fc . Q lillspmissP lifp 1*11 Ilf: Utiy Q) -yZ 03 > > 7- “5 S«|s .?
03 x; m'a g ^ .£ 03 <n o
- 1 .a:»- u: !§>!* wii5 § 0) O >H = C/5 CL 2 ~ fQ 5 e I ^ O 0,5
(5 3 0(0 0 cr ¦IC 1 Lfe 1
- ‘S 5 -g D > <5 UJ _j O if) Z > -J tn Ills |8 s ?s l-'aaci (5Q§?
Pi f3 C O X CM u Uj UJ u* 0 ¦ 11 S § w !2 0 *- 8 « m £ 6 u O 55 CO CC 0 >, w c CO O '¦0 < ex.
U. 3 E 0 ^ 0^5 2 O) 0 cu x; D- <X O — 3 0 Xlili 5 E < II 4-^
- C ^ La ^ u>m .£ -S — £ "Z. 0 u!
R ~ c a vs Z C£ =a-a ^ 8 Cl fs ' T3 <D & W _ a ?
±: ^ ¦s-fla a u t: a r* ^ p n 0.
A s
- H 0 HO X INTO THE NET contains all the tools required to access
and explore the internet with ease The double CD set contains
usable versions of MIAMI, Voyager. IBrouse, AmiTCP and more. In
addition the CD’s contain many utilities for creat¬ ing your
own WEB pages, down-loding mail, much more.
Most items am direcfly usable from the CD's and in-to-tRE-net Contains around 5000 erotic hand drawn Images in the Japanese anime tradition.
This CD is of an Adult nature and should not be purchased by anyone likely to be offended by drawings depicting nudity and / or sex acts.
Includes images only suitable for persons over the age of 18.
ANIME BABES 118}' d Mick Davis's Cartoon Clipart Volume One is a new Amiga CD-ROM con¬ taining around 500 commissioned cartoon images, all of which can be used "royally-free". Each image is stored as IFF, and all have been scanned at the highest possible resolution to ensure the best qual¬ ity when printed. Supplied with a 30+ page print¬ ed index of each image. Every commissioned image on this CO is 100% original and does not/will not appear on any other CD-ROM. ~ &¥3on mick DAVIS' carToon ClipArt I The new Magic Workbench CD contains the I largest collection of Magic Workbench Icons, \
Backdrops and tools ever compiled. Includes \ well over 5.000 Magic WB Icons, Over 600 \ specially selected Magic Workbench back- | drops in 8, 16 and 256 colours, over I 30megabytes of Workbench tools, gadgets.
I patches and desktop enhancer tools/utilities.
] The CD also includes Magic Workbench aswell as many other items never before released on any Amiga CD ROM. If you want to update/enhance you existing Workbench 2 or 3 then this is the perfect Workbench add on CD ROM, This CD is only suitable for any Kickstart2/3 based Amiga's such as the A500+, A600, A1200. And A4000.
RafSi I___ MAGIC WORKBENCH EflHANCER V2
1. 2gigabyte (1200mb) ready-to-fit Amiga hard drive.
Pre-formatted and installed with Workbench 3.
Supplied with all cables and instructions With FREE harddisk sw!
Quad(4x) speed CD-ROM drive complete with interface for the A1200. Supplied with installation software. Includes a FREE copy of the Epic Collection.
Please quote: O-Drive Now only £149 00 _ _ + £4,OOP&P- AMIGA CD-ROM Drft SEEDY ROMS THE HOTTEST AROUND Adult Sensation is possibly the Amiga’s largest selling adult title. It features over 4,000 high quality 256 colour images of the "adult' nature. Image viewers and coverters are includ¬ ed for any Amiga. (OVER 18 ONLY) jjBPS, (CD01) £19.99 Vdult Sensation 2 not only contains 4,000 new colour mages but also includes tons of adult related samples, adult music modules, tonnes of adult stories, adult animations, black&white 70 s photos, adult games and more.
(OVER 18) (CD115) £19.99 Sexy sensation, this CD contains around 2,000 specially ;hosen high quality BMP & GIF Images, viewers & graphic converters are included for easy and quick access to any of the pictures on any Amiga. (OVER 18) {00169) £19.99 Adult Sensation 3D actually contains over 2,000 true 3 Dimensional colour images. 3D viewing software and lop quality 3D glasses are also supplied. Available now!
(OVER 18) ‘"Hated 80% (901*51 Elt.SHl kdult Animations contains hundreds of naughty? Anima- clips for Adults only. Viewing software included for the Amiga. Limited first stocks so order now. HURRY!*!!
(STRICTLY OVER 18 s ONLY)
- l_ fCflr1*SKi £29.9* Adult MENsation is a collection of unigue
images of the male body. This CD-ROM has been compiled to
forfill the hundreds of requests for a CD dedicated to the
ladies.
Very easy to use. Okay on any Amiga.
164) £19.99 ^ Only £179.00 [IGA 1.2G1G HARDDISK + E4.00P&P We
took everyones valid comments with concern to the first
release of the Encyclopedia and changed, modified updated
the whole product to the extent that it now includes over
20.000 subjects. The new 1997 version of the Epic
Interactive encyclopedia is available now, it features a
superb new updated multimedia interface, hundreds of film
clips, images, sound samples and subject information text
The 1997 version now supports a multitude of new features
inluding: Colour images. Full-screen filmclips. National
anthems, and a unique lnter-ACTu feature which allows you to
interact with certain subjects like: chess, piano, etc. A
superb reference title for the whole family.
NEW FOR
* lt has to be said that the graphics set new prece¬ dents in
Amiga multimedia presentation' Graeme Sandibrd. Amiga Formal
"Why is it you are the only company producing decent Amiga
CD-ROMs' G. Hamilton ‘If you’re on the lookout for some
interaclive refer¬ ence material then this fits the bill". Tony
Horgan. CU 1997 AG A version features ini Multi-media Interface
97% Of I True 256 colour !
Unlike anything seen on the Amiga''1 ’Produced In theUK unlike most encyclopedias ’Around 16,000 subjects covered from Aalborg to 2y ’Hotlist editor So you can create lists of subjects ’Hundreds of samples Music tracks and and over 200 samples ’Thousands of pictures Over 3,000 colour/mono pictures included ’Dozens of film-clips/animations Over 200 subject related film-clips ‘View many film-clips "full-screen” New Zoom option ‘Now includes Music tracks National anthems and different music styles ‘Import new subjects from the Internet or from floppy disk ‘Export data to printer or file and use
it in your own projects 'Kids Explorapedia Eight kid's interactive play-about sections "I worked on this title for almost two years, and it still impresses me' Vince Pike, Epic Zygole The new mam interface Export screen Install & Setup Kids Category selector The Exptorapedia menu The subject creator Hotl/st Manager AVAILABLE FOR ALL AGA AMIGA'S (with 4mb+ ram & Hard drive) ‘Enhanced speech facility Improved s ' speech synthesis "Subject creator Create your own subject data ‘Network compatible Can be run through CD32 or CDTV EflCawClOPHM GROLIER HUTCHINSON'S A PRODUCED IN 1996/1997 1993 1991
40. OF PICTURES 3000+ 1300 MADE IN THE UK USA USA/UK AGA
INTERFACE V X X iHifi UPGRADABLE / X X I NO. OF SAMPLES 100‘s
163 SEARCH MOOES j\ ¦ 7- ! : • NORMAL NORMAL FILMCUPS X X
SUPPORTED X X w mm MUSIC X X tnter-ACT V X X ’Requires an
Amiga T200 or 4000. A han1 drive, a CD-ROW drive and 4mb* of
ram (€mb ram recommended) LightROM Gold 3D Objects. <lwq 4
rOB) Ocfamed Sound Studio CD32 Network set 2 Personal suite
Reduced The Learning Curve DEM Rom Light ROM4 Octamed 6 CD
Reduced XI Paint 4.0 1078 Weird Textures 3000 jpeg Textures
Into The NET (2cd) Multimedia Backdrops Sounds Terrific 2
(2cd) Aminet set one Amirtet set two Amine/ set three Aminet
14 October Aminet 15 November Aminet 16 Amiga Repair Kit CD
Amiga System Booster World Info Turbo Calc v2.1 Spreadsheet
Amiga Developers CD Print Studio Pro Magic Publisher (4cd)
Meeting at Pear/s 4 Mods Anthology (4cd) BACK FOR THE FUTURE
• Upgrade your existm existing version to the 1997 version,
‘Simply return your current CD-ROM version along with a cheque
of just £11.99 plus P&P THE EPIC tNTERA<5TIVE’ENCYCLOPEDIA '97
I The Kara \ Collection™ lisa profes- l sional and l unique set
of fonts, back¬ drops and tools for spe¬ cial effects in
pictures, animations, titling and presentaions. £34.99 This CD-
ROM con¬ tains over 1000 digi¬ tal elevation maps(DEMs).
For use in VistaPro.
Scenery. Animator or World Construction Set DEM-ROM ;£14.99) LIGHT-ROM 4 £29.99 The latest issue contains thousands and brand new objects for Lightwave™ GIF SENSATIONS (2CD) Contains around 10,000 colour images suitable for DTP. (CD128) £19.99 NOTHING BUT GIFS Features thousands of very high quality mages.
(CD197) £19.99 This superb highly rated Amiga CD-ROM World Atlas i features flexible quick access to individual countnes I via continental maps, county list, capital or general I index. Concise, informative county histories. Each I country is supported by a series of maps K depicting regional position, major cities, oic I LIGHT-ROM GOLD £19.99 I Contains the best I Lightwave™ 3D objects \ from LightROM issues 1, 2 and LightROM 3.
LIGHT-ROM CD-ROMS mam WORLD ATLAS AGA KARA FONTS CD IMAGE CD-ROMS aati This CD was rated 95% in AF, it features all the tools and informa¬ tion, specifications etc, needed to produce and develop Amiga software. Includes the latest ver¬ sions of the installer, CD press¬ ing software, CDXL toolkit, etc. L AGA Experience 2 jflflffiuuyj I contains 100% \ original AGA mate- \ rial including pictures, l AGA demos, AGA games, 1 and AGA tools. Most informa- 1 tion runs direct from the CD.
1 * Normally £19.99 jA EXPERIENCE 2 (CQ210X es.aa) Aminet 16 contains over 600mb of the very latest Amiga software, including games, demos, animations, music, tools, comms. Patch¬ es. Etc. Available for £12.99 or £10.99 when you take out a subsenption.
Available Now!
Fii O *E cl ro.v; ¦, ' Orders copyjiow Just £2.50 inc P&P ELOPERS CD v1.1 (cd22B> ek.99 (CD239) £12,99 DTP TOOLKIT '-,-r£3 ANIMATION NATION Fonts. Clipad and Hundreds ol stunning many tools. PCD265 animations. FCD268 TOOLS FOR FOOLS COMPUTA MUZAK Hundreds of grenl utill- WflHjN Hundreds of music tie* and tools FCD267 ¦ ; • ' modules FCD266 POSTAGE COSTS
T. Standard. <UK)£l pei CO (Oversone) £2 por CO
2. Next Day Delivery.
(UK) casts CtO for tipln 10 CD s 3 Same Dtty Delivory (UK) niO|<»r towiv-Uciticr. P.O. A
4. Cants on Delivery (UK) costs £17 for uplo 10 CD's JmbS Choose
any of the following CD-ROMs #7>;.
FRCf with every 125 you spend!
Spend £25 choose one free CD ^ Spend £50 choose two free CD's etc. tlw Games EXPLOSION [t ¦ V i Contains hundreds oI Mttji games FCD263 DEMO MANIA Volt Contains hundreds of ISTnv “| great demos. FCD264 BACKING THE AM1GA| AULTHEVJAT Arcade Classics is an original col¬ lection of ALL your old arcade favourites, Including Amiga ver¬ sions of PACMAN, SPACE INVADERS. ASTERIODS, MIS¬ SILE COMMAND, PENGO, , FROGGER. LOAD RUNNER, GALAXIANS, DONKEY KONG, NUMEROUS TETRIS GAMES, BATTLEZONE. TEMPEST. COMBAT, TRON.
SPACE WARZ, THRUST. Q-BERT. HUNCHBACK. MOON PATROL. TRAIL BLAZER, BREAKOUT, CENTREPEDE, CYCLES, 8EZERK, SNAKE, SCRAMBLE, PING PONG.
BREAKOUT. NUMEROUS C64 CONVERSIONS, A COL¬ LECTION OF JEFF MINTER GAMES AND HUNDREDS MORE. Over 600mb of unforgettable retro-gaming.
Now Includes easy to use Multimedia Amiga Interface.
Print Studio PRO allows you to create and print a wide vari¬ ety of business cards and labels. Also features: PicturCAT, Printer24 - A 24bit graphics print manager. 200mb of mono & colour clipart, and hundreds of quality fonts. Print Studio 1 PRO provides a versatile colour correction system, resulting in perfect colour output on most printers. KS3 or high tr' q Ti : PRINT STUDIO PRO Contains 1200 our most popular floppy based software titles on one giant 600mb CD-ROM.
Now you can purchase the entire Epic collec¬ tion in one go. Subjects include: Professional mono clipart, colour clipart, numerous 3D objects for Imagine & Lightwave, Colour, Bitmap, Compugraphic fonts & Adobe fonts, Graphics converters, Music tutorials, Beginners guide, 3D stereogram generators, Hundreds of Sound FX and samples, Virus Killers. Hard disk installer & tools, Various Hardware projects, Hundreds of games including Mind teasers. Puzzle, card, arcade and board games, books, and more.
THE EPIC COLLECTION v2 ?
The World of AMIGA SGMING SCCN The Epic Interactive Quiz Show is an exciting new Amiga based CD-ROM quiz game for the whole family.
1wr Fwturvs Inlude;
* AGA hi-res graphics ‘Virtually every question is spoken
* Upto 4 players/teams can play
* 20 different subject catagories ‘Select from 10 different
charac¬ ters, or add your own charactors.
* Use keyboard or special controller
• Over 3000 different questions
• Includes “flash card" questions OPTIONAL INTERACTOR"
CONTROLLER. £24.99 THE EPIC INTERACTIVE^QUIZ SHOW I Insight
dinosaurs has been pro- l duced in association with The l
Natural History Museum in I London, and features the work of I
world renowned dinosaur illustra- ! Tors. It features hundreds
of photo's, illustrations, video clips, narration and sound
effects. It is the ultimate A-Z of dinosaurs. CD includes both
ECS & AGA versions.
Retro gaming at it's best. Around 3000 all-time classic spectrum game files on one CD-ROM, Emulators included for any Amiga.. Games include Manic Miner, Skool daze. Monty mole. Startrek, Thrust, Jet Set Willy, The Hobbit, Strip Poker, Danger Mouse, The Sentinel, Micro Olympics, Under Wurlde, Uridium, Atic Atac. River raid, Barbarian, Hunchback and around 3000 other classic spectrum game files including multi-load games. Speccy '96 also contains hundreds of documents containing instructions for most games aswell as hundreds of speccy game cheats.
Okay on any CD-ROM drive connected to an Amiga.
Rated ovtf 90% JUSTIN. Women of the Web... “ (CD402) Just £19.99 Call now for a FREE full colour 16 page CD-ROM catalogue!
[ World of Clipart is a double CD* I ROM containing around 40.000 I mono and colour clipart images \ contained in over 100 catagories I in IFF, GIF, PCX, CDR. EPS, I TIF, & BMP. Tools for converting 1 images to another formats are \ included. Subjects include : Animals, Anatomy, Babies. Men, Women. Trees. Reptiles, Insects, Xmas.
Religious. Planes, Vehicles, Ships, Toys. Zodiac signs, Eye catchers, Humour. Cats. Dogs. Computers, Technology. Sealife, Space, Symbols, Dinosaurs, Plants.
Nature, Ads, Tools, Astrology, Hands, Birds, Business, Office. Workers. Cartoon. Lion King. Education, Food.
Gardening, Holidays. Houses & Buildings. Helicopters.
Children, Banners, Medieval, Military, Monsters, Music, Sports. Transport, and more. I Rated 94% WORLD* OT CLIPARTV* AMINET SUPER SUBSCRIPTION torsion!., now also includes: Workbench games, lottery pred ctors. Hundreds of bad jokes and more Rated: AF GOLD 95% * CU 91% - AUI90% - AC over 90% THE SPECCY CD ’96 CALL OUR SPECIAL AMINET SUBSCRIPTION HOTLINE ON: 01793 432176 TO SUBSCRIBE!1!
ThT C64 CIX- \ This new CD contains hun- [ dreds of megabytes of Blitz i source-code, Blitz tutorials, 1 game graphics, sound-fx, l fonts, many Blitz WEB pages \ and game music tracks, all of \ which you can use freely in 1 your own Blitz programs.
TZ ENHANCER <cd;52 eu.99 This CD contains almost 100 variations of the worlds most ( addictive and loved game. Nearly all the games are ready to run directly from CO. And archived versions are also included.
Available Now!
HING BUT TETRIS (com) ea.aa This CD contains information that NOBODY wants you to know about, and includes tons of megabytes of text documents and photographs relating to UFO sightings and abductions etc. GAMES CD v2 (CD251| now £39.99 Emulators Unlimited contains Software emula¬ tion tools for Ihe Amiga. Spread over numerous | platforms are emulators for: Apple, BBC, Commodore 64, Commodore VIC20, Amstrad CPC, Apple Mac, Gameboy, Atari ST, MSX, Apple200, Atari 800, Atari104Qste, Sinclair OL, Unix and more. Also features hundreds of games.tools etc for most of the emulators.
The FLASH-ROM is a ‘companion* Emulators CD that contains many new cartridge based machine emulators like: Kelecovision, Nintendo, Gameboy etc. Order code: (CD260) £19,99*. Order both Emulators & FlashROM for just £29.99* (CD283).
EMU LATOR5 UNLrftTEcTy lloanto's Dersonal Suite con* la ins the full ver- of Personal Paint, Personal Sbase, Personal Write, P. Fonts and over 50Qmb of use- able Art. Texts & Fonts.
Paint, Image Processing. Animation.
24bit Printing, Wore Processing. Database and much more Rated 90% a 'Subject to price change without notice.
2Seperate order lines UK Orders: 0500 131 486 Overseas;+44 1793 514 188 3 Ways to receive your order St0 ndard 1-2 days. Next Day or Same Day Delivery Easy ways to order «¦* Pltone. Fax, E-mail, Post.
Ways to pay J Credit card. Cheque, Postal-order, Cash or C.O.D Choices of free CD-ROMs Music, Games. Demo's. Tools™ I SCI-FI Sensation is an exciting [ new CD-ROM containing over I 1.3GIG of SCI-FI images, anima¬ ls tlons, 3D objects, Sound FX, 1 Documents. Themetunes.
\ Scripts & SCI-FI games.
I Subjects included are: 1 Babylon5, Startrek (The origi- \ nal, TNG, Deep Space 9 and Voyager). Batman, Dr Who, Thurderbirds. Robocop. Sea I Quest DSV, Bladerunner, Aliens, I Terror hawks, 2001. Blake7, | Battlestar Galactica, Tron, Total I Recal, 2010, Space 1999 etc. J ‘Buy SCI-FI Sensation from us and j you will always receive the latest | available version.
CU Amigo: 91% A Ul: 93% This NEW CD rom contains around 15,000 all-time classic Commodore 64 games and sw emulator to run them on your Amiga.... In stock now!
REPLACEMENT WORKBENCH RWBS4- WB1.2 [idlsksl ram HW3W- WB1.3 (3dUks) BCD RWB1W- WS2.K (3disks) cm RFVB19-5 • WB3.0 (Sdisks) cm HARD DRIVE SETUP SHS7-2 - A6D0 HD Setup 4 Install £7.00 AH07.2 - A1200 MD Setup & Install cm ATP3-1 - Atapi IDE Drivers hoo AAZI-2- ZappolA/cos Diivers £7.00 SSS12-2 - Squire) SCSI Software Cpos PAINTER DRIVERS OfiVS-1 -100 Ptintcr Drlvera raw TRANSFER YOUR AMINET SUBSCRIPTION FROM YOUR CUR¬ RENT SUPPLIER AND NOT ONLY WILL YOU GET EVERY FUTURE COPY OF AMINET FOR £10.99 BUT WHEN YOU JOIN OR SUPER SUBSCRIPTION WE11 ALSO SEND YOU £20.00 WORTH OF AMIGA CO- ROM VOUCHERS FREE
0= CHARGE.
(Epson, Cinon, HP, Stir, etc) Send to; EPIC 43 Akers Hay, Swindon, Hilts, UK. SH2 2NF Fax:01793514187 Open Monday-Saturday 9:30am - 6:00prrcsh Overseas Orders; +44 1793 514188 'If you Ijve in Austraia or New-Zealand you can ajrdiase any cf our CD-ROMs from our Sydney based office Send your orders to. EPIC. 36 Forest Road. Heathcote. NSW. 2233 Tel: (02)9 520 9606 Fax: (02) 9 520 6077 Tor prices in Australian SS5 stnplydoubte the UK £££ prices fcsa?d PRIORITY ORDER FORM NAME_ ADDRESS.
MACHINE_ PAYMENT METHOD_ CREDIT CARD DETAILS EXP DATE PLEASE SUPPLY " prkc! L0,:- VAT rmis Qty £££ TOTAL GOODS VALUE £ POSTAGE A PACKING £ AMOUNT ENCLOSED £ « Amiga Rejuvenated ®onday 20 January saw the Independent Amiga Rejuvenation Survey being launched. The survey will be up and running until the 3o March and then the entries will be processed. To access the survey go to: http://www.skip.adb.gu.se/~gunnar/iars Response has been favourable so far with prominent Amiga people such as Wolf Dietrich of Phases saying of IARS: "Phase 5 Digital Products appreciates very much the independent efforts
of engaged Amiga community members to support the planning of the future of the Amiga.
The IARS project seems to be an excellent means to coiled and analyse the views and opinions of Amiga users all over the world. We are looking forward to seeing the results which shall be compiled in “The Independent Amiga Rejuvenation White Book", and expect this compilation to be a source of addi¬ tional information and inputs that can support our goal of designing the dream machine that the users want. We hope the IARS project is successful and gets the response from users worldwide that it deserves."
The project aims to find out your views and ideas concerning the future of the Amiga with topics such as what hardware specifications you would like to see and also what made the Amiga so successful.
Qivid Imagination Impulse has announced a new version of Imagine for the Amiga. Version 5 includes new features such as Arexx and CyberGraphix support The compa¬ ny is determined to keep support for this platform, and the product alive and is offering customers the chance to buy Imagine 5.0 for SIOQ plus S10 shipping.
UK/EC customers should contact Infologic for more details on 004 6675
5594.
HOWING IN Sweden Sweden plays host to this year's largest Amiga conven¬ tion in Scandinavia. Called AmiTech '97, it is organised by AUGS (Amiga User Group of Sweden) and SUGA (Swedish User Group of Amiga) and their main sponsor is Distribution 4, the new leading Amiga computer and peripherals distributor of Scandinavia.
It takes place on Friday 25 April 1997, Saturday 26 April 1997 and Sunday 27 April in Wasahallama, at the Royal Djurgarden in central Stockholm.
Go to http://www.canit.se/amitech/ for more information.
Ejews Hound Hugh Congratulations to Hugh Poynton who now becomes our News Editor. Please address all news cor¬ respondence to him and don't for¬ get to tip him off on any scoops!
The address is Amiga Computing NewsDesk, IDG Media, Media House, Adlington Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire SKIO 4NP.
Qersonal Paint 7 Developments Due to the release of the new CPU blitting module which is now available on Aminet (biz/cloan/PBlit_68K.lha), Cloanto has made its Personal Paint 7 the first Amiga program to actively exploit the full functionality of both the Graphics library and the Amiga blitter applied to bitmaps stored in Fast RAM.
Michael Battrlana from Cioanto commented, "Normally, two crucial parts of the Amiga system require bitmap data to be stored in Chip RAM: The original (Agnes) blitter chip and the Graphics library. Personal Paint uses both, which until now meant that it had to store in Chip RAM at least the bitmaps currently being manipulated. Thanks to its modular design, Personal Paint 7 already implemented a "virtual blit¬ ter" which optionally used the CPU instead of the Agnes chip.
The module just released extends this capability by implementing a faster 32-bit blitter (the Amiga blitter works in 16 bits)."
The developers at CyberGraphX have completely rewritten the Amiga's original graphics library so that the Amiga is not reliant on just using Chip RAM, but can now use ail the Amiga's memory to store and manipulate graphics data.
Cloanto worked in conjunction with CyberGraphX to make this possible. Mr Battilana said, 'The efforts of the CyberGraphX and Cloanto programmers have finally made a dream come true for many Amiga users who had plenty of Fast RAM but never enough Chip RAM."
More information is available at the Cloanto Web site at http://www.doanto.com/. Amiga Computing Qonjour Internet Eloquence has announced the launch of the first on-line language course. The first is “La Connexion Francaise" and is available entirely through the World Wide Web. It is subscription based and aims to take beginners to a high standard.
Co to http://www.elok.com/ for more information Qoom for a View?
ViewSonic has upgraded its economy monitor series by including features not normally found in these types of monitors. For example, this means that the id" colour monitor, E64I, now has digital controls and a high 86Hz refresh at 800 x 600.
The ViewSonic E655 which supersedes the I5ES now has OnView controls and a flat square screen.
Both of these new models will have an anti-glare, anti-static screen as well as reduced heat emissions and power consumption.
ViewSonic ViewSonic upgrade its economy monitors such as the E641 mall World Netcom has reached an agreement with AimQuest Corporation (founders of GRIC - the largest alliance of ISP's and Telcos who are trying to set up commercially viable global Web services). This agreement means Netcom's current roaming services will be extended. At the moment customers in Canada, US and UK have unlimited access across these countries.
Now though, customers can access the Internet through over 40 other CRIC member ISP's and Telcos around the world in countries such as Singapore, Japan, China, Malaysia, Switzerland and Spain.
Customers can access these other ISP's in much the same way as a bank network which allows customers access to their ATM machines. Brian MacDonald, Managing Director of Worldwide Development at Netcom said, "Research has shown us that international busi¬ ness travellers need an easy-to-use familiar way to connect to the Internet that doesn't com¬ promise quality and convenience." He continued, "Through this agreement with AimQuest, Netcom is able to provide these professionals with a reliable and cost-effective global Internet solution."
Do TO THE Internet The Millennium Commission has said no to the Internet. According to Mike Farrow who had his Internet project turned down, the Commission, in its third round of Internet funding, has not listed one Internet project even though they are the only Lottery body which are allowed to accept projects with a significant Internet content.
Mr Farrow asked the Acting Chief Executive of the Millenium Commission if he thought the Internet represented a sig¬ nificant moment in our history to which he replied, "Not for this country, it was important for the Americans." When turned down, Mr Farrow wrote to many MP's and received nearly a hundred let¬ ters of support.
Qreebie Amiga If you’re broke after Christmas don't fear. Not only does Gareth Lofthouse give you the best ways to get free software, support and advice in this month's feature, "The Great Giveaway" but a new site has also been set up to provide quality Freeware for Amiga users.
Whether or not it succeeds depends on you lot sending in suggestions or any Amiga Freeware you have written, The only two rules are that they must be Freeware and they must be high quality. It's called ACES (Amiga Coding Excellence Scheme) and they have compiled a list of things that make programs worth using.
These are:
• Font sensitive GUI
• Keyboard shortcuts in windows ¦ Re-sizeable windows (if at all
possible - good on big screen modes)
• AREXXport
• Amigaguide help (on-line is obviously better)
• An Installer script (or a drag & drop type instal¬ lation)
These are not strict rules though - so please send any
suggestions to aces@cyberservices.com QD Problem Public Domain
software is causing con¬ cern to trade body, ELSPA after a
recent discovery of a program that would be considered in bad
taste. According to ELSPA, the industry's good work of self-
regulation could be undone and although they have tried
distancing themselves from PD titles, the worry is that the
media see it as just another computer game.
As we reported previously, the media were alerted after the discovery of a game called Schoolyard Slaughter which involved shooting children as they crossed the playground.
Commercial computer games differ from PD games in that they are regulat¬ ed by the Video Standards Council and the VSC has stated that it would ban such a title. The problem for the public now however, is how do they protect their children from such unacceptable titles? Some kind of regulation has to be put in place to ensure that this grey area is covered by some classification system.
Amiga Computing M ORE ?
Awards Timothy Berners-Lee, inventor of the World Wide Web, has had another hon¬ our bestowed upon him. He received the Institute of Physics' Duddell Medal for his, "Outstanding contribution to the advancement of knowledge by the invention of the networked information system known as the World Wide Web."
It was awarded by Dr Godfrey Stafford at the two day meeting of the World Wide Web consortium (W3C). W3C aims to continue development of the Web including improving underlying protocols used by the web as well as advancing the User Interface to take into account the needs of the disabled.
Ross Words According to a recent newsgroup discussion, a USA newspaper printed a crossword with the following clue in it: "Bygone computer - five let¬ ters". And the answer - apparently it's an Amiga!!! Ooops! Surely - they mean Atari?
The Bloomberg newsroom in Chicago printed a story about the Amiga which would have brought a tear to the eye of any Amigan. In the article, it told the legend that when Jay Miner was inventing the Amiga his dog would have to wag his tail in. Approval for a particu¬ lar design to go ahead.
And tribulations as well as pointing out the loyalty of the users saying that "Tens of thou¬ sands of enthusiasts remain so smitten by Miner's elegant machine that they’re waiting out the companies turmoii and patching their ageing computers rather than succumb to the Microsoft Corp/Intel Corp duopoly..." - and quite rightly so!
The report told the tale of Amiga's trials Qjest Bett Bett '97, the Educational Technology Show, proved a great success despite the Arctic conditions which hit London. There was a significant rise in overseas visitors which will establish Bett as the international forum for educational IT. Rt. Hon Gillian Shephard MP, in her opening speech, called for greater IT investment in education and outlined the Government’s plans to provide schools with state-of the-art multimedia solutions.
However, David Blunkett MP called for the games console industry to develop educa¬ tional material for families who can't afford expensive Pcs.
Qrint Perfection Epson has announced that it is bringing out the worlds first 1440 dpi colour inkjet printer. Called the Epson Stylus Color 600, it is aimed at both the home and business user and is priced at E280 excluding VAT.
The company is also launching an Epson Stylus Color 400 inkjet printer. It prints at 720 dpi and is priced at £227 excluding VAT. Amiga users should be abie to use these printers by getting hold of some third party software, such as TurboPrint.
Incorporating Swap Shop If your advert is 1 O words or fewer, it is total¬ ly free. 11 to 20 words is only £6 and 21 words to 25 words is EIO.
? SportsMasters £15, UFO £10, Microcosm CD £15. Andy 01604 flf 416722.
? Amiga A1200 for sale, £160 ono.
Mint, boxed, loads of extras. Phone for details or make an offer. Terry 01525 384532.
? Wanted, Ishar 3, A1200 version pre¬ ferred (not essential) 01233 638035.
? A1200 Magic Pack for sale. Brand new. £250. Telephone 0121 604
9501.
? For sale: A1200 with mice, two joy¬ sticks, autopad, 31 copyright games and 10 boxed games and cheat man¬ ual for Dungeon Master, mags, disk box, Amiga manuals. Phone for details. £175 - 200 ono. 0181 473 7724, 12 Pound Park Road, Charlton, London, 5E7 8AF.
? Amiga A1200, 2 joysticks, one con¬ trol pad, mouse, SCART lead, Commodore Power Supply, 21 game disks, 10 blank disks, 16 work disks, 11 boxed games and manuals. Perfect Condition. £400 ono. Phone after 9pm 0181 470 0592.
? 68020 14MHz card and other A500/+/600 goodies all cheap, phone Greg 01445 712189.
? Wanted A1200 contacts. Write to, Amund, Tiurveien 2, 1534 Moss Norway.
? Wanted: Amberstar, Ambermoon, Abandoned Places 2, Ultima V, Italy- 543-68044, Andrea ? For sale or swap: Apocalypse heli¬ copter shoot up for flight simulator.
01274 622684.
? A1200 contacts wanted: Barry, 7 Griffiths Drive, Southport, Merseyside, PRG 7DP.
Qrder form Name_ Address.
Postcode Telephone h= _____ | Cheques should be made payable to "Amiga Computing" Please include my advertisement in the next available issue of Amiga Computing. 1 confirm that the advert is not selling illegal copies of software or hardware that do not belong to me.! Permit you to publish my address/telephone number only if 1 have included these details within my advertise¬ ment copy. 1 am over 18 years of age (applicants under 18 must get a parent or guardian to sign below).
Please write clearly - we can't be held responsible for errors in your advertisement especially if your writing resembles a spider crawling across the page! American readers - remember you can also take advantage of our Classifieds Section - we have over 11,000 other US readers that will see your advert.
Send to: AMC Classifieds, Media House, Adlington Park, Macclesfield SK10 4NP Remember to include your phone number/address in the advert as well as on the form!
Replacement Mice ........................£6.95 MegaMouse 400 ...........................£9.95 MegaMouse Plus {3 Button) .........£10.95 Optical Mouse ................... £29.95 New Golden Image TrackBall............£19.95 Pen Mouse.........£12.95 (ideal for CAD)
a) Use PCMCIA port for total external solution without opening up
your Amiga. You can Hot plug this device without harming your
Amiga.
B) Use internal IDE port with AlfaDuo if you have
2. 5" Hard Drive (will be with full IDEFIX software).
C) Use Internal IDE port with AlfaQuatro buffered interface if
you have 3.5" Hard Drive (will be with full IDEFIX software).
Alt CD ROM drives have play CD facility. Audio connection at front as welt as at the back. Metat casing.
RAM CARDS A1200 A1200 with clock and 4Mb............£49.00 A1200 with dock and 8Mb ............£65.00 A1200 with clock & 33Mhz FPU ...£80.00 RAM CARDS A500/500+ & A600 A500 512K w/o clock ..................£15.00 A500+ 1Mb w/o clock..................£20.00 A600 1Mb w/o clock ..................£20.00 A600 1Mb with clock ..................£30.00 External Internal External* Internal A60Q/A1200 A1500/A2000 A500/A500+ A4000 Quad speed CD ROM for £149.00 £119.00 £129.00 £109.00 Eight speed CD ROM for £169.00 £139.00 £149.00 £129.00 ‘(for A5G0/A500+ Atfapower hard drive controller and Hard Drive is
required). A! 500/A2000 supplied with IDE controller & software. A&000 supplied with AlfaQuatro interface & Fult IDE Fix software.
AlfaPovver Hard Drive controller A500 ...£'99 AT-Bus Hard Drive controller A2000 ......£69 Oktagon 2008 SCSI controller ...............£99 Multiface III.......................................£79 PCMCIA Controller for CDRom for A1200 £69 NEW MULTI I/O CARD FOR AMIGA 1500/2000/4000 Active 8 port high speed serial card.
Mttltiboard Support 57600 Baud rate on all channels simultaneously. ......................._£299 New AlfaQuatro Buffered Interface Specially made hardware and software. Allows 4 ATApi devices, ie, 2 IDE hard disk & 2 IDE CD Rom to Amiga 4000 internal IDE controller, through Alfapower on Amiga 500/500+ and possibly Amiga 1200, comes with full IDE Fix software ..................£59 Joysticks & Joypads Amiga Joysticks.....................................£9.95 Amiga Joypads.......................................£9.95 Multi Media Speakers 100 watt (pmpo) ....................................£30.00
Multi Media Speakers 240 watt (pmpo) ....................................£45.00 Multi Media Speakers 300 watt (pmpo)* .................................£59.95 3D surround sound <gEEB!EgB Externa! Floppy Drive fur all Amigas......£39.95 Internal Floppy Drive A500/500+ ......£35.00 Internal Floppy Drive A600/1200+ ..£35.00 A-Grade Double Density box of 50 disks......£13.00 including colourful labels _ HARD DRIVES + AT-BUS CONTROLLER EOR AMIGA 500(+)/Al 500/A2000/A3000/A4000 AT-Bus hard drive controller ............£69.00 Alfapower hard drive controller .........£99.00 Alfapower-640 640Mb hard
drive .........£199.001 Alfapower-1.2 G 1.2Gig hard drive .........£259.001 Other sizes please ring IDE 2.5" Hard Drives IDE 2.5" Hard drives come formatted and installed with Workbench. Cable, screws, software and instructions supplied, (please ring for availability) ¦ 60Mb.................£59.00 250Mb £99.00 80Mb.................£69.00 340Mb £109.00 ? 120Mb...............£70.00* 420Mb .........£119.00 170Mb...............£79.00 540Mb £129.00 IDE 3,5" Hard Drives IDE 3.5" Hard drives come formatted and installed with Workbench. Cable, screws, software and instructions supplied, (please ring
for availability)
1. 7GIG...........£179.00
2. 1GIG...........£219.00
2. 5GIG...........£239.00
3. 2GIG................£Call
3. 8GIG................£Call 640Mb...............£99.00
720Mb.............£110.00 840Mb.............£125.00
1. 0GIG £159.00 ? 1.2GIG £165.00* 16Mb Simms ...£60.00 32Mb
Simms. ..£150.00 V/Jujjii1 us Gold rvfsntss Asuusd j_rj
Atjjjtjei rusjjiisl Psbsuusy \l bbfJ Best pricing on CD ROM
Drives & Hard Drives.
We can supply CD ROM solutions for ALL Amigas from A500 to A4000. We will match any genuine advertised price and also give free CD Cleaner on top where we have to price match any product All our External IDE CD ROM Drives have built in power supplies (they do not draw power from your Amiga) Three different options to connect CD ROM drives to A600 or A1200 800 dpi................................................£79.00 800 dpi with full OCR (last few so hurry) ...£99.00 400dpi with Migraphs acclaimed Touch-Up, Mergc-it and full OCR............£119.00 Miscellaneous Products 44pin 3 connector
cable...........................£10.00 44pin 2 connector cable ...........................£5.00 40pin 3 connector cable 90cm ..................£10.00 AlfaDuo 44pin to 40pin Interface St IDE cables...£20.00 AlfaQuatro 3x40pin buttered interlace & IDE cables .£39.95 DD floppy disks i in (I ntt tit i] multicoloured disit labels DD floppy disks (100) ittcludmj) multicoloured disk labels ...................... .£25.00
3. 5" Hard Drive Kit for A600/1200 + Install
software..........................................L\ t>.00
Colourful Mouse Mat Animal Jungle design and Dinosaur design
...£5.00 Optical Mouse Mat
.................................£5.00 2 in 1 Scanner/Mouse
Pad ('list be used as a memo pad
..................................oS.OO Contoured Wrist
Pad.................................£3.00 Plain Wristrest
.......................................£2.00 CD Cleaners - 1/2
price CD Rom Cleaner ....................................£3.00
Automatic CD Rom Cleaner (bamry powered) .. .£ i 0.00 Laser
Lens Cleaner .................................£4.50 ..£13.00
Accelerator Boards 1230 33Mhz + 4Mb
.....................£135.00 1230 33Mhz + 8Mb
.....................£145.00 1230 33Mhz +
16Mb.....................£175.00 1230 50Mhz + 4Mb
.....................£179.00 1230 50Mhz + 8Mb
.....................£189.00 1230 50Mhz +
16Mb.....................£219.00 All prices include VAT.
Please add £3.50 P&P tor items under £30.00, £5.00 for items
over £30.00, £8.00 P8cP for Scanners, Speakers & Hard Drives,
£10.00 courier for next day. Tax Free Export Orders Welcome.
Golden Image accepts Access, Visa, Cheques & Postal Orders. E&OE. Prices subject to change without notice. Goudx subject to availability. Specifications subject to change without notice.
Goldenlmage (UK) Ltd Unit 65, Hallmark Trading Estate, Fourth Way, Wembley, Middx HA9 OLE Sales Hotline No: 0181 900 9291 Fax: oisi 900 9281 http://www.reserve.co.uk/gold Talking Pages: 0800 600900 Our standard terms anil conditions apply — available on request. Wc do not supply on a trial basis.
Bumper Prizes US/I NEWS Qreebie Tape Nova Design, Inc. is now shipping its demo videotape for its ImageFX and Aiaddin4D prod¬ ucts. This tape is free to ail Amiga, Video Toaster/Flyer and Amiga software dealers or stores, as well as Amiga user groups. The tape is also free to be copied and further distributed.
Dealers and user groups may contact Nova Design, Inc. to receive the videotape at (804) 282-5868, or write to: Nova Design, Inc., 1910 Byrd Avenue, Suite 204, Richmond, VA 23230, USA. Hours are Monday through Friday, between 1pm and 5pm Eastern (New York) time.
User groups must add Nova Design to their newsletter mailing list and supply one to Nova prior to receiving the tape.
Anyone else wishing to obtain one of the lmageFX/Aiaddin4D demo tapes may either copy one or order one from Nova Design for S10US, plus S5US for shipping outside of the US. Call
(804) 282-1157 between 1pm and 4pm, Eastern time. Nova Design,
Inc. urges Amiga users to see the tape and find out more
about these two products.
?
Qhow Offs The Gateway Computer Club, Inc. announced its three newest exhibitors and attendees to the Gateway Computer Show - Amiga 97. Amiga Report Magazine, Compuquick Media Centre and NewTek, Inc. join Nova Design, Inc, Oregon Research, QuikPak, Ozware, Intangible Assets Manufacturing, Silent Paw Productions, Inc. and SoftLogik Publishing Corporation in committing their attendance to the show.
The Gateway Computer Show - Amiga 97 will take place 15 and 16 March at the Harley Hotel in St Louis, Missouri. The hotel is located about seven minutes away from the St. Louis Lambert Airport and will have a special show rate. Show times are Saturday 11 am until 5pm and Sunday 11am to 4pm, although people are cautioned that special classes may begin earlier or end later. There is no information yet on the types or num¬ bers of classes, although it is rumoured that NewTek will be hosting at least one.
Show information can be obtained by mailing bscharp@icon-stl.net, or visiting http://www.icon- stl.net/~jwwilson/GAC/show.htmi. The Gateway Amiga Club can be contacted by e- mail at barryh@crl.com, or by postal mail at: Gateway Amiga Ciub, PO Box 811, Bridgeton, MO 63044, USA.
He Northwest Amiga Group is holding a raffle, tentatively scheduled to take place I on February 25. First prize in this raffle is an A4060T with has 10 megs of RAM and 850 megs of hard drive space. An Amiga Technologies Software bundle is also included.
Second prize is a 100 meg Iomega ZIP drive with one free cartridge and third prize, a S50US gift certificate to AmiTech Electronics, an Amiga dealer. Tickets are S5US each. For more informa¬ tion, check www.rdrop.com/users/bern/raffie/, or send e-mail to ini@aracnet.com. The Northwest Amiga Group headquarters are in Portland, Oregon. General meetings are held on the fourth Tuesday of every month at 7:00pm.
More information on the group can be found at http://www. Aracnet.com/~be rn/N AG/.
Mr. Hardware Computers of Central Islip, New York, has announced a special upgrade price for owners of previous releas¬ es of Sbase4 or Sbase4Pro Amiga, to Sbase4Pro vl.30n. This ver¬ sion includes bug fixes and new features not present in older ver¬ sions.
Upgrade prices depend on the version currently owned. Owners of SuperBase Amiga of any version can upgrade for S60US, owners of Sbase4 Amiga of any version can upgrade for S50US. The upgrade from SuperBase Professional Amiga of any version costs S30US and the upgrade from Sbase4Pro Amiga version 1.30m or older, costs S20US. Sales of these upgrades will aid in the further development of the Sbase4 package.
Mr. Hardware Computers is working on an expanded new ver¬ sion of Sbase4, but does not yet have a release date. Contact the company by phone on 516-234-8110, by e-mail at hardware@li.net or by BBS at 516-234-6046.
BuickPak's final bid for Amiga QuikPak has entered what it calls a final bid for the Amiga technolo¬ gy as of 31 January 1997. QuikPak states that, according to the US legal counsel for Mr. Hembach, the deadline for the submission of bids was 31 January, It also states that the winning bid is expected to be chosen by the end of February. Reaction from the Amiga com¬ munity is best summed up by a caption on the Amiga Web Directory for the QuikPak press release: "Here we go again!"
Ase Upgrade Contact point The Northwest Amiga Group WWW: http://www.aracnet.coni/-bern/NAG/ Bob Scharp, Chairman Gateway Computer Show - Amiga 97 WWW: http://www.icon-stl.net/~jwwil- son/GAC/show.html Email: bscharp@icon-stl.net The Vantage Point Phone: 773-465-5158 E-mail: bohus@xnet.com WWW: http://www.xnet.com/~b0hu5/ Mr. Hardware Computers Phone: 516-214-8110 Email: hardware@li.net BBS: 516-234-6046 QuikPak Email: QPInfo@ix.netcom.com quik- pak@ix.netcom.com Bob Fisher Nova Design, Inc 1910 Byrd Avenue, Suite 204 Richmond, VA 23230 USA Phone: 804-282-5868 FAX: 804-282-376B [£Jew vantage
The Vantage Point, an Illinois based video production company which uses Amigas, Toaster systems and the DraCo for its editing and special effects, has announced its new Web site. The site is currently accessible, but it is expected to undergo some additions and refinements through the month of February.
One such addition is expected to be a gallery of stills from previous projects, possi¬ bly including shots from the lmageFX/Aiaddin4D demo video commis¬ sioned by Nova Design, Inc. Nova Design's ImageFX software was also employed in the creation of some of the graphics used throughout the Vantage Point Web site.
Katkerine Nelson Amiga Computing Paxtron AMIGA REPLACEMENT CHIPS AND SYSTEM ITPORARES Jtaxtffii PRICE I avtron is North America's largest wholesale supplier of Amiga replacement and upgrade chips REPLACEMENT & UPGRADE CHIPS Gary (390MM2)...............................................532.95 (Factory Now) PRICE Super Buster Rev. 11 (390539-11).....................50 1 3 FOM OS ....................................................50 6' cge:te (391380-31}................................... 50 Video OAC (3914224)1) ..........................50
2. 04 ROM O/S .......................................95
2. 05 ROM (V37.350) (A500 & A2000).................95
2. 04 ROM A3000 (Set of 2 Rom 0/1).................^.50
2. 1 Workbench for floppy users (complete O/S without support
file)..................... .95
3. 1 ROM (A500/A2000)........................ .95
3. 1 ROM (A3000/A4000)...................................S62.50
3. 1 ROM (A1200) .........................................S62.50
3. 1 ROM(s) Software/Manual S124.00/S137.50 ROM Switch/Swtch-Itt
with speaker....................50
3. 1 manual only............................ .95
3. 1
Software.........................................................00
3. 1 Workbench for floppy users (complete O/S without support
file)......................................95 A2091 7.0 ROM
Upgrade....................................95 A2620/30 7.0
ROM Upgrade..............................S19.95 8520
GIA..............................................................95
83724/8375 Agnus with diagnostic disk/guide.....95 8375-B
(2MB) (A3000) 318069-03......................50 8375-10
Agnus (318069-10) PAL.........................95 8375-18
Agnus (318069-18) 2 meg PAL .95 Paula (6364)
A500/A2000..................................S10.95 Denrse
(8362) A500/A2000..................................95 Super
Denise 8373 w/diagnostic disk.................S19.95 Gary 5719
A500/A2000............................ S10.95 Busier 5721
(A2000).............................................95
6800Q-8MHz CPU
(DIP)......................................S11.50 68003-16MHZ
CPU (DIP)....................................50 68033-RC50
PGA...............................................S84.50
68882-25
PGA.....................................................95
Western Digital SCSI chip
8A.............................,95 Video Hybrid - (A500
390229-03)..........................95 GVP Upgrade Chip
Series II...............................529.95 SURFACE MOUNTED
DEVICES (For A1200, A3000, A4000, CD32) 8520 PLCC
(391078-02).....................................S19.50 Amber
(390538-03)..............................................50
DMAC 4 (390537-04)........................... A50 Lisa
(391227-01)..................................................50
Ramsey (rev.4)
390544-04..................................95 Ramsey (rev.
7) 390541-07 ................................50 Alice 8374
(391010-01)........................................50 GaJ
(XU9) (390123-01)).......................................95
Gayle
(315107-02)..............................................95
Budgie
(391425-01)............................................95
Super Denise (391554-01)................. .95 Paula 8354
(391077-01)......................................95
.........................95 68000CPU
(390004-07)................................. 95 66020-16
(391506-01).......... 95 MC 68662RC25A PGA New
(390434-01)............95 MC 68882RC20A
PGA............................... .00 MC 68882RC33A
PGA........................................50 XC 68882RC40A
PGA.........................................95 MC
68030FE25B QFP (390399*05)....................95 MC
68030RC50 PGA............................... .95
MOTHERBOARDS (Factory New) CD32 (no RAM memory)
NTSC..........................95 CD32 complete wilh
RAM/tasted NTSC...........9.95 CD32 complete wilh
RAM/tested (PAL)...............95 CD32 replacement CD
mechanism .95 A500 (rev. 3) inc all
chips.....................................95 A500 (Rev.
5/6)....................................................50
A600................................ 4.00 A1200 (NTSC)
United quantity 3.0 0/S all memory New 5300.00 A1200 (PAL)
Lmt*d quantity 3 0 OS at memory Nevs...0.00 A2000 LATE Rev.
8372/2.05.............................9.95 A3000
(16MHz).................................................4
50 A3000
(25MHz)...................................................4.50
A3000T (Tower)
25MHz....................................9.95 C64
(refurbished, tested all chips)......................S29.95
C64 untested, all chips clearance....................2/S25 00
AMIGA FLOPPY DRIVES (Factory New) Amiga ‘Q-Drive’ 1241 CD ROM
Drive lor the Ai20O.S179.95 High Dens. External floppy for all
Amigas,,.......4.95 High Density Irtemal Floppy Drive:
A4000...........................................................4.95
A2Q00...........................................................9.50
A500 Internal
680k...............................................95
A600/1200 Internal....................... .50 A2Q00
Internal
880k............................................S39.95 A3000
Internal 880k................................ .95 A4000
Internal 880k............................................95
CD32 Replacement CD mechanism....................95 1541
(refurbished)................................................95
1571 (limited quantity).................... S49.95 POWER
SUPPLIES (Factory New) A500 .................................
S38.95 A500/A600/A1200 Big Ft. (200 Watt) Micro
R/D.......95 A500 power supply (used) 220 volts Europe
.95 A590
..........................................................
.95 A1200 110 volts onginal factory
......................95 CD32 Original / Factory (110
volls)......................95 CD32 Original / Factory (220
volts).....................95 CD32 B;:g Foot (200 Watt)
Micro R/D ................50 A20Q0 11Q/220V, internal
original........................95 A2000 Big Foot (300
Watt) Micro R/D..............4.50 A300Q interna) (110/220
volts)..........................0,00 A3Q00 Big Foot (250
watts) Micro R/D.............4.50 A3000
Tower.....................................................4.00
A4000 internal (110 volts) .......................9.00
A4000 ini. 300 Watt Big Fool (exchange).........9.95 1084S
Phillips Flyback Transformer only............534.95 1084-D1
Phiilips/Daewoo Flyback only...............50 1084-D2
Daewoo Flyback Transformer only .50 5084$ new
MotherfcoardFfyback.................. .95 1084S power
supply board (refurbished).............95 C54
nonrepayable.................. .95 C54 repairable
................. .95 C54 5.2 amp Heavy Duty (also 1750
REU)........95 085 110
Volt..................‘.....................................95
C128 external 5.2
amps......................................S39.95 1541 11/1581
................................................... .50
KEYBOARDS (Factory New) A500 (limited
quantity)...................... A
600................................ .. C123D (limited
quantity).............. A*
200............................................... A20CO
(Amiga Technologies).
A3CC0 (Amiga Technologies).. A4CC0 (Amiga Technologies) .35 .50 95 .95 .53 .5-3 50 A2CC0 keyboard adapter to A4000.......................95 ADD ON BOARDS (Factory New) 68020-030 (A4000)................. .95 A2Q58 (OK) (A200Q) Expansion board 8K............95 A501 original Ram Exp. - 512K (A500)................95 Microway Flickerfixer........................................4.00 Slingshot Pro/pass thru (Micro R/D)....................50 A1050 RAM Expander (A1000) 256K..................95 APOLLO ACCELERATORS 1230 Lite 25MHz 55330 WMMUPU tor A1200
computers 4.95 1230/50MHZ 68030 forA1200 computers........9.00 124Q/25MHz 68040 for A1200 computers........9.95 124Q/4QMHz 68040 for A1200 computers........9.95 1260/50MHz 68060 for A1200 computers........9.95 1200 SCSI Module for Apollo A1200 accelerators S129.00 2030/25MHz 68030+68882+SCSI-2 lor A2000S299.95 2030/50MHz 68030+68892+SCSI-2 for A2000SS89 95 2040/25MHZ 68040+SCSI-2 for A2000............9,00 2040/40MHz 68040+SC Si-2 for A2000............9.00 2060750MHz 68050-SCSI-2 for A2000............9.95
3050. 50MHz 68050+SCSI-2 for A3000 Desktop .$£29.95 3040 40MHz
68040*SCSI-2 for A3030 Desktop .9 95
4040. 40MHz 68040-SCS1-2 for A3Q007 & A4000<T} 9.95
4060. 50MHz 68060-SCSI-2 for A3000’ 6 A4O00(T) 9.95 Mini Meg
2Mb Chip RAM Board.......................5.00
SX32.................................................................S299.00
PHASE 5 ACCELERATORS Blizzard 1250 Turbo Board
.......................S749.95 Blizzard 1230-IV Turbo
Board..........................9.95 Optional Blizzard
1260 cr 1230-IV SCSI Krt 9.95 Blizzard 2050 Tumo Board
...............9.95 Cybe'Storm Mark II
05a50MRz................. 9.95 Cyberstorm Fas: SCSI-2
Mocu e.................9.95 CyberVision S4'3D
2Mb........... Call CyberVsion 54-30
4Mb....................................9.95 CyberVision
54-3D MPEG Module..........................Call CyberVs on
54-3D Scan Dcuber/Momtor Switch...Call CyoerG-ashX
Software.......................................-95 MOUSE
CONTROLLERS (Factory New) Amiga
1352................................................ .50
Wizard 3-button (lor all
Amigas)..........................95
A4000................................. .85 Amiga
CDTV....................... .95 Amiga A1200 mouse port
replacement kit..............95 CD32 controller
......................................75 DIAGNOSTICS
Advanced Amiga Analyzer (see below)...............95
Final Tesl diagnostic disk by
Amiga.......................95 Amiga Troubleshooting
Guide........................ .95 Commodore Diagnostician
II ....... .95 Complete Service Manuals: A500, A500+,
590, AtOOO.
I230pnnte*, 1602,1902.1902A, 1934, 2002, 2091, 2300, 2630. CDTV, 1581, C65.............................95 A500 schematics, A600,1084S, 1084S-D1,1084ST.
1936A, 1960, A2000............................................00 A1200, A3000, A3000T, A4000. CD32................S39.95 CLEARANCE SALE A500 Computer (NTSC) with P/S.....................9-95 A520 (New) Video Modulator Adapter..........50
2. 04/3.1 RCM Switch - (Switch Itt) with speaker...S17.50 15-23
pm adapter cable ........................... .95 Monitor
Cables - 30 Different types......................CALL
Monitors: 1084S, 1802. Etc ............. CALL Laser printer
memory board OK (All HP units).....95 Sony QD615Q data
cartridge ..................S7.50 Joystick • Captain Grant
(for all Amigas)..............S2.99 ? ONLY AT PAXTRON ?
AMIGA A3000 - TWO GREAT DEALS Amiga A3000 (25MHz) Computer Includes: 9 Factory Refurbished Motherboard {keyboard, P/S, etc are NEW), 9 Complete A3QQ0 Service Manual (valued at .95), 9 User Manual.
9 90 Day Warranty.
4.95 (plus UPS) Amiga A3000 Computer (in kit form) Includes: 9 A3000/16MHz (factory refurbished) motherboard with 2 megs of RAM (25MHz version, add S35.00). 9 New A3000 Power Supply [110 or 220 volts).
9 New A3000 Floppy Drive.
9 New Daughter Board.
9 Amiga 3000 Mouse 9 Full A3000 Service Manual (valued at .95). 9 User Manual.
9 All Cabling, 9 90 Day Warranty (on motherboard only).
9.95 (plus UPS) SPECIAL OPTIONS Ramsey 7 Upgrade........................................................................S31.95 DMAC 4 Upgrade..........................................................................95 Super Buster 11 Upgrade................................................................95 Western Digital SCSI 8A.................................................................95
3. 1 Operating System Upgrade
ROM..............................................50
3. 1 ROM Software (package of 7
discs)............................................50
3. 1 Books/Manual (without disks or
ROM).........................................CALL 1 x 4 Static
Column ZIP (8 zips = 4
megs).........................................00 Hard
Drive.......................................................................................CALL
AmiFAST 3000 Adopter [ZIP to SIMM
adapter)................................50 Rack Mounted
A3000
Cabinet........................................................00
Spare A300 Motherboards - See top half of ad (Motherboard
Section) for prices ADVANCED AMIGA ANALYZER 2.0™ An
Inexpensive Diagnostic Analyzer That Works On All Amigas A
complete diagnostic hardware and software analyzer (uses point
and click software interface.! The analyzer cable plugs into
all Amiga ports simultaneously end through sophisticated
software, displays 8 screens to work from. Shows status of
data ports, memory (buffer) checker, system configuration and
auto test. Reads diagnostic s-atus of any read/write errors
from track 0 to track 79. Software automatically tells what
errors are found and the chips/components responsible. 85 to
90% of the problems presented to service centers are found
wilh this analyzer. Saves you lots of money on repairs and no
end user or repair shop can afford to be without one. Don’t be
fooled by its low cost. Simply plug in cables from ihe
analyzer box. This diagnostic tool is used by end users and
Amiga repair centers worldwide and is the only one of its
kind. Over 15,000 sold.
New low price Amiga "Q-Drive" 1241 CD ROM Drive for the A1200 The Amiga Technofogies "Q-Drive" 1241 is a PCMCIA interface for the Amiga 1200 (CD32 emulator). 11 is a super fast CD-ROM drive equipped with a PCMCIA connector.
Price: 9.95 (Quantity pricing available] ??? WANTED *** Get Cash for your A2000 computers.
New or Used (NTSC or PAL).
We pay top dollar. We also pay UPS shipping charges.
ATTENTION DEALERS Paxtron has been appointed as a North Amsrican distributor tor ACT Apolio and Phase 5 accelerators, Give us a chance to quote you our best prices.
New enlarged Web page: www.paxtron.com Our web page is continually updated with latest products and price changes. Visit us and check it out. Enter your order there or by E-mailing us at pax1roncorp@rcknet.com. ATTENTION DEALERS: If you would like to receive our dealer catalog fax us your letterhead.
28 Grove Street, Spring Valley, NY 10977 914-578-6522 • 800-815-3241 800-595-5534 • 888 PAXTRON - FAX 914-578-6550 Hours: 9-5 pm ET Mon.-Fri. • Add S6.00 UPS Charges * MC/VISA * Prices subject to change E-Mail for orders & correspondence: paxtroncorp@rcknet.com WE SHIP WORLDWIDE!
Paxtron CORPORATION DISK 1 TURB PRINT Professional IflrseeSoft for the \MK;\ multiExtract (0% done) GHFont.Izx Ra InBoot.Izx Mexch.Izx PC-Task.Izx TurboPrInt5.Izx IXG.Izx Rbort Install Before you even think of putting the cover disks any where near your comput¬ er, make sure you write protect them.
Move the black tab in the top comer of the disk, so you can see through the hole, this makes sure you cannot dam¬ age your disks in any way. Fhere is no reason why the cover disks need to be written to, so even if the computer asks you to write enable the disks, don't do iL To extract any single archive, simply double click its icon, and follow the on screen instructions. If you want to quick¬ ly extract the program to Ram, select the NOVICE level on the welcome screen and press proceed once on the current screen and then again on the next. The program can then be found in your Ram disk.
Normally most programs will need fur¬ ther installing, so read the documents on how to do this.
Hard Drive Users Hard drive users do not have to boot with the first disk, but you must make sure you have the Amiga's Installer pro¬ gram in your C drawer. To make sure your hard drive has the correct files in place, double click on the SetupHD icon. This will check if you have the Installer pro¬ gram and, if not, will copy it across, do not worry as it will not write over any existing files.
All you hard drive owners will find MultiExtract very useful. It is a separate method of extracting the cover disk files.
It allows you to extract a number of files in one go, to your hard disk or Ram.
When you run MultiExtract you will be presented with a number of check boxes, each representing one of the programs on that cover disk. Just de-select all the programs you do not want extracting, and then press proceed. All the selected programs can now miraculously be found in the selected destination.
Extracting Cover Disk files It's possibly the last thing you think j about, but is proba¬ bly the most impor¬ tant part of produc¬ ing documents on I your Amiga - what the final print out will look like. Using I TurboPrint you will be able to get incredibly crisp, sharp, well defined images and documents from your Amiga, probably the best you have ever seen.
This may seem a bit of a wild state¬ ment, but TurboPrint really can perform such a transformation on your print outs and using this demo you can try it out for yourself. It will only allow the printer to use half the page, but at least you get a chance to see the output for yourself and not have to take my word for it.
Once you have everything installed on your machine, the first thing to do is run the preference program and set TurboPrint for your printer. If you are just going to using plain old greyscale docu¬ ments you will be able to take advantage of all the advanced dithering that TurboPrint offers, along with possibly higher DPI settings than the standard Amiga drivers can do.
You will see a huge improvement in colour printing. Print in full 24 bit colour along with enhanced colour selection. All this and more can be changed from with¬ in the preference program, it should take you some time to look around. Once everything is set to your satisfaction, to quickly try out TurboPrint, run the graph¬ ics publisher.
Graphic publisher can load many differ- 1 fURBOPRINT 5 Demo Author: IrseeSoft Workbench 2.04 Make you print out sparkle with this great fully working demo of Turbo Print from IreeSoft Amiga Computing Installing TurboPrint To get TurboPrint off the cover disk, just go through the normal process. Double click the AC disk icon and double click the TurboPrint icon, follow the on screen instruction.
TurboPrint can now be found in the Ram disk and needs to be installed from here. Before running the install program, you must double click the Assign TurboPrint icon otherwise the install will fail.
The installer will ask you a number of questions, one of which will ask you if you want TurboPrint automatically started each time your Amiga is run, this places a program in the WB5tartup drawer and replaces the normal Amiga print routines with the special TurboPrint ones. After you have finished trying TurboPrint, to disable it, simply remove this program.
The main TurboPrint preferences may look a little intimidating but really take no time at all to get use to ML GfxSlze | Graphics} Text V Poster ] Hardcopy Diffuse | Err—Dt f f [ Type Size Br Lghtness Cont rast Gamma Colour j Megat tve Mirror Save QanceI ent types of picture files including IFF, Jpegs and Gif files. It then produces an on-screen preview of what the final dithered print out will be like.
If it looks to dark or washed out you can adjust the brightness and contrast levels, and if you want other pictures can be loaded on top. To change the print style you can also loadup the TurboPrint preference program at any time.
Nr 16 II to. Co tours ijjjjlijil Rotate Pattern j V" Pure Black SAVE A FIVER Wizard offer — exclusive only to Amiga Computing readers Return this coupon to Wizard and get a £5 discount off TurboPrint 5 To order, send a cheque and your details to: I I I enclose a Cheque/Postal Order for the value of £44.99 Amiga Computing Reader Offer, Wizard Developments, OO il JLJLJLJL'LlI ILO PO Box 490, Please charge my Access/Mastercard/Visa Dartford, ___ __ Kent, Expiry date O L_0 !_ DAI 2UH.
Signature Please rush me a copy of TurboPrint 5 to: Name (Miss/Ms/Mrs/Mr)_ Please allow 28 days for delivery All prices include postage, EC add £5, overseas £10 p&p Address Make cheques/postal orders payable to: Wizard Developments ’Offer ends 6 April. Voucher not to be used in conjunction with any other offer.
Post Code 0ne discount Per voucher.
Country- please send your order form to: Amiga Computing Reader Offer, Wizard Developments, Daytime Phone- pQ Bqx ^ Dartford Kent DA, 2UH_ RainBoot 1 iXG Author: Kimmo Pekkola Workbench 3.0 Author: Ivan Sturlic Workbench 3.0 Why do you have to sit there looking zombiefied at a blank screen waiting for your Amiga to restart? What you want is a boot picture. RainBoot is a boot picture program for nutters. No plain old, lets just have a pic¬ ture on the screen, that's not for me buddy. I want scrolling text, fancy backgrounds, progress bar, config¬ uration information and boot pictures. Did I
mention you can even play tracker modules for a bit of aural pleasure? All these features come with a price, RainBoot is complicated to set up. Even with the install script you will have to do a lot of work so read the doc¬ umentation - a couple of times.
Faulty disks If you should find your Amiga Computing CoverDisk damaged or faulty, please return it to: This is an interesting program, it provided a whole bunch of new extensions to AmigaCuide files, allowing graphics, better formatting and even animations to be added in documents and yet still be readable by a normal AmigaCuide viewer.
To try it out just run the iX-Guide program, go to the docs drawer and open the iX- Guide.ixml file. Doesn't look like your normal AmigaGuide, does it? It does use the same system however, and the document you are reading with all the fancy graphics still loads correctly into Multiview or AmigaGuide.
TIB Pic, TIB House, II Edward Street Bradford, W, Yorks BD4 7BH.
Please allow 28 days for delivery Magic- Exchange Magic User interface Author: Michael Einemann It is a handy dandy Exchange replacement for all you people that love MUI. If you don't like MUI, this is just another creations, memory eating, processor chewing MUI program that you can ignore and continue to put up with the standard Commodore effort. Including the normal advantages of a MUI program, this gives you everything Exchange has, plus mul¬ tiple programs can be changed at once and you can adjust the priority of the task, which is nice. Just run it and try it.
PC-Task v4 Author: Chris Hames Workbench 2.04 68020 processor Am i Peg So you want to run PC software, what do you do? Go out and blow the best part of £2000 or spend 50 quid on a piece of software that will let you run whatever you like? PC-Task gives you full 486 emulation with advanced dynamic compilation that can speed the emulation up to three times that of a normal emulator and all the tra¬ ditional PC display modes, including SuperVGA with up to 2Mb of video memory.
This demo gives you a nearly fully function¬ al version of PC-Task, the one restriction being that it cannot write to any disks. There are two versions: The dynamic and the traditional interpretative version. The new dynamic emu¬ lator uses special dynamic compilation rou¬ tines to greatly speed up the emulation, at the expense of greater memory consumption. So if you are low on memory, use the interpreta¬ tive version.
OK, lets get one thing Straight, emulators are complex pieces of software and Pcs are far from the easiest things to use. So combine the two and you’re asking for trouble. To use PC task you must, at the very least, have a double density PC format¬ ted disk before you can even do anything with the program. To make one you need to type format A: /s /f:720 into a real PC, with a DD disk in its A drive. This can be used to start the emulation, but you will still need some sort of PC software to really test this great PC emulator.
DISK 2 As the demo will not let you write to any disks, even a fake hard drive, the software wifi have to fit onto a floppy so get hold of some old D05 software and you can try it out.
Author: Miiostaw Smyk Workbench 2.04 Do you want the fastest Mpeg player on the Amiga? Well this is for you, not that you should expect too much on a plain old A1200, but any accelerated Amiga will be able to bang out Mpeg streams without breaking out in a sweat.
As always the cover disks are compiled at the last possible moment so you get the latest Amiga products and programs out there, nor¬ mally without any hitches.
In the rush this month, a couple of the programs do not seem to have drawer icons (I'll fire myself after I have written this). If you extract a program and it does not seem to be where it should be, select from the Windows menu Show/All files and this should make it appear. Right you, you're fired.
SPECIAL OFFER PRICE FOR AMIGA COMPUTING READERS!
Wa6P wrnmm —¦—*- TT-nf^ Audiogenic cricket games are renowned as the world's best. BRIAN LARA CRICKET '96 for the Amiga incorporates some great new features many of which were suggested by users.
For example, the SIX-HIT button which allows you to hit out whenever you want; USER-CONTROLLED FIELDING (optional); new VAR1ABLE-5IZE BOWLING MARKER underlines the difference between top bowlers and the occasional bowlers and DISK-CACHE-ING virtually eliminates multi-loading on machines with more than 1Mb of conventional memory.
ONLY £19.96 (RRP E29.99) WHEN YOU QUOTE REFERENCE 96AC OTHER RECENT AUDIOGENIC PRODUCTS Exile Discovery Disk £7.99 A chance to explore the parts most games players never reach! The data disk includes numerous saved game positions together with comprehensive hints to help you complete this incredible game.
Specify whether you have the original version or the new AGA version when ordering.
Super Tennis Champs Data Disks £7.99 There is even more fun to be had with these add-on disks. The Women's disk allows you to play Ladies tournaments, even a Grand Slam. The Mixed Doubles disk allows you to enter Exhibition matches or a League. Just £7.99 each, alternatively get both sets on one disk for El 4.99. PARTIAL FEATURE LIST One or two-innings matches, limited or unlimited overs, one, two, three, four or five day matches, stoppages for rain, breaks for lunch and tea, manual or automatic fielding, return ball to either wicket, set field settings for each bowler, fields automatically
swap for left-handers, spin, swing and fast bowlers, bowl over or around the wicket, left and right hand¬ ed batsmen and bowlers, superbly ani¬ mated batting strokes, four skill levels including new 'arcade' level, teams from all 12 World Cup countries and all 18 English counties, authentic batting and bowling statistics, declarations and fol¬ low-ons, spectacular animation and graphics include shadows that lengthen and change direction.
Order by phone on - 0181 424 2244 or send a cheque (made out to Audiogenic Software Ltd) to Customer Services (Dept 96AC), Audiogenic Software>, Winchester House, Canning Road, Weaidstone, Harrow, HAS 7SJ.
Add £1.25 per order for post and packing.
Please state Amiga model when ordering Ofter last month some of you may be getting a little more adventur¬ ous with your musical composi¬ tions and may feel the limita¬ tions of the standard trackers that proliferate the computer market. The next logical step for any would musician is to step into the world of Midi.
In the electronics industry, standards tend to fall into two categories - those that fail miserably and those that surpass all expecta¬ tions. Midi well and truly falls into the latter, being a run away success helping to com¬ pletely transform the music industry along the way.
Meaning Musical Instrument Digital Interface, Midi gives a standard way for all forms of instruments to communicate and control each other via a standard set of com¬ mands. Being digital, it allows a computer with the right interface and software to take control.
When notes are played on a Midi instru¬ ment information about the note, strength and instrument are sent from the Midi out port. This can then be read by any other instrument and if you just so happen to have a computer attached to the Midi network, a sequencer can read and store this data, along with timing information allowing the notes to be played again later.
You will be glad to hear that for software you may not need to wander too far. That all encompassing music program, OctaMED, has a Midi sequencer built in and will handle all a beginner's needs. If you find you do out grow OctaMED, Music-X, Dr T's KC5 or the highly accomplished Bars & Pipes Pro should provide everything you ever need. Most of this software is around five years old, but even so provides everything a professional musician would need, particularly Bars & Pipes Pro and, compared to the industry standard CuBase, cost absolute peanuts while providing the vast majority of features.
For anyone quickly casting an eye over the available synths, drum machines and mixing desks it is very easy to be put off by the sometimes incredible expense of Midi equip¬ ment. But for a beginner who has already dabbled with sampling and more than likely has a copy of OctaMED, the very basic equip¬ ment necessary to get started can be picked up for not much more than a 100 pounds.
Before you can go running off and buying Midi equipment you will have to give the Amiga a way of hooking up to, and commu- Midi So you want to make beautiful music with your Amiga? Neil Mohr takes you one step beyond er, you plan to start using multiple Midi instruments and have many different sound sources you will need to start considering mixing desks and muiti-track recorders, at which point you will be moving on to own¬ ing a fully blown recording studio.
So, your first and most important purchase is a good keyboard, also known as a synth.
Compared to trying to write music in a nor¬ mal tracker program, a keyboard is a far more natural way of composing, allowing you to quickly try out and change parts of your compositions and, once you are happy, record off to your Midi sequencer. This is not to mention the vast improvement on how good your music sounds.
As will all technical equipment, synths have the usual array of technical jargon sur¬ rounding them. Terms like polyphonic and nicating with this equipment. To do this you need what is aptly called a Midi interface and can be picked up for 20 pounds. As a mini¬ mum you need an interface that has Midi in, out and thru connections, allowing your Amiga to receive, send and pass on Midi information.
First Computer Centre sells quite a rea¬ sonable interface and can provide additional Midi to connect everything together if you need it. As a note, the lack of any Midi inter¬ face on the Amiga has been cited as a reason for the Atari ST (that had built in midi ports) being anywhere near as popular as it was in the music industry.
Once you have access to Midi software and interface you can consider your next pur¬ chases. At an absolute minimum you can get away with owning just a keyboard. If howev¬ Amiga Computing Block OctaMED Sound Studio has all the Midi facilities a beginner will need multi-timbral may be Creek to you but are very important abilities in a keyboard to look out for. A polyphonic synth is able to play more than one note at a time so allowing complex chords to be played as each note hit requires a separate channel.
Captur*‘Mg9 | >s Ruto-I*r*tn*f* C*ptuT* [ Pilch A polyphonic keyboard becomes even more important if it is also multi-timbral, this is a synth that can play more than one instru¬ ment. So you can have a cello, bass drum, high hat along side you piano, that could need five or six notes adding up to around 12 notes at once.
HIDICh r j information - (Tempo ¦ SPD 3S/6) The synth keyboard is probably the most important part of your set up so it is wise to take your time when choosing one. If you just want to try out the basics then a reason¬ able keyboard can be picked up for around £100. If you plan to go for anything more expensive make sure you try it out fully, as you do not want to be lumbered with a key¬ board you don't like. If you can afford it, a touch sensitive keyboard gives more control over notes, allowing you to add emphasis to notes.
ERIOUS CONSIDERATION With just a keyboard you can get away with using your sequencer to handle all the mixing, and for basic results your hi-fi ampli¬ fier and cassette will do. If you do start to add further synth sound modules or a drum machine, then a mixing desk is going to be needed, allowing all the audio outputs to be mixed together and recorded off to cassette.
To reiterate what I said at the beginning, even though at first glance Midi equipment may look expensive, the actual basic equip¬ ment required to get you going is fairly low cost, especially if you go for second hand equipment The beauty of Midi is that you can slowly and seamlessly add to your sys¬ tem. A final word of warning, if you get bitten by the Midi bug a complete system capable of adding real time accompaniment could cost up to £10,000, so try not to go over¬ board, I wouldn't want your house repossession on my conscience. A'*?r Starting off in Midi does not have to cost too much,
and this feature is really aimed at begin¬ ners who want the better end results that track¬ ers provide but want to keep the starting cost low by using basic software and the minimum of equipment, probably second hand. However If you find you get the bug for composing your own music and want to expand to a full record¬ ing studio, the cost can quickly rocket. Here are some extras you may want to take into consid¬ eration.
A keyboard synth is basically a keyboard connected to a synth module, and it is possible to buy synth modules separately with no key¬ board that are then controlled directly from your Midi sequencer. This allows you to com¬ pose the music from your main keyboard and replay the sequence but to the Midi synth mod¬ ule, giving you a larger selection of possible sounds.
A possible alternative to an additional sound synth would be a good drum machine, essen¬ tially a specialised synth module, allowing you to add drum and percussion without the need for a full drum kit.
Beyond basic sequencer based composition, when it comes to adding real time vocals or musical accompaniment to your composition you start to entet the realms of an expensive recording studio. Along with the necessity of a mixer, you will have to add a multi-track recorder or direct to disk recorder that are not cheap. For vocals, a signal processor will be a necessity to at least add a little reverb to make vocals less flat.
This is not to mention a quality microphone, headsets and, as I doubt you have a dedicated sound booth, a compressor to remove back¬ ground hum and noise from vocals will be a must. Finally on the equipment list, if you need CD quality, would be a DAT drive, so you can run off to the nearest record producer with your latest creation.
For perfect recordings you have to remove all forms of interference, This includes noise added from poor leads and overloaded power supplies, make sure you use good quality leads to connect everything up and try not to run audio and Midi leads next to power cables or anywhere near monitors.
If you get to this sort of stage you would have well outgrown your typical hi-fi system and should have already splashed out on ded¬ icated amplifiers, headphones and speakers.
Amiga Computing Ot's been a long time coming for Amiga fans, but Lightwave 5.0 has finally arrived on the platform where it all began. The wait seems even longer thanks to its appearance on just about every other platform before¬ hand, including its latest appearance as a Power Mac product.
Still, it's here now. But the question is: Has the wait been worth it? Well, that's something you'll have to decide for yourself after the customary stroll through the add-ons and updates but there's definitely a few surprises
- both good and bad.
Paul Austin casts a critical eye over NewTek's latest incarnation of Lightwave What's new in Layout As ever there are buckets of minor interface updates and rethinks, but I'll be concentrating on the features that make the difference between sticking with what you've got or signing the cheque.
On the Layout side life, as ever, looks pret¬ ty much the same as it did in 4.0. However, it is always the same with Lightwave: If you want to know what's really happening you have to look behind the scenes.
On the surface the only noticeable change is the arrival of front face and solid previews on Layout's stage. Although hardly earth shat¬ tering in technological terms, it nevertheless represents a marked improvement when it comes to overall ease of use.
Rather than suffering a sea of seemingly interconnecting wireframes while construct¬ ing complex scenes, solid and front face pre¬ views do a great job of simplifying what in the past could present a very confusing spectacle.
In addition, it also offers the added bonus of much faster redraw when things are starting to get seriously cluttered.
One of the hidden secrets of the Layout is the new approach to surface textures and alpha channels. Aside from the long awaited arrival of support for tiling of textures, per¬ haps the most radical change is the arrival of unlimited texturing with associated alpha channels.
In the past, surface attributes were limited to one texture each. This meant one in the colour field, one in the diffuse field etc. Although combining attribute textures in this way can produce stunning results - as proven by such notables as Ron Thornton - this new Amiga Computing TU RE found ability to link unlimited texture maps and alphas across the whole range of attrib¬ utes is sure to revolutionise surfacing within Lightwave.
Left and below: Bones were just the begin* ning, now muscles can bring character animation to life. And thanks to joint com- pensation, objects bend rather than buck¬ le at the elbow rwnrwLt-ni f- St'-' / «r» r> trm irT-ra r-rt .'-.ryj*
- .»
- ¦ :
- i'¦ - The actual process of applying textures remains virtually
the same. However, now you can go on adding new layers to
images to surface by simply clicking the "Add Texture” button.
The actual texture mix is controlled by simply adjusting the
new ‘Texture Opacity" control. Therefore you can easily blend
all the textures within a particular surface attribute to
produce the perfect mix.
It—nrnrm SEEESQES trrrmicrrfn rTTr^*r™r,i rcrtrirrm LJPfflptn M .llh.i 1 Hi m arm itts #/iJ i itctto r-.fri wvrHrttTrrw i v-vV ' ' ~ JlTT _ 1 . ~ 1' -T The final touch of genius is the ability to add an associated alpha channel image to every texture you use. Therefore you can have two textures on the surface both at 100 per cent opacity but with the an alpha channel cutting holes or blending the second image to reveal the image beneath. And of course, one or both could be animated textures or image sequences generating movement across the surface.
Basically the more you think about the potential and experiment with the flexibility multiple image layers provides, the more and more impressive these new features become.
Arguably the next most important step on in the evolution of Layout is the arrival of muscle flexing and joint compensation when animating an object using bones. By combin¬ ing the two you get control, not only over the movement of a bones object, but also its deformation as the bones move and rotate the object they control.
Muscle flexing is the visually more impres¬ sive of the two. With muscle flexing active the area occupied by the bone will swell or expand in relation to how much rotation is applied at the joint with its parent bone.
There are various options to fine tune the effect, but in essence it does exactly what you expect. As the arm bends at the elbow, the muscles bulges by a defined amount.
To complement the realistic effect of bulging muscles, joint compensation pro¬ vides an equally, if perhaps less impressive, weapon in the fight for realistic character ani¬ mation. Essentially joint compensation stops unrealistic pitching or folding at the joints as an object deforms. In short, joints bend rather than buckle. Like its muscle flexing counter¬ part you're provided with complete control over the strength of the effect - either negative or positive.
In addition to these two new features, bone control itself has also been enhanced with bone strength falloff also appearing in the mix, enabling even more intuitive control over charac¬ ter animation with¬ in boned objects.
Kinematics is another area to see some enhance¬ ments with new features such as active goals and user definable goal strengths. Like bones, the kine¬ matic enhance¬ ments are really a case of building on existing abilities and mak¬ ing good things that bit better, adding more flexibility and intuitive touches for more nat¬ ural approach.
More anim specific add-ons include multi¬ ple morphs target from the same envelope, interactive camera zoom and interactive light cone adjustment. The final touch in the light¬ ing department being Layout's newly found ability to project an image through a light which, as the cover image demonstrates can create some seriously weird effects. Not exactly an everyday tool, but certainly worth experimenting with... What's new in Modeller Like Layout, Modeller has seen a few changes. But unlike its counterpart, Modeller has one major killer application in the form of MetaNurbs.
MetaNurbs combine traditional polygon based modelling with the power of splines.
Although spline based modelling is already available thanks to spline patching, building models using traditional spline patches is, to say the least, an acquired taste.
Although splines are superb for the pro¬ duction of organic forms they can often be very tricky to implement. But thanks to MetaNurbs, spline problems are a thing of the past.
Basically MetaNurbs enable you to build a traditional poly¬ gon based object which when MetaNurbs is activated - by pressing the tab key - becomes an interactive spline based model which you can continue editing via normal editing tools.
As you edit the original model the changes appear instantly on the spline floating in the pre¬ view window.
The end results are fluid organic models in the style of metaformed objects, but unlike metaformed models MetaNurbs are totally interactive, enabling you to drag scale and squeeze the model into the exact shape you require. Only when you're completely happy with the new shape do you freeze the newly formed spline and transform it back into a perfectly formed organic model.
Aside from the pure modelling power of the system perhaps the real beauty of the MetaNurbs is that there is no learning curve involved in using the new tool. All the skills you've amassed while working on normal polygon models can now be applied directly to spline based modelling.
In practise, MetaNurb modelling is like modelling in clay. The only limitation is that polygons involved must be quad or four sided. On occasion this can present problems with certain forms, the poles of spherical models for example, which are inherently made up of triangular polygons. Fortunately that's where Metaform can help by sub-divid¬ ing and smoothing any untouched triangular polygons to match the organic shapes gener¬ ated by MetaNurbs process.
Better still MetaNurbs also adheres to Modeller's selection rules. Therefore if only part of a model is selected it’s only those polygons that the MetaNurb process will 3ffect.
As you can imagine creating so many com¬ pound curves and assorted organic forms can occasionally generate none-planar polygons and subsequent rendering errors where adja¬ cent polygons don't align correctly. As a result it's always worth checking for none planar Amiga Computing their debut as Plug¬ ins on the PC - and yet there's no sign of them appearing on the Amiga... The bad news... With the uncertain future for the Amiga and the ever growing presence of Pcs, Macs and assorted Unix boxes, it's perhaps understandable that the Amiga isn’t high on Newtek's priority list. And although
Lightwave is virtually identical across the board it must be said the abject lack of development on the Amiga is starting to take its toll.
Without doubt the most notable omis¬ sion is Open GL/QuickDraw3D Support as found in the PC and Mac ver¬ sions respectively. On both platforms it pro¬ vides real-time shad¬ ed previews in both the Modeller preview and the Layout stage.
Obviously the speed of preview is relative to the machine in question, but is an impressive addition to Lightwave's visual repertoire, enabling an interactive preview of surface attributes within Modeller and also the effect of light¬ ing within Layout.
RAM or above Product details Product Price Tel 0171 468 3444/Fax;0171 468 3488 Ease of use 88% Implementation 78% Value For Money 85% Overall 84% Lightwave 5.0 Supplier Advanced Media Group (amg) £995 (£350 as an upgrade) Pf;] yt-f
- ! T, :1. ItTH7-
- Hri r- - ?¦ 4-..... dj:; i il^ fr x Finally, hit freeze and the
spline is trans¬ formed back into a perfect organic poly¬ gon -
and all the time you see the changes happening in real-time as
you edit polygons after creating MetaNurbs model.
Other, less impressive but nevertheless handy, additions include the ability to set basic attributes to surfaces prior to export into Layout, including name, colour, specular¬ ity, glossiness, smoothing and the number of sides. A slightly more useful addition is a new lasso style zoom tool, which although simple, does help to speed things up when you're dealing with large models with areas of high detail.
PLUG-IN AWAY As Layout and Modeller evolve, Plug-ins are destined to play an ever increasing roie in the growth of the overall package. Thanks to Plug-ins Lightwave’s long suffering program¬ ming team can sit back a little and let the third party guys do some of the hard graft.
In version 5.0 over 60 assorted plug-ins ship with the package split roughly 50/50 between Layout and Modeller. On the Layout side the main emphasis is on post process¬ ing, object deformation, solutions to parent¬ ing problems and the simplification of char¬ acter animation.
On the Modeller side such notables as Metaballs make an appearance, although I couldn't try the feature first hand as it failed to run on both machines I attempted to run it on - no doubt there's a bug fix in the post.
Basically Plug-ins are the future for Lightwave and with 63 assorted tools to play with as standard I'd need another three pages to do them any real justice.
Unfortunately however. Plug-ins do present a worrying prospect for the Amiga community.
Although they have been a part of the Amiga version since version 3.5 there appears to be no Amiga based third party support planned.
All the effort in this area is happening on the PC and other platforms. In fact, many of the old Amiga third party programs such as Sparks and Fibre Factory have already made Bottom Requirements RED essential BLACK recommended 16 Mb Workbench &8030 Due to the lack of suitable hardware accel¬ eration and ongoing development this kind of real-time preview simply isn't possible on the Amiga. Admittedly, even OpenGL doesn't deliver the complete picture, as only attribut¬ es and not textures are shown in the preview.
However, it is still an important advance that the Amiga simply can't accommodate.
Fortunately there are still a number of things the Amiga can offer in the display department that Newtek appear determined to ignore. The most annoying of which is an apparent refusal to offer full third party sup¬ port for anything other than the Picasso II dis¬ play board.
Obviously offering direct support for every type of display device is perhaps a little unre¬ alistic, but there's no reason why Cybergraphics support couldn't have been added, thereby enabling virtually anyone with a third party display card to share in the Picasso ll's ability to show 24 bit/truecoiour single frame previews and perhaps more importantly deliver wireframe previews of animations generated within Layout.
The big decision The big question - is the all new Lightwave worth the investment? Well, if you're already running Lightwave 4.0 the answer has to be a resounding yes! If you can take advantage of the upgrade offer it's an absolute must.
Obviously the lack of OpenGL and proper third party display support is annoying, but the combination of Metanurbs, better bone control alongside all the other updates and add-ons make it worth while.
If you're new to 3-D and are toying with the idea of paying full price, I'd suggest looking long and hard at the alternatives beforehand. To be honest, it's obvious that unless something remarkable happens to the Amiga the long-term future of Lightwave lies on other platforms - so unless you're planning to stick with the Amiga for religious reasons, the Mac or PC look a much better bet when it comes to the full asking price. /T'X Amiga Computing low COST DELIYERV Tel: 0113 231 -9444 Fax: 0113 231
• 2-4 Week Days £3.99 _
- 9191 LARGE jWROOAl EASY ACCESS FROM M62, Ml and Al, COFFUT® —
kwkstai ¦ CIWTREr^y _______31
• Next Week Day £5.99 F L.
• Saturday Delivery £15.00 I JIT Delivery subject to stock
availability SHOWROOM ADDRESS:CSSS FIRST COMPUTER CENTRE, w™
DEPT. AC, UNIT3, ARMLEY PARKCT, STANNINGLEYRD, LEEDS, LSI2 2AE.
LEEDS CITY CENTRE WORLD ARMU^ GYRATORY Ffwr¥ME« JwiHI hmikMl MU Bind M tvmjf (ran Hi’ I Folow Uf-nkx ASITIvi nr-frt >.[* U» Jlrmirj prtSnry /rfti /MVtlt IT, Al 1 ta A/mle, flrratovy 6fefij6tAl uW d" hrrwf far AM, Whn-ncrin w** d»t AJ4 (tTT-fuavij Cmrn ctnot) wtvcfi m«ti A/nlrj jriitory FIRST COMPUTER CENTRE [oj^N7 DAYS A WEEK |E-Maii: sales@firstcoiri.demon.co.uk WEB: www.firstcom.demon.co.uk BBS; 0113 231-1422 Memory Hardware CD ROM Drives/Squirrel I/face Amiga A1200 MagicPack Indudes^Wordworth V4SE.
DiUstOre, Organiser, Turtujcalc 3.5, Personal Paint V6.4, Photogenic* I 2SE, P inbail Mania ft Whin.
Very limited Stocks Early, Purchase Recommended.
Squirrel scsi-n J nterface*£45.00 Amiga A1200 Magic Pack Inc. 170Mb HD &ScalaMM300 Same software* pack as Magic Pack, But also includes Scala MM300(Rcq.4Mb>. ra CD ROM Drives LOWEST PRICES EVER!!
AI 200 4 Mb RAM £70.99 I A1200 8 MbRAM £89.99 33Mhz Co Pro add£25.00
• When bought with iny SCSI <l«vtc«.
* 54-95 if bought (tpinti 'New!
* PRIMA A500 512kRAM no clock PRIMA A500+ | MbRAM PRIMAAfiOO I Mb
RAMnoclock Surf Squirre SCSI-II Interface
* £79.99 P Itra 6 Speed IDE £ 189.99 Ultra Drive Kit £119.99
MASSIVE REDUCTIONS 1 Mb 71 Pin SIMM 2 Mb 72 Pin SIMM 4 Mb 72
Pin SIMM Bmb 72 Pin SIMM 16 Mb 72 pm SIMM 1Mb 30 pin SIMM 4 Mb
30 pin SIMM 256by 4DRAM(DILs) 256by 4ZIPP5 Part exchange ava
old memory. Call for pricing.
£129.99 ! .XSwed External SCSI CD ROM Drives ¦SCSI Conn*, reguired to run Internal SCSI CD ROM drives 1 Sanyo CRD2S4Vx.Sp,.d £89.99 | TeacCD56Sx6Sp«ed £121.99 1 ToshibaS70l.ns^.d £149.99 Yvhrn bought with any modem or :si davit* £99.95 if bourht miril £10.99 £14.99 £17.99 £34.99 £B0.99 £10.99 £29.99 (each)£4.99 <each)£6.?9 able on your £379.99 StSI davit* £99.95 ifbOVthl Woirilr Octagnn/GVPSCSI Card £99.99 £479.99 14"Monitor £259.99 17" Monitor £389.99
* !f bought with an Amiga_ I st Starter Pack
• A1200 dust cover
• 10 xDSDD disks + labels
• Top quality joystick Only £19.99 Software Specials
• Vista Pro Lite full ver. £9.99
• WordworthVJ £9.99
• Deluxe Paint IV AGA £9.99
• Blitz Basic 2.1 £29.99
• TechnosoundTurbo tl £29.99
• Final Writer 5 £74.95 Accelerator Cards Viperll-33 £129.99
Blizzard 1230-50 £ 159.99 Blizzard 1260-50 £479.99 | SCSI
Enclosures LsineleCasef69.99 DualCase£l 19.99 i Deluxe mouse
mat/ 3 x AI 200 games PRIMA Hard Drives Disk Drives Monitors
Peripherals Mega Mouse* 400 dpi ( 3 button) Mega Mouse
400dpi(2button) £11.49 Amiga Mouse S&OdpI (3 button) £12.99
Quality Mousemat (4mm) £3.99 Golden Image Am/ST Trackball
£17,99 ZyFi-2 Speakers (8 watts/channel) £26.99 Zyft Pro
Speakers (16 watts/channel) £5 7.99 Roboshift (Auto
mouse/J.stick *witch£9.99 Kickstart 2.04/2.05 (for use in A600)
£24.99 CIA 8S20AT/O controller £18.99 68882 Co Pro 25mhiPLCC
£25.99 68882 Co Pro 33mhiPLCC £29.« Zipstick Joystick £11.99
Saitek Megagrip II_- - - (Amiga Modulator £34.991 Amiga Std.
PSU £34.99 Heavy Duty PSU £69.99j| I 1(3.5 Hard Disk Drives^ i
IDE SCSI I 540Mb..£ I I 9.9? 270Mb......£99.99 I B50Mb..£
142.99 540Mb......£149.99 I l.4Gig...£l85.99
I.SGig......£249.99 1 2. J Gig...£206.99 2.1 Gig.....£397.99 8
1(3.2Gift... £27 2.99 4.3Gig..... £862.99 1
2. 5" Hard Drives for A600/AI200 with Installation kit cSeagate
cgxnzr 80Mb.„.£64.99 130Mb....£80.99 I !70Mb...£85.99250Mb..£l
19.99 I 420Mb.£ 129.99540Mb..£ 139.99 I
810. ......£149.99 I -0Gig..£2l 9.99 I
J. 3Gig..£294.992.2Gig,.£399.99|| 117" 1701........£399.99 17"
Multi-Sync Monitor, Lowest ever price.
AMICAl
• Snckidm
• I X lOOMbcutndfa I (SCJI Wki 1 tdiytor nuyCi ZipToots Driver
Software Suits Zip&lazz Drives £.16,99 New Amiga |Monitors|
Multi-Sync Monitors 114” 1438s......£269.99 LlC Monitor
Includes Built In Speaktn Build Your Own SCSI Hard Drive
• SCSI case with built in PSU £69.99
• SCSI Hard Drive,Select from above SCSI Squirrel Interface£45.00
12 Month Warranty.
6miga External drive£44.95 iLmitek1.76MbExt. £69.99 M 200/600 Internaldrive£39.99 500/5 00+lntemal drive£39.9
3. 5" H/Drive Install Kit £ 19.99 Includes setup software, cables
and full instructions, no Hard Drive.
Delivery £1.50 per _ ""Zr£” CD ROM Software Miscellaneous Modems Software 1078 Weird Texture! £12.99 l7BltftLSDVoLI/2/3 £17.99 17Brt Collection 17Bit Continuation I Tbit Phase 4 I Tbit Sth Dimension 3000 JPEG Textures 3D Images/Objects AGA Experience I NFA £12.99 AGA Experience 2 NFA £ 12.99 AGA Toolkit 97 £1.99 Amiga Desktop Video 2 £12.99 Amiga Developers CD £12.99 Amiga Repair Kit £39.99 AmiNet 13/14/15/16/17 £12.99 AmiNetSetl/2 £17.99 AmiNet Set 3/4 £29.99 Arcade Classics Plus £12.99 Artworx Assassins CD Vol. 3 C64 Sensations v2 Card Games CD CD-PD 1/2/3 Dem Rom Demo Collection vl Epic
Collection 2 Epic Int. Encyclopedia Euro CD v I Geek Gadgets GIF Sensations 2 Giga Graphics A Global Amiga Expmce.
Graphics Sensations I Guinness Disc of Rec. Horror Sensations (18) Hottest 6 Into-the-Nel Insight Dinosaurs Learning Curve Ught ROM 4 Light ROM Gold LSD Compendium 3 Magic Publisher Magic WB Enhancer Meeting Pearfsv4 Movie Maker Special FX MultimcdiaToolkit 1+2 Multimedia Backdrops Network 2 CD Network 2+ CD31 Cable N othing but G Ifs AGA Nothing but Tetris Octamed 6 & Sounds Terr. £ 17.99 Octamed Sound Studio £22.99 Oh Yes More Worms Photogenic! 2 Prima Shareware I CD Pov-Roy Retro Gold CD Scene Storm Sci-Fi Sensation 2 Software 2000 2CD Sound FX Sensation Source Code Space ft Astronomy
£17.99 £25.99 £12.99 £17.99 £17.99 £28.99 £17,99 £17.99 £17,99 £17.99 £17.99 £1799 £4.99 £17.99 £24.99 £17.99 £17.99 £39.99 £8.99 £8.99 £17.99 £17.99 £17.99 £12.99 £33.99 £17.99 £9.99 fniHiV34+ Fax Modem Amazing Price/Performance
• 33.6 Baud Rate^Class I Fax
• BABT & CE approved.
Only..£99.99 Complete with cables & Amiga N-comm Software |Tne Prima ATOM Heavy Duty PSU £69.99
• High Quality 200 Watt PSU.
• Colour Co-Ordinated Cuing.
• 4xThe Power of Std. Amiga PSUl
• 12 Month Warranty.
Final Writer 5
F. Writer Lte.
Wordworth 6
W. orth Office Mini Office Final Data Final Calc Twist 2
Turbocalc 4 Dir Opus 5.5 MIDI I/face MegaLoSound Aura 16
TST-II Pro Net&Web Net&Web II GP Fax only I Browse_ £72.99
£39.99 £39.99 £49,99 £46.99 £39.99 £94.99 £74.99 £49.99 £45.99
£17.99 £24.99 £74.99 £29.99 £29.99 £66.99 £44.99 £24.99 PRIMA
£S.99| ¦-I £9.991 I cl?
£|7.99| £ I 7 ??¦ £12 9?l
• -! ’ 951 £ I 3.5 5 B £10.99 £14 99 £6.99 £17.99 £ 12.99 £1.99
Space Shuttle Encyclopedia £i4 9? I System Booster £17.991 The
Colour Library £8.991 The Spectrum CD 96 £I6.99| The Personal
Suite £17.9 Utilities 2 (PDSoft) £17.9 Utilities Experience
£IJ.99l Weird Sc. AMOS PD £16.991 Weird Sc, Clip Art £8.991
WeirdSc. UPDGold £ 17.991 Workbench Add-Ons £30.991 World Atlas
£24.991 World Info 95 £ 17.991 Zoom 2 £18.991 Bargains V32Bis
14,400 Fax Modem Only!! £49.99 V22Bis 2400/9600 Modem Only!!
£24.99 Pro-GRAB On1y...£129.99 24 R/TpCMCIAiJ,pcor(J9.99 Power
Scan v4. £89.99 256 g/scaleon AGA Amfgai. 64 g/scale non AG/
5ower Scan Col. £ I 74.99 24 bit cotpur scanner. 16.7 million
colours We also carry a wide range of cables & ladantors in
stock CalU £899 £17.99 £16.99 £ 12.99 £599 £12 99 £5.99 Modem
Accessories Phone Line Extension Cables... 5M.£6.99 I0M.£8.99
ISM.£10.99 Dual Socket Adaptor.... £6.99 Emulators Unlimited £
17.99 Encounters £11.99 FREE!! Prima Shareware CD-ROM worth £10
with every order of CD-ROM software over £30 Printers/Flatbed
Scanners Consumables ' ACCESSORtis ' Printer Switch Box 2 way
£12.99 Printer Switch Box 3 way £17.99
1. 8 Metre printer cable £4.99 3 Metre printer cable £6.99 5
Metre printer cable £8.99 10 Metre printer cable £12.99
Epson2008 Hr. Warranty • -It*. 99 Epson 5008 Hr. Warranty
£7S.99 Epson Iron-On Transfer £12.99 Epson 720dpi Paper Pack
£12.99 Disks Ribbons I Citiien Swift/ABC mono £3-99 I Citizen
Swift/ABC colour £ | 2.99 I Stir LC90 mono ribbon £4,99 I Star
LC10/100 mono £3,69 I Sta r LC10/100 colour £7.99 I Star
LC240c colour £ I 3.99 |SurLC240cmono £8.99 I Star LC240 mono
£5.99 |StarLC24-10/200/300 Colour £13.99 I Rc-Ink Spray for
mono ribbons £11.99 PREMIER-INK Cartridge Refills Se»e a
fortune in running costs with your Ink/bubble|et. Compatible
with the HP J Detkjetseries,Canon Bjt0f20/B0/1101200/ I
200/330, Star SJ4I, Citizen Projet and many ¦ Single refills
(22ml) £6.99 iTwin refills (44ml) £12.99 iThrcc colour kit
(66ml) £19.99 iFullcolour kit (88ml) £27.99 |Bulkrefillt
(125ml) £24.99 Laser Supplies I Hewlett Packard LaserJet
5L£65.99 I Hewlett Packard LaserJet 5 P £75.99 I Hewlett
Packard LaserJet 4L £68.99 IH. Packard Ljet4/M/5/M/N £99.99
|CanonLPB-460 Toner £79.99 er printer supplies for major
Tufacturers available Call.
Ink Cartridges Canon BJ10/Star SJ48 £ 17.99 Canon BJ200/230 £18.99 Canon BJ30 (3 pack) £12.99 Canon BJC 70 mono (3 pack) £10.99 Canon BJC 70 colour (3 pack) £17,99 Canon BJC 4000 colour (single) £ 16.99 Canon BJC 4000 mono (single) £6.99 Canon BJC 4000 mono high cap. £28.99 Canon BJC 600c mono/col. £|.99/C7.99 Citizen Printiva mono/col. £5.99 HP. DeskJet 3 40 mono £21.95 HP.Deskjet 500 mono/col. £22 99/C24.99 HP. DeskJet660 mono/col. £23.99/£25.99 HP. Deskjet850C mono/col. £27.49/£28.99 Epson Stylus mono/col. £ 13.99/£27.99 Epson Stylus Col. Ilsmono/col.£ 17.99/£24.99 Epson Stylus 500
mono/col. £ l6.99/£24.9?
Star SJ144 mono/colour (single) £7.99 Printer Dust Covers £5-99 Canonl EPSON I Canon BJ30 £159.99 I Portable mono printer, 30 page ASF built In.
IcanonBJC70Cok»ur £185.99 I Portable cotour printer. 30 page ASF.
I Canon BJ240C £190.99 I Colour Printrr.720 dpi.
I Canon BJC4100 £195.99 I Qualitycolour/fait mono printing. 720x360dpi.
|CanonBJC4200 £254.99 I New version, with Photo Realism Cart. Option I Canon BJC4550 £369.99 I A3 version, with Photo Realism Cart- Option I Canon BJC620 £320.99 I Enhanced c olour printer, virtual 720 dpi.
Stylus 400 Colour £214.99 720x720 dp4,4ppm Black, 3ppm Colour.
Stylus 600 Colour £274.99 1440dpi,ippm Audt.tppuiColour, Stylus 800 Colour £399.99 1440dpi, a ppm Blat k. 7 ppm Coloi Epson GT-5 000 s<«oer £329.99 Entry level A4 Colour Flatbed Scanner.
Epson GT-8500 £450.99 400dpi Fully featured A4 Colour Flatbed Scanner Amiga Scanning S.wart £59.99 Bulk DSDD I 0 x £3.49 I 00 x £26.99 30 x £9.99 200 x £49.99 50 x £14.99 500x£! 14.99 Branded DSDD I Ox £4.49 100 x £33.99 30 x £1 1.99 200 x £64.99 50 x £17.99 500 x £155.99 Bulk DSHD j 10x£3,99 100 x£29.99 30 x£10.99 200x£5S.99 50 x £16.99 500 x £ 129.99 Canon T-Shirt Transfer £POA Canon BC-06 Photo Cart. £24.99 Canon BC-09 Fluorescent £34,99 Canon BC-22 Photo Kit £37 99 Canon BC-29Fluorescent £32.99 Canon Bubblejet Paper £14.99 HEWLETT* PACKARD CITIZEN HP340 Colour Portable £179.99 Full Colour,
6OCxIPO dpi Mono. JOO.JOOdpi Col HP400Colour £149.99 Fuff Colour. 6OCx JP0 dpiHono. 300x300 dpi CoL HP 690/693Col. £249.99f£269.99 300x300 dpi Colour Printing, now even faster.
HP870 Colour £414.99 600a600 dpi up to 6 plplm mono. Jp£p,'m colour HP5LLaser printer £339.99 4 p/p/m, 400 dpi, I Mb of Ram.
HP 6 P Laser printer £569.99 B p/p/m 600 dpi. 2Mb of Ram.
HP DJ690 Photo Cartridge i29.99 HP Photography Paper £9.99 HPBannerPaper £9.99 HP DeskJet Paper Pack SOOt 10.99 HP Premium Glossy Paper £9.99 Paper Fanfold (tractor feed) 500 sheets £6.99 Fanfold (tractor feed) 1000 sheets £12.49 FanfoW (tractor feed) 2000 sheets £21.49 Single sheet 5 00 sheets £6.99 Single sheet 1000 sheets £12.49 Single sheet 2000 sheets £21.49 Epson Stylus 720 dpi paper pack £13.99
H. Packard Glossy paper pack (10) £9.99 High quality Inkjet Paper
(500) £ 10.99 | ABCColourprinter £1 19.99 Simple (aa easy as
ABC) to use 24 pin printer.
Corns as standard with 50 sheet Auto sheet feeder. Trector Seed optional at £34.99 | Citizen Projet-llc £129.99 Colour InkJet, 100x300 dpi. TO sheet ASF I Citiien Printiva 600c £379.99 I 400 dpi colour, 1200 dpi mono printer. Use's ‘~iw Adverted MitroDry print T M hnology._ Branded DSHD 10 x £4.99 100 x £35.99 30 x £12.99 200 x £69.99 50 x £18-99 500 x £159.99 StudlO 2 New ver. 2,14 “If you worn le gvi the ban ponMe result!
From your prtntor, got a copy cfStvOto".
£49.99 or £44.99 When purchased with a Printer.
Labels xSOO £6.99 Labels x I 000£9.99 , Weird Science Ltd. / Rowlandson Close, Leicester, Leicestershire. LE4 2SE Tel. +44 (0)116 234 0682 Fax. +44 (0)116 235 0045 email, sales@wcirdscience.co.uk or tech@weirdscicnce.coMk il IMP i. mm imSt 11/ r i m H M vyvvvv.vveifdscience.cojLm Magic Publisher including Ftr.il Writer 4 SE' ~ i - A mine! Set 4. Dated January 1997, consists of 4 gigabytes of software in 9.000 archives.
Including the full versions of Directory Opus 5. II. With 95 megs Utilities, 79 megs Documents, 408 megs Text Software. 12 megs Disk/HD Took, 7 megs Hardware related, 756 megs Pictures «£ Animations. 208 .megs Graphics software. 394 megs Graphics & Sound Demos, 563 megs Games. 685 megs Music modules. 28 megs Music software, 131 megs Communications uud more. Aminet Set 3, dated July- 1996, consists of 4 gigabytes of software in 9,000 archives.
Including the full versions of Imagine 4.0, XiPaint 3.2, Oc tamed 5.0. collection °L tools to push the capabilities of the Amiga to the limits. Nearly all the fantastic utilities can be started by simply direct from the compact disc. R de-archiving required contents include a commodities, backup, file management, cache programs to optimise system performance, data recovery, CD-ROM utilities, virus Hillers and a whole host more. TtiSs CDAJB2M fsr afg&im&’E jem? Av®facete mm%’ The Amiga System Booster CD enables users to really make the most of their computers 'with a superb ” —of topis — *
collection tif screen blankers, mouse tools & jyJ Aminet Set 1 nr 2, consist of 4 gigabytes of software in 12,000 archives. The software is on four compact discs. With Utilities, Documents, Text Software, DiskJHD Tools.
Hardware related. Pictures A Animations, Graphics software, Graphics & Sound Demos, Games. Music modules. Music software. Communications, Amiga Development software. Business software and more. AU of the archives are easily accessible with a simple Index menu system with scorch.
The Amiga Developers CD from Amiga Technologies comes complete with the all the developers tools and docs, provided to the official developers. Included are the complete CD32 developers tools with Build CD and ISO CD, Envoy
2. 0 package. Enforcer, Workbench 2.0: 3.0, 3.1 tools and
documents with the updated native developers kit, SANA 11
package and the installer package. Also included is a vast
amount of info. N&mtf fee mtfwnktzter Magic FuMishrr ctmpriits
uf four compact discs ana or this unitfu* CD-ROM set sou trill
find alt you need tc create professional looking tlrtcumenli.
Thrrr are mare than 10.000 Fonts (Colour Fonts. Bitmap. IFF.
Adobe, Inteltifonti. Tructrpe £ PMFj, more than 5,900 clipart
Stony of (heir are exclusive to thu cimpact disc. Full
commercial versions of Final Writer 4 SE ana Wordworth 4 TP
are included. Both rturel as great wore processors on the
Amiga, Tools far creating HU'tt pages along with backgrounds
and special clip an fat this purpose is olso included. A. Jet
~£S as-X*T.
CtttSSiKS jriSMEi2 sfstt lit fsztS Kot S>fcS3t.
Uzj.
Geek Gadgets contains virtually all of the tools you need to get started programming on the Amiga, including advanced C\ C++, Fortran and ADA compilers, assembler, linker; EM ACS editor, "make source code control systems Ires & cvs), text and file utilities, GNU debugger, text formatters (groff & TeX), and much more. Everything comes with complete source code and all binaries have been compiled from the supplied sources. AH tools on the Geek Gadgets CD can be run directly from the CD- ROM, without the need to install any files on to your Hard Drive.
J J. The Amiga Repait Kit CD comes complete' with the all with all the tools required to backup and rescue your precious data on hard drives.
Lti&z fS will rescue and restore most damaged, corrupt and even deleted files from floppies, hard disks etc. During the process it will attempt to fix all ‘ 1 software damage, superb program that will allow you to restore your valuable date even if the Rigid Disk Block has been destroyed or over written. Sftdzinszy can recover files from normal or corrupted disks.
3a:SXS&3& AnsSgSi BkBb* J--J yJJ t jjIUSJS Suit HOLDS'/ A collection 18,000 music modules arranged of four compact discs all sorted by composer, groups and type.
All stored ready to use from the compact discs. Provided with II me I megs of Modult tile ptaye lists and 25 megs of module players foi many different computer platforms.
This'7 years titanic work provides overt 1,000 hours of music enjoyment along with information on may of tin composers whose work is featured.
Q Aminet, the worlds largest Amiga archive, provides compact discs of the sites latest software uploads. Each volume contains about LI gigs of archives with a superb menu system for un-archiving the files and a simple search facility to help you find exactly the file required. The search facility will even list the compact disc that the file is on. The latest Aminet CD’s contain a theme. The Aminet 16 theme is music modules. Aminet 15 is available now and so is Aminet 16.
A Aminet CD rs 12 to 14 are also still available.
Workbench Add-on CD (Utilties) £24.95 Meeting Pearls 4 (Software Collection) £8.95 $ .'Sasa/sBSui X sssafx&SECJi s>.i. zivttiz ¦tvj Zssti/i3ii£i s&sxttf&'t rifivxn SSI; I —J f~4 -1 JjJ ^ m J JiJj
u. y Olga Graphics Four CD-ROMs linage Collection £ 19.95
Xt.Paint iv 4.u 24 Hit Image Manipulation £49,95
www.weirdscience.co.ul Grenville Trading International GmbH
Carl-Zeiss-Str. 9 79761 Waldshut-Tiengen. Germany Tel. +49
7741 83040 Fax +49 7741 830438 Email: amiga@gtigermany.com
Internotionof Distributor: The Euro CD contains a vast variety
of programs and data for the Amiga in the Aminet mould.
However this CD differentiates itself by have the contents
ready to run without de¬ archiving. The contents include
Animations 36 megs. Commercial 21 megs, Demo's 65 megs, Disk
tools 12 megs, Fonts 12 megs, Games 57 megs, Misc. 6 megs.
Modules 110 megs, Music megs, Objects 12 megs, Pictures 118 megs. Presentations 23 megs.
Printer 1 meg. Programs 23 10 megs. Text files 26 megs.
Utilities 16 megs and Vidules 3 megs. Full English docs, and menus.
\USiO ZU megs, Samples 4 megsT System S, Tc (jetting an Amiga connected to the Internet is one of the most difficult tasks due to the complex installation routines of AtniTCP and the lack of any real guidance.
Not only n il! This situation change but you will now be able to get connected to the Internet and the K'HH without a hard drive or the complicated setting up of the software. Our extensive networking skills have really been put to the test providing a simple connection from a compact disc providing a pleasant introduction and connection to the internet. Most of the difficult setting up is done automatically for you with the connection program provided. All that is required is the answers, to a few simple questions. In addition the CD contains all the toots required for both the beginner and
expert, full instructions on getting connected and many very helpful documents on the Internet and Wwfc The tools include AmiTCP, Mall, FTP, HHH and many more. In addition there is a section on W1HV page creation with clip art and creation tools. Easy Hard Drive installation possible but not required.
Wondering u'bat all this World Wide Wri is all about, worried about expensive connection and telephone bills, concerned that it mar not be Jar you. Well check it out without the connection or telephone charges with •Out-of- the-Sel". This compact disc contains the contents of actual H M U sites for you to browse with the Amiga browsers provided, no online costs at all.
It is till inctudrd ready to run directly from the compact disc.
There it a diverse variety of sites and subjects covered to give an excellent feel for the ITOTV whilst you browse for free. Find out about the W'VVlV without the cost of a connection.
I j,g| ejjffll-jgf ^ \W\ LMJ A'A-^'X sl y33E$I03 SHEaS {OVER 200 DEMONSTRATIONS OF FULL COMMERCIAL PROGRAMS AND 7 FULL VERSIONS) fUKjR*
J. r , r i —1 Following in the Assassins CD tradition ~ J i ~~~ f
J wc proudly present another 500+ games ~?T.\ CD with the
superb Assassins menu system, mice again improved with access
y ’t'4 cy. To each game, it’s requirements, #4 ^ i A, [- \ 1
instructions and information. The games \f Sw 1.V, can be
played from this superb menu.
Ji£iaB33Jj'J3 CD 'JUL S fv f I f \ From Weird Science comes a superb Workbench 3.0* Utilities _ j w \ _ir at wuh ihr very best utilities presented ready to run directly J j j taPf | from the CD. So installation necessary. The i innpacl disc is I prevented with both ‘Sew Icons'and ‘Magic Workbench'team dflDjy* ¦ and an otltgn sequence that enables cither atthr choice of th* t Jhj aver alftt sets U up ready for the utilities It* run directly. The contents have hem indexed with adcsefipdon of all the fully zj*r categorised utilities available. Any of the utilities can b, ¦ ¦ AjjgF %. Launched
from tlu guide directly.. The cafgenet in dud.
F Graphics, Disk L’tils.r Operating Sjfttm. Emulation M j/TlV I Work bench. Music. Butinets. Communication ” Performance, Text. Programming and more.
Aircraft Educational Art Fairy Tala Computer Mathematics Desktop Utils Spelling Electronics tMnguagrs Engineering Ijterature Geography Drama Health Music History Mythology Hobbies Philosophy Religion Science Astronomy Biology Books Chemistry Ecology Geology The music and sounds files can be auditioned from an easy to use interface for both a PC & Amiga. Included art 4,4011* modules, 400 extra large moefule.i Uiver 3tt0k each,} 795 Scrcamtracker nunlulrs, 1,000* categorised midi files, 42411 IFF samples, 020 +.
Categorised WAV samples. 1,000* ~ ’Of-j Walkabout Instrument samples in WAV .
& IFF formatt, IQO's of utilities for ^ * * J Amiga and as a bonus the Complete MidiCraft collection of Midi files.
Ifsv i7.SMK V~‘:£ Z~ 7333.
StiundStudio has arrived. With fabulous new features including full mixing l facilities, save modules as samples, L notation editor (with printing), 64 channels, new midi commands, mare Toccata support, no sample size limits, fast mem facility and more.
SouttaStudlo has lifted Amiga music creation to ttcw heights .
Xtza} ?x jxrisisxs.
Olh SLIP'S.
Women of the Mrfi is an r.veiling new multimedia experience bringing all the latest Internet j technology to the home. This title is compiled in A HTML format. Using pictures, text files, animations and sou ml utmptex. "ji/i over 459 megs uf inftinrwrion on over 250 of wfjrids most beautiful and famous women, The easy point and dick interface maker the whole CD-ROM accfsiihtc to both beginner* and ciperts alike IW'fA fult r colour images and itden this < u'npact V disc ii sure to pie an Ihx ttrj hfil In Ctl l2 and .{nlfa Swiwilrif Am j«ii t+5 lu m*th truer. Thh CD l» an absolute mma here fir
alt Vnwirt CD mmtn. The ronctpt nail vprmtian has been ^ imptu.tJ in firry paeu'Mr *«> Fhv nil* hwui in aJhSuX JS f front/., nidi mure mtauxy available an J fate fast ram to iapron ipttd. One iuftoa prest oa the Amiga ran str-up any program Or run an both mcrtuurs, including the entire Semet ttt-upal the wedofymtr [££ clmrr in Aatk aUchinrt. Vn man dtflknit IVZ-UJ rautmrr Smut now nmi at ndrai ipenh ami is «w» Oie fittest errr. A ifhwnf cad mouse can Llr1 After more AaH a rear of keuet work, we arrpre/ud us jam the rtlrtar if Personat Vainr }h!t vmsnn has puree X 100 new features. IneUfing: ¦
Anr and Improved ftit jenmeh. Including Pkotp CD err. Mtr. JrEC. 24-hu tmu: >pt, and rm f
• Pnf/tilaiidl taletnri f/alurei Lit Oil jnimaiutas.
JEakumeril ustrinierfiet ' Ixf .Mlrit |t—>»•and-, with urtpti itreCdffi mcceitfbft ft'j-n Ae toother Sds D_L JdbJj J7 This I if-KitVI Im luJrs rmuuaJ Fanil 0.4 and Personal WrUe 41 Jrtm ( toaitli-. Sltove 4 Fenomz!
'Jrrm Diet I. Fenomil Fonts Staler t A 2 fC7oaretot, i' profiiritiant ruluiu finti, Cloaata i trielHff flit ipritbrwuuadon and repHearicn m/twa/t' and PSCi tooth,,, pi*, i ifereo-,gm/uv. Stereogram animutwni. Am,fa J jfrinta downloadable finis aid tens. The CD-Rfi/ui ¦ipnstaa. Tio puttie ifinatn or sharrwdr* sofriem^l Who eawtmertimj Utley inetaie fat! M+aaaaU hi' .VmsigaCuude final Itegtl.k and (2.rmart, with tame tries idin in »mr* and Italian k The Tcry best from Light Rom I, 2 arid .1 with over 6.000 Lightwave objects and scene filet.
Light Rom (laid was created for those who ; did not purchase Ijght Rom 3. The
* material on light Bum Gold is compatible
* * with all versions of Ijghtwave on all platforms. Thu material
is presented using the content directory method for ’Xvf* all
asm of Lightwave 4.0 and higher.
JB\ All of the Ug Jit ware objects and scene \ files are represented with thumbnail . '¦ renderings for easy prei tewing.
I30*b\L Biijsds The Epic Interactive Encyclopedia 1997 Edition now inrltidn over 16,000 articles, 4,000 images. 200 sound clips, 200 fUm clips. 3 search engines, over 1.000.000 words. Rational anthems, the ability to jjp create your ow n articles, guided tour and EL much more. The latest rersion containf Sfj at lean four limes as much Wp/fA information as it's predecessor. JjjHHu UGHT-BOM 4. A 2 CD-RUM set for the Amiga. Mac, IT/Wim.i f AT features all itew Ijghtwave objects and scene files. In addition there ix a bonus CD-ROM of 3,000 Jpeg Texturrs, see below.
LIGHT-ROM 4 a Isa includes a colleclwn scene files by Alan Chan.
This set contains wholly new material and h an absolutely superb resource for Ughiwave.
Tres new illy free t c r i a I tetl with itware 4.0 & ¦crsions.
_tiunLD j'JC/C5*l3SlJ!;\ pg/ix 'vErnmNjjj j The award winning Multimedia Experience provided for users to create their own stunning multimedia presentations with images, text, video and sound, t With the new low price all W users can start multimedia.
Ly The fully featured Hariri bide net? Brow Kerf Irrawst miikes turfing the net Willi your Amiga a breeze. Suppom HTML l,S A J av well as Serstape extensions. Caches pages, uses MCI (included) fully compatible with hx-To-The- StL Worii wnh any video card and will support external datatypes for sounds, animation and video.
\rxus2 JA n ailable ^ £M.S9 - Data t 7Z33.
Sexus is a tory utility ding easy file gtment.
OT! C1J7> WES CITE HO PURCHASE H£C£: 5J OWLY WHILST STOCKi \UJ J J L> JLO-j Uzju.
Jj. ~j jJff rJ}) 'JJ3L0L UK POSTAGE IS £1.00 FOR THE FIRST ITEM SOP EACH EXTRA ITEM. OVERSEAS IS DOUI jj* a'jjll ;>LSj'ciiuU J U?ln) S13L '&L j'Jl j'JiLL before using them.
CinemaFont neatly fills a hole that Cinema4D has left, and you could argue that it should be included with Cinema itself, but if you want to add text this is your only real choice and, if it could handle the holes in let¬ ters, would have been perfect, /¦'•f Bottom line Oust squeezing into this issue are two new program extension for Cinema4D. One thing not men¬ tioned in the review is that Cinema offers an extension function aiiowing external programs to be 'plugged-into' Cinema. Once added they can be accessed just like any other Cinema function from the extension pop-up menu.
The first two extensions to appear from Maxon are CinemaFont and CinemaWorld, both adding a new interface and a simple way of creating complex new models you can add to any scene you like.
I would say the most important addition out of the two is CinemaFont. An omission from the original program was any type of font support - fonts can't be loaded and con¬ verted to a model. Two simple pre-designed fonts are provided with Cinema but this is very limiting and is hardly what you need if you are going to be using text a lot.
CinemaFont gives you the power to import any Postscript Type-1 font and convert it to either a straight forward polygon or an actual 3D model in Cinema.
The extension is installed directly to the Cinema4D drawer and is run from within Cinema. The window appears on the Cinema screen, looking all very similar to the normal Cinema interface. From here everything is very straight forward, select what Type-1 font you want to use. Only six styles have been provided, but as Type-1 fonts are rife both commercially and in the public domain you should have no trouble picking up any style you like.
Once you have got this far, just bang in the text you want and a preview outline of the finished polygon is displayed. The text can then be saved as either a spline polygon or a complete model can be generated right along with bevelled edges, so you have complete control over the size and number of polygons used. Click OK and you have instant text - well, generating a text model does take quite a while but raytracers should be used to wait¬ ing around. There is an option that will create a complete Cinema font that can be used with the special text object speeding things up consider¬ ably.
CinemaFont does seem to have problems generating the text models when it comes to adding the front and backs of letters with 'holes' through the middle such as 'e'.
Basically, it just ignores the holes and slap the plates over the top, meaning you have to edit the models yourself Slap-in support for text, now you can do 3D titling in Cinema4D Want to add text to Cinema, well now you can. At a little extra cost, of course Ever/one wants to add whistles and bells to their Web pages.
Tina Hackett finds out if E V I E W - I Hi-Soft's offering can do just that /f* The amount on offer is truly amazing and no matter what the kind of graphic you need for your site. I'm sure you'll find it here.
Qny take your fancy?
Here is just a selection of what images you can find: Coming Soon/Under Constmction/Backgrounds/Banners/Textures/Animals/Business/Maps/Miiitary/Time and Date.
RED essential publishing has really taken 1 I W m off in the last year or so and it H Tit ^Bseems everyone wants to be a media mogul of the Internet.
Anyone can get published on the Web and, as people who visit often will know, this has both its good and bad points.
On the positive side it means that everyone can have their say and, of course, it does lead to plenty of variety. However, on the other hand, the Internet is often a haven for nutters spouting any old rubbish which gives rise to a wealth of junk and scruffy looking pages.
Nova Development, however, hopes to put a stop to all this. Okay, the folks there have not put together a 10 tip guide on howto win friends and influence people over the Internet, but they have produced a package which will at least make your pages look nice - despite whatever ludi¬ crous information you wish to impart.
Although this package is only available a; either Mac or PC format, distrib¬ utor Hi-Soft says it is equally suitable for the Amiga and runs with Ibrowse and most other browsers. Amiga owners also receive an information sheet describing how to make the most out of the program.
From the moment you open the box and find two shiny new disks and a 120 page manual staring at you, you know this is going to be a jam-packed product. There are an amazing 50,000 graphics files {of about 20,000 different images) to choose from which vary from buttons, banners, textures and colour clip art.
The amount on offer is truly amazing and no matter what kind of graphic you need for your site, I’m sure you'll find it here. Whether you want a graphic of a certain world leader or a sign of a zodiac you will find it within Web Explosion, Graphics are provided in GIF or JPEG format so they can be used with any program that supports them and all are royalty free for use on the Web.
Although PC owners can take advantage of the catalogue program on the Cds, Amiga users can not. To view an image those with Amigas will have to find files that have ",HTM" as an extension which are found in the image directories. If you then ioad them into a pro¬ gram such as Ibrowse you can preview the images.
However, and this is my main problem with the package, it wouid have been nice if a front-end had been added so that Amiga users could view the images with ease - even a demo of Ibrowse added to the package would be appreciated. It is rather irritating to realise that you can’t actually even perform a search and you are left to laboriously search for what you need on your own. However, the manual proves invaluable in that you can look through the images without having to plough through the Cds.
Nevertheless, I am still impressed by the actual quality and quantity of images packed onto these CD's. Whether you want a more corporate formal site or a fun, colourful home page, this package is recommended. It's advisable that you are familiar with HTML or a Web page editor before you begin.
Bottom - Requirements BLACK recommended UOJ CD Drive Web Browser Product details Web Explosion Product Hi-Soft Supplier Price £49.95 Tel 01525 718181 sales@hisoft.co.uk E-mail ___ Ugj) Ease of use 50% Implementation 50% Value For Money 70% Overall 75% Amiga Computing CAR WARS! THIS YEARS DRIVING LINE-UP REVEALED NEED FOR SPEED 2 9 V71364 895007 Need help? I do, I'm running out of ideas of what to say here [Requester worries Having read Neil Mohr's article in issue 107 regarding installing floppy based games ^ J onto a hard drive, I decided to have a go at doing that with the excellent game
Bubble m & Squeak, I followed the instructions exactly and soon had a drawer in my work partition with a the files of both games disks in it I then created the script file and the start icon as described. No way could ! Get the game to run. No matter what I try I always end up with either a fatal error message or unknown command. Could you please tell me what is wrong, and how do 1 get the thing to run?
I am also having a minor problem with my Workbench preferences. I am now unable to load a picture as a background as the requester will not list the files on either my work partition or system partition. The same applies to the sound preferences. In other words, both requesters can be opened, directed to Work or System, but will go no further. All the other preference programs work fine, what has happened as it all used to work?
D. Lucas, Bevely The problem you are encountering with Bubble and
Squeak is that it cannot be , run from hard drive. It is one
of those games that is hard coded only to run from the floppy
drive, even though it does come on normal DOS disks. I did try
this r\ myself and had the same problem. From looking at the
DOS script you sent, it looks like you were doing the right
thing.
As for your problem with the file requesters used by the WBPattern and Sound preference programs. These requesters filter out all the files that are not DataType supported sound or picture files leaving only sound or picture files shown in the file requester. These preference programs are the only programs 1 have seen that do this handy process.
It sounds to me that somehow you have lost your system Datatypes. One way to check would be to try using Multiview to load these sound samples as this uses the DataTypes to recognise and load files. On the sample side there is the chance that they are RAW samples and so would be skipped over by your DataTypes, but this would not explain why the WBPattern is not recognising pictures.
If it is your DataTypes that are missing, then depending on how well you know the Amiga’s operating system, getting them back could be straight forward, or not For DataTypes to func¬ tion correctly you need to have three things correctly set on your machine. Firstly the DataType description files, these are held in the Devs/DataTypes drawer and tell the Amiga how to recognise file types and to activate that specific DataType. The basic Datatype files are found on the original Workbench disks and you should be able to just drag them across to the Devs/DataType drawer.
The second part of the DataType system is held in the hidden Classes drawer, again in another Datatype drawer. These files hold the routines that decode files into a form Amiga programs can understand. If you want to drag these fdes across you will have to use the show ail files in the window menu to make these drawers and files appear.
Finally, before the operating system will recognise the DataTypes there has to be a line in your startup-sequence which is: c:AddDataTypes REFRESH QUIET This should be added before the Iprefs entry and preferably just after the BindDrivers com¬ mand. If after doing all this the preference requesters still do not work, then I am not sure what is going an.
ORE CHIPS, MUM I thought I would mention that I fixed my crashing prob- ECH N 1C A L ^ k lem I wrote in about it. It was quite simple, 1 had the J program Disk Master on the Workbench Screen, instead ~ of it's own screen. This caused some problems when 1 moved Icons and froze my System.
Now, I am getting frustrated with the Lack of Chip Mem.
2Mb is just not enough! I have 16Mb of fast memory. But there is no way to get any more chip mem. Do you know anyway to get anymore, or was this just our friends down at Commodore's mis¬ take?
¦ Tim Favro, darkman@i-d.com ¦ Bit odd that, a program letting you open it on the J—' Workbench and then proceeding to make your machine crash, well if anyone else is having the same problem, you now know how to fix it.
Unfortunately there is no way you can add extra chip memory as the Agnus/blitter chip that handles all the custom chips memory access can only address up to 2Mb of memory, and there is no way to get it to access any more. Usually 2Mb is more than enough, but graphic intense programs, nowa¬ days Web browsers can be included in this, can quickly chew this up.
One thing you may like to try, but I do not know if it will work, is try the VMM program that allows you to add virtual memory to your machine. You have to have an MMU to use this.
One option it allows is to allocate programs any chip memory they want This may allow programs to allocate more than 2Mb of chip memory, but as to how the custom chips will handle this, I do not know. If you are desperate it may be worth a go.
The only real way you can get around the chip memory prob¬ lem is to use a graphics card, then any displayed graphics can be stored in your fast memory and display memory can be added to your graphics card. So you get the benefits of being able to have more graphics and also the display is many many times faster.
I suppose when the ACA chipset was designed, 2Mb of chip memory was thought to be enough and, on the whole, it is for most people.
|0 DOING SPOUSES I have a problem, recently I upgraded my old A600 to an A1200 with an 80Mb hard drive, j Looking back through my old cover disks from Amiga Computing i found the : Photogenics disks and proceeded to install them.
When I came to boot the program it asked me to enter the registration number. I fran¬ tically delved through my back issues and found that my wife had mistakenly thrown a number of my beloved magazines in the rubbish when she had a clear out Could you please let me know what the registration number is so that I can use the software?
Mr S. Cillan, Stamford Well, I don't know about that I could say it serves you right for letting your wife near your stuff. I mean everyone knows women and anything technical do not mix, it just confuses their minds, which are put to much better use thinking about fluffy things and kittens. (Thanks Ed.) As I am in a good mood the regis¬ tration number is 309851220, don't lose it again.
Amiga Computing Q Jargon box HEATING GIT ^ . Hi there, could you please direct me to any / decent Amiga cheat sites?
—' Steven Woods, .J steven.woods@northland.ac.uk Try Timt's Amiga cheat list at ://www. Netrover.com/~timt/ amicheats.html it apparently has 1100 cheats for Amiga games.
So you should be able to find what you MMU - A hardware device used to support virtual memoiy and paging by translating virtual address¬ es into physical addresses. This means hard drive space can be used as memory to store program code and data, so giving you lots more memory to play with Chip Memory - aka Graphics memory. On Amiga computers memory is split into two separate types
- chip and fast. Chip memory refers to the memo¬ ry that is
accessible to the custom chips and processor. This means that
any graphics or sounds that need to be displayed or played by
the custom chips has to be stored in this area of memory.
Fast Memory - Refers to the area of memory that is only accessible by the Amiga's processor AGA - Advanced Graphic Array, the custom chipset found in the A1200, A4000 and CD32. It gave the Amiga the ability to display 8 bit (256) colour from a 24 bit palette . Try Tim ¦ http:/?
— amiche over 11
* Sn vnu vi / Qnimated OAP ?
OUBLE DISK I was hoping you could sort out a per- " ' j plexing problem that myself and a f friend have been experiencing with disks we have be swapping with each other, I have an A1200 and he is using an A4000, but sometimes disked formatted on my machine will not read on his even though they are straight forward Amiga disks, what is the problem?
T. Lecky, Haunton sounds like you are using your ’friends high
density (1.7Mb) disks on your AI200 and format¬ ting them as
double density (880k) disks. These will work fine on your
A1200 as it has a DD drive, but the A4000 will have nothing to
do with them as it sees a high density disk that is not
correctly format¬ ted. It expects a high density disk to be
for¬ matted to 1.7Mb. As a rule you should not use HD disks
formatted to 880k as there is a greater chance of losing
information. If you ever have this problem you need to tape
over the left hole of the HD disk so the drive thinks it is
only a standard DD disk.
I ylLt ‘ It: H > fri /-f\ di< Do you have a problem? Do you sometimes find your¬ self poised over your Amiga with axe in hand, spout¬ ing profanity at the stubborn refusal of your software or hardware to behave in the correct manner?
Well, calm down and swap the axe for pen and paper, jot down your problems, along with a descrip¬ tion of your Amiga setup, and send it off to Amiga Computing Advice Service, IDG Media, Media House, Adlington Park, Macclesfield SK10 4NP. Alternatively you can e-mail us at ACAS@acomp.demon.co.uk I came to computing at the age of ^ J 80, having previously used a Sony / Sketch Titler and various VCRs, s believing that a computer would be little more complicated than these.
My reason for buying an Amiga 1200 was that I wanted to produce animated cartoons.
Having battled with this machine for four years {not understanding the language of the instruction manuals but learning empirically by trial and error on the computer) I have managed to produce some crude animations using Dpaint V. I belong to a local movie mak¬ ers club and the members have now begun to criticise these, so I realise that they are starting to take them seriously, but encourag¬ ing though this is, even the few who own Amigas do not use them for this kind of work and so although they can tell what is wrong, cannot explain how to put it right.
Nowhere can I find tuition for the Amiga at an elementary level, either from local classes or by correspondence. Surely I cannot be alone in needing this?
Mrs V Greene, Harrow 1 am happy to tell you that your AI200 is capable of produc¬ ing quiet impressive results, given the right software and hardware as animation is one of the Amiga's strong points. Unfortunately you do not really say what exactly you are hoping to do or what specification machine you have, but that gives me a good excuse to waffle a little and give you a number of possible chokes.
The type of animation you are doing at the moment with Dpaint is the same process as cell animation - for each frame of animation you have a completely new screen. Dpaint allows you to create as many frames as your memory allows and 'flip' through them creating the animation.
This type of animation gives you the greatest degree of freedom but requires lots of memory, unless you are happy using low resolution screens with only a few colours. You have to remember that the size of animation you can create is directly related to the amount of memory you have and the amount of memory each frame consumes.
Roughly speaking, a two colour low res¬ olution screen takes 10k. So to produce a one minute animation running at eight frames a second would require about 4800k, or just over 4.5Mb of free memory.
To do the same using a 256 colour high res screen would need a whopping t50Mb!
If you are running a vanilla AI200 with only 2Mb of memory you will really need to upgrade. Accelerators are now approach¬ ing the £100 mark and I would advise get¬ ting 8Mb Ram and a hard drive will also be a necessity. You should be able to pick these two up for around £300.
This still does not help get around the problem of memory. What you can do is use a program such as MainActor, a full version was given away on our December 95 issue, individually create and save each frame of the animation and, using MainActor, pull all the frames together into a single animation as large as your hard drive can handle.
Working this way you have a few sec¬ onds of animation loaded into Dpaint, so you can work on the frames. When you are happy with what you have done, save your latest frames off and move onto the next section of animation.
Cell animation does give you the most freedom but it is also very time consuming. An alternative you may want to consider is the pro¬ gram MovieSetter, given away a couple of times by a rival maga¬ zine, this allows you to make lots of character animations, such as a man walking, and position them over a backdrop and animate the characters. Due to the limited number of colours, generally you have to stick with cartoon style animations, but due to the way it works with a small amount of memory you can get quite long results.
Are looking for there. A good site for general Amiga games news is the Amiga Flame home, point your Web browser to http://www.niweb.com/dnet/dnefPwic/ami' flame.htm If you have the time it may be a good idea downloading an Aminet index file and searching it for game cheats as there are a number of cheat databases on there.
Amiga Computing VALUE PACK #6: INFOFILE database, F-40 Pursuit, Ports of Call,Who/What/When, Masterly pe.AII for VALUE PACK #10: MAXIPLAN PLUS V170.
P. O.C., ZANY GOLF, GET IT ALL FOR VALUE PACK #99: DELUXE
PAINT 4 (AGA), WORDSWORTH, PRINT MANAGER, + 2 Free GAMES:
Dennis & Oscar .95 TO U.K. CUSTOMERS: TO FIGURE £ COST FROM
U.S. DIVIDE THE $ AMOUNT BY APPROXIMATELY I.65.THISWILL SHOW
YOUR COST IN STERLING.EXAMPLE: .95 = APX. £36.34. POSTAGE
ISA MINIMUM OF £5 - LARGER ORDERS AT ACTUAL COST.SHIPPED FIRST
CLASS AIR.
YOUR HOURS TO CALL TLAS: 3pm TILL 2am (U.K. isApx.6 hours ahead).
TEL: OO I-9 15-563-4925 FAX: OO I-9 I 5-S63-43 i S GREAT TLAS DISKS FOR jumi.50 EACH: GAMES: EDUCATIONAL HOME & BUSINESS: 116-SPREADSHEETS 268-LABEL PRINTERS 2B7-EASY BANKER 288*VIRUS KILLERS 400-BANNER MAKER 449-BUDGET 472-MULT1DOSGID S20-TURBO-PAL F/1.3 620-QUICKPAL F/2.0X 63S-SONIX DRUM KIT 67I-KICKJ.3 INSTALL 788-BEST DISK COMERS 81S-MAG 1C WORKBENCH 821 -DLSKSALVAGE 2.0X+ 902-S-KICX F/IOX 905-NEWICONS F/2.0 HD 949-ZIP 8 UN-ZIP 978 THE LOTTO I03I-AWEB 1048-MUI 3.3 1120-3.6X/2 0X DEGRADER IS07-BIRTHDAV HISTORT 844-HEAVY METAL MUSIC 8S2-CHURCH MUSIC 856-DOS TUTOR F.10X GAMES: 22-YATZEE (3
GAMES) 24-WHEEL OF FORTUNE 44-DOWNHILL SKIING 70-MISSION COMMAND 80-PAC-MAN 103-TETRIS GAMES 114-LEMMINGS PLAYABLE 128-SPACE GAMES J36-HATE (ZAXX-CLONE) 137-BLACKJACK 148-BOULDER DASH 162-VIDEO POKER 240-CHESS 6 PACCER 245-CHECKERS 255-PINBALL 328-TRIX/WRANGLE 349-OXYD 378-DOMINOS & CARDS 433-SCUD-BUSTER 684-ULTIMATE RIDE 728-TRODDIIRS 766-DESERT STRIKE (DEM) 772-POPEYE 796-MEGABAU. 3 AGA'ECS 797-FIRESTORM (DEM) 800-MATH WIZARD 801-CHEMISTRY 853-NIGHT MATH ATTACK 890-BLACKBOARD 891-AWARD MAKER 2 892-PAINT IT (Not 1.3) 893-PICTURE MATH F72.0X 894-KIDS DISK S F/2.0X 938-AM-DOS MANUAL 2.0x
981-ALPHABET TIME 982-EARLY NUMBERS 983-FRACTION ACTION 9S4-THE HUS C CONNECTION 985-GUlTARi PIANO TUTOR 986-CATS AN INSIGHT MISC: 1032-LZX+UN-LZX 1041-tude max 1053-DIALER 812-5CORCHED TANKS 037-TANKX S REUQA 9I5-ZAXXON 926-CHARR (TANKS) 940-SOliTAIRE CARDS 950-DELUXE PAC-MAN 964-BOW UN G (Dem) 1034-EXTREME RACING (Dem) 1043-O8SESSION PINBALL (Dan) 1049-CAPITAL fUM5HMEW(0tm) 1055-NEMAC4DEMON 1058-A/B F/2.0X-GAME CHEATS (056-ZEEWOLF (Dem) ! 530-KINGPIN AGA (Dem) 1532-TANK ATTACK 1-MEG EDUCATIONAL 188-STAR CHARTING 338-CROSSWORD GEN.
345-COMPUTER TUTOR 350-DESERT STORM 399-BIBLE PROSPER 495-MATH PLUS 669-COLORS'MATH 719-ASTRONOMY 783-UTTLE TRAVELER CLIPART-PAC #4: 6-DISKS - Religion, Sports, Animals.......8 TEMPLATE FOR D-PAINT: FITS TOP OF KEYBOARD 9
2. 04 ROM KIT FOR A500/A2000: 2.04 ROM, 2.05 Software &
Books...59 S-K BUNDLE: FUSION PAINT, CRAZY CARS, HOLE IN ONE
MINIATURE GOLF. KINDWORDS. SUPER SKI 3-D ALL 5 FOR ONLY .5
ADVANCED MILITARY SYSTEMS.!1.00 AMINET 3 OR 4 (SPECIFY) 8.95
AMINET II OR 12 (SPECIFY)—12.95 AMINET SET #2,3 OR 4 EACH
39.00 BRUTAL FOOTBALL................. 7.95 DESKTOP
FONTS.'CLIPART 8.95 DIGGERS ..........-..................7.95
EPIC INTERACTIVE ENCYCLOPEDIA 44.95 GLOBAL EFFECT
................7.95 GROLIER ENCYCLOPDIA CD-3239.95 INSIGHT
TECHNOLOGY 6.95 KID
CHAOS...................................14.95 MARVINS
MARVELOUS ADVENTURE 12.95 PINBALL FANTA5IES 6 SLEEPWALKER.
12.95 PSYCHO KILLER__________________ 1.95 SENSIBLE SOCCER
_______-.12.95 TOWN WITH NO NAME 1.95 CD SUPER SALE: AMERICAN
HERITAGE DICT. ...52.95 AMINET 8 OR 9 (SPECIFY) 9.95 AMINET
13,14,15 (SPECIFY)....18.95 BATTLE CHESS .............12.95
CHAOS ENGINE ....................5.95 DEFENDER OF THE CROWN
7.95 EUROSCENE .....................2.95 FUN SCHOOL
3..............................8.95 GROLIER ENCYCLOPEDIA
CD-TV.4.95 GUINNESS DISC OF RECORDS.6.9S JAMES POND ROBOCOD
2........9.95 LEMMINGS........ 9.95
MINDRUN..................... 1.95 CINDERELLA STORYBOOK 12.00
SPORTS FOOTBALL.......................4.95 TOTAL CARNAGE
..............9.95 GREAT DEALS ON AMIGA SOFTWARE: -ALL ON DISK
- {THE SYMBOL' * ’ INDICATES OVERLORD
........................95 OVERRUN
.........................19.95 PINBALL 'DREAMS' ECS ..32.95
PINBALL 'FANTASIES’ AGA ...32.95 PINBALL 'ILLUSIONS’ AGA 29.95
PINBALL'MANIA' .................29.95 PINBALL ‘PRELUDE AGA-ECS
...29.95 PINBALL 'SLAM-TILT AGA 34.95 PINBALL T.TANKENGINE AGA
.19.95 PINBAU. ‘SOCCER* ECS 14.95 POPEYE 2*...... 9.95
POPULOUS 2........ ...22.95 POWERDRIVE (RACING) -..18.95
PREDATOR 2 1.3 Only...............14.95 PRIME
MOVER_____________________5.95 PROJECT-X
...................................9,95 PUSH
OVER_________________11.95 QUICKWR1TE WORDPROCESSOR 8,95 RAMBO
3*........... 4.95 RED ZONE (MOTORCYCLE) 12.95 RINGS OF MEDUSA
1.3 Only 4.95 RISE OF THE ROBOTS HD.AGAI7.95 ROAD RASH
(CYCLE)____________I9.9S ROTOX (SPACE GM) ...........4.95
SCI-FI COLLECTION ...........9.95 SEEK AND
DESTROY..................12.95 SENSIBLE GOLF — ........37.95
SENSIBLE SOCCER '95-96...........33.95 SLEEPWALKER .........
17.95 SHADOWLANDS* ....... 9.95 SHADOW OF THE BEAST
3*.......9.95 SHADOW WARRIORS*.. _ 4,95 SILENT SERVICE
2_____________ _27.95 SIM CITY 2000 AGA .........28,95 SIMON
THE SORCEROR.. J7.9S SINK OR SWIM 1.3 Only .6.95 SKELETON
KREWAGA 12.95 SKY8LASTER*,., ...........1.95 SPACE
QUEST4.......... 12.95 SPACE
WRECKED*.......................9.95 SPACE 1889 9.9S SPERIS
LEGACY AGA___________19.95 SPIDER MAN*..——, .....—3,95 STAR
CRUSADER AGA 42.95 STEALTH AFFAIR 'BOND* 6.95 SUBWAR 2050
AGA.....................16.95 SUPERBASE PERSONAL
2.......-.19.95 SUPER SKIDMARKS.....................28.95
SUPER SPACE INVADERS* 12.95 SUP.ST-FIGHTER 2 TURBO 29.95
Shipped Within 24 Hrs NOT FOR 3.OX SYSTEMS) SUPER STARDUST AGA
.95 TARAGHAN* (DJDADV.)............3.95 TEAM SUZUKI*
(CYCLE)___________7.9 S TEAM YANKEE (WAR GAME) -11.95 TERMITE
(2.0 & 3.0* SYS.) 37.00 TETRIS ..... 6.95 THE COMBO-DISK (WR
MU5IC).6.95 THEME PARK AGA __________19.95 THEME PARK MYSTERY*
2.95 THOMAS COLLECTION (Kids Gms.).27.95 THOMAS ELECTRONIC
PAINTBOX 27.95 THUNDER BLADE (COMBAT)..l 1.95 THUNDER BOY
F/1.3 Only 2.95 THUNDER HAWK (Copter Combat).9.95 TOTAL
CARNAGE*______________17.95 TOTAL ECLIPSE. ...... 3.95
TRANSWRITE W'PROCESSOR.. 12.95 TRIAL BY
FIRE_________________12.95 TV TEXT PROFESSIONAL 6.95 UFO ENEMY
UNKNOWN ECS/AGA.15.95 UNIVERSE ..............27.95
UNTOUCHABLES.............................5.9S
UTOPIA-_______________________22.95 VIROCOP ECS/AGA 28.95
VIRTUAL KARTING AGA 18.95 VINDEX (SPACE FIGHTER)* 2.95
WARZONE* ________ 12.95 WATCHTOWERAGA...................28.95
WILD STREETS 1.3 Only 4.95 WING COMMANDER 24.95 WIZ 'N'
LIZ*...................................9.95 WONDER
DOG........................9.95 WORLDS AT WAR .........6.95
WORMS (68020+) . 32,95 WORMS 'DIRECTORS CLTT...39.9S
XP-8............................... 36.95 ZEEWOLF (HELICOPTER)
27.95 ZEEWOLF 2'WILD JUSTICE1.42.95 ZERO
GRAVITY............................3.95 ZOOL AGA = 6.95, ZOOL
2 = 12.95 688 ATTACK SUB.......................529.95
ABANDONED PLACES..............14.95 ACTION FIGHTER ...9.95
ADV. OF WILLY BEAMISH________14.95 AFTER BURNER__________ 9.95
ALADDIN AGA_______________23.95 AUEN
3________________________9.95 ALIEN BREED 3-D
AGA...............24.95 ALIEN BREED 3-D 2 AGA............39.95
ALTERED DESTINY*.......................9.95 AMIGA VISION*
...... 11.95 AMIGAVISION PRO. ..........19.95 AMIGA-CLIPS
SOUNDS...............T.95 ANARCHY________________12.95 APIDYA
(ADVENTURE)...................7.95 ARMALYTE.
___________________6.95 ARTHUR____________ .3.95
ATOMINO.................. .7.95 BACK TO THE FUTURE
3..............7.95 BAOLAND PETE*.........................9.95
BANSHEE AGA.____________ .17.95 BARBARIAN 2*. __________7.95
BATMAN_______________ 4.95 BATTLE-STORM____________7.95 BAT
2.................................................19.95 BIG
BUSINESS* .....................6.95 BIRDS OF PREY
—........................27.95 BLACK
CRYPT................................24.95
BLASTER*________________________________4.95 BLITZ BASIC
2.1.......... -47.95 BLUES BROTHERS, ............4.95 BODY
BLOWS GALACTIC AGA .6.95 BOMBER BOB 1.3 ONLY.._.........7.95
BOPPIN 'ACCURSED TOYS'______3.95 BRAVO ROMEO
DELTA...............11.95 BREATHLESS AGA _______...29.95 BRIAN
THE LION ...............28.95 BUBBA'N'STYX
_..............14,95 BUBBLE & SQUEAK ECS/AGA... 16.95 BUCK
ROGERS*_________________9.95 CANNON FODDER 2.... 34.95 CAPITAL
PUNISHMENT AGA ...39.95 CIVIUZATLON ECS3AGA________29.95
CLASSIC ARCADIA.. ...............7.95 CLEVER & SMART 1.3
Only...........2.95 CLOWN-O-MANIA 1.3 Only 2.95 COALA (68020+)
....................27.95
COLONIZATION...........................36.95 COOL CROC TWINS
.....19.95 COLORADO 1.3 Only ..........2.95 TLAS - P.O. BOX
COUGAR FORCE*.....................59.95 COVERT ACTION
...........................9.95 CRIBBAGE & GIN
....._...........9.95 CRIME DOESN'T PAY______________9.95
CRUISE FORA CORPSE.................8.95 CURSE OF AZUR
BONDS...........9.95 CYBER-BLAST*____________________9.95
CYBER-PUNKS ..................4.95 CYTRON................ 9.95
DARK CENTURY..............................6.95 DEATH
MASK....................................5.95 DELUXE MUSIC
V2........................57.95 DELUXE PAINT 2. _________ 2.95
DELUXE PAINT 3_____________14.95 DELUXE PAINT
5_______________I09.9S DESERT STRIKE____________ .22.95 DICK
TRACY .........................7.95 DINO-WARS’
.........................4,95 DISNEY ANIMATION 5TUDIOY32.9S
D-GENERATION AGA..................9.95 DOUBLE DRAGON
2*..................2.95 DRAGON SCAPE..._ ......4.95 DRAGON
STONE ____________1195 DUNE 2 ____..............2195 DUNGEON
MASTER 2 020+ 38.95 EXILE = 22.95. AGA = 37.95 EXTREME RACING
AGA...........2195 EXTREME RACING DATA DISK 12.95 F-19 STEALTH
FIGHTER.............32.95 F-l 17 NIGHT
HAWK....................2195 FEARS AGA .......... 27.95 FIELDS
OF GLORY ______I4.9S FIRE POWER ..................8.95 FLAMES
OF FREEDOM ________.4.95 FLASHBACK_____________CALL PULL METAL
PLANET...................19.95 F-JS STRIKE EAGLE
2.................17.95 F-29 RETALIATOR .............. 7.95
GENESIA (A-1200).-......................18.95 GENESIS
(LANDSCAPE GEN) ...12.95 GLOBDULE _________ 9.95 GLOOM AGA
............. 29.95 GUARDIAN AGA........................95
GUY SPY .................. 19.95 HARLEY DAVIDSON*
_________9.9S HeiMDALL 2 AGA ______ I2.9S HEROES OF THE LANCE*
9.95 HILL STREET BLUES*---------------195
HOOK'CAPTAIN'___________14.95 HOUSE OF FLUX __________1.95
HOVERFORCE................................I4.9S HUDSON
HAWK,...........................9.9S HUMANS 3 EVOLUTION
AGA..37.9S IMPOSSIBLE MISSION AGALEC5...9.9S INDIANAPOLIS
500....... 18.95 INTER OFFICE.........................-34.95
INTERNATIONAL SPORTS CHAL* 7.95 IRON TRACKERS____________7.95
JAGUAR XJ-220____________ 16.95 JAMES R 2 ROBOCAD AGA.,„ 6.95
JOE BLADE 1.3 Only.......................195 JOHN MADDEN
FOOTBALL 18.95 JUNGLE STRIKE AGA... ..22.95 KGB. .......24.95
KILLING CLOUD* .........6.95 KINGS QUEST 5_ _________19.95
KINGPIN BOWLING ______27.95 KNIGHT
FORCE...............................6.95 KNIGHTS OF
CRYSTALLION 12.95 LEANDER .....................11.95 LEGENDS
AGA..............................29.95 LEMMINGS 2
TRIBES'..................28.95 LEMMING 'WORLD' AGA 38.95
LEMMINGS'OH NO MORE 21.95 LEMMING ADD-ON_______________4.95
LEMMINGS'CHRISTMAS' 7.95 LION KING AGA ........22.95 MARVINS
ADVENTURE AGA 19.9 5 MATH BLASTER PLUS______________4.95 MAVIS
B. 2 TYPING ...........28.95 MEDIEVAL WARRIORS .......12.95
MEGABALL 4__________ _I8.95 MIGHT AND MAGIC 3________19.95
MONKEY ISLAND SECRET OF'22.95 NIGEL MANSELL RACING AGA ..4.95
NSGHTSHIFT _________________7.95 NIPPON SAFES_________ ...9.95
NORTH & SOUTH*.. ..........9.95 ODYSSEY ............. 29.95
OPERATION COMBAT 2_________I2.9S ORK (WITH HINT BOOK) 9.95
OVERKILL AGA..................... 4.95 MICE & JOYSTICKS EKUPSE
MOUSE W/PAD .95 MEGA MOUSE 300 DPI -21.95 WIZARD MOUSE 560
DPI 27.95 GOIDEN IMAGE PEN MOUSE I8.9S BLACK MAX
JOYSTICK..............2.9S POWERPLAYER JOYSTICK 3.9S QUICKJOY
2TURBO JOYSTICK. 19.95 JUPITER
JOYSTICK.....................19.95 GRAVIS GAME
PAD...................24.95 LOGIC 3 ACTION JOYPAD-18.95 CD-32
CONTROL PAD...........14.95 DISK DRIVE CLEANING DISK .4.50
MOUSE CLEANING KIT 5.50 MEGAMOUSE 3-Button 400 DPI .34.95
ZIPSTICK SUPERPRO JS 29.95 open ’/ daws a\ week GLOOM DELUXE
020+.............3195 GOLF'GREENS 3-D*____________-.195 GOLF
'INTERNATIONAL_______4.95 GOLF'JACK
NICKLAUS'..............12.95 GOLF'NICK
FALDOS'.................12.95 GOLF'PGA
TOUR'........................29.95 GRAPHICS STUDIO- ..... 2.95
GUNSH1P 2000............ _27.95 30499 - MIDLAND TEXAS 79712
SHIPPING & HANDLING U.S. (Minimum) ....00 - C.O.D. Orders
ADD - Most Shipped UPS Ground, 2nd AND 3rd DAY AVAILABLE,
ADD - SHIPPING & HANDUNG Canada (Min.) .00 - Insured
Only if Requested - All orders Shipped AIR - Larger Orders
Shipped at ACTUAL COST TELL US ABOUT YOUR AMIGA SYSTEM AND
WE'LL HELP YOU AVOID PROGRAMS THAT WILL NOT RUN FOR YOU ###->
2- FREE CATALOG DISKS WITH ANY PURCHASE <-### ###-> OR GET OUR
6-DISK CATALOG SET FOR ONLY <-### Orders/Info: 915-563-4925
Fax.- 915-563-4315
C. O.D. VISA Boldly browsing With the release of Voyager NG, the
Amiga now has a frame supporting browser, but is it any good?
Channel 4 has a well laid out, framed site. Voyager has a good go at dis¬ playing it but seems to have gone over the top with the scroll bars .hen Voyager first appeared a i I i f A while back we were promised an \ A m all encompassing Amiga browser (with the unfortunately Trekkie name Voyager NC) supporting everything that HTML had to offer, including those nasty frames. We have had to wait long enough but finally the new version is upon us and Amiga users can try the delights of frames.
For a good while Amiga users have had reasonable access to the World Wide Web.
Amosaic was never really up to the job, being very slow and limited to the most basic HTML tags. With the arrival of iBrowse just about all of the HTML 3.2 tags were supported and, though the rival Netscape and Microsoft browsers keep introducing new unofficial style tags, the majority of Web pages stick to using HTML 3.2. The only part of this Amiga browsers have not got is frame support - luckily the use of frames is not that wide¬ spread and many sites do offer alternate none framed sites, so we have got by, but support never hurts.
So just how well does this version handles frames? Well they work, but do not look par¬ ticularly good and are not always formatted or linked correctly. Straight forward framed sites are fine, but sites containing nested frames do not seem to be displayed very well.
Voyager has a tendency to unnecessarily add scroll bars., it also does not currently allow frames to be sized. You should remember that I am looking at a pre-release version and most of these problems will be corrected for the final version and frame sizing will defi¬ nitely be in. So Voyager does allow you to navigate framed sites, it is just that it needs a little tweaking.
Another important addition is progressive image decoding, along with much improved colour selection and dithering giving a better colour display. Even so, running on a 64 colour screen. Aweb still has the best colour selection and graphics do look better on it.
The progressive decoder works well for Cif and Jpeg images, though on an AGA machine they constantly flicker when downloading and when the page is scrolled.
Overall, I still think iBrowse is the better browser, not because it particularly displays HTML any better than Voyager (to be honest Voyager probably beats it slightly), but because iBrowse has a more accomplished interface. IBrowse has been constantly updat¬ ed with the usual user feedback and there are a whole host of options and features readily available. There is no reason why these can¬ not be added to Voyager and I would expect to see them some time shortly.
Voyager’s new advanced display preferences. You still really need a 256 colour scroon, or a CyberGraphX card, to get the best results Lo«3o<» [http //vvw .Channet4xa3.uk Cultui t Comiol Freaks Drama Schools Color quantization: Two pass Animation El B mem n 134? Imocme Rw tonight at 4 andils programmes Dithering: sy by using more chip ram? (AGA systems only) 4 and Is the polrtoarts on everyihrg you 11 30pm programmes fire spot know about history is a be.
Dark Skies gather on Mondays al WMAOCAMSMCWmaMUHGHOUJAT 3 00p<Tl It's not too late to have a go at our boards-ti^ad competition and you coutt vm a — The Peopfes tmagneaiens The hncfcs meet
- kjmp n to find out Agenda offers you nvaded America the Rockets
- fib A al about Charmd a chance to put the portmans on
ererythng you Dithering: _£>_Floyd-Steinberg_J (.both settings
»re ignored for HiColor/TrueColor scrccnsj DCT processing;
_T~)-_Integer, fast, less accurate_| Reduce flickering of
transparent GIFs .
T mnrp r^hirv ram? / A A nnlu'S Legacy GFX board software compatibility? _ Floyd-Steinberg Amiga Computing _ Cancel O A/1 PAR I N G THE COMPETITION ?
E= For many, the best browser the Amiga has to offer and an update that will add frame support and help iBrowse catch up to Voyager is close to com¬ pletion. Colour selection is still lacking but hopefully this will be addressed in the update too With the sec¬ ond version of HTML came a whole Host of new formatting commands and the first big addi¬ tion to HTML; tables. These new formatting commands along with tables gave Web page designers much 'jL 1* i - „ *SUt ¦ ~ o Cl ©) # # O The thing with Web browsers is that no two will dis¬ play a page the same. This can be a straight forward
difference in the fonts each browser is using - both the type of font and size will make a big difference to how a page is laid out. More subtle effects come in the form of how browsers interpret layout tags.
Some do not support them so they are skipped, while others simply use different amounts of spac¬ ing in positioning text and graphic items on screen.
Most HTML tags will not cause too much of a ruckus if a browser does not support them, but there are odd ones that will cause major problems if you try to browse a page with a browser that does not support them.
Currently the HTML language is officially at version 3.2 and as a page starts to use new tags from later and later updates of the HTML language, the more the chance that a browser will not display it properly.
The original graphical Amiga browser, Amosaic, only supported the very basic HTML tags that allowed you to add simple text formatting and place graphics In a page, but with very little control over how it will appear on screen.
MU/ hatters only have Aweb as their choice of Web browser, but that is not necessarity a bad thing.
Seemingty faster than both iBro wse and Voyager to access pages with better co/olv selection, this CtassAct based browser has lots to offer more freedom over how they laid things out. It also left the Amiga lacking a browser that could display these, until iBrowse appeared, that is. Now the Amiga had a browser that could cope with all the Web pages out there.
Then Netscape started to take things into its own hands. Unhappy with the amount of time it was tak¬ ing the World Wide Web consortium to come up with the new set of HTML tags for version three, Netscape went ahead and creat¬ ed its own. Version two of Netscape Introduced frames, a new style tag that was different from others in that if your brows¬ er could not handle them then you could not view that Web site and you had to pray that the Web designer included a none framed version, which many did not Frames have been around now for well over a year and a half now, and finally a browser has
appeared that will let us poor Amiga users view these sites. The trouble is, the way framed sites should be displayed is up to debate. The usual way was to have a border around each sec¬ tion but now browsers can make these invisible, they are also scaleable and if necessary can be scaled by the user.
Considering that companies such as Netscape and Microsoft have huge teams of programmers working full time on updating and testing their browsers, I am amazed at how well Amiga browsers and their programmers have kept up. At the moment Voyager and iBrowse, which should have a frames update by the time you read this, are at the same level as Netscape 2 when it was released.
As a comparison ! Have looked at how the other main Amiga browsers display a framed site along with Netscape 3 and the latest version of Microsoft Explorer. If you think this is a little odd you should remember that using Shapeshifter and MacPPP you will be able to get your Amiga on-line using MacOS and run either Netscape or Explorer.
If Netscape is the king then Explorer is the pre¬ tender to the crown.
Sporting a dragable inter¬ face, a la iBrowse, it has introduced a whole set of new tags that were not supported by any other browser, though pages using them looked just as good without Q've been framed copper Bottom ' Some people love them, most people hate them, but which ever camp you fall into you cannot get away from the fact that there are enough Web sites out there using frames to make it a necessity that your browser supports them.
Originally frames were introduced to make to give Web designers more freedom over how their site looked to the user. Using frames designers could shove the company logo in the corner and never have it leave the sight of the user, making sure you never forgot who’s site you were on. Along with this they could specify where exactly things should appear on screen.
Voyager happily han¬ dling the table intense Amiga Computing site that looks lovely in 256 colours, and is frame free HTML is a designer's worst nightmare, they can spend hours designing a Web page that looks absolutely beautiful on their machine but may look dog awful on another machine. As HTML is a machine independent mark up language it relies on the browser to format text and graphics and not on any fixed fonts or position by the original designer, though this is coming.
Getting back to frames, generally people do not like them - even Netscape, shortly after introducing them to its site, had them removed. The basic prob¬ lem is that they do not add anything useful to a site and, if anything, make them harder to navigate - it's one thing you will not see on the Amiga Computing site, so there.
I~i - ... m Requirements RED essential BLACK recommended 4 Mb ?
RAM or MUI 3.6 above Product details Product Voyager-NG Supplier Vapor Price Shareware | Tel WWW: http://www.vapor.com/ S Ease of use 95% Implementation 80% Value For Money 95% Overall 87% Amiga Computing Oepetitive tile patterns are used to create backgrounds in a great many programs, including a high proportion of games. On the face of it, producing such effects is a relatively sim¬ ple task involving drawing multiple copies of an image using what is effectively an MxN grid. Games coders use these routines for one reason only - to save memory.
Obviously if you want a repeating pattern background then it's far more efficient to load a small image and duplicate it than to load an image that's the size of the screen itself. But it’s not just games coders who find such effects useful. Amiga browsers such as Ibrowse also use tiling to implement the Netscape background extension tag. By creat¬ ing an image and using an HTML body tag of this variety: you'll instruct the browser to load the chosen image and use it to create a tiled background for the page. The main reason Net users are brightening up their Web pages in this fash¬ ion is
speed - keeping images small means they are downloaded far more quickly than an equivalent full screen image, Both users and coders alike should find something of interest here. Paul Overaa delivers the first of two tutori¬ als on Amiga background tiling effects How Thai!
Qspecially For New Coders If you're into coding, these sorts of effects can also easily be added to your own pro¬ grams with the actual source images for background band shading etc. being pro¬ duced using methods such as the Dpaint trick we mentioned. Having acquired a suitably sized brush it's then necessary to convert it to an Image structure using a utility like Ken Howe's BrushCon. The code form of the image, along with a rou¬ tine that produces the tiling effect, is then incorporated into your program.
As far as the tiling operations them¬ selves go, the simplest way of creating a MxN grid of image tiles is to set up a twin loop that calculates the grid co-ordi¬ nates and uses them in conjunction with, say, the Intuition DrawlmageO routine and using C for example, one obvious way to code would be that shown in list¬ ing one. In practice, it's better to avoid the multiplication operations and if, as an extra refinement, we allow offset posi¬ tions to be provided as function parame¬ ters we end up with the routine in listing two.
The same sort of loop thing can just as What's so special about this area of the site!
Help for users new to this area ¦ ,3k.
AC Programming P ages/Pro rect Support "> | Mew proiects which may be of interest | •> | RECENT page changes!
? | Subiecti t index easily be done from assembler. We'd draw each row of the grid by making say Drawlmage{) library calls incrementing the function's left offset drawing position by the width of the image block each time.
Once a row was complete the top offset value could be increased by the height of the image and the row drawing operations repeated. As with the equivalent C rou¬ tines the image width and height values do not need to be explicitly provided because they're stored in the image struc¬ ture itself.
So, have we said all that needs to be said about tiling? On the face of it, yes, but although both the assembler and the C loops work, this is not the end of the story.
Sure, they'll seem fine when using fairly A typical textured band shading background effect is used on my pro¬ gramming support pages at the Amiga Computing Web site large images but when you start pushing things by tiling large areas using small images you begin to realise that these obvious loop methods are not efficient - far too much work gets done. As an extreme example, filling an area 200 pixels deep by 400 pixels wide using a 2 pixel by 2 pixel source image means that the image ends up being drawn 20,000 times.
There’s more disturbing news in the fact that, when you compare the C and assem¬ bler routines, you will actually find very lit¬ tle difference in the time it takes for the respective routines to execute. This is because compilers are able to generate perfectly efficient loop code and so, speed-wise, there is nothing to be gained by using assembly language.
Qand Shading Step-By-Step One of the most popular of the currently favoured Web page background tricks involves creating coloured horizontal or vertical banding effects similar to this: EVIEW Then mark out the area as a brush and flip it vertically... All you now have to do is save a tall thin section of this combined image as a brush like so... And that's it. Convert the brush to gif or jpeg form (the two formats most commonly used for Web graphics) and, when that image is used as a Eeb page background, the browser's tiling action will automatically produce those band effects. Needless to say
if you want to produce vertical banding instead of the horizontal form you simply shift all the operations around by 90 degrees and save a section thafs wide and narrow.
With this example the banding has been made deliberately extreme so the effect can be dearly seen. In practice however, fainter banding effects tend to be used and these give an almost textured feel to the page. Such pages look good, load quick¬ ly and, best of all, once you've seen how the back¬ ground tile is created, you'll realise how easy is it to do. Here's one method commonly used: First, use Dpaint or an equivalent program to create a rectangle containing a dither effect: You can use pretty much any art package you like for creating these initial tiles.
Personal Paint is already popular and the new Draw Studio package looks set to attract its own band of enthusiastic followers. The other main offering, Photogenics, is partic¬ ularly useful since the streak and gradient loaders can produce suitable images direct¬ ly. With any of these packages attractive band shaded backgrounds can be easily pro¬ duced with images 10 pixels wide by 100 pixels deep and occasionally even smaller brushes will do the job!
?
O c Must Be Kidding Now if I told you that, with the example just mentioned, it's possible to reduce the num¬ ber of drawing operations from 20,000 to less than 40 (still using the same original 2x2 image size) you'd doubtless think I was jok¬ ing. But I'm not and obviously this sort of effi¬ ciency gain makes for some pretty spectacu¬ lar speed increases. It does make the coding a little more involved but don't panic - next month I'll be explaining exactly how this improvement is achieved.
N Columns- R M o w s I Photogenics Is very use¬ ful lor tile creation since streak and gradient effect type loaders can produce suitable Images directly void DravTilesfstruct Itagt *i«agej>, struct BistPort *r*stport_p, WORD rovs, WORD coluins) { ilO!S left=0, top=0, i, j; for (i=0;<rovs;i+t) { for tj=0;<colu«ns;j++> ( DravIiage(rastportj>,iaigejs. Lefttleft_offsit,top+topjif(set); ieftt=i»*gc_p->VidtJi; } topt=iiage_p->Height; ltft=0; /* resit for next rov *1 ) ) Listing 2: Another tile creating possibility drau_rov j»r _LV0PravIiage(a6) a faster afternative subq 11,fi decrease count beq
neit_rov
• ove.v aMt add.v set top offset fori nev left offset drau_rov2
• ove.v di,dO needed for library fi tfon call eove.l a2,a0
restore rastport pointer ¦oue.l a 3, a 1 restore iiage pointer
bra drav„rov beep going next_row Subq #l,d3 decre count beq
drav_end love.v d7,d6 reset start left offset for rov
• ove.v 55,do reset coluin count aove .v
• t,d1 add.v d5,d1 ¦ove.v d1,a* top offset for next rov bra
drav_rov2 Listing 3: Part of a DrawTllesO 680x0 routine which
works in much the same way as the C examples provided.
Check Out The CoverDisk You'll find source code and runable exam¬ ples using both C and assembly language along with a ReadMe file that gives some extra details of the programs themselves.
Just to whet your appetite you'll also find an example that utilises the trick that we'll be discussing in the next instalment (the source code for this latter offering howev¬ er comes with next month's issue).
Emn 37 APRIL 1997 r The Internet is a whole new world of exciting things just waiting to be discovered. Providing, that is, you can get through.
^<^L>c£^aiinste>eaiaecty<«ifiisttime,evety lima ^ ¦V Here at NETCOM, Karen makes sure you do just that.
You see, she helps us to operate more modems per customer than other Internet Service Providers - which means you should never hear the engaged tone.
Our huge web cache in Bracknell (which is packed with ail the most popular sites and games) also means you don't end up trying to connect to the same server at the same time as six million other surfers.
You'll also always be able to get through to our helpline if you get stuck, as our technical support staff are here 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.
Karen and her modems also save you money. Because they're the fastest available, you'll spend less time on-line downloading files and so have smaller phone bills. Not that you'll be spending a lot of money; all we ask is a flat fee of just £14.95 a month (including VAT) and you can have your first month for a special introductory price of just £5.95. If you'd like to get more out of the Net wilh NETCOM call, fax, apply at our web site or send us the coupon below. We'll then send you your free copy of NETCOMplete Amiga that'll have you better connected within 10 minutes.
NETCOM Call: 0800 973 001 Fax: 0645123 512 Apply at: http://www.netcom.net.uk T" The internet people it's easier to get on with PLEASE SEND ME MY FREE COPY OF NETCOMplete 'Amiga on diskette. When I register, I will receive my first month for £5.95. I'll be using Ihe Net for ? Business G pleasure ? Bit of both. Send completed coupon to: Netcom Internet Limited, Freepost TK 2238, Box 512, 28 Old Brompton Road, South Kensington, London SW7 3BR.
Name; Mr/Mrs/Miss/Ms.
Address:- . Telephone; _ Postcode; _ NETCOM and NETCOMplete ore trademarks of NETCOM On-Line Communication Services Inc All other brand names and trademarks are fully recognised as Ihe property of therr respective owners From time to lime we may pass your name on la other, carefully selected companies who may wish lo mall you with offers Please tick here if you prefer not lo receive such information. ?
RGV01 Ezra Surf takes a look at what you readers are ranting about This month you tell us about Amiga support in your country and reminisce about the good old days... 0E MEMBER WHEN?
Write in!
1 3 The current local time is 1:36:07 am. The date is 1/30/97 and here [ sit using my ever faithful friend and companion the machine of machines, the doer of all that is asked which is a swear word on the lips of all avid Amigans - the Pentium (trumpets blow, fireworks explode).
Don't get me wrong, I was one of many that bashed the IBM PC I used to say "Look at that clown over there, he has to buy a game card just to use a joystick". "And this guy here is buy¬ ing something called a sound card, and yet another person buying a video card".
"They should have bought an Amiga" I would say. This statement would get under their skin and I would grin at them and stroll away. But in hindsight I think maybe we were the fools. After all, which machine survived the computer war? The Macintosh came through it as nothing more than a toy for the rich, the Amiga was attacked on all fronts with no pos¬ sible hope of survival and W3S bombed into oblivion. Yet we, the faithful, held out, being lied to the whole time. "Help is on the way" they said. "Don't give up, we are not defeated yet."
Well this is, at best, nothing more than ancient history. And what destroyed our beloved Amiga was not technology, or lack of it, but lack of foresight on the part of those idiots at Commodore that thought they had it in the bag. I think greed at the top of the cor¬ porate ladder had a lot to do with it After all, how can you lose as much money as the big wigs at CBM said they lost when your product is selling as well as it had only a short time before?
I would hang out at the local Amiga shop after hours with the man that sold me my one and only Amiga. We would talk for hours about the old days when we all got into this comput¬ er thing - the Atari, the Commodore 64 and so on. He would be working on Amiga 4000's and 1200's and I asked him, "What are they and can I get one?' His reply was "Get one, every one I get in is already sold. If you want one, the best I can do is put your name on the waiting list They are sold almost as fast as they are built and I can't keep up with the demand".
Well, my name is still on that waiting list But l eventually bought an A500 that was sitting with the used hard drives and controllers and was happy with it up until that fateful day when I made my weekly visit to my friend, the 'Amiga man'.
I swear he had tears in his eyes when he told me CBM was going belly up and that he was dropping his support for Amiga and con¬ centrating his efforts into his IBM line. Now ask, how can things go that bad when you have machines that are that hot you can't pump them out fast enough?
We all know what happened next and it is still going on. I predict that whoever owns, or will own, the rights to the Amiga will repeat his¬ tory, only this time Amiga will fade into the dust and be nothing more than a fond memory for each of us to look back on. We should all move on to the future, I have. I love my Pentium (almost as much as my wife, or so she says). My A500 now sits in a spot to my left instead of in front of me.
I am still working on trying to get the damned German 020 accelerator board with 4 megs of 32bit ram and SCSI controller with 2megs 16bit fast ram to work in harmony so I can find my SCSI hard drive and access my sys¬ tem from it -1 only started this project in 1994.
My next project is file sharing between the Amiga and the PC. My wife asks why and that devilish grin from the past returns to my face as I say "'Cause that's my Amiga". Oh yes, my Amiga is outdated by even the standards set back when our world fell apart, but enough is enough. How long can you hold on to a dream of a machine returning (at least to America, maybe chances are better in Europe, I don't know ) after ail these years of being told this company owns Amiga, no, that company owns Amiga, no it's a toss up again. Wake up people, we are being played as idiots in this ‘game’ nothing has
changed yet nor will it change as long as someone keeps making a buck out of you.
They made bucks off me. I bought my Amiga 500 back in '92 or '93 I always thought of com¬ puters as home game machines and in my mind the Commodore 64 was the only machine worth considering. Well 1 played games through the 1980s then I discovered graphics and midi, the 64 wasn't the greatest at these. Not having the cash for a new system I made do with 64 and added gadgets and soft¬ ware when I had the extra money. Years past and I could afford better, my sights set on a 1200, maybe even the 4000. That never hap¬ pened - my name is 'on the list1.
I settled on a used A500 and dumped tons of money into it via custom chips, new OP sys¬ tem, SCSI controller, SCSI drive, 16bit memory, 68020 accelerator card made by some crap heads in Germany who sent them to America with a German operating program disks ( of which I am scouring the Web trying find out if anyone translated the German docs into English so I can use what I paid for). I also bought 4megs of 32bit memory for the accelerator then finished off by buying a different monitor and this doesn't include my nervously hacking a modification onto my motherboard. Where does it end? Well,
for me, it ended last year when I had enough, I don't know where this Amiga 'game' will end, and deep down I really don't care anymore.
But if I am wrong, and Amiga survives, guid¬ ed by the hands of a company that cares about the machine and its history, please don't forget the many users that have old machines and would dearly love to still use them. I know Viscorp is doing this and Escom did that and Amiga Technologies exists, but it is still a ‘game’, only with more players hoping you keep on holding on and dishing out, Stop and think of all that has happened since the demise of CBM. I think most IBM converts were Amiga users who, like me, got sick and tired of the 'game'. I feel if support for these companies stopped it
would take about a week to weed out the money grubbers from the truly serious people who care about bringing the Amiga back to its former glory.
Go ahead, buy that IBM you won't be sorry, yeh I know. But then I will have to learn Windoz
- it isn't Amidos but it works, it truly works if you take the
time to learn it Keep your Amiga for whatever purpose you wish
and enjoy comput¬ ing on both sides of the fence Dfirest If you
have something you need to get off your chest then put pen to
paper and write to ESP, Amiga Computing, Media House, Adiington
Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4NP. You can also Email us
aFESP@acomp. Demon.co.uk We have various software bundles to
give away for the best letters (please indicate whether you'd
prefer serious software or games).
We do try to reply to all Emails and letters, but at busy periods this is sometimes not possible so please bear with us Well, I hope you feel a lot bet¬ ter after getti ng that off your chest Okay, I can under¬ stand people who are get¬ ting sick and tired of the whole situation and want to go out and buy a PC but surely after all this wait something has got to happen soon - f mean, really, it has to... I don't like the thought of the alternative.
For those who have gone over to the PC, like you say, you can still use your trusty Amiga and that way you get the best of both worlds. By the way, I do fear for your sanity if you're still sitting up at 1.30 in the morning on the computer... your poor wife!
Amiga Computing EW SUPPORT For many years I have been using the Amiga for all my computer needs. I started from the humble A500 when it was first commer¬ cially launched in this country and from there upgraded with the extra half meg of memory, then to the A1200, with which I got a monitor and an 030 accelerator with A meg of memory.
For a while last year I was contemplating switch¬ ing over to the PC. I am currently reading for a mas¬ ter in computer programming and electronics and it seemed that I was going to have to sell out to be commercially acceptable, I thought it the only possi¬ ble move. Don't get me wrong, I love my Amiga, always have and always will.
Something has happened that has made me change my mind and decide to stick with the Amiga market - the PHASES A/BOX. After all the commo¬ tion over who owns the technology and no-one doing anything about it. Phase 5 has developed this (hopefully) AMIGA compatible computer for an amazingly low price. As an electronics engineer the product turned me on at the first glance of the spec. It also opens up so many possibilities for a pro¬ grammer.
For all those out there who are in the same posi¬ tion as I was, let me just say, if Phase 5 can keep its promises (which they have done in the past), the Amiga will be alive again. Support from the Amiga's rightful owners (whoever they may be) will be a long way away. Phase 5 has committed itself and thus deserve all our support.
Rob Millward t What Phase S is trying to do is very J commendable. As you're proba- 1 bly aware, it needs the AmigaDOS to do this and hopes J the new owners will sell them the rights to use it The company are also at present trying to write its own version of this.
Alternatively it will be relying on p-OS which is near completion and will be perfect for the Abox
- however, there is no software yet for p-OS.
The good news is that Haag & Partner, authors of Storm C and Art Effect is already saying it will support p-OS and is in the process of porting its software over to it ELLO FROM DENMARK How do you do, AG You say you don't get many letters from Poland, how many do you get from Denmark?
Anyway, Piotr tells us there are just two Amiga only mags in Poland. In Denmark we only have one, and we (yes, you can meet me!) Could use more readers. So any Danish and Norwegian people should contact us at: AmigaAdvis@vestnetdk or snoilmail: Amiga Advis Jembanegade 47, 4450 Jyderup That's all, folks!, Morten Skov Denmark Mfl Okay, there's your free plug! Anyone else want to let us know what the Amiga situation is like in their country? Write in to the usual address... I I am a fan of Amigas in general and will support it to the end, but I am afraid I will be forced to sound the death- knell
for the Amiga in Australia very soon.
ND HELLO FROM Australia There are only two (count them) Amiga dealers in Sydney (the largest city in Australia). The largest of these, Amadeus Computers, has slowly shrunk Amiga section (it is forced to sell PC sys¬ tems to make up the shortfall) until it now fills 1/5 of the total room of the business. It used to fill 1/3 of the total room. They have even been forced to stop selling Amiga games - they cannot afford to have them rated by the Government anymore.
Everyone I know, except in the (tiny) Amiga circles I inhabit, has either written off the Amiga as a dead computer or is ignorant of it So, I plead to Amiga Technologies (or whoever is now in charge of the Amiga) to do something to stop the death of the Amiga. We don't need PowerPC's (yet), we don't need ignorance, we need the public to be made aware of what the Amiga is like now, not in 1985, as everyone seems to remember it here. A good advertising campaign would go down well for starters.
The last time I saw an advert for anything close to Amiga technology was in 1989. It would do no harm at all to start again, not just in Australia, but everywhere the Amiga is sold. Sales would pick up, more people would show interest and the Amiga would live for another day.
Matthew Briggs, Winston Hills, Sydney, Australia.
As we saw in the survey in last month's cover story, the Amiga situation varies from country to country. It's very sad that support is dwindling and like you say, some advertising would be great right now. We hope that it will be one of the new owner's main priorities.
Eiet Worries the programs are built in. They have chat, www, ftp and a whole lot of other stuff. I know their WWW browser isn't that good but they offer a much wider range of ser¬ vices.
It would be great if something like this came out on the Amiga. It would save the need for lots of separate programs. Also the way it is billed is good as you only pay for how long you are on-line for. They also offer you five Email Address This would be a lot cheaper for someone like me who doesn't use the Internet enough to warrant the 10- 15 pounds bill. Please somebody bring something like this on our excellent machine.
Nigel Holland The more ISP's we can get to support the Amiga, the better. We recently ran a feature which covered which ISP's were support¬ ing Amiga owners - we were pleasantly surprised. If anyone knows of any more Service Providers though who are providing a good service for Amigans please let us know at the usual address.
I've been using the Internet for about a year now and I think its fun in all respects, but I use it at school and not at home.
1 have all the equipment to go online but it's just all the hassle of getting everything set up. I mean if you want to Email some one you need a program like Yam, or if you want to chat you need Amirc. Also there is the hassle of getting on line in the first place. There are very few providers who fully support Amiga users and even fewer who give you the necessary software ready to go on-line. It is very hard for someone who has little knowledge to get all the soft¬ ware set up and working fully. I use my local BBS for Email as it is free and because he is half Amiga and PC he can give me the
sup¬ port. It is also the cost as well not only do you have to pay your phone bill but there is connection cost and monthly charges.
Why can't AOL bring out their software on the Amiga. You only need one HD disk or two DD disks (which could come as cover disks and you install it and your away. Ail Amiga Computing Gasteiner 0181 345 6000 Facsimile 0181 345 6868 18-22 Sterling Way, North Circular Road, Edmonton. London N18 2YZ LONDON'S AMIGA iALKS & REPAIR CENTRE RAM CARDS WE CARRY RAM CARDS FOR ALL AMIGA COMPUT¬ ERS AT VERY LOW PRICES AMIGA A500 1/2MB £15.99 A500+ 1MB £19.99 AMIGA A6G0 1MB £19.99 1MB WITH CLOCK £34.99 AMIGA A1200 ham cards come WITH CLOCK & FPU SOCKET 0MB £29.99 1MB £39.99 2MB £49.99 4MB £54.99 8MB £79.99
BLIZZARD 1230 IV 0MB £149 4MB £169 8MB £189 16MB £209 32MB £259 FPU 33 Mhz picc £10 SOM Hz pga £50 crystals £5.00 MEMORY SIMMS At Gasteiner we have simms & memory for all ram cards & accelerators made for Amiga computers A500, A60O, A3000. A1500, A2000 A4000 30PIN SIMMS1MB £10 4MB £25 72PIN SIMMS 2MB £9 4MB £15 8MB £22 16MB £65 32MB £119 SCANNERS EX VAT INC VAT GT 5000 EPSON £350.00 £411.25 GT 8500 EPSON £700.00 £822.50 GT 9000 EPSON £600.00 £705.00 ARTEC 600DPI FLATBED SCANNER with amiga software £269.00 BEST BUY HARD DRIVES WE SELL HARD DRIVE FOR ALL AMIGA COMPUTERS. WE HAVE SCSI OR IDE HARD
DRIVE TO FIT AMIGA A500, A600, A1500, A2000, A3000 & A4000 WHATEVER CON¬ TROLLER YOU MAY HAVE? IF IN ANY DOUBT PHONE OUR TECHNICAL PEOPLE SCSI FASTEST DRIVES 290MB INT SCSI £50.00 £58.75 730MB INT SCSI £99.00 £116.33
1. 2GIG INT SCSI £159.00 £186.83 2GIG INT SCSI £285.00 £334.88
4GIG INT SCSI £600.00 £705.00 730MB EXT SCSI £130.00 £152.75
1. 2MB EXT SCSI £219.00 £257.33 2MB EXT SCSI £300.00 £352.50 4MB
EXT SCSI £650.00 £763.75 8MB EXT SCSI £999.00 £1173.83 IDE
3.5“ BEST BUYS 420MB £99 850MB £129
1. 3GIG £149 1 7GIG £169
2. 5GIG £199
3. 2GIG £249 IDE 2.5“ SUPER SMALL HARD DRIVES1 170MB £69 340MB
£89 520MB/540MB £129 810MB £159 1GIG £199
1. 3GIG £259 2GIG £369 FAX & MODEM NEW 33.6 WITH CABLES FOR ALL
AMIGA £69.00 CD ROM & WRITERS CD ROM EX VAT INC VAT 4 SPEED
£100.00 £117.50 2SPEED £79.00 £92.82 8 SPEED £200.00 £235.00
CD WRITERS PINNACLE £549.00 £645.08 RICOH 2 SPEED £329.00
£386.57 YAMAHA 4 SPEED £629.00 £699.00 PRINTERS EPSON 200 £119
EPSON 500 £249 EPSON PRO £379 HP640 £249 HP870 £379 MONITORS
INC VAT MICROVITEC 14" (NEW) £250 MICROVITEC 15" £359
MICROVITEC 17" £469 SHOP SOILED PHILIPS 8833 £119 SAMSUNG 15"
£259 SAMSUNG 21" (NEW) £1059 SONY 15" £329.00 SONY 17" £586.32
GASTEINER 15" £258.50 GASTEINER 17- £419 BITS & BOBS ZIP
DRIVES £149.00 JAZZ DRIVES £420.00 SQUIRREL £50.00 SURF £89.00
SMD MPEG £199.00 SCSI OKTAGON £89.00 MULITIFACE III £74.99
ALFAQUATRO £55.00 IDE CONTROLLER FOR A500, A1500, A2000, A4000
£79.00 IE! ©IF ^©PflTlnl SyQuest ezflyer 230MB £199 INC VAT
ZIP, JAZZ & SYQUEST CARTS ZIP CARTS £15 EZ135 CARTS £15 EZ230
CARTS £23 JAZZ CARTS £79 SQ 200 CARTS £59 DELIVERY CHARGES
SMALL CONSUMABLES AND SOFTWARE ITEMS UNDER THE VALUE OF £59
PLEASE ADD E3.S0 P4P.
OTHER ITEMS EXCEPT LASERS, NEXT DAY COURI¬ ER SERVICE E10 PER BOX. OFFSHORE AND HIGH¬ LANDS, PLEASE CALL FOR A QUOTATION. IN ADDI¬ TION WE OFFER THE FOLLOWING EXPRESS SER¬ VICES: SATURDAY DELIVERY NOHMAL RATE PLUS £15 PER BOX, MORNING, NEXT DAY NORMAL RATE PLUS £10 PER BOX.
E&OE. PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT PRIOR NOTICE.
ALL TRADEMARKS ACKNOWLEDGED.
TRADERS TERMS & CONDITIONS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
Here do you go if you want to catch the latest Amiga rumour?
Or download the latest update to your favourite piece of software?
Or exchange gossip with other Amiga enthu¬ siasts located on the other side of the world ?
The answer should be the Internet.
Thousands of Amiga users have already band¬ ed together to cover up the gaps left after many of your computer's commercial compa¬ nies went bust or moved on. Whereas the Amiga scene on the high street is currently almost non existent, hardcore Amiga fans are finding the Internet an unbeatable resource.
Just as was the case years ago, the lack of proper customer support from Commodore forced ordinary users to develop the machine's capabilities themselves and the current difficulty in the Amiga market has provided a catalyst for the growth of a fanati¬ cal support network on the Web.
© The Internet’s value to Amiga owners is hard to overestimate. In countries where commercial Amiga support has all but disap¬ peared, the on-line community has proved the only source of relevant information or product updates. But even in Britain where the market remains relatively buoyant, there are resources on the internet that can hugely enhance your enjoyment of your computer of choice. The message is, if you want to keep in touch with the latest Amiga developments, you have to get on-line.
Because Internet magazines that seek to chart the Net have focused almost exclusive¬ ly on PC resources, Amiga Computing has decided to redress the balance with a new review guide to the best Amiga-specific resources on the Net. Happy hunting... Qmiga Web Directory http://www.cucug.org/amiga.html Still the best Amiga Web site on the Internet, this unspectacular but functional service has become a kind of unofficial user group for the global on-line commu¬ nity. Certainly it's by far the best place to start looking for Amiga related material.
News and rumours tend to get posted to AWD before they get anywhere else, so this is the place to be when looking for There are tons of free software, reviews and tutorials to be found on the Internet. Gareth Lofthouse constructs an Amiga on-line treasure map The unglamorous underbelly of the Internet it may be, but this is where all the news and gossip gets exchanged and where good Web sites like the Amiga Web Directory get a lot of their information from. Furthermore, if you :‘l” have any sort of technical problem or query, news¬ groups are by far the best place to go on the Net for advice
and solutions.
Newsgroups It. 1 il* 1 w kl.r.UUCUat M*|- *1 ,r m.-i 5ie iuauy sjtr t£ /urauat Coopesai, ajtoct srtitt ur jatj.
Ii v»k ul Dirney « rvo of Ac r*c: btrjtn Apjasty QrzXPH fcdOOT f Jsjt tacifIt rev I Tr.xs }*tt b4M tatm ud r.-icri TV vtaliw a imltd ts I ilviyi Ua suit ms a taed e Unity srarks « pKTJ Cm t'Ctt (T5fl inf U ates i tenaca) TV tnde t There are dozens to choose from, but the best starting point is probably alt.amiga, the all round Amiga newsgroup. Alternatively, if you’re a beginner using the Amiga on the Internet head for the excellent comp.sys.amiga.introduction. After that there's all sort of newsgroups covering specialist areas including discussions on emulation, MIDI music, the thriving demo
scene and so on. For a full list of relevant news¬ groups head for the Amiga Web Directory (http://www.cucug.org/amiga.html). Alternatively, if you're looking for Amiga news and rumours and sifting through that lot sounds a bit time consuming, then we can heartily recommend Chris Kemp's Amiga Network News ( point your browser at http://194.22.56.227/homepages/ckemp/ News/default.htm). This brings all the most interesting news and rumours from all over the newsgroups to the Web, and is a good a way as any of keeping up with the latest gossip with ihe minimum fuss.
Mum use with Amigas.
Of course there are freebies galore at the Shareware Support Index, a section of the site that catalogues a huge number of programs including productivity applica¬ tions, games, comms, emulators. It’s huge, though not so daunting as Aminet can be to the first time visitor.
News of the buy-out. There's also a huge database of Amiga product reviews and links to just about every Amiga related site or news¬ group to be found on the Internet. There's also free technical advice, including tips from US Robotics on set¬ ting up its modems for opti¬ The only complaint relates to Agnes, the site's internal search engine. AWD is so huge, and so packed with diverse material that it really needs a tool to help users seek out the resources they need, but sadly Agnes hardly ever works !
QmigaZone Review erribership required for logins w <s® • &
• sIm. * rtt< 'nJivr i & i tnrf rrxxtauy a! Ta WlMsri Mis&jgjng
Frit L/brfries swjin C*!s uii v*»: sari dot fcj .T.al»CILJgJ7j_
A members only Amiga club exactly cheap, but that fee also buys
you unlimited use of CalWeb UNIX shell account with all the
usual shell tools including e- mail, news, FTP, telnet and 10
Mb of free storage - so you can even host your own Web site
their if you wish.
AmigaZone offers a free trial for a week - details are available at the URL listed above.
?
YwsiuJT.* [rfoanrtcaptf Latest News Ctoanto, mak¬ ing software updates avail¬ able on Aminet ger GLQANm [T]ot spots Almathera http://www.almathera.co.uk/ Attractive design marks Almathera's Web site out as one of the new breed of professional Amiga resources. Fast and glossy, it's not just the Internet equivalent of a pretty face either; as well as on-line order forms for Almathera's highly respected product list, you'll find some of the best free¬ bies available for the Amiga enthusiast on the Net Photogenics 1.2, Almathera's superb image manipulation package is the benchmark graphical
program for the Amiga, and this version can be down¬ loaded for free. You can also order the 130 page manual from the site for a special offer price of £19.95, which will help you maximise your use of the program. However, it is fully usable without the manual, you'll just have to spend longer some of the more unusual features by trial and error.
Alternatively, if you've already got Photogenics version 2, visit the site for the latest patch which includes some fixes and a number of new features for AREXX fans.
Almathera have also announced a new series of commercial products that will be downloadable from the site, the first of which is XCAD2000.
This is arguably the Amiga's best Computer-Aided Design and structured drawing program, which originally cost £124. If Almathera continue to make unrestricted programs like this available for free, there are going to be a lot of happy Amiga enthusiasts flocking to their site for a long time to come.
While you’re there, it's also worth popping into Almathera's gallery, with superb artwork from talented Photogenics users, APORWARE http://www.vapor.com/ Don’t miss out on some of the amaz¬ ing comms goodies that are available from this site. First off, you'll be presently surprised to find that this is a frames based site, This is unusual because Amiga browsers until recent¬ ly haven't supported frames; however, you can download Voyager, the browser that is frames compatible from here.
That's not all, though. There are tons of products to preview and try out here relating to Internet connection and comms, plus the latest news on relevant products. Bookmark it immediately!
Http://www.amigazone.com/ Boasting over 40,000 visitors, AmigaZone is currently the only commercial on-line Amiga service. It offers over 25,000 files, thousands of Amiga Usenet postings, and articles are downloadable for reading off-line. Amigazone also features live chats every day of the week, and prizes are up for grabs on Sundays including the like of CD Rom drives, cool software and so on. Mail and news can be read on-line, but you can also save money on your phone bill by reading it off-line using software like Q-Blue.
You can access this members only service using telnet or rlogin and more recently its been possible to use your Web browser for access. At SI9.95 a month, the service isn't VaporWare M» http://www.cloanto.com/ _ Like Almathera, this Amiga stalwart company has realised the value of supporting customers over the Internet, and this flashy looking site is in the middle of an ambitious expansion.
The site host Amiga software that's catalogued and accessed under an unusual clickable page unusually designed to look like your familiar Workbench screen.
Cloanto, maker of the ever popular Personal Paint and Personal Suite software, has also put its software and support files in the "biz/doan" directory of Aminet. This will give access to useful files including demo versions of the current soft¬ ware range, scripts and macros, developer docu¬ mentation and enhancement patches. It has also just made the CPU blitting module available on Aminet (biz/cloan/PBiit_68klha), which allows Personal Paint 7 to become the first program to actively exploit the full functionality of both the Graphics library and the Amiga blitter applied to bitmaps stored in
Fast RAM. See this month's news story for more details.
Of more interest to those awaiting new prod¬ ucts will be the section devoted to Internet soft¬ ware. As yet Cioanto's plans for this area are still secret, but the fact that this long established Amiga company is focus¬ ing its efforts so much on the Internet can only bode well for the future.
The Amiga Home Page http://www.omnrpresence.com/0miga/ This is a large and comprehensive site, but (or most pur¬ poses it doesn't quite match up to the Amiga Web Directory. There's the familiarly huge array of links for news, rumours, magazines and shareware software.
However, this is probably the best place to go if you want contact information for your nearest Amiga user group.
The site is also worth a visit if you're looking into the Amiga illustrious history in film and TV production, and it host probably the best potted history for the machine you'll find anywhere.
Qminet http://wua rchive.wustl.edu/- a mi n et/ Cheapskate Amiga users need look no fur¬ ther. This is the largest collection of files on the Internet, and fortunately for you they're for use exclusively on Amigas! There’s so much shareware available for downloading it's daunting, though everything's catalogued in helpful directories. There's also a directory to cover newer shareware programs as they appear on the site, so its relatively easy to keep up with the latest free stuff as it is made available.
LOANTO Amiga Computing oftLogik Publishing s Contact Order Products Free Stuff Support Updates Web Links | TypcSmith
* Amiga fonl editor ' and tnrmrlor.
It# ^ A glossy site, but not much to play with at Softlogik http://www.softlogik.com/ The kings of Amiga DTP (thanks to its excellent Pagestream package) are rep¬ resented on this snazzy looking site, though unfortunately it was designed using Apple Macs rather than Amigas.
This reflects SoftLogik's increased focus on Macintosh products, but the site still caters mainly for Amiga users.
Although there's a ’Free Stuff' page, this is currently rather disappointing for Amiga users. The only reason to visit it so far is to get your hands on the ProDraw Clip Converter, a small utility that can convert Professional Draw Clip files or directories into the more standard IFF DR2D format so that they can be used by other Amiga programs.
Otherwise the site, with its on¬ line order forms, serves as a useful contact point for Amiga enthusiasts interested in the development of products like Pagestream and Type Smith, an Amiga font editor and converter. North American readers are also able to order Digita’s prod¬ ucts from the site.
Http://www.amigasupport.com/quikpak/ Contact your Amiga heroes over the Internet... This rather bland looking site is not the most prestigious of marketing tools on the Internet, but then the front-running bidders in the Amiga salvage operation have got more important priorities to deal with at the moment. This site is still a must for book- marking If you're interested in the latest update on the Amiga buy-out story, plus news of the exciting new machines the company is already building. "Now things are happening,."
The site proclaims. Who knows...maybe it will be true by the time this issues in print Qhase 5 http://www.phase5.de/ OK, unsurprisingly considering this is the site of the innovative German hardware developer, there's nothing in the way of freebie software to be acquired here. It's worth a mention, however, because it represents one of the best examples of how a company can offer Amiga enthusiasts excellent customer support over the Internet.
The technical support sec¬ tion, for instance, includes FAQs on Blittersoft’s accelerators and graphics cards. There's also an errata section detailing known problems with their products, and downloadable software updates. If you've got a prob¬ lem and that doesn't fix it, then you can e- mail you bug reports to Blittersoft's special¬ ist labs.
Developer and retailer support is also available, as well as the latest news about Cool dudes Dave Haynie http://www.iam.com/people/dave.h tml Another of the original Amiga god¬ fathers, Dave is currently closely involved with PIOS and its attempts to build a new range of computers that carry on the spirit of the Amiga computers. The above Web site will give you a brief bio of Dave's contribution to the Amiga story, and there's also an e-mail address allowing you to post your queries to the great man himself.
Qarl Sassenrath http://www.sassenrath.com/ Find out what one of the original Amiga design heroes has been up to since his dra¬ matic resignation from Viscorp at the end of last year. 5assenrath created the Amiga's mul¬ titasking kernel; now his site details the devel¬ opment of a new portable language called LAVA and his proposals for a new approach to computing. Interesting stuff.... Top 5 Downloads A few of the most popular Amiga down¬ loads at the moment: MUI v3.7 http://wuarchive. Wustl.edu/- aminet/ Multi User Interface is needed to use MUI programs, with there vastly improved inter¬
faces I Browse http://www.hisoft.co.uk Arguably still the best browser for the Amiga, try it out for free first Voyager http://www.vapor. com/ But if you want a browser with frames compatibility, get it and other excellent comms software at this site pa http://blittersoft.wildnet.co. uk/ An exciting new, software only PC emula¬ tor for the Amiga - download the demo here XCAD2000 http://www. Almathera.co. uk/ Get this brilliant 3D design program, plus the brilliant Photogenics if you've not already got it!
Amiga Computing ?
NOVEMBER 1996 PC Task 4J> Adranad 486 7*0 SofiwATt BmuUbr SOCCER MOUSE WORTH *19.99 69, yk «p Omb 4mb 8« B I6ms 32m b e39.m [69* £89.55 N/A N/A £59.49 [89* £ 109.55 N/A N/A [89m e119«
(139. 55 [179* (249*5 [109* £139.59 [159.55 1199* (26955 [129*
fl59w [179.55 (219* ,289* [129* (159*
(179. 5, (21955 (28955 il99.« [229* (24955
(289. 55 [359* [269* [299.55 (319* .359* (429*5 [399* (42955
[449.55 (48955 (559* RAM8s33MHz FPU 68030/33MHzsFPU
68030/40MHz 6BG3Q/40MzsFPU 68030/5 0MHz 68040/2 5MHz K fpu;
68040/40MHz (me. Ffu; 68060/50MHz (me. Fpu) t SCSI-II
Interface for the Magnum 68030/68040 b 68060 Cards
- Supplied with software - £79,99 ARE PHE-INSTALLEQ WITH THE
SYSTEM SOFTWARE & ABOVE DISKS - UNLIKE OTHERS WE PROVIDE THE
DISKS JUST IN CASE!
49 PRICES INCLUDE CqlltCIIOM Ji DcllViRY CP FAX Fax SvffwAit -KVvfoi fir Ail /AmifAi * Othcr Products A500 512k RAM Expansion £14.99 A5Q0plus 1 mb RAM Expan.
E19.« A600 I mb RAM Expansion f 19.99 ALL win* a FREE Ora 4 wwth £50 4mb 72-pin SIMM Bmb 72-pin SIMM 16m& 72-pin SIMM 32mb 72-pn SIMM e30 £50 e90 £160 ALL SIMMs ML NEW AM) HAVE a lm Warranty 2m3 6 Haro Disk Required £24.i Insiom Guide • A! 200 Insider Guide - A! 200 Next Steps Insider Guide - Assembler Insider Guioe - Disks 6 Drives 49* TotalI Amiga - Workbench 3 Total! Amiga - AmigaDOS Total! Amiga - Arexx Total! Amiga - Assembler ENTERPRISE £14.95 BETWEEN 9AM AND 5.30PM, MONDAY TO SATURDAY, TO PAY BY CREDIT CARD. TO PAY BY CHEQUE OR POSTAL ORDER PLEASE SEND YOUR ORDER TO - WIZARD
DEVELOPMENTS, PO BOX 490, DARTFORD, KENT, DAI 2UH Cheques should be made payable 10 WIZARD DEVELOPMENTS. Prices indude VAT 6 carriage to the UK mainland. Please add £5 to your order for EC destinations and £10 lor other countries. AS products are subject to availability E60E Advertised prces & specification may change without notice. AD sales are subject to our trading conditions
• copy available on request.
S60opi IF R1L 3 BUTTON \ MICE & MATS fir til A mig At t A/tri S7t Award WINNING 5SDdpi Resolution i
* 90% RATING IN CU Amiga ? Micro Switched Buttons ? Amiga/Atari
ST Switchable ? All 3 buttons can be used with MANY PROGRAMS
SUCH AS Directory Opus 5 BEIGE DR BLACK £12.99 MAT £2 .99 OR £1
WITH A MOUSE Magnum RAM8 Card Spsd Increase of 2.3 times ¦
2.88mtps
• Available wtth 0,2, 4 or 8MB of 32-Bet RAM installed ? Uses
Standard 72-pin Ssvms # Optional PLCC Type FPU (floating point
unit)
• Battery Backed Clock/Calender • Finger CutOut to help
Installation * Trapdoor Fitting
• OOESN'T VOID WARRANTY * 0-4MB - PCMCIA COMPATIBLE (FOR USE WITH
OVERDRIVE, SQUIRREL etc.) * Zero Waite State Design.
AmwaDOS Pack £34.99 Total! Amiga - AmigaDOS & Mastering AmigaDOS 3 ¦ RtfE«wt Usualiy £43.94 ¦ SAVE NEARLY £9 A1200 Beginner Pack £39.95 2 BOOKS (Insider At200 6 Not Steps), a 60 Mnuie VlOEO, 4 OSES OP PO TO GO WITH THE BodSAXKiS Al 200 Workbench 3 Booster Pack £39.95 2 books (Disks & Dams 6 Workbench 3 A to Z}. A 90 WNUTE VdtO, 1 OS* & RtTDWHCE CMC £19.99 £21.99 NEW £21.99 £24.99 Mastering Amiga Scripts £19.95 Mastering Amiga Beginners £19.95 Mastering Amiga Printers £19.95 Mastering AmigaDOS 3 - Reference £21.95 Mastbiing Programming Secrets £21.95 050 Bodu& VduS UK Comms/Iwternet
• *"* STAR BUY* £14.95 £14.95 £14.95 £14.95 Insider Guioe -
Workbench 3 A to Z £14.95 Magnum 68030/68040 b 68060 Caros
Speed Increase of up to 27 times ? 68030/40 or 50 Processor
running at 33/40 or 5QMHz (NEW Processor Chip - NOT
Overclockeo) * MMU in ALL Processors * ‘040 fits Standard A1200
• no PROBLEM & IS SUPPLIED WITH A HEATSINK & FAN * UP to 32m&
of RAM can be aooeo ? Kicicsiari Remapping ? Optional SCSI-1!
Interface ? Can accommodate a 72-pin industry standard SIMM ?
68040/60 have built-in FPU, 68030 card has optional PLCC/PGA
type FPU (Floating Point Unit)
* Battery Backed Clock/Calender ? Trapdoor Fitting - doesn't void
warranty * PCMCIA COMPATIBLE SO YOU CAN STILL USE PRODUCTS SUCH
AS OverDrive HD or CD/Zappo CD-ROM or Souwfla
* Zero Waite State Design.
OljmtBB*tt Quarterback
6. i and disk Suite Quarterback 6,1 * r*. T Tools Deluxe — ARE
BACK ON SALE. CONSIDERED BY MOST AS Twf USX BACKUP AND DISK
RECOVERY PROGRAMS WE HAVE AVAILABLE THE TWO PACKAGES COMBINED
AT AN UNBELIEVABLE PRICE (NORMALLY £79.99). DtSt backup. Disk
Recovery & Optimisation are two KEY TASKS THAT JUST SHOULDN'T
BE LEFT TO INTERIOR PD ALTERNATIVES.
Get the Best f34 w Get the QumisrBau Disk Suite.
IMAGE FX 2-6 t«f best .j-. Image *‘'iT Processing Package there *4, is FOR 1H€ Amiga. Amiga Format Goto • CU Awards. Bubble Filter, | Fire FX, Wireless Hooks, Shear & Straw mooes. Enhanced Lightning Effects, FilmGrain Ado/Remove, Liquid Distortion, Sponge Drawmode.
Sparkle Effect & much > more are in version 2.64k Seno Faxes TO AND FROM your Amiga.
Even Fax directly FROM YOUR APPLICATION.
Amiga Format Gold. Amiga Computing 9/10. Fax Compatible Modem Required ^ Compatible with ALL Amioas ? High Quauty SONY Drive * Robust Metal Case ? AnthCuck as Stanoaro ? Enable/Disable SwncH ? Low Power Consumption ? Thru Port for Extra Drives r9A
• a £oY« On V YT.99 with PowerCopy Pro 3 • The BEST Backup System
sairuRN £179.** The Classic , Bback-It 1200 Fitting System
Designed to accommodate the newer drives on the MARKET OFFERING
HIGH CAPACITY & SPEED AT GREAT PRICES. OUR PACK INCLUDES ROBUST
jjBjg STEa FITTING BRACKETS, ALL CABLES FOR POWER AND DATA.
INSTRUCTIONS & 7 DISKS FULL OF HOT SOFTWARE SUCH AS DIRECTORY
Of*US
4. 12 (WORTH £50), MU 13, MCP, Galaga AGA, Virus Checker, Moos,
ReOrg, Abackup and MUCH MORE.
All software can be installed with our custom click *m' _ _ _ GO system. Ail drives 1X)gb el49.« by Qualified Technicians ? All Amiga Computers Covered ? Prices from as little as £29.99 _ ? Many repairs by Wizaro require NO Parts « Prices include Insured Courier Collection b Deuvebt, Labour, Full Diagnostics, Service, Soar Test & VAT.
? Fast Turnaround ? All Technicians are Fully Trained & Qualified ? Upgrades bought at same time fitted FREE!
* 90 days Warranty on all Repairs ALL FOR JUST £29.99 4- PARTS
Pro System oms 4.12 Ccmfiih AtSOO Hud pij. Kb y.-.£5J Yes, at
long last, a professional way to install a high CAPACITY HARD
DISK WITHOUT CARDBOARD & glue! Our PACKS OFFER YOU OUR
EXCLUSIVE AND & YEAR COPYRIGHTED BHACK-lr 1200 FITTING SYSTEM 6
WARRANTY CHQ|CE 0f ^ SpEED/L0W CQST HARD DjSKS ORDER HOTLINE
01322-527800 01322-527810 I CONTACT US ON INTERNET SALES®
W12ARD-D.D6MON.CO.UK Power-Up youb Amiga with this 250w
Enhanced Amiga PSU FOR UTTLE MORE THAN THE PRICE OF A NORMAL
25-30W Amiga PSU! Designed fob A500/B00 & 1200. Encash) in
Steel Subsystem, All Cables Supplied, Monitor outlet ON bacx of
PSU, Only QuauIy/New PSU's used,
3. 5” & 5.25" POWER CABLE AVAILABLE TO POWER EXTERNAL CD-ROMs,
Hard Disks etc. M- [ASrllOCtKS 2 - The only FULL ACCOUNTS
PACKAGE, Ledger Baseo accounts system, Amiga Format Gold CALL
ABOUT TRIAL OFFER Haro Desk & 11 & 2mb RAM Required £ 117.99
33MHz FPU Kit- RLCC type FPU b Crystal - will fit MOST CARDS -
CALL TO CONFIRM.
£29.99
1. 2gb d69.« Inciudd Bback-It Stjtim (me £35) A UK Deuveby Disks
50 Disks & Colour Labels i* 100 Disks & Colour Labels Repairs
WORKBENCH REPLACEMENT & FILE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM The BEST just
got BETTER! After 12 months of further development Opus 5.5 s
now ready and shipping. Stunning new features include:- ? Icon
Action Mode ? Workbench Replacement Mode oramaticaiiy enhanced
? OpusFTP capability to access Internet FTP sites with a uster
? Borderless Button banks ? Filetype-specific pop-up menus ?
Cybergraphics RTG supported
* Independent HoiKeys ? Script I SYSTEM TO EXECUTE | COMMANDS
UPON events ? Multiple 1 CUSTOM MENUS WITH § SUB ITEMS ?
Automatic Filetype Creator to| CREATE AND TEST «H Filftypes
WITH EASE ? A FONT VIEWER ? USTERS FIELDS FOR TITLES,
RE-SORTING BY FIELDS, PUIS A ’VERSON' FIELD ? COLOUR RE-MAPPING
QF BUTTOftflCON IMAGES WITH SUPPORT FOF MAGIC WORKBENCH1 ETC. ?
SELECT1VEIY WOE UNWANTED DRIVE ICONS ? CUPBOARD SUPPORT FOR
CUT, COPY AND PASTE IN GADGETS & LlSTERS * RESIZE, Nl tj^H
ICQNIFY, AND SCROLL BUSY LlSTERS WHILE BUSY • ICON and Lister
snapshots are stored separately from Workbench - so you could
snapshot your CD-ROM icons! ? Listers can now display a
BACKGROUND PICTURE/PATTERN ?
Internal Opus CU to quickly test commands & Arexx scripts ? Many _ NEW INTERNAL COMMANDS AND MANY £ W B.99 NEW AR 0OC COMMANDS HAVE BEEN ADDED OR EXTENDED WITH NEW FEATURES. YOU CAN NOW EVEN ADO YOUR OWN INTERNAL COMMANDS!
Workbench 2+6 Hard Disk Required At last, the long awaited PC i Task 4.0 is now shifting featuring:- Advanced 486 SOFTWARE ONLY adJLAUON, Qynamic Compilation for faster EMULATION, UP TD 16MB ACCESSIBLE UNDER MS-DOS, MDA, CGA, EGA, VGA & SVGA SUFPORTED, up TO 256 COLOURS ON AGA MACHINES, CyberGraphics support, Muliiple hard DISX FILES AND PAFFTIIION SUPPORTED, CD-ROM and High Density drives supported, Run MS-DOS APPLICATIONS IN A WINDOWS ON YOUR WORKBENCH! RUN Windows 3.1 in Enhanced mode! Many times oueker THAN VERSION 3.11 REOlflttS KjtCTARf 2.0 AND A 6B0Z0 PROCESSOR OR BETTER.
If rou have a printer - you MUST get TurboPrint, !t radically enhances the printouts you normally get by replacing the Amiga Printer System with the Faster and Visibly Better TurboPrint System. Options incluoe Poster Printing, Colour Correction, Dithering, Colour Balancing, Dn-Screen Preview and Much More... Most printers are supported *cau to check.
STOP PRESS - Version 5 now incluoes 'Graphics Publisher" to load multiple pictures, individual colour correct, rotate, twist and more. Enhanced TrueMatch COLOUR CORRECTION, NEW DRIVERS FOR HP, Cannon & Citizen MODELS.
T«lgOPRJNT S m It vnu uaut a ociutib _ vnii Ml ICT r.cr TiratfiPsnil IT CALL ABOUT UPGRADES
* 99 CALL ABOUT UPGRADES even bigger and better this year So On
With The Show ALL the exciting new releases from the leading
Amiga developers Save £100’s On Special Offers ICPUG Free
Advice Centre Internet Village High End Applications
Presentation Theatre jNjrjyrjftjj Mxjjjbjtldlj OanirBj
rmninsrmijtiij London Saiitfday, JVJ'jy 'JYib jJ win ’-I ’J J
Avoid the queues by booking in advance Credit Card Hotline
01369 707766 Cheques and Postal Orders made payable to The
World of Amiga at PO BOX 9, Dunoon, Argyll. PA23 8QQ Admission:
Adults £8 Children £6 UTORIAL These types of contraction (many
other C operands can be used in this way) often con¬ fuse
newcomers but you do need to be aware of them since they are
commonly used.
Just to make matters worse C also provides two other operators, ++ and which are a little unusual. They're used for incrementing and decrementing variables and allow opera¬ tions such as... x = x t 1; to be written as.... x+t; Punch drunk already? It's not surprising - we've got through quite a bit this month. I have however put some example code, along with additional notes, on the coverdisk and hopefully these should help put the more important issues into perspective.
A single byte capable of holding one character, an integer, usually reflecting the natural size of an integer on a given coiputer/processor.
A single precision floating point nuaber.
A double precision floating point number.
Table 1: C’s fundamental data types char int float double he main objective this month is to look at the way C represents numbers and text while outlining a few operations that can be per¬ formed on them. Some of the topics might seem heavy going but don't worry too much - most things will be explained again whenever we encounter them in example code.
Data items used within a C program fall into two basic categories - those whose values remain fixed and those whose values change.
For obvious reasons the first group are called constants and, for equally obvious reasons, the second group (since their values can vary) are called variables.
C allows any number of different data types to be defined but essentially all are derived from C's four basic data types - int, float, char and double. We met the int (integer) last month, but for easy reference, Table I gives the four type specifiers available. In addition to these a number of 'qualifiers' can be applied - short and long, which apply only to int type variables, and unsigned and signed which apply to either int or char type vari¬ ables. On the Amiga a long int is a four byte (32 bit) number, a short int two bytes (16 bit), and char (character) variables, as you might well have
guessed, are single byte (8 bit) values.
These qualifiers just give the programmer the chance to use memory more efficiently. If, for instance, we were dealing with a variable we knew would never be negative and never be used to hold values greater than 255, we could declare it as an unsigned char. The com¬ piler would then realise that we are saying this item will never require more than 8 bits of storage and would therefore reserve just t byte resulting in no memory being wasted.
Text strings You will use text strings in many programs and, as we've seen previously, static (ie con¬ stant) text strings can be written as a sequence of characters enclosed in double quotes. When you define variables for holding text strings however, you have to set up an array of char sized locations using a statement such as: char ifstriajEJs'tEST”; I will be explaining about arrays and text strings in more detail next month but for the moment the important point is that these strings are represented as a series of consecu¬ tive memory locations (each holding one character of the text)
along with a terminal null (zero byte) value. This means that if, for instance, you create a four character string 'TEST' the compiler will actually store it using instance, you wrote: 5 bytes of memory like 50 area = area + 10 1 2 3 I 5 T £ S 7 i!
The area variable would be set to a value 10 i i more than its original. For assignments such I i 1 j as this C does in fact allow a shortcut - the start of string teriinal null value above expression can be written as... area 10; I've mentioned this because one favourite pit¬ fall of C coders in general is allocating memo¬ ry for text strings and forgetting about the trail¬ ing null. Don't dwell on it for the moment (you'll get plenty of examples next month) - just remember that, with C, a text string of N characters will always require (N+l) memory locations.
C supports all the normal arithmetic opera¬ tions including addition (+), subtraction (-), multiplication (*) and division (/). It also pro¬ vides a number of relational operators such as greater than (>), less than (<), equal to (=) and not equal to (!=).These are normally used in conjunction with loop and if-then style con¬ ditional tests. Doubtless most of you will be familiar with the general ideas of such things from languages like Basic, so I'll delay giving any statement examples until later when we deal with C's conditional test arrangements.
One thing we do need to deal with is assignment. For assigning values to variables a single = sign is used, its simplest use is in statements which take the form: variable = son expression or value The expression on the right side of the = sign would be evaluated and the variable on the left-hand-side set to the result so if, for More C coding help from Paul Overaa, this month it's variable types and operators which come under the spotlight Certain words, that are reserved for use as keywords in the C language, like int, float, char and so on, must not be used as variable or constant names.
Other that you're free to choose pretty much any name you like.
They can be formed using letters, digits, or the the underscore character (names must not however actual¬ ly start with a number).
Naming Variable and Constants Ail C names are case sensitive and programmers This is the typo of output you’ll see when you run this month’s example code Amiga Computing (because of a long established convention) tend to write constants in uppercase and variables in lower¬ case. It's worthwhile maintaining this convention because it helps programmers to understand each other's code! Perhaps the most important thing howev¬ er is to get into the habit of using names which are understandable - this will make your programs easier to read.
Issue 98 - April 1996 Making Movies - your guide to Amiga desk-top video. Final Data, Ethernet Special, Digital Quill On the Disks: Capital Punishment, Utilities Unlimited II Issue 99 - May 1996 Missed an issue of Amiga Computing?
Do not fear! Simply fill in the coupon and one will be winging its way to your doorstep!
Beginners Guide to what's on the Net, Hard Drive Round-Up, Modeller 4.0 On the Disks: MUI 3.3, Tooled Up!
Ertflinesr W , an* it ¦ »wa sue 101 - July 1996 I News - VIScorp's plans (or the Amiga, Surf |uirrel, World of Amiga, Net&Web n the Disks: Image Engineer/Essential Shareware Issue 100 - June 1996 Build your own Amiga sound studio, 100 Issue Birthday Celebrations, Modem Round-Up On the Disks: Storm C mm Issue 106 - December 1996 The Amiga’s role in theatre, Dopus 5.5, Squirell Mpeg, Aweb-ll On the Disks: Photoegnics - full program Issue 107 - Christmas 1996 ACK ISSUES LJ The best Christmas presents for Amigaphiles every¬ where, Worms, Director's Cut, Draco update, Golden CD (3 Disks) On the
Disks: Jet Pilot/DrawStudio/SiipStream Back issues order Form 1 Simply send a cheque or postal order for just £4.50 made payable to IDG Media.
The magic address is Amiga Computing Back Issues, IDC Media, Media House, Adlington Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4NP.
Please allow up to 28 days for delivery.
? Issue 97 - January 1996 £4.50 3 Issue 101 - May 1996 £4.50 ? Issue 107 - Christmas 1996 £4.50 ? Issue 98 - February 1996 £4.50 ? Issue 103 - June 1996 £4.50 ? Issue 108 - February 1996 £4.50 1 ? Issue 99 - March 1996 £4.50 ? Issue 105 - Julyl996 £4.50 ? Issue 109 - March 1996 £4.50 .
? Issue 100 - April 1996 £4.50 ? Issue 106 - Sept 1996 £4.50 ? Issue 110-April 1997 £4.50 Name Address Post code Tel | O Please tick if you do not wish to receive further information or specie/ offers.
FREE FREE GAMES CHEATS 1.4 EMULATOR ON ALL ORDERS FREE FREE .AMITCP v4.5 DIALUP STOP PRESS!!
(NEW!! FULL TCP CLIENT] Voyager Supports FRAMES!
LIBRARY DISK POST & PACK ON ALL ORDERS VOYAGER-NG v2.1 W [EXCLUSIVE!! NEW WWW CLIENT] MICRODOT-II m [AMAZING NEW MAIL/NEWS CLIENT] .AmTelnet mt [TELNET CLIENT - AMFTP AUTHOR!] Am Talk new [INTERNET CHAT CLIENT] .AmFinger hew [FINGER CLIENT] AmTerm [NEW COMM/BBS CLIENT] & MUI 3.8 (Shareware) COMPLETE Internet Software £ 59.95 £109.95 £ 99.95 £139.95
20. 00
20. 00
19. 00
19. 00
12. 00
18. 00
12. 00 NetConnect CD Version or 3.5” Ffoppy Disks
33. 6 Voice Modem
33. 6 Non-Voice Modem
33. 6 Voice Modem & NetConnect Voyager Next Generation (v2,1Q)
Microdot-ll (call for release date and to confirm price)
AmlRC vl.32 AmFTP v1.72 AmTalk v1,2 AmTelnet v1.0 + AmTerm
vl.Q MUI 3.8 (when you buy Vapor products or NetConnect)
• 5% Discount when 2-4 Vapor products are bought, 10% Discount
for 5*
• Note that the Vaporware products are e-mail only but can be
sont on floppy for a surcharge of £2.00 per product.
Fniffgm w 331 33600 bps DATA/FAX modem - true v34. Throughput to 115. 200 BPS via V42 bis data compression Group 1.243 send/receive FAX (14.4)
• Voice CommandsDSVD upgradeable (by software) ‘voice only ¦ Auto
Answer 'vo*ce onty ' Full Duple* Speaker ‘voice only
• Call Discrimination ’voce only
• Fa* on demand *vo»ce only ' Simultaneous voice and data (S.VD.)
’voice only
• Message playback via sound card i speaker or headset 'voice
only
• Auto mode detection allows modem to connect with a modem that
is configured for differing connection modes ¦ Extended AT
command set
- Upgradable ROM chip (safeguarding against future speaficaiions)
• 0T and CE Approved
• Amiga 25pm and Surf Squirrel/PC 9pm serial cablo included
- With Headphones and Microphone ' .mc« only
- Full 'gel started' documentation
• 5 year warranty - also undergone rigorous Amiga tests DISKS
COST £1.50 EACH, NO MINIMUM ORDER, ALL VIRUS FREE AND USER
FRIENDLY All Games are on 1 disk and run on all Amigas unless
otherwise stated.
PICK AN EXTRA DISK FOR FREE WITH EVERY EIGHT DISKS YOU PURCHASE Supported by ISP's Worldwide' NetConnect allows you to soloct your country then select an ISP (easy!) - we have about 160 ISP's listed from 29 different countries [58 from the UK!). Nearly 100% of tho WORLD Is covered for any user who wants to connect to the Internet!
- 50p per CD lor UK delivery
- E1 per CD for EU delivery
- £2 per CD World delivery
- £3 for 2-3 day delivery
- £4 for next day delivery
- £15 for Saturday delivery UNDERGROUND P.D., 54 CARMANIA CLOSE,
SHOEBURYNESS, ESSEX SS3 9YZ. Tel: 01702 295887 Amiga Model:.
Name: .
Address.... Make cheques/P.O.'s payable to Active Software and send to tho address listed opposite. We can accept credit or debit card orders. For any additional informa¬ tion call U* A5AP!
Postcode:.. Wanting to get onto the Internet? Already connected, but frustrated with your software? NetConnect is all you need to get connected to the Internet and contains a suite of seven commercially licensed Internet applications. You won't find an interface as easy-to-use as NetConnect's!
We have spoken at length to so many of our customers about getting onto the Internet - we know exactly what you need and what you want. You want software you can use - not shareware but commercial software, you want the hassle taken out of the installation and you want a suite of the very best Amiga Inlemet software. Indeed, (o make NetConnect the very best we organised program¬ mers to enhance their software - so you get previously non-released software. NetConnect contains a full TCP client worth over £35 in itself! You can save masses of £££'s from buying NetConnect as there is no need to
licence the Internet software - full versions all licenced for you! Remember you are also entitled to minor upgrades/fixes as a registered user!!
Buy Your Vaporware Products Direct From Active!
Want to get connected?
Save over £23 with Enterprisei Buy NetConnect and get FREE connection to Enterprise (worth £20 ex. VAT or £23.80 inc. VAT)!
New for Voyager-NC v2.7 HTML 3.2 specifications - tables and full frames (scrolling and floating as shown) now supported!
Internal Image Decoder - fast internal GIF/JPG decoding, GIF Anims, 24BIT CyberGFX support!
Graphical Printing - print web pages as they are shown!
Enhanced Features - POP-UP menus, MIME GUI, extra security, FULL FTP module and much more!
Send your order to: Active Software, PO Box 151, Darlington, County Durham, DL3 8YT, ENGLAND.
R3 01325 352260 active@enterprise.net Postage and Delivery PLATFORM GAMES ? 1330 CAPTAIN BONUS C 1233 ROACH MOTEL ? 1A4510 C.W. GAMES ? 1553 LANCE-0-L0T ? 1A62 CHARLIE COOL ? 1712 DITHELLS MUCUS n 1701 ITS HIDEOUS ? 1654 THE BIRDIES ? 1BJBJUMFMAN DELUXE C 1819 A12 DANGER DOG SPACE BLASTERS ? 911 SOLO ASSAULT ? 906OBLITERATOR ? 498 THE LAST REFUGE ? 1434 SPACE BLASTER D 1473 EXENEX AJR0ID5 ? 1796 THE ASTRO KID ? 1789 MEGA TYPHOON G 1855A12 SPEEDBREAK ARCADE GAMES C 5S5 HUGO V2.5 DISK ? 273 KELL0G5 EXPRESS ? 1368 aliens ff ? 1338 STRIKE COMMAND ? 1500 U.PD 24 GAMES PD VERSIONS ? 025 HUNTER PLUS
? 815 LEMMINGS PACK D 023 RICK DANGEROUS ? 1457 TI-FIGHTER ? 022 THE GODS ? 026 ROBOCOPV2 ? 1703 S.W.0.5. EARTH ? 1702 S.W.0.5-MOON ? 1778 PINBALL FANTASY COMBAT GAMES ? 941 FATAL BLOWS ? 938 MafiTIAl SPIRIT G 290 FIGHT WARRIORS ? 1238 WEAPON MASTER ? 142B CYBERGAMES 3DSK ? 1548 FIGHT A12M ? 1720 A1200 SAMUR!
CLASSIC GAMES ? Oil ASTEROIDS ? 693 MISSILE COMMAND G 77S OVERLANDER ? 692 SPACE INVADERS ? 841 COOKIE ? 303 DONKEY KONG DRIVING GAMES G 951 FLAMING ENGINES ? 1469 THE ROAD TO HELL _ 1417 MANG FENDERS V2 C 1466 A12 KNOCKOUT Q 1642 A12® EX RACING ? 1636 Hill CLIMB G 1705 A12 AER RACERS ? 974 FI EDITOR 95/6 SIMULATORS 332 SEAIANCE-SUB ? 333 BATTLE CARS V2 926 HEUCOPTER ? 1273 A12 TRAIN DRIVER SPORTS GAMES _ 1014 CRAZY GOLF ? 366 GOLF 18TH 2 DISK G 822 CRICKET AMOS V2 ? 630 TEN AN SOWUNG ? 1171 2 DSK CRS-ANGLER G 1373 ICE HOCKEY ? I317A12GON FISH'N ? 1465 A12 2 DISK TENNIS G 1251 TOUR TENNIS G
1630 INTER CRICKET G 1700 GOLF 9 HOLES G 1667 TABLE TENNIS ? 1329 U.S.A. BASEBALL HINTS « CHEATS ? 418 1000 CHEATS G 931 BACKDOOR V3 I 821 PASSWORD MANIA ? 813 GAME TAMER V4.5 ? 820 MEGA CHEATS ? 681 SIERRA SOLUTIONS G 1118 UP TO OATE VI 1358 GAME SOLUTIONS I 1653 SOLUTIONS V3 16S1 SOLVES B DISK OVER 18 GAMES I307TERRORLINERV3 ? 997 2D5K ADVENT VI G 1001 2DSK ADVENT V2 ? 101 TERROR UNER VI G 1087 ADULT TETRIS G 1248 STRIP POKER ? 1145 A12 NUMBERS VI _i 1335 ADULT DROIDS ? 1533 DRAGONS BALL ? 1517 ADULT BOMBER ? 1643 TERROR UNER V4 G 1654 LEGO BREAKOUT ? 1768 4 DSK A12 ADVENT TETRIS - COLUMNS _
294 KLACK-TRIS COLMS L_ 107 TWIN-TFLIS TETRIS G 293 DR-MARI0 COLMS C 626 MEGA-BLOK TETRIS ? 1602 SUPER FOUL EGG G 1627 PILL-MANIA G 1866 WALL STONES PAC-MAN GAMES G 252 YUM YUM PAC MAN G I096PUC-MAN ? 1L38A12 CYBER MAN ? I346WABES PAC MAN G 1648 A12 BOBS LEMON n 230 SUPER PAC MAN BREAK-OUT & PONG ? 003 MEGABALL VI ? 459 MEGABALL V2 ? 1459 CYBERSPHERE ? 559 MEGABALL V3 ? 1704 BORIS BALL ? 18S3 DOUBLE BATTLE BOULDERDASH GAMES ? 1423 MINE TRASHERS ? 1527 ICE MINE PRO ? 1595 NEW MINES ? 1569 BUG MINES ? 1572 UNDER MINES G 1573 GOLD MINES G 1577 EMERALD HEAD ? 15B0 EXPERT MINES G 15B2 DENMARK MINES
G 15S3 STYX MINES ? 1689RO-BOULD-IX PUB-CLUB GAMES ? 1304 CHECKERS V2 Li 222 FRUIT MACHINE L 37S CARDS SOLITAIRE L 1246 AMIGA CRI3BAGE G 1362 PUB DARTS TOUR L 560 WORLD OASTS ? 14S0 SAT SNOOKER ? 1112AI200X CARDS BOARD GAMES 910IIEW MONOPOLY STAT C 631 SCRABBLE ? 476 CHESS GAME5 I j 1433 LIFTS 8 LADDERS ADVENTURE GAMES ? 116 STM TREK 2 DISK ? 297 NEIGHBOURS 2 DISK G 13S9AI2 ALIEN SPACE G 1503 4DSK A.N.G S.T. 1711 A12 INGENIOUS G 1671 BREED 1995 1753 A1200 GLOOM STRATEGY GAMES ? 876 GLOBAL NUKE WAR 825 IND-ESPIONAGE G 1182 A12 NIGHTMARE G 1170 A12 LORDS 2 DSK I 1431 UFO UNCLOTHED _ 1547 SOLO
5TAR-TREK 1623 FLEET 2-MEG PUZZLER GAMES _ 9S3 CHANEQUE 2 DISK G 914JINXA1200 2DISK 1135 SPRING TIME ? 1211 AMIGA GEM2 G 85910 PUZZLERS ? 1550 PUZZLE PITS ? 1546 EXPERT BALLS ? 1633 THE WOOGUES LI 1765 BIRAIN BALLS G I764ER1DGE BALLS MANAGER GAMES G 876 SCOTTISH LEAGUE ? 321 AIRPORT 443 SLAM BALL ? 817 8L00D BALL G 1429 ULTI MANAGER ? 1699 PREMIER PICS ? 1763 AIR TRAFFIC ? 1771 MICRO MART 3 QUIZ GAMES ? 1031 TREK TREV 5 DISK ? 716 POP MUSIC QUIZ ? 309 THE QUIZ MASTER 462 WHEEL OF FORTUNE ? 1597 QUIZ 555 ? 1683 HOLLYWOOD TRW ? 1670 A12 DEATH ROW LOGIC GAMES ? 1037 MARBLES GAME ? 1035 ATOMIC
GAME G 119 DRAGON'S TITLES G 112 DRAGON'S CAVE _ 369 BOOM'IN ECK!
G 1477 BOMB MANIACS ? 1476 MARBEL-LOJS U 1687 TILE MANIA AMIGA LEISURE G 205 AMIGA PUNTER ? 228 PERM CHECKER ? 1210 LOTTO LUNATIC ? 1438 A-GENE VS ? 1594 LOTTERY SYSTEM G 1682 THE PHYSICIAN ? 1840 SUFOPIA U.F.O. 4 7200 MEGADEMOS ? 1270 DOOM RAVE ? 1220 AMIGA JAMWIM G 1165 VENTILATOR 0 1414 2 DISK DOVE G 1415 MYSTIC ILEX G 1685 Disk jade L 1725 DREAM WITH ME C I7B3 FATAL MORGANA AMIGA MEGADEMOS C 460 TEKNO RAVE C 1015 2DSK TAZ QUEEN G 1120 2DSK TAZ-QUEEN 2 G 1104 2DSK OXYGENE C 1084 ASCII NOT 1.3 C I7BS TECHNO TRACKS C 1816 BATMAN 2 DISK A120O SLIDE SHOWS L 740 4 DISK MANGA ? 1271 PIXEL STORMS
G 1193 LEMMLNGTONS G 1546 MI55 MANGA G 1550 5TARFLEET 3DSK AMIGA SLIDE SHOWS C 704 REVELATIONS G 061 PAT NAGEL'S GIRLS C 936 AVIATION HISTORY L 1050 5 0SKU0N KING G 1498 NIGEL MANSELLS ? 1472 YABA DABA DO ARTWORK PACKAGE C 063 ULTRAPA1FFT ? 349 SPECTRA COLOUR C 748 ILLUSION PAINT G 1460 A-Z PAINT PAD ? 1565 CARTOON STUDIO ? 1707 PERFECT PAINT ? 1760 JNR PICASSO ARTWORK PROGRAMS ? 1293 A12 MAGNI-CAD 1 'J 071 GRAPHICS CON KIT ? 070 GRAPHIC UTILS C 133 FRAC LAND BUILD ? 1026 PICTURE LAB ANIMATIONS 084 PUGGS IN SPACE C 233 COOL COUGAR G 651 FA1RLIGHT 242 C 831 RED DWARF ? 475 BAIT MASKING ? 347
NEWTEK V3 2 DISK G 187 ANIMATION STUDIO ? 1447 2 DISK JAP MANGA ? 1784 BAIL OUT VOL 3 AMIGA VIDEO O 329 VIDEO INSGLIPT _ 790V1DEOTRACKER 5 DISK ? I48S-MOOWE MUSIC MAKERS ? 220 FUNK KEYBOARDS G 431 RAVE KEYBOARD5 ? 661 MED WORKSHOP 40I5C 202 MED V3.2 729 DRUM MACHINE G 787 SONIC DRUM KIT ? 73SOCTAF4EDV2 ? 136 THE ART OF MED ? 192 THE COMPOSER G 61B MUSIC DATABASE ? 981 AUDIO ENGINEER C 1268 HIPPO PLAYER ? 168! PROTRACKES 3.5 ? 1791 OCTATUTOR V5 CLASSIC - POP ? 1029 COTTONEYE SONG ? 201 PIANO CLASSICS ? 234 VIVALDI 2 DISK ? 342 AMIGA-OEUS ? 213 DIGI CONCERT V2 ? 620 BAGPIPE MUSIC ? 248
EXPRESSION V2 ? 473 RHYTHM'S DANCER ? 1357 2 MEG DACO VI ? 1759 GUITAR BLUES Q 1757 HEAVY METAL ? 1800 TEKNO MAGE 96 SAMPLES - MODS ? 660 KOHG 0IW 8 DISK ? 647 SOUND FX 3 DISK ? 619 DRUMS 2 DISK ? 1666 URBAN 6 DISK ? 1SBB DANCES DISK ? 125B MOVIE SAMPLES ? 1828 NEW WORMS SFX ? 1861 MONTY PYTHON ? 1850 ANSWER-PBONES AMIGA EMULATION C 423 2 DISK SPECTRUM ? BB9 PC EM 2 DISK ? 327 ACTION REPLAY ? 9SS DOWN TO A500 ? 313 UP TO AS00PLUS ? 414 UPT0A12M ? 1779 MESSY SID VOL 3 DISK COPIERS ? 380 NIB8LBR (NIB) G 727 MULTI TASK (Ml) C 1S8X.C0PY PRO Li 357 COPY AND CRACK G 325 LOCXPICKER V2 _ 1667 COPY 8
CRACK V2 HARD DRIVES ? 779 W/B 3 INSTALL ? 780 W/B 2 INSTALL G 621 HJD STACKER G 655 MR BACK UP PRO C 490 3 DISK MAGIC W/B G 957 GAMS INSTALL V2 i_ 1141 GAME INSTALL V3 C T199 GAME INSTALL V4 C 1692 A BACKUP VS ? 1674 CD ATAPI G 1775 2 DISK MUI 3.6 C 1770 2 DSK ERROR TALK PRINTING ? 243 AWARD MAKER 40SK ? 065 AMIGA FONT 7 DISK ? 100 PRINTER DRIVERS G 043 PRINTING STUDIO i 345 BANNER MAKER L 057 TEXT ENGINE V4 ? 394 INVOICE PRINT L_ 749 FORM PRINTER C 16S8 CARD AND LABEL ? 1642 PriNTMASTER AMIGA BUSINESS C 832 DATABASES 2 DISK r 092 ACCOUNT MASTER ? 470 LITTLE OFFICE ? 244 SPREADSHEET ? 535 UK
5.T.D. CODES G 1464 DIARY 2000 ? 13SS AMIBASE V4 ? 1758 DAILY LIVING COLOUR CLIPART G 637 6 DISK COL/BRUSH C 633 7 DISK CLIP ART ? 901 9 DISK WORLD MAP MONO CLIPART G 172 15 DISK PORTFOUO _ 558 7 DISK CUP ART AMIGA MODEM _ 702 COMMS TUTORIAL ? 413 N. COMMS V3 079 OFTICOMMS V2 G 1032 MAX BBS PROG G 1562 EASY D M S. PROGRAMMERS ? 283 A-BASiC TUTOR ? 306 UNDERSTAND AMOS ? 722 TONS OF AMOS ? 1067 AGA DATATYPES ? 169! NORTH C . . 1754 AMIGA DOS FRAU DO IT YOURSELF _ 239 SUDESHOW MAKER C 808 MAKE A DISK _ 242 MENU MAKER ? 1154 HEDLEY GUIDE A12 VIRUS CONTROL ? 506 A1200 VIRUS G 160 M.V.K. PLUS ? 1440
Z CHECKER VS.4 AMIGA UTILITIES ? 1030 A12DIONIC TOOLS ? 612 4 DSK TOOL KIT ? 1629 UN-ARCHIVER DISK & SYSTEM ? 165 SYSTEM TESTER ? 467 FILE UNDELETE ? 194 DISK OPTIMISE G 356 ENGINEERS KIT ¦G 245 FIX DISK 168 HARDWARE MANUAL AMIGA EDUCATION G 766 GEOGRAPHY ? 532 MATHS 5 DISKS ? 644 ENGLISH 4 DISK G 486 LANGUAGES 4 DI5K ? 270 PLANETS 6 DISK ? 304 ENGINES 5 DISK ? 059 AMIGA TUTORIAL ? 1269 OPAINT 4 TUTOR G 937 A1200 / 600 TUTOR ? 1361 2 DISK INTERNET ? 1360 AMIGA GUIDE ©isk Magic first appeared to the Amiga world back in October 1994 and its ease of use made it one to recommend. Now though,
HiSoft has taken into account what the end users have said and given it a few tweaks and new features that should improve on the orig¬ inal.
What makes DiskMagic stand out from other file managers, such as Directory Opus, is that it is extremely easy to use and highly con¬ figurable - so configurable in fact, that no two versions will look the same. When we looked at the original quite a while ago, our reviewer noted DiskMagic is more a hybrid between Version 4 and 5 of Dopus. For example, rt has "DOpus 5's multiple preferences editor and fluid window positioning but has the source/destination, non-multitasking simplicity of Dopus 4."
The program has a font sensitive, resolution independent interface which means you can run it on any resolution screen with any font you wish. On the screen you will see two win¬ dows which show Directories One and Two - one of which is the active window and source directory. If you then want to copy, for exam¬ ple, the other becomes the destination direc¬ tory. The middle screen shows the device list windows where you can see drives and devices. At the bottom of the screen you have gadget buttons (either represented by text or a graphic) which are unlimited in the amount you can have. Another
useful feature is the Status bar which shows how much free RAM you have plus date, time and CPU load, The package also proves useful as a slide viewer. You can set a time for each picture shown rather than clicking on the mouse button. The product's main selling point however, was that it can work with LHA and LZH archives as if they were nor¬ mal directories. A new fea¬ ture in this version is the ability to also recognise LZX archives.
While Dopus 5.5 is best left to the techies, DiskMagic2 remains user friendly to the rest of us So what else is new and is it worth shelling out for whether you have the original or are looking for a completely new file manager? Well, that's going to be up to you and your own specific requirements. The best we can do here is to give you an idea of what has changed or what has been added and their usefulness.
The original DiskMagic had a button where if you press and let go the directory window will read in the parent directory, but by holding down the button you could access a list which contains previously read directories that are Qhoice is Yours DiskMagic has remained simple and easy to use. The Drag and Drop makes life very easy and is a lot less fiddly than Directory Opus 4.
Most people would agree that it is a lot sim¬ pler on the whole than Dopus 5.5 and, while Dopus 5.5 is best left to the techies, DiskMagic 2 remains user-friendly to the rest of us. 5aying that, the way you add a Amiga Computing Get organised with minimal fuss. Amiga Computing finds out if this really is possible with Hi-Soft's latest program buffered in RAM. This has changed slightly so that when you click and hold down on this gadget it will change from an upwards point¬ ing arrow into a downwards pointing arrow.
When the mouse is released a list appears of the previously read directories and two arrow gadgets and a move gadget let you scroll through. You then click on an old directory or the screen to close.
SuperDuper which lets you copy entire disks. It also includes the ShowHotKeys program which means you can keep track easily of your hot keys and avoids you defining the same hot key by displaying a list of current hot key defi¬ nitions.
You can now completely arrange the win¬ dows to your own preference and then save it The default setting arranges the windows from top left and the other four settings activate one of the user positions.
Other features have been improved, for example when you wish to delete something you can now display a progress indicator bar and there is also a Fast Delete option. You can now also play a Soundtracker module. /- A totally new function, called Copy Newer, copies files from the source directory to the destination direc¬ tory. A file in the target directory will only be over¬ written if the source file is more recent. Show DataType is also new and uses Workbench 3 DataTypes to display pic¬ tures. These can include JPEG or GIF if the appropriate DataType has been installed. This process however,
does need technical knowledge.
Bottom ' line Another small but useful change is that the device list now shows the amount of free stor¬ age space available in Kb or Mb and as a per¬ centage. Files can also be copied and encrypt¬ ed and a requester opened for password entry.
A Decrypt function does as you’d expect and a password must be given before it will do this.
DiskMagic 2 now contains the program new file type is a bit iong winded and requires technical knowledge.
The manual included is from the original version with a booklet containing the amendments. These together should pro¬ vide enough information to get you up and running - if not, 30 days technical support is provided free of charge.
.hen version two of Cinema4D 1 1. I 4 came out around a year ago, its 1 '1 >• release was overshadowed somewhat by the release of Lightwave 4, and somehow the release of version three has again coincid¬ ed with the latest release of Lightwave. You should however not overlook Cinema4D - at well under half the price of Lightwave you get a program that can produce equal¬ ly stunning results from an easy to use interface.
If you are upgrading or starting afresh with Cinema4D, you use the normal Amiga installer to set everything up, which most people should have no problem with. As with every HiSoft product, Cinema4D comes with excellent packaging, including a 400 plus page manual and a manual addendum that list all the latest changes in version three.
The manual is very helpful, it starts off with a number of introductory tutorials that explains, in basic terms, each part of Cinema's modelling, layout and animation tools and will get beginners off on a good footing. The rest of the manual explains each menu, window and requester in Cinema step by step. A few more advanced examples in the manual would have been helpful but the provided set scenes do help show off Cinema4D’s more advanced fea¬ tures.
One striking thing about this product is the lovely Intuition interface, so the mod¬ eller, tool bars and the requester can be opened and moved around to where ever Neil Mohr takes a look at the latest incarnation of Cinema 4D and wonders if it can stand up to the onslaught of Lightwave 5 you like, and you can even save the posi¬ tions and size the windows for either the default settings or individual projects. This means you can run Cinema of a CyberGraphX screen along with EGS, Retina or Picasso screens. There is also an option to make direct use of specific card redraw¬ ing routines that
greatly speed up window redrawing.
All the traditional viewing modes are available with Cinema along with indepen¬ dent 3D and camera views. You quickly become accustomed to Cinema's way of moving around with hot keys letting you switch between move, rotate and zoom movements. As well as selecting view, ?
ET THERE BE MORE LIGHT An extra effect not possible with Cinema is to make the light source visible in the scene. This mimics the effect that light has when passing through mist or smoke. As the particles reflect light off to the sides this makes the path of the light through the fog visible, in Cinema you specify how quickly the light will diminish from the origin of the light source.
Cinema now gives you even more control over how light sources illuminate scenes and camera lens effects can be applied to the final image. You know, the sort of lens flare that you get in almost every Lightwave render you have ever seen.
In Cinema the light source can be made to produce a good looking star burst effect along with the ancillary lens glow effects that produce the coloured circular rings that run along a line through the original light source.
As with all the other requester windows in the program, you are provided with a great deal of control over how the end lens flare will look.
All parts of the star burst and lens glow can be adjusted, with up to 15 lens glow rings being available for each lens flare effect with which you can change the size, colour and brightness. If you want to add a lens flare to a scene just for the hell of it, a no light radiation switch will make the added light source not affect the scene.
That will also directly reflect a light source.
To help you create realistic models, Cinema4D has a very comprehensive mate¬ rial manager that, from one window, allows you to adjust every variable affecting how an object will look in the final picture, allowing you to alter the surface colour, texture, transparency, reflection, highlights, luminance and relief.
Using material is split into three sec¬ tions: A material selector, creator and man¬ ager. The most useful is the manager where you can access all the materials in a scene and using the list of radio buttons select what attribute you want to change and change it. It is here that any bump maps or bitmap textures ate also added, even though textures are controlled via a separate texture tool box. CinemaAD can now handle IFF, BMP, Tiff and Jpeg images in full 24 bit colour so textures saved in any of these format are fine, this was probably added as Cinema4D is now out for the PC and Mac.
One of the most important steps in creat¬ ing realistic models and scenes is in what you make the objects out of. Think about it, if you look around yourself what makes all the things you look at the way they do? The answer is what they are made of, this effects how light is absorbed and reflected off them and gives them both the texture and colour you see.
For example, wood has a rough surface, scatters light rays more and so looks duller and has no highlights compared to some¬ thing made of polished plastic or metal, object, origin and point edit modes that all basically work in the same way.
Objects can be handled in a hierarchical manner, so if you create a car object under this heading you can sub objects such as chassis, wheels, window and these them¬ selves can again be sub-divided. This makes for a simple way of quickly selecting objects from the object selector.
To view scenes you have plenty of render options from the quickest wireframe modes, to full on ray tracing modes. If you Talking of which the Mac version has real time texture previews in the material selec¬ tion and manager windows, maybe in ver¬ sion four?
Create a preview animation using the mono wireframe mode, Cinema can replay the animation in a window on the Cinema screen that can save time.
The package now handles all rendered pictures in full 24 bit, no matter what the actual output screen being used. Along with the new supported input/output file formats means you get much better looking end results.
Inverse Kinematics have received a num¬ ber of good enhancements. Firstly, joints can have restrictions applied to them, allowing you to stop elbows being bent into painful looking angles. The other set of new effects relate to how chains of con¬ nected objects react when dragged around by the mouse. Allowing either only a few or all the connected objects being moved.
One of the new points about the raytrac- er is that it is launched asynchronously from the main Cinema modeller. This allows you to carry on editing a scene while the raytracer invisibly computes away. The problem with this is that the ray tracer is launched at the same priority as the mod¬ eller that makes it jerky to use, starting the raytracer at a lower priority would have been a much better idea.
ATERNAL MATERIALS While I am on the subject of asynchro¬ nous things, it would be nice if some of the extra requester could be left open such as the object and material selectors, but as hot keys are attached to them this is no real problem.
An important change for this version is that Cinema4D is now 100 percent 060 friendly, earlier versions had a few 060 unfriendly instruction that slowed rendering but these have now all been eliminated and the program purrs along under an 060.
Cinema4D is a comprehensive package offering almost everything you need in a ray tracing package. It's efficiently designed interface makes it easy to learn and simple to use and is one of the few ray tracing programs to offer a true Intuition interface and has full CyberCraphX and RTG support. Imagine and Lightwave might be more widely known but the consider¬ ably lower price of Cinema makes it a good alternative. /:'*T 1—.......... flfftr | Requirements RED essential BLACK recommended ......... ii -ii faaBl6 MbB 9Mb Hard drive RAM ^^020 RAM I RTG card Product Cinema4D v3 Supplier Hi-Soft
Price £199.95 Tei 0500 223 660 E-mail sales@hisoft.co.uk WWW: http://www.hisoft.co.uk/ s I Ease of use 90% 1 Implementation 85% | Value For Money 96% 1 Overall 91% Amiga Computing Subscribe - you can't afford not to Because Amiga Computing is the best way of finding out everything you need to know about your Amiga and, if that isn’t enough, each magazine also comes complete with 2 of the J hottest disks crammed full of the { latest software and demos.
SUBSCRIPTION HOTLINE Phone:0151-357 1275 fax: 0151-357 2813 or e-mail us at: database@dbdirect.demon.co.uk Save £8!
And save even more when you subscribe by Direct debit DIRECT Amiga Computing priority subscription form USA/Canada subscriptions Q 1234 12 month with disk S70 ? 1234 12 month without disk S40 Please mark on if this is anew subscription or a renewal New G Renewal O 0 I wish to pay by: ? Cheque/Eurocheque/Postal Order payable to IDG Media | | Credit Card (Vis&'AceasaTrarelaycard'W.asiercarSl-LrocartVConfied) Expiry Date Card No Subscribe now and not only will you save over £8 off the more than reasonable rate of £58.50, but we’ll also pay your local postie to deliver all 13 issues direct to your
door, before they hit the shops, and guarantee you protection from any future price increases.
9 I would like to save money with the following yearly subscription: New Renewal ? 9799 ? 9801 UK £49.99 ? 968B ? 9689 EU £69.99 ? 9690 ? 9691 World £84.99 Subscribing by Direct Debit is the easy way to pay and stops you ever having to worry about your subscription to Amiga Computing lapsing again. Plus, you’ll spread the cost over quarterly pay¬ ments. And just in case that wasn’t enough, we’ll even throw in an added saving of £5 off the regular subscription price.
0 I would like to save even more money wilh a UK quarterly direct debit ongoing subscription ? 9800 UK £10.99 Quarterly Direct Debit Instruction AUTHORITY TO YOUR BANK/BUILDING SOCIETY TO PAY DIRECT DEBITS ? Tick this box if you do not wish to receive promotional material from other companies
• Deliver my magazine to: Name (Mr/Mrs/Miss/Ms)- Address- Name ct
bank/buitdtng society... ...........................Postcode..
Name of account...................... Your account no.
Sort code | ZDCDl Signature(s).............................. Date......................................... FOR OFFICE USE ONLY Originator's Identification No. A i5 I 1 1 4 ' 1 j 2 Ref No. ............................................................ Your instructions to the bank/building society: I instruct you to pay Direct Debits from my account at the request ol IDG Media.
The amounts are variable and may be debited on various dates.
No acknowledgement required.
I understand that IDG Media may change the amounts and dates only after giving me prior notice.
I will inform the bank/building society in writing if I wish to cancel this instruction.
I understand that if any Direct Debit is paid which breaks the terms of the instruction, the bank/ building society will make a refund.
Bankybuilding society may decline to accept instructions to pay Direct Debit from some types of accounts.
Daytime phone no_ Poslcode.
Send this form to: Database Direct. FREEPOST, South Wirral L65 3EB. (No stamp needed if posted in UK.)
Your subscription wifi commence from the earliest possible issue Amica Computing he Amiga's corporate future might be as uncertain as ever, as long as there is a Public Domain and Shareware scene, rest assured that the beige beauty will never die. There's no Perfect PeeDee Past this month because there was simply too much other stuff to cram in... Qattleships 2 Dave Cusick performs his penniless pauper party piece and peruses plenty of PD. Again lay Ball Programmed by: Patrik Jansson Available from: Classic Amiga Software Disk Nos: G44S A, B & C When I was a child, 1 was reasonably fond of
Battleships. This was not, 1 hasten to add, because I found this charming amalgam of skill and luck any more entertaining in itself than the next kiddy; rather, I feel, because I associated Battleships with long car journeys, and in my experience long car journeys invariably led to camping holidays in Wales.
Without the once-alluring prospect of four¬ teen days under a tarpaulin on a remote Welsh peninsula lacking all but the most basic of toilet facilities to follow, spending thirty minutes mark¬ ing crosses on an eight-by-eight grid and glee¬ fully yelling "Splosh!'' at my sister's unsuccessful guesses would surely not have proved so... bear¬ able.
Still, if you hanker after the thrills of naval war¬ fare but - alas - have no friends on hand to engage, you will be pleased to learn that Battleships 2 has come cruising over the horizon and is eagerly awaiting permission to anchor Player 1 ?
? 3 ‘X
- »l «l E
- -*-: I ¦ «e ffl m m
* mmm Mi m\ m
- *-r 111 .' -V 111
- . 1 ft* v ... ma&mm 1
h. and you can compete with chums too itself in the calm waters
of your 3.5" harbour.
Actually, because Battleships 2 manages to fill three whole floppy disks in its archived form, a hard drive is necessary to play the game. Other requirements include an AGA machine and 4MB of ram, so you would be forgiven for thinking that some impressive graphics and sound lay ahead. You would, however, be horribly wrong.
The main differences between computerised Battleships and the pencil-and-paper original seem to be that here the playing field is larger, shots are fired in salvos (with the number of shots available depending on the vessels still at your disposal), and various actions are accom¬ panied by brief black and white movie clips.
These film snips are a nice touch, although the spelling of some of the accompanying text leaves a little bit to be desired.
Battleships 2 scarcely breaks new ground in home computer entertainment, but to be fair it is an accomplished version of the old favourite, and it is perfectly capable of holding the atten¬ tion for a considerable time.
Programmed by: Gerald Brook Available from: Classic Amiga Software Disk No: G447 A curious combination of Breakout and Three-in-a- row, Play Ball involves bouncing coloured balls off a wall and up a table, with the objective of getting three balls of the same colour in a line. If you do succeed in making a row of three balls sharing any one of the five different colours, Mmm, options you will earn one of sever¬ al bonuses which should help ease your progress somewhat.
Everything takes place against a strict time limit, which can be specified beforehand from the options screen. Once that time has elapsed your score will be calculated. The ultimate objective is sim¬ ply to score as many points as possible so as to scale the loftiest heights of the high-score table.
With decent enough graphics and sound (and music which can, thankfully, be turned off), Play Ball almost manages to be a curi¬ ously engrossing puzzler. In the long term it does lack a certain addictive quality, so whether the interest will endure is debatable, but nevertheless fans of cerebral pas¬ times would do well to investigate this offering.
Id's Stuff Produced by: Les Wigmore Available from: Classic Amiga Software Disk No: ED27 When I was at primary school, art consisted of either drawing matchstick people in our news books (living their lives under a shining yel¬ low sun and a line of blue sky at the top of the picture) or crawling around on sugar paper wearing garish aprons and holding paint-soaked sponges. These days, kiddies get all sorts of fancy computer programs to play around with. Where's the justice there?
Kid's Stuff is a fairly accomplished art pack¬ age aimed squarely at younger Amiga users.
Although it is not really suitable for children under perhaps six years (at least), it offers plenty of sloppy painting tools which should appeal to the kids in question. In addition to the standard tools it is also possible to use clip art, play tunes and mess around with sound samples, meaning that even kids with short attention spans should find plenty to be going on with.
The only reservation I would have in wholeheartedly recommending Kid's Stuff is that I feel the interface is perhaps not quite intuitive enough for young minds - supervi¬ sion, arguably necessary anyway, would in this case be essential.
This version of Kid's Stuff has the Save and Amiga Computing Shareware My, what an attractive user interface you have This includes a silky-smooth scroll-text and three sets of tunes to choose from, divided up according to their length.
Encompassing everything from bleepy computery music (with the two alarmingly named Synthetic Dick modules, which in a generous mood I decided were probably tongue-in-cheek efforts) to a tango, and fea¬ turing beautifully sampled instruments rang¬ ing from steel drums and xylophones to springy sounds, Carter certainly covers a wide variety of styles.
As with all music disks, Carter's fate will inevitably be to be consigned to the diskbox after, at most, a handful of plays. However, testament indeed to its mould-bending (if not mould-breaking) nature is that you might first want to copy a couple of these tunes on to your hard drive.
...but after that it's impressive music all the way ARTER Programmed by: Mystic Available from: Classic Amiga Software Disk No: DE206 A & B The vast majority of PD music disks seem to consist of cheesy, derivative dance-type noise, devoid of any semblance of originality or char¬ acter. It is therefore a pleasant surprise to see a collection of modules which are at least a lit¬ tle unusual.
Carter relies on the strength of its 14 mod¬ ules rather than any flashy effects. Apart from a Batman picture and some rippling credits to accompany the obligatory ambient synth sounds during loading, the graphics in Carter are limited to a simple single-screen menu.
QC Task v4 Programmed by: Chris Harries Available from: Classic Amiga Software Disk No: EM7 It is a sad fact, but one that is becoming increasingly obvious even to ardent Amiga fans: The computer world is now dominated by PC Contemptibles, with multi-million dol¬ lar companies like Microsoft, IBM and Netscape ploughing huge sums of money into convincing the world that machines like Demo the Amiga have had their day, and that com¬ patibility is more important than diversity.
To a certain extent they are right - in the information age, compatibility is extremely significant. The classic argument that “I'm buying a PC because we use them at the office and I need to be able to take my work home" is well-grounded, if a little extreme.
For owners of high-powered Amiga systems who do not want to have to grapple with the untold pleasures of IRQ conflicts, trouble- some sound and graphics cards and BIOS configuration problems then emulation is a more attractive option than mortgaging the house to buy a PC.
Although in this demo version of PC Task, the save is disabled (and thus it is impossible to run programs which use disk caching, such as Windows 3.1), enough features are fully functional for you to get a good feel for the sort of emulation speed your machine is capable of using this powerful software emu¬ lator.
With PC Task you can effectively turn your Amiga into an 80486. The 486 might not be at the cutting edge of PC technology, and games emulation is not really practical - Doom would probably not be too impressive even on an 060 Amiga, and you can forget about Quake, because that requires a Pentium machine anyway. But PC Task is cer¬ tainly more than capable of running most industry standard applications, such as Microsoft Word. PC Task allows emulation in up to 256 colours on ACA machines (although because ACA screenmodes are less than spritely the emulation speed will suffer) and supports all
the usual graphics cards.
The demo release includes two versions of PC Task. One uses a Dynamic compilation method, resulting in a faster emulation speed but requiring plenty of memory, whereas the other is Interpretive, meaning less ram is used but your 486 will not run as fast. The demo should at least help you decide whether or not it is worth your while splashing out £69.99 on the full Monty.
How Do You Do It?
Qf fender Programmed by: Fred Bayer Available from: Classic Amiga Software Disk No: G443 Perhaps disappointingly, Offender is neither a Doom clone featuring generous helpings of sampled expletives nor a Theme Park-esque simulation of life in a penal establishment, In actual fact it is, fairly predictably, a Defender done.
Avid Public Sector readers who were bored enough to feel the need to digest my fatuous wafflings in issue 109 may recall my sharing with them my joyful experiences with an old 8-bit Defender clone by the name of Gauntlet. Offender comes as close to recap¬ turing that magic as any Amiga game I have seen.
To run Offender you will need a reasonably powerful Amiga: a 68020 is a minimum, as is an FPU. Your starfighter is controlled using a combination of the joystick and keyboard.
The traditional approach (a thrust key and a Frrt> Paqcr praublq presents Offender HaII of Fawc Scoring
L. ii'.r.-r k\' I Zi
• Miirxrii wo Instructions
2. Unknown jHr'riH
3. Unknown 10080 •
I. Unknown 3S0B0f
S. Unknown 30808 1
8. Unknown 2500P I ?. Unknown 20800 '
0. Unknown 15088 I 't. Unknown 10808 | Use the lov.t uk to steer
[ vour fiqhter -»nd to ( irr. F f or -ji.nl boob peess SPACE:
f or2 the left nouse button.
For hvprrsrsrr press Ihej riqhl noise button or RE - [ URN. Us*- the ‘S* fcev 1*1 sound off/on.
I ,
* &¦ kW
* ¦ S^wnwr 0 Bi*nbcr 2V Preis ri< to return to| to this, screen
diirinq the!
• tone ur press it now t»; nuit.
I” rr*t0 start 3 Offender: tip top arcade action separate reverse key to change direction) has been discarded in favour of more intuitive joystick control, but the hyperspace and smart bomb functions will require you to lunge desperately towards the Return key and the Space Bar respectively.
Whilst my Defending prowess has deterio¬ rated considerably with time, I managed to complete the first two levels of this demo in about two minutes without losing a life, only to find that to play any further it is necessary to register. Indeed this disk really only offers a taster of what the full version has to offer, rather than being a genuine must-have game in itself, but once you have played Offender the chances are you will want to purchase the full Shareware version as soon as possible.
Registration costs SI 5 and as well as plenty of extra levels, the full version boasts better sound effects to accompany the addictive arcade action.
It's like the eighties all over... only less annoying I Like It?
It'Will be freely 'ublic Domain, enceware, if you ficient quality to ickit in a padded nd it in with all 'ublic Sectoiican- missions, 1 ions. The magic Media House Macclesfield You'll Never Walk Alone Classic Amiga Softyjari 11, Deansgate Radcliffe I (Tel: 0161 723 1638) OXES Programmed by: Derek Brockhouse Available from: Classic Amiga Software Disk No: ED 117 Gap (having disposed of my inebriated chums appropriately), I was suddenly forced to lunge brakewards so as to avoid redeco¬ rating the exterior of my trusty voiture.
Presumably thanking its lucky stars that the driver in question was stone cold sober and riding a Cantona-inspired wave of adrenaline (and thus had sufficient wits about his person so as to halt his steel char¬ iot prior to impact), the fox (for that, dear reader, is what the beast in question was) hastened hedgewards, without so much as a second glance at the unshaken hero of the hour.
All this would be unsurprising had I been steaming along a quiet lane in the depths of rural England, but in fact I was in the middle of a housing estate at the time, Foxes, it would seem, are everywhere these days.
To most of the public, the fox appears to be a cute and cuddly furball. Farmers know differently; foxes can be real nuisances, prowling around in the darkness and some¬ times killing farm animals.
This well-compiled disk aims to answer some common questions about these fasci¬ nating creatures, which it does using a com¬ bination of text and images that are all accessible from a main menu screen.
Although it is unfortunately all too brief, run¬ ning to only a few screenfuls of information, Foxes makes informative and absorbing reading.
Amiga Computing Cough and Drop Test We reveal what’s new with Minskies Furballs news news news =3 CD \ \ \ LO j i / i "It's not writing, it's typi Kerouac On The Road.
Amiga Action News ng". So said Truman Capote after reading Jack Same could be said for Hugh Poynton's The analogy isn't brilliant but the Amiga is like one of those horrible old crones in horror movies, Annie Wilkes in Misery for example. Just when you think James Caan's done the old hag in, she dusts herself off and comes back for more. Likewise, whenever you think the Amiga's breathing its last, the bloody thing finds a new lease of life.
The start of 1997 sees the Amiga games market in pretty good health. At the moment three big players are wrestling for control. Epic is launching an assault on the market with the release of more than 30 games, both old and new. Guildhall has rights for a number of older Amiga games as well as a fair few class new ones and Vulcan is trying to keep its claws on the 70 per cent of the market that it owns already. Add to this the fact that, at present, there are many Amiga coders out there who are producing impressive looking games off their own back and the future begins to look pretty rosy.
The best thing is, this influx of new Amiga games isn't just going to be sold via mail order, software and music stores across the country are likely to have Amiga products once again gracing their shelves. You've got no excuse now - go shopping.
Phoenix i ' - •- a* V
- . ZS&sasP .
Mid summer 1997 could see the release of an impressive new space combat and trading game called Phoenix which will be similar in concept to Origin's Privateer series. German developer, Emmanuel Hanns, is producing the game which will boast texture mapped space ships and video footage.
The game will be divided into two parts; a trading and an action section. The trading section will offer more than 15 planets, each with various geographical locations which you can travel to. In addition to this the player will encounter over 30 different characters who blink and move their mouths realistically as they speak. These characters will provide you with information, missions or items throughout the course of the game. In this section of the game, interaction with the characters will be done via a user friendly point'n'dick system.
The action part offers dogfights in space with various 3D texture mapped spaceships such as carriers, trans¬ porters, pirates, military police and space stations.
Emmanuel Henn plans to include special FX such as lens flares, explosions and debris.
Phoenix will need at least an A1200/4000 with 68030, 4 MB FastRAM and a hard disk and a CD version is also being con¬ sidered.
Virile Vulcan Vulcan Software continues to sign up new Amiga coding talent like there's no tomorrow. Austex, the creator of Uropa 2, has signed with Vulcan to refine and produce its space action/adventure game, as have Ambrosia, the creators of Genetic Species and Ablaze, the Slovakian team behind The Strangers.
New games include Five Aside Football, Pinball Brain Damage AGA, Wasted Dreams, Cold Blood, Enforcer, Ultra Violent Worlds and Alien Olympics.
Also available in the next few months will be expansion disks for Vulcan's JETPilot and Burnout.
The Vulcan Web site includes a very rough demo of Enforcer, a doom clone currently under development. As you can see from the screen shot, even in its early stages Enforcer looks quite impressive.
It e w s news news BlackBlade Beauty Blackblade, an Italian Amiga software developer, has posted pictures of its ambitious but very impressive looking new development. The game, which promises to be a exotic and high tech sci-fi flight sim, will use a revolutionary graphics engine and storyline management device somewhat similar to X-wing.
The game will be available on CD (hopefully) sometime in Spring 1997. It is not known whether the game has a UK pub¬ lisher (Epic and Vulcan take note). We've included a few screenshots to give you an idea of the graphical quality of the game. Music for the game will be high quality CDDA sound¬ track combining light digital techno and new age music. Have a look at Blake Blades Web site at: http://www2.shiny.it/-yagg/ (=i- 1 announced te which Ben 1 Wastelands). Se controlled atcaoe B ^ cent \~£'^.^^-rssssA \ 613068 —----- Forgotten Forever looks like becoming the Amiga's answer to Command and
Conquer. Taking much of its inspiration from Dune II, Forgotten is a real-time strategy war game currently being developed by a Hungarian software team called Charm Software.
Charm plans on including about six different terrain types, between 50 and 60 missions to accomplish and 20-25 vehi¬ cles to control. As well as this there will be 20-25 different buildings. There is plans for four language modes for the game (English, German, French and Hungarian).
More importantly though, a null modem link could make the game multiplayer. Technically the game also boasts some pretty impressive technical features such as its ability to run in any screen mode in any size that supports double buffering, sprites, and 256 colours (PAL, NTSC, DBLPAL, DBLNTSC etc.). It does not disable multitasking and is HD installable (actually there will be no disk version, but possi¬ bly a CD version). It will have a maximum terrain size far larger than Dune II (4096*4096 pixel maximum terrain size as compared to Dune's 1024*1024).
News news news Epic release Exciting news for Amiga owners this month - it is revealed that Epic plans to release 30 Amiga titles, some new, but many trans¬ lated versions of German games that have never been seen before in this country. All will be available on floppy and CD and will work on an Amiga 1200.
Cine Tech's Sixth Sense Investigation will be part of the label, as will Kargon, a 3D, four player adventure game, a puzzler called Morbulus and an ultra violent Doom clone called Testament. New games include a multi player racing game called Flyin' High. Epic plans to release around two ot three games each month.
Flyin' High, an arcade style racing game, will be the flagship of the new range of titles. As you can see from the screenshots, Flyin' High is a 3D texture mapped arcade racing game with very impressive graphics. It is said the game will have a challenging course with hills, tunnels, ski-jumps and lots more to discover.
There are different courses such as the city, forest or in the snow.
In addition to this, Epic plans to find a back door into many big name high street stores by releasing 60 old Amiga classics with an Amiga Emulator for the PC. As many shops won’t touch Amiga products, this ensures top name stores will stock the packages.
Marbteous Aurora Tech Specs Aurora Works, the Canadian Amiga software developer, has announced the release date for its first game, Zone 99, will be some time in late Spring.
Zone 99 promises to be a revolutionary new game boasting features such as 16 chan¬ nel audio and an 800X600 play screen. The game will be aimed at higher end machines (although versions will be available for ACA machines) and will be compatible with what¬ ever A-box type machine might appear in the coming months.
Negotiations are underway with British distribution companies and projects such as Betrayed, an action/adventure game and The Obelisk, a Myst like adventure game, are planned for the near future, Aurora tells us that now it has written the software devel¬ opment tools for developing its games, titles will be appearing at a regular pace, with an initial plan to publish two titles per year.
Aurora is currently looking for talented Amiga graphic artists, so if you think you may fit the bill, drop them a line. Aurora Web site is located at; http;//www.auroraworks.com:80/Welcome,html Pussy Galore Impressive arcade action news news news Guildhall Sollware/Bmary Emotions has just released its new arcade actioner, Minskies the Abduction, We previewed the game a few months ago and thought it a pretty impressive puzzler.
Minskies the Abduction heads up Guildhall's t 1 „ ~ range of new Amiga games, along with a puz- V- ii fe, ^ zler called GunFury, foot- .' .**_ ¦¦ ¦' "s W ball management sim, E 0* HESSra! Eutoleague Manager and m, T j* I'-mh i iv: Basket Island, an arcade i IkEF basketball game. In addi- i SBW JWB '' ' tion to these new games, ^ Guildhall is re-releasing a Microprose products H :^|R" Such as Theme Park and ' ct Wrr.r :-es Railroad Tycoon. For fur- I h rVT~^ •••¦ ¦ ‘her details contact i Mhrncr' j "nnM. Guildhall at 01302 4SCORD lBSriJ I T.l:SC0Re: 13ilu 980000 Minskies, The Abduction - Tetris
with cats Up to date Tracksuit Applause Software, creator of Tracksuit Manager 2, has announced it will be releasing an update disk for the 1997 season sometime in February. The disks will include all the moves, changes and player statistics that have changed since last year's footie season in both cup and league competitions.
Vulcan tech I players"5 p0IW!rup* hi*h defi^on sound effeS ^ I UropaOwillK . "ectsand s“PPcrt for two ( mem of eeooo CpuTs'mb *" Amigas with a minimum • hard drive Umnas '•« m and will be nb„aij ? Require- I GTI Chart Toppers Ctl, the mail order Amiga software specialists, has just released its retail fig¬ ures for January 1997. Vulcan, Clickboom and The Bitmap Brothers are all fairing well. Topping the chart is the excellent beat 'em-up, Capital Punishment, followed by Sensible World of Soccer, Hattrrck and Chaos Engine 2. Vulcan's new flight simulator, Jetpilot, is also proving popular, as
is Killing Grounds and Team 17's Worms.
Explorer piccies Chris Page, developer of the new Digital Anarchy Software/Vulcan space simula¬ tor/strategy game Explorer 2260, has posted the first major screenshots of Explorer on his Web page. Not bad are they?
You can read an interview with Chris in the 109 and 110 issues of Amiga Computing.
For further details of the game peruse Chris' page at your leisure, the Internet address is, http://www.cs.man.ac.uk/~pagec5/index.html UN LOCHL NODE INUfcX tCCAl NODE.ttfjKS <HMm> *bs i in luFOerssr HalutClZi-CE PBTAII, hCTUCPK EhiP VARCr FSCOHSTV.
VKCAL HcruOf* <*tC. T rtUhltti SYSTEM N0DF I INKS SrwlL llll ItJTOl
• MlrtOTr ACT* I A. fSEMOlE NODE IIHSS ACTION FEATURE Hugh
Poynton continues his round up of new games developers for the
Amiga. This week Macclesfield based Pandemonium Software.
Development that was initially feared.
Instead, enthusiasts have begun to develop their own games and companies have emerged to market and distribute them. Development teams such as Aurora have sprung up to develop for high One of the beauties of the Amiga is that it is essentially a hobbyists machine. Unlike the PC and Mac, the Amiga seems to attract people not averse to trying their hand at a bit of coding.
For this reason the massive withdrawal of support for the platform from major software companies has not dealt the deathblow for Amiga based games end machines in the hope that people will still be using some variant of Commodore's machine into the 21st Century.
'bedroom developers' across the world are finding that they are entering a rich market. The Australian developer Austex Software has been signed up by Vulcan, as have the Slovakian team Ablaze. Closer to home, Digital Anarchy's Explorer 2260 has found a distributor.
Pandemonium is the latest young hopeful. Otherwise known as Ben Parker and Mike Burnett, two apprentices at a nearby factory. Writing on an Amiga 500.
1 200 and 3000, Ben and Mike have completed their first game, a quirky duck- hunt game called Blasted, the aim of which is to shoot ducks whilst avoiding their falling poo.
Ben and Mike's latest project, Machines of the Wastefand, looks like securing them a bright future in the Amiga gaming world. The ace up their sleeve is a project they have been working on for the last six months - a three dimensional texture mapped tank game called 'Machines of the Wasteland'.
Machines of the Wasteland is set in an alien world where mercenary bands of goblins compete for their planets last resources. Like some weird meld between Mad Max and WarHammer 2000, these goblin clans drive about in tanks blowing the stuffing out of each other and capturing resources, enemy positions and rescuing hostages. Essential to the performance of the tanks is water (it is used as a fuel and a lubricant), so strategic considerations also come into the game.
In order to achieve the maximum possible success in battle, you must crew your tank with the best mercenaries you can find. Each tank has room for three crew; a mechanic, reloader and gunner. These are to be found in the seedy bar. The wage they ask for will be reflected in the level of skill they display. Mechanics are not essential to the running of the tank, but only they can repair a battle damaged tank. If your crew are not paid they will, like ail good mercenaries, leave your pay. Weapons upgrades are available and a novel new feature included is the bartering option which will allow you
to decide on the crew's pay via a fruit machine-like device - strike it lucky and you will get away with paying them peanuts.
From what I've seen, Machines of the Wastelands looks pretty impressive. It blends features from different games anc!
Genres - there’s 3-D shoot 'em-up action during the tank battles, the crew recruitment brings a trading element to the game and a degree of strategy is required where what you capture and where is of much importance.
The graphics look good, especially when one takes into consideration the fact that 'Machines' is Pandemonium's first venture into 3-D gaming. The bulk of the game takes place in a barren desert littered with objects such as trees, shrubs, buildings and other tanks. The engine in which the game environment is buiit is true 3-D and in order lo allow lower spec computers to run the game, the display is from third, rather than first, person perspective.
Viewing the tank from behind rather than as if you were sitting in it avoids the chances of that pixel effect appearing on slower machines.
Ben and Mike are investigating the possibility of a two player version of the game for A1 200 and above. Machines of the Wastelands is still in its early stages and it has yet to be taken to a publisher. The game looks as if it should do well and Ben and Mike say they have plenty more ideas in the pipeline, so watch this space.
If you want to contact Michael Burnett and Ben Parker, Pandemonium, write to them at: Mayfield 25 Victoria Road Macclesfield Cheshire SK10 3JA Tina Hackett is having a bad day. Waht better way than to vent her anger than blasting some alien beings?
I thought Doom clones had had their day on the Amiga. When Doom originally came out Amiga owners were green with envy. Games developers panicked and, not wanting to lose any Amiga gamers over to the PC, took to the drawing board to develop something, quick- smart. Originality went out of the window but it transpired that the games players didn't care and snapped them up by the truckload.
Fear, Breathless and Gloom led the way, Alien Breed 3D also impressed. It was then, however, that every developer seemed to think a fast buck could be made by jumping on the Doom bandwagon, it was also then that all the problems started and, rather than Doom Clones, we started to see Doom Drones. Terrible graphics, uninspired gameplay and monsters as menacing as Frank Bruno seemed to be the formula for Go on just through the trees to get some bullets the Drones.
Things then went a bit quieter as the gamers wised up. Now, 3D Shoot 'em up's are back and Amiga owners have three newies to look out for. Two are from Vulcan: Genetic Species and The Enforcer, and the other, called Testament, is being distributed by Epic's label, Islona.
In this preview we’re going to take a look at Testament. Developed by a German company called Insanity, i! Promises the usual entertainment of blasting aliens with guns, picking up ammunition and navigating your way around dark gloomy rooms.
It starts in a rather RPG type fashion - you're outside with lots of eerie trees and what look like castle walls. Walking around, you can arm yourself with a gun and plenty of ammunition. It soon becomes clear that not everything is quite right, a bloodied corpse lying on the ground tends to give it away!
Okay, so Doom type games don't dwell too much on a storyline but this one goes something along the lines of the living dead are having a bit of a knees-up in the graveyard along with their flesh-enting type chums. You turn up only to find that these all-night namely Time for a sharp exit, you think - playing the part of the reaper, from here you must make your way through swampy tracks and eerie tombs shooting any of the cannibalistic creatures as you go. So after collecting as much ammunition as you can, you then enter a foreboding building that wouldn't take any harm from having a few chintz
scatter cushions and pot plants about the place. It's soon time to try out your new gun as monsters fly out at you from all directions - the ones we've seen so far being a slimy green eyeball - yeuchh, and a brown fanged type thing that seems to hurl green vomit over you.
The game is graphically not bad although the monsters aren't exactly pant- wettingly scary. Also the map in the corner of the screen needs some work.
Accompanying music is quite reasonable in conveying the atmosphere. From what I'd played for this preview, I hadn't managed to bog-standard like, you will also have to find keys to get through doors and watch for other collectibles such as Medikits. There's also skulls and scrolls to pick up which help you along the way.
The version we saw was in German but when it is released in May '97, all text will be in English with a Commodore installer script.
Reviews in German magazines have been favourable so far earning it 74 per cent from Amiga Magazin and a quote from Amiga Plus saying "it plays well, the difficulty level is perfect..." it's certainly not going to be a Doom-beater, but as a cross between an RPG (in looks and atmosphere) and a 3-D shoot 'em-up, it looks like it should provide a fair amount of entertainment.
Testament will be released on three disks and cost £24.99. it should run on any 2Mb AGA Amiga and will be hard drive installable. In the meantime if you want to contact Islona, the number is 01 793 4321 76 or e-mail islona@epma.demon.co.uk ACTION REVIEW STRATEGY Back in December, 1 wrole a preview of an excellent new game being developed by Vulcan called Tiny Troops. The game looked like being a fun new Iwist to the traditional, 'lets play at re-enacting the Tet Offensive' genre, known as war games.
Tiny Troops Hugh Poynton dons his space helmet and prepares to meet Vulcan’s new invaders in mortal combat H^ ^ mm The storyline was stupid but fun: After 450 years of continuous fighting, two races of space aliens arrive at two simple but problematic conclusions. The first is that after all this time fighting they find they rather enjoy wanton destruction. The second is that if they continue to bombard their planet with heavy ordinance they'll bugger it up beyond repair. The plan they eventually come up with is lo jaunt off to Earth and continue the fighting. Fortunately tor the human race,
these fierce galactic warriors are only knee high to a grass hopper.
It's your |ob to direct these pint sized THE LOW-DOWN PUBLISHER Vulcan DEVELOPER In house CONTACT 01705 670269 PRICE £16.99 DISKS 5 SUPPORTS All 1Mb Amigas GRAPHICS 82% SOUND 85% PLAYABILITY 85% DIFFICULTY Tricky REVIEWED BY HUGH OVERALL SCORE f- <)* Does the Green Cross Code cover for the eventuality of large dinosaurs on the other side of the road?
X t / platoons around is'•^S.
Kitchen work .
Surfaces, wi ndow UpjTYr * boxes and whatever else will double as a (»'!. - V battlefield. Your first Tv.,-.f decision is to decide \ whether you'll 1 control Ihe bunny \ ^ rabbit like Klutes or the \ . .. Marvin the Martianesque ^3; Furfurs, ^ Once you've done this it's N. time lo decide which tactics need to he employed to bring victory. Flow [J!
Many troops will you utilise? There I*; are a total of 12 troops to command ng but a smaller group of perhaps 5 will be easier to handle and easier lo manoeuvre. The full 12, however will have buckets more firepower. ^ Will you split your force into two or three groups and surround them, use UK one group to attack, and the other to defend your teleport base or just go p4| for the ever useful kamikaze death charge using every killer critter at your disposal? [ Although I'm no Tecumsch Sherman, this task is a little more difficult I_,V.- V . | The first casualty of war is your flower bed = than
you might expect going by the cute cartoon feel of the game. The task of = defeating ihe enemy will take a fair amount of brain power and more than a little luck.
Tiny Troops is like a mental amalgam of The Smurfs, Micro Machines, Chorllon and _ the Wheelies and Platoon. As combinations go, it's a bit of a weird one, but it's a cocktail that makes for 11 strangely addictive ¦*. ' Jijjjt,Tf* Jy and very enjoyable
s. ’.jSL- little game. Tiny '¦ f S''- Troops is a fun ¦ >-:-T 'V
\ and involving ¦ “1 •'’WVBSOC* t‘.: V anu involving A tal<e
ori a aSi'.'sftrc. 1A traditionally viSififtwsS sj<iui1 »enr<?
Awi ' c las" Q I'd recommend V' 7 " 10 anybody.
- LMmmMi H Ah well, I guess they keep the greenfly away Sun, sea
sand and the other. Klute and Furfur kick off beach front style
ACTION PREVIEW R P G raming Have the Stones of Kazoo I foreseen
this new arrival from the one known as Islona? I think not,
must be faulty... reriite
- SW Our friend the Wizard checks his fitofax to see if he can
'do lunch* 1 knew ii load of fantasy role players at
University. They were a pretty weird lot.
They’d spend Friday evenings playing strange card games whereby if somebody threw a dice wrong they'd be banished from the realms of Kraal for three aeons - or in English, the kitchen for an hour.
It never really appealed to me - as far I'm concerned magic and the like has been forever tainted by the unsurpassable crapness of David Copperfield and Paul Daniels (the cleverest bit of magic those to have managed is their respective spouses; Claudia Schitter isn't bad for such a cheesy bequiffed bloke and, though no oil painting, Debbie McGee is certainly a good catch for such a chrome dome).
To gel back to the point, I wasn't thrilled when given a copy of Islotia's Kargon to preview. The intro screens were full of those characters you might associate with an RPG - hard looking female warriors with pneumatic chests, tough but stupid looking warriors with mullet haircuts and loads of mental dwarfs and goblins.
However things weren't as bad as I first thought.
Firstly (and ! Reckon a few mote games could do with this feature) Kargon included a tutorial option. This was invaluable. Lets face it, when you buy a game, do you read the manual and then play the game whilst % ' I've chosen the scary Uncle Albert Character in the middle rcn d i ng the boo k s I ovv I y W “ I and methodically. I think j not, you just use trial and error and muck ' -- ^ about for 10 minutes until you've got the hang jyr^a of it. This option lets you muck about whilst learning a lot about the vy,, game in a short time. \ Once you've learnt how to N navigate your way around the
maze, casting spells on your hapless opponents and avoiding the terrifying blue tentacle things. The game can be played by up to four players which is something of a boast for an Amiga game
- the only other game capable of supporting as many players at
the moment that I c an think of being Burnout.
Although involving and exciting to play the game isn't as truly 3-D as you might first think. It seems as though it belongs to a generation of i omputer games before Doom or Kargon's sister f,. Release, Testament. You can only move yoursplf square at a time.
Square at a time, c , This doesn't i" V. i ¥ detract from ¦¦ ' Ai " ~ the game and
- .in other features '' — sut-^ l1s l*1L’ [II / multiplayer T
support and —' _ ,-v' : t / even 1 he y ‘ V >, characters you
are
• i> given the choice of i/o playing (angeli
- ¦ warthog and pixie included] make the game interesting and fun
to play.
¦ H '' detract from ¦' yji 7 the game and ¦» nrttr i* wo?ii Ijrarr. * nHM- It's your job to save this quaint provincial little land from the powers of evil What amazing dress sense The four player mode is great fun AMIGA Super Leagues Yes, the most comprehensive Amiga games library is back. The Super leagues work as they have always done - the creme de la creme o f each genre can be found in the top 15-20; whilst any new releases in the top half of each league are usually worth a look.
Older releases standing the test of time and managing to hold on to positions in the top two thirds of each league are also good buys, if you can get your hands on them.
Alternatively, just look on the whole thing as a chance to reminisce. Right then, deep breath... Arcade Adventure
I. FLASHBACK
- US Gold
9. D/GENERATION
- Mindscape
3. FIRST SAMURAI
- Mirrorsoft
4. ASHES OF EMPIRE
- M/rage
5. HUNTER
- Activision
i. ROBOCOP 3
- Ocean
7. THE IMMORTAL
- Electronic Arts
8. SECOND SAMURAI
- Psygnosis
9. MOONSTONE
- Mindscape
10. CORPORATION
- Core Design
II. CADAVER
- Renegade
19. LORDS OF TIME
- Hollyware
13. EXILE
- Guildhall Leisure
14. JURASSIC PARK
- Ocean
15. LITIL DIVIL
- Gremlin (CD32 only)
16. ANOTHER WORLD
- US Gold
17. SPACE CRUSADE
- Gremlin IS. SHADOW OF THE BEAST
- Psygnosis
19. CYBERCON 111
- US Gold
10. BARBARIAN 11
- Psygnosis
11. SWORD OF HONOUR
- Global/DMI
19. GOLD OF THE AXTECS
- US Gold
13. XENOMORPH
- Ubisoft
14. HERO OUEST
- Gremlin
15. ROCKET RANGER
- Cinemaware
96. IT CAME FROM THE DESERT
- Cineware
17. LAST NINJA 3
- System 3
18. THE SIMPSONS
- Ocean
19. HORROR ZOMBIES FROM THE CRYPT
- Millenium
30. UNREAL
- Ubisoft
31. KULT »Ubisoft
39. MEAN STREETS
- US Gold
33. HEAD OVER HEELS
- Ocean
34. PRINCE OF PERSIA
- Domark
35. OBITUS
- Psygnosis
36. VOODOO NIGHTMARE
- Activision
37. ZOMBI
- Ubisoft
38. NINJA REMIX
- System 3
39. COLARADO
- Ubisoft
40. BLOODWYTCH
- Mirrorsoft
41. ESCAPE FROM COLDITZ ^ Digital Magic
49. CRYSTALS OF JutBOREA
- Similarils
43. HARE RASING HAVOC
- Intbgrames
44. DRAGONSTONE
- Core Design
45. MERCENJUtY 111
- Novagen
46. SHADOW OF THE BEAST II
- Psygnosis
47. DIZZY’S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE
- Codemasters
48. DEATHTRAP
- Anco
49. DRAGON'S LAIR III
- Readysoft
50. TREASURE TRAP
- Codemasters
51. SHADOW OF THE BEAST
- Psygnosis
51. INFESTATION
- Unknown
53. RESOLUTION 101
- Millenium
54. NUEROMANCER
- Ubisoft
55. RAN XEROX
- Ubisoft
56. BATMAN: THE CAPED CRUSADER
- Ocean
57. WEIRD DREAMS
- Rainbow Arts
58. SIR FRED
- Ubisoft
59. HEROES OF LANCE
- US Gold
60. SPACE ACE II
- Readysoft
61. STORMLORD
- Unknown
61. THUNDERBIRDS
- UBI
63. GHOSTBUSTERS 9
- Activision
64. BOROBODUR
- Thalamus
65. BRIDES OF DRACULA
- Gonzo Games
66. NIGHTBREED (INTERACTIVE)
- Ocean
67. GUY SPY
- Readysoft
68. THE RETURN OF THE MEDUSA
- Slarbyle
69. OMNICORP CONSPIRACY
- Unknown
70. BLADE WARRIOR
- Unknown
71. CHAOS IN JUJDROMEDA
- Arc Software
79. BADLANDS PETE
- Arc Software
73. BEASTLORD
- Grandslam
74. UNIVERSAL MONSTERS
- Ocean
75. INDIANA JONES AND THE FATE OF ATLANTIS
- US Gold It. SPACE ACE
- Readysoft
77. DRAGON’S LAIR 9
- Readysoft
78. CRIME DOES NOT PAY
- Empire
79. SINGE'S LAIR
- Readysoft
80. DRAGON’S LAIR
- Readysoft
81. BARBARIAN
- Palace
89. OBL1TERATOR
- Unknown
83. KRISTAL
- Unknown
34. GALDREGON'S DOMAIN
- Unknown
85. THEME PJLRK MYSTERY
- Mirrorsoft
86. PYRAMAX
- Unknown
87. EVE OF HGORUS
- Millenium
88. PAC LAND
- Unknown
89. THREE STOOGES
- Cinema ware
90. AQAUNAUT
- Fission Chips
1. VALHALLA AND THE FORTRESS OF EVE
- Vulcan
1. VALHALLA 1 BEFORE THE WJU1
- Vulcan
4. BENEATH A STEEL SKY
- Virgin
5. LEGEND OF KYRANDIA
- Virgin
6. INDIAN JONES AND THE FATE OF ATLANTIS
- US Gold
7. LURE OF THE TEMPTRESS
- Virgin
S. SIMON THE SORCERER
- PDQ
9. DREAMWARE
- Empire
10. FLIGHT OF THE AMAZON QUEEN
- Renegade
11. SECRET OF MONKEY ISLAND
- US Gold
19. CURSE OF ENCHANTIA
- Core Design
13. MAD DOG WILLIAMS
- Came Craflers
14. HEART OF CHINA
- Dynamix
15. BLOODNET
- Gametek
16. THE CLUE
- Black l egend
17. LABYRINTH OF TIME
- Electronic Arts
18. INDIANA JONES AND THE LAST CRUSADE
- US Cold
19. LEISURE SUIT LARRY S
- Sierra
10. OPERATION STEALTH
- US Gold
11. KING'S QUEST VI
- Sierra
99. CRUSE FOR A CORPSE
- US Cold
13. LEISURE SUIT LARRY SERIES
- Sierra
14. KGB
- Virgin
95. COSMIC SPACEHEAD
- Codemasters
16. MANIAC MANSION
- Eldersoit
17. KING'S QUEST SERIES
- Sierra
18. DARK SEED
- Cyberdreams
99. ELVIRA: MISTRESS OF THE DARK
- Accolade
30. ELVIRA II: JAWS OF CEREBU5
- Accolade
31. POLICE QUEST 5ERIES The infusion of fresh talent into Amiga
Action continues. Our Caz made her debut last issue and this
month Paul Faulkner revises the Super leagues
- Sierra
39. FLAMES Of FREEDOM
- Microprose
33. STAR TREK
- Interplay
34. RI5E OF THE DRAfiON
- Dynamix
35. NIPPON SAFES INC
- OMI
36. HITCH HIKER’S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY
- Infocorn
37. DUNE
- Virgin 3B. LOOM
- US Gold
39. WILLY BEAMISH
- Dynamix
40. CODENAME: ICEMAN
- Sierra
41. UNIVERSE
- Core Design
49. SPACE QUEST IV
- Sierra
43. SPACE QUEST SERIES
- Sierra
44. FUTURE WARS
- US Cold
45. ZAKMCKRAKEN
- US Gold
46. ZORK TRILOGY
- Infocorn
47. TRAIL BY FIRE
- Sierra
48. SUSPICIOUS CARGO
- Gremlin
49. WEEN: THE PROPHECY
- Coktel Vision
50. PLAN 9 FROM OUTER SPACE
- Gremlin
51. WONDERLAND
- Virgin
59. DEMON IAX
- Silmarils
53. MAUPIT1 ISLAND
- Lankhor
54. PLANETFALL
- Infogrames
55. GUILD OF THEIVES
- Rainbird
56. B. A. T. II
- Ubisoft
57. STATIONFALL
- intocom
58. INNOCENT UNTIL CAUGHT
- Psygnosis
59. CONQUESTS OF CAMELOT ~ Sierra
60. LURKING HORROR
- Unknown
61. ULTIMA SERIES
- Origin
69. MANHUNTER SERIES
- Sierra
63. DEJA VU 1 & 9
- Mirrorsoft
64. B. A.T.
- Ubisot't
65. SHOGUN
- Infocorn
66. SPELLBREAKER
- Infocorn
67. WISHBRINGER
- Infocorn
68. CHRONOQUEST SERIE5
- Psygnosis
69. ENCHANTER
- Infocorn
70. SORCERER
- Infocorn
71. BEYOND ZORK
- Infocorn
79. ZORK ZERO
- Infocorn
73. SUSPECT
- Infocorn
74. BUREAUCRACY
- Rainbow Arts
75. DEADLINE
- Infocorn
76. TIME
- Rainbird
77. INFIDEL
- Infocorn
78. CORRUPTION
- Rainbird
79. FISH
- Rainbird
80. IINXTER
- Rainbird
81. HOOK
- Ocean
89. THE PAWN
- Rainbird
83. SUSPENDED
- Infocorn
84. LEATHER GODDESSES PHOBOS OF
- Infocorn
85. TIMES OF LORE
- Origin
86. COLONEL'S BEQUEST
- Sierra
87. GOLDRUSH!
- Sierra
88. FASCINATION
- Digital Integration
89. STARCROSS
- Ubisoft
90. HOLLYWOOD Hl-JINX
- Infocorn Shoot 'em up ALIEN BREED 3D 1.
9.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
- Team 17 FEARS
- Manyx SKELETON HREW
- Core Design CHAOS ENGINE 9
- Time Warner Interactive ALIEN BREED 9: TOWER ASSAULT
- Team 17 IUNGLE STRIKE
- Electronic Arts DESERT STRIKE
- Electronic Arte CHAOS ENGINE
- Renegade
9. ZEEWOLF 9: WILD 1USTICE
- Binary Asylum
10. GLOOM
- Guildhall Leisure
11. VIROCOP
- Warner Interactive
19. GUARDIAN
- Acid Software
13. ALIEN BREED 9
- Team 17
14. PROJECT X
- Team 17
15. ALIEN BREED‘99
- Team 17
16. BLOOD MONEY
- Psygnosis
17. TURRICAN 3
- Renegade IB. BREATHLESS
- Power Computing
19. SWEV
- Storm
90. SEEK AND DESTROY
- Mindscape
91. BJINSHEE
- Core Design
99. WALKER
- Psygnosis
93. SILKWORM
- The Sales Curve
94. ZEEWOLF
- Binary Asylum
95. TURRICAN 9
- Rainbow Arts
96. ALIEN BREED
- Team 17
97. OVERKILL
- Mindscape
98. URIDIUM 9
- Renegade
99. BLA5TAR
- Core Design
30. STARDUST I SUPER STARDUST
- Daze /Team 17
31. XENON II: MEGABLA5T
- Renegade
39. THE KILLING GAME SHOW
- Psygnosis
33. Z-OUT
- Rainbow Arts
34. R-TYPEII
- Activision
35. X-OUT
- Rainbow Arts
36. SIMULCAR
- Microstyle
31. TURRICAN
- Rainbow Arts
38. ALCATRAZ
- Infogrames
39. APIDYA
- Blue Byte
40. AMINIOS
- Psygnosis
41. DISPOSABLE HEROE
- Gremlin
49. MIDNIGHT RESISTANCE
- Ocean
43. CYBERPUNKS
- Core Design
44. WOLFCHILD
- Core Design
45. MICROCOSM
- Psygnosis
46. EPIC
- Ocean VENUS
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
59.
53.
- Gremlin R-TYPE
- Activision BATTLE 5QAUDRON
- Ubisoft FIREFORCE
- ICE APOCALYPSE
- Virgin SPACE GUN
- Ocean ALIEN BREED 3D 9: THE KILLING GROUNDS
- Team 17 JET STRIKE
- Alternative WING COMMANDER
- Mindscape LETHAL XCESS
- Grandslam VITAL LIGHT
- Millenium WINGS OF DEATH
- Thalion FLY HARDER
- Krisalis ORK
- Psygnosis CITADEL
- Black Legend PEGASUS
- Gremlin HOSTILE BREED
- Palace T9 ARCADE
- Virgin ATOMIC ROBO-KID
- Activision BONANZA BROTHERS
- US Gold SUPER SPACE INVADERS
- Dorn ark AGONY
- Psygnosis
69. MEAN ARENAS
- ICE
70. WARZONE
- Core Design
71. STELLA 7
- Sierra
79. MON5TERS
- Ubisoft
13. RUNICON
- 21st Century
74. FIREHAWK
- Codemasters
15. STRIKER 9
- US Cold
76. FANTASTIC VOYAGE
- Centaur Software
11. OPERATION WOLF
- Ocean
78. LINE OF FIRE
- US Gold
19. THE EXECUTIONER
- Audiogenic
80. ARMALYTE
- Thalamus
81. SHADOW DANCER
- ITS Gold
89. BATTLESTORM
- Ubisoft
83. OPERATION THUNDERBOLT
- Ocean
84. XENON
- Renegade
85. SUPER SKWEEL
- Loriciel
86. WATCHTOWIR
- OTM
87. STARUSH
- Ubisoft
88. ROBOCOP 9
- Ocean
89. MERCS
- ITS Cold
90. BAAL
- Unknown
91. ANARCHY
- Unknown
99. CARDIAXX
- Electronic Zoo
93. TOTAL CARNAGE
- ICE
94. CAVITAS
- US Gold
95. WESTPHASER
- Loriciel
96. FIRE AND FORGET
99. XP8
- Wealhermine
100. DEATH MASK
- Alternative We'll bring you another 300 obscure games to peruse
next month. By the wayr let us know if you can find Dizzy's
Excellent Adventure and claim a prize... AMIGA ACTION Ml The
hardest track included in Burnout Part 1.
It'll take you weeks to master the spiky donut track A question: Do you reckon any kid in the world has ever played with toy cars and not played at crashing them together? I seriously doubt it. When we were kids we used to play at making the toughest Lego cars possible, run them along the ground until they reached a decent speed and crash them into your opponent's car. The cars were tough but, unfortunately, only as tough as the lego they were made out of. The playground used to look the road to Basra on a bad day. Its a fascination, a sicko morbid fascination that almost everybody shares (do
you reckon hundreds of years ago people had fascinations with crashing horses together? It makes you wonder).
Hugh Poynton makes old couples in brown Allegro’s look like speed fuelled wild eyed joy-riders. Not the perfect choice to review Vulcan’s latest auto destruction fest then Burnout, Vulcan's impressive high spec arcade game is another example of the simple pleasure people gain from crashing cars. Like Destruction Derby, it actually elevates the pastime into a sport. Set in a future where media corporations will do anything to retain their hegemony of the airwaves, and people are so fatigued by constant death and destruction their taste in sport has changed somewhat.
No longer satisfied with Wolf making scary faces at the audience when Rupert from Richmond yanks him off the rings on Hang Tough, these future Sky subscribers want death destruction and blood, preferably by the skip load. As in films like Rollerball and The Running Man, the contestant's eagerly sought prize is their lives. In this apocalyptic future, to try and pull in as many viewers as possible, the corporations show what the public want - Burning - a nightmare meld of a destruction derby, dodgems and monster truck shows.
At first glance Burnout is visually very impressive, the fully rendered graphics give the game a high quality feel - it looks more like a game you might find in an arcade.
The sound is also pretty well done and, in genera!, the game strikes you as being very highly polished.
Burnout stuck me as being a pretty amusing and entertaining arcade game.
Another name for it could have been Battle Dodgems, because that is the basic aim of the game - bounce other cars onto the vicious looking spikes on the perimeter of the play area or shove them over the edge of giant precipices.
How you choose to do this depends on whether you go for brute force or manoeuvrability. You can drive a three tonne monster car and just shunt other players until they're flatter than a month old pint of lager or pick a zippy little trike and rush around like a demented mouse attacking the other players on their unprotected flanks.
Burnout can either be played as a tournament, where you have to complete eight rounds on the four different arenas, or as a deathmatch, which can include up to . Four players. Cars can be upgraded, weapons attached, brakes improved and shields added.
Like many of Vulcan's releases, this is deceptively addictive. The game totally suprised me, it looked like a fairly simple arcade game, interesting in a brainless way ‘The Chicken Run' accelerate as hard as possible and The Space Volvo. Heavy Metal, the hardest brake before you hit the solid bits at the end car in the game for a few hours but ultimately boring after that. My perception was shattered after spending most of one Monday afternoon in the office trying to be Burnout champion
2045. The four tracks are different enough to warrant you souping
your car up in a number of ways to stand you in good stead
for winning. The donut shaped tracks require good brakes,
the circular tracks good shields, and so on.
30 seconds to do and there is not a vast deal of skill involved. If there were a selection of maybe 10 or 15 However, there is something you should be aware of if you buy Burnout. When you buy the game you are basically buying the shell of the game. I expect that Burnout will become very popular because of the endless possibilities the game affords; Worms with only four levels would be, lets face it, fairly crap. That is the problem Burnout faces at the present moment. With only four battle arenas available at the moment, completing eight rounds in each does not take that long.
Another basic problem is that the gameplay area just feels too small You have four cars on one screen and they're meant to butt each other out, Sumu style. This is good fun, but rarely takes longer than about screens included with the game, this might have been alright, because the amount of time required to master each screen would have given the game some extra depth.
The problem is that you only get four screens and in most simple circular arenas, you either get bounced onto explosive spikes or fall off the edge. The game would have been infinitely better if only the arenas had been much larger - say four screens that scrolled. I think this problem could well be cleared up however, when the future arena disks become available and the arena editor THE LOW-DOWN PUBLISHER Vulcan DEVELOPER In ho use CONTACT 01705 670269 PRICE £16.99 DISKS 5 SUPPORTS All 1 Mb Amigas GRAPHICS 85% SOUND 85% program allows you to create more challenging and ingenious arenas.
Reviewing Burnout at the moment seems to be quite difficult because, as Vulcan has made clear, the game is so expandable that reviewing the bog Standard version seems almost unfair. This very limited number of levels just doesn't provide enough depth to the game, 10 levels would have you playing the game constantly. Four just ensures you play it until you've mastered those four tracks and then you've got to wait lor lire data disks. However, when the future car and data disks are brought out, there will be little to stop this game from becoming a runavvay success.
FI 9 Stealth Fight er Goodies Hugh Poynton investigates an old Amiga classic.
Hack in I hr; early rl.iys rjf computer gaming Mirroprose was the undisputed king of the simulation. It had a big stock of games that were lot) quality products in Ihe late "flOs.
Coinciding, as they did with Ihe rise to fame of Torn Clancy and the techno-thriller, ihesc games seemed to mostly involve killing Russians. A variety of games such as Silent Service, Team Yankee and ! 15 all centred around stopping the dastardly Reds sieam rollerrng across Europe. FI ft was the cream on iht; pudding of llns particular generation of si 111 s. When il came out in 1988 F 1*1 was remarkable. Although nowadays you can probably get a toasted sandwich maker with more than enough processing power to run this game, in the late 'tlfJs the game looked better than any other flight sim.
For the first lime you < ould see an u< < urate depiction of your plane from loads of different external views and you < oulrl view the enemy before blowing 'em into next Tuesday.
As part of its re-release campaigns, Guildhall is giving F 19 a new glimpse of daylight and, in an age of texture mapping and Al enemies, il still cuts the mustard. The aim of the game is to ily your weird looking plane into trouble spots around Ihe world.
This was in 1088, in the early days of Perislroika, so many of the targets are in the old Soviet Union (the commies did make iriUUSTES DIESES |w i set
• it OW M FhtlWY. Ti'ECTEJ Ktmc m ftifSKEi Buirwi s ra Duck in
under the radar to give the Russians a pasting Although not
massively detailed, the graphics do have a crisp, pleasing look
to them PUBLISHER Guifdall Leisure DEVELOPER Microprose HD
INSTALLABLE Yes PRICE £14.99 SUPPORTS Any 1Mb Amiga 4
IRCUI5TEF!
Run QTGb TRRrKCHtl RHEFE CREED SHIR
5. .-i Bored with shooting Russians, Captain Hughster goes for a
French Trawler instead Bonanza™'' Islona, a new games labely
is set to open the floodgates with many new UK releases in
1997. HUGH POYNTON finds out more Something strange is
happening in the Amiga gaming world. A good year or so since
the major software houses started curbing their development of
Amiga products, software companies are emerging, like the
proverbial cockroach after a nuclear war, to lay claim to the
Amiga games market.
Vulcan Software, in only a few short months, has expanded its software collection from a handful of games to an impressive library including sims, beat 'em-ups and platformers. Companies such as Applause and Mutation are producing quality games.
Because the 'big boys' have withdrawn support for the format, Amiga development companies have sprung up to feed the demand for games. Although, in the present climate, the risks are much higher, so too are the potential pay-offs.
1 997 sees a new player joining the ranks of Amiga dedicated software companies.
Islona, a subsidiary of Epic, has announced this month that it is to launch an unprecedented 30 Amiga games into the UK market. These games, a mixture of European games not yet seen in the UK and brand new games, represent the largest release of this type for the format in years.
Many of these new games are available Flyin' High Flyin' High is a brand new, texture mapped, multiplayer racing game that will spearhead the new Islona releases. From the screen shots Flyin' High looks like a quality arcade style racer of the sort the Amiga hasn't seen since the release of Xtreme Racing.
Although details for this particular game are sketchy, there will be a number of different tracks in city, forests and the snow. Pedal to the metal with Flyin' High Sixth Sense Investigations Max, Sixth Sense Investigations makes use of the VEGA graphics adventure system which allows it lo run at 50 frames a second and enables the player to zoom in on the various characters. The game will also include over 30 different locations and speech in six different languages. It looks as though the game will be able to run on any Amiga with 2Mb and will also be available on CD Rom.
One of Islona's most exciting new releases is called Sixth Sense Investigations. Currently being developed by a Swiss software team called CineTech, Sixth Sense Investigations is expected to be released in May 1997. The game is a comedy graphic adventure about a buddy buddy detective team who solve the problems and mysteries of their rich clients.
In a twist slightly reminiscent of the classic '70s comedy Randall and Hopkirk Deceased, the two are aided in their work by the spirit of a grumpy old git.
Written in a style similar to that of Sam Q Ivhen did you decide to start producing games far the Amiga and what prompted you to support the Amiga platform when almost every software developer was abandoning the machine?
Hugh Poynton talks to Adrian Cummings, single handed saviour I first started writing for the Amiga back in 1988, and had my first commercially released game published in 1990. After a few years working on other titles and platforms for various publishers such as Core Design, I eventually moved into the PC development side of things which turned out to be a nightmare to get together. In the end, to get my work published and make a living, I decided the only machine pos¬ sible to publish your own work on, without a large investment of cash up front, was the Amiga. After around seven years of
games software development for other people, Mutation Software mail order was born, but it hasn't been easy.
Of Amiga platform games After coding on the Amiga for some years and then leaving the market, only to come back to it again, the first thing I noticed was that all the 'Big Boy' publishers had pretty much left the Amiga for dead.
As a developer in say 1992/93 when everything was still going fine, to get a good publishing deal with a good publisher and make pots of cash was relative¬ ly easy compared to the situation now.
I would say the Amiga's future is a completely dif¬ ferent ball game now, and unless somebody buys the machine and puts it back on the high street shelves with new hardware and some heavy mar¬ keting, 1 feel this is the way it is going to stay for a while to come. If Phase-5 could come up with a cut down version of its A-Box machine for around £399 for the mass market, I believe we could be talking serious good times ahead.
Q Many of your games seem tongue in cheek, quite cartoony and funny, do you have a particu¬ lar preference for this type of game? Have you any plans for making, say, a Doom clone or a strategy game in the future, or are these fun arcade/puzzle games almost like yaur trade¬ mark?
Ah you noticed. Yes, the game style that suits my own particular talents are of course the cartoony 'completely bonkers' type of games. I would like to do some more serious games though, but I will have to work quicker than before to keep Mutation Software ticking over as a small business in this ever shrinking Amiga games mar¬ ket. In this type of business situation, its advisable to stick with what you know best, at least until you can afford to experiment with ideas a little more. On the other hand, I would like to think of the cartoon- style as being my sort of trademark, I can’t see any
harm in that really.
Q Do you believe that because the Amiga is a relatively easy and inexpensive format to write for compared to the PC, you ore much more likely to discover genuinely talented pro¬ grammers and game concepts? Does the fact that writing for the PlayStation (via the 'Yaroie') or PC is so prohibitively expensive that the games that will emerge will be less original and more safe? What advice would you give somebody hoping to program and produce their own game on the Amiga?
I believe the Amiga is the only affordable platform to develop and publish on, from the small developer/publisher point of view. Yes there is the PC, but we really are only talking CD- ROM, not floppy here, and if you are trying to make a start in the world of computer games and publishing, you are not going to get far on that format without a solid game, a fair bit of money for duplication and packaging and a lot of blood, sweat and tears. I personally have tried it, and vowed not to try again until I had a good line up of published Amiga titles under my belt first The one thing I fee! I got
wrong first time around, was that t didn't realise the need for publishing expe¬ rience at some level first, before entering what is a much bigger arena. My advice to anybody wishing to enter development and publishing would be to cut your teeth on the Amiga first - its a much smaller piece of cake to deal with from all angles. Never bite INFO.
C ,4-Si'Ll'- K i PJ J LL
* iL OUT S^HJivO 1937.
L£AM SELECTION 7-B-SIOE FOOTBALL Grunt Werewolf Skeleton Uanpire Munhy Blob Frank Octopus Thing Ghoul Witch Knight F1-F5 = Preset Teens.
Shift = Swap Goalies.
Space = Choose Plyr.
Return = Select/Start.
Esc. = Quit,
• [ FIUCE-T/'’* Spook The Peter Beardsley look alike squad.
Another new release. Monster Football Galloping goblins!
Adrian's latest, Castle Kingdoms off more than you can chew,
you could get in complete mess and waste a fair amount of time
and money.
Q In the current environment, is it easier or harder to design and sell Amiga based products? Obviously there is less competi¬ tion now many of the major software companies have dropped out of software development and distribution, but the market has also dwindled.
As i mentioned earlier, I have to work more quickly and efficiently now than I ever did before, so yes, it has become much harder.
At the end of the day, the unit sales of my games are much smaller than they used to be, and it was a shock at first when I realised that my previous games used to seil around 10-15,000 units on the Amiga and ST back in '92-93. This is one reason I chose to release games on all Amigas, not just AGA only - to maximise the market.
I would like to concentrate more on pure¬ ly AGA, but for some reason it would appear the OCS/ECS market is still much larger. I have been accused of taking a step back¬ ward so to speak (which would be unheard of on the PC), but I have to go where the market is. I am not able to change the situ¬ ation on my own at the moment, and the AGA market does not generate enough sales (for me at least) on its own to exclusively produce games for it! Maybe there are more pirates on AGA, I'm not sure.
Q Do you fancy programming for anoth¬ er platform other than the Amiga? What is the special attraction of the Amiga for you?
1 have programmed on other platforms but consider the Amiga the only machine worth working on the at the moment because I can personally make money out of it as a small developer/publisher. I men¬ tioned the possibility of working on the PC earlier, but the Amiga is a dream to work on and I can see Mutation producing a lot more titles in the future, as long as I can sell them.
It comes down to this :l love the Amiga, always have, always will and no other machine ever had that magic appeal for me. For a machine that is supposed to be six foot under, it's still remarkably alive and kicking, shouting, 'I'll be back'.
FEATURE AMIGA ACTION I 77 Hmkl KEW=II SOFTWARE AMIGA - PC - All Commodore 1-3 disks El.50 4 or more latfaa ' DONT BE DECEIVED by our small advert. We are now in our sixth year of tradins and stock thousands of PD titles (from only 60p) So why not claim your FREE catalogue, ilstlng all our titles by sending an SAE to: PATHFINDER PD (AMC), 41 Marion Street, Singley, West Yorkshire BD16 4NQ Tel/Fax: 01274 565205.
Email; Sales@pathpd.demon.co.uk or download ft from our new internet web site:- http://www.pathpd.demon.co.uk JUST CHECK OUT OUR PRICES!
100 Disk Labels £1.45 Mouse Mat £1.99 Disk Drive Cleaner £2.50 A1200 Dust Cover £1.99 AGA Experience CD Vol. 2 £19.99 Assassins Ultimate Games CD Vol. 2 £19.99 R DISK CATALOG U E Post & Packing for orders under £6 is just 60p and FREE for orders over £6 Tel 01257 402201 Fax 01942 497928 E-Mail: ssantiga^'warp.co.uk For a FREE catalogue of the latest and best in Amiga Public Domain software simply send us your name «£ address and a loose stamp PD prices: I«I0,„,m80p; I 1-20......70p; 21+......60p Postage & Packing is free on ail PD orders — Local orders qualify for free delivery All orders are
sent First Class and we only use new TDK/Fuji disks FT.
Call (0181) 651 5436 or Write to 45 Brookscroft, Linton Glade, Croydon CR0 9NA www.icpug.org.uk Independent Computer Products Users Group tIt* I (Dept AC), 79Woodnook Road,Appley Bridge, Wigan, Lancs WN6 9JR Amiga enthusiasts catering for Amiga enthusiasts!
5<£S welcome any enquiries from new and experienced Amiga users alike Phone now for details of our Amiga User Grou FREE FRIENDLY HELP BY POST nr PHONE ANYTIME!
FREE C1AB MEMBERSHIP PICK YOUR OWN PROGRAMS!
BY NAME NUMBER AND SIZE!
IT'S EASY!
500k makes 1 bootable disk!
800k makes 1 non-boolable disk!
FREELY UPDATED CATALOGUE WITH FULL DESCRIPTIONS INDEX & VIRUS CHECKER ONLY £1!
Phone for the LATEST PROGRAMS!
South Croydon Surrey CR2 9YS Tel: 0181-657 1617 The LEADER - OTHERS CAN ONLY FOLLOW!
THE BEST QUALITY PI) & SHAREWARE PO Box 672 To place an ad on this page call Advertising on 01625 878888.
Free typesetting service available ARE YOU MISSING OUT ON THE VERY BEST AMIGA USER GROUP?????
Chic Computer Club offers great discount offers on all computer goods. Thousands of new contacts, free help & advice, gigabytes of free PD/Shareware from our members-only BBS.
Regular newsletter. Second hand hardware, software bought'sold. Plus: Now offering FREE Internet Home Page and E-Mail address, and FREE advertising on our Internet site, Plus Full Internet Connection for LESS THAN £1.00 per month!!!!!
Find out what you're missing by sending an SAE for our FREE intro pack to:
C. C.C. (AC04), P.O. Box 121, Gerrards Cross, Bucks, SL9 9JP.
(01753) 884473 See Chic on the Internet at
http://www.uk-main.com/main/chlc.htm Wa also offer groups for
IBM/Apple/Atari/8 Bits/Consoies/Fantasy/SCI Fi Gamers and Midi
Music users Trade and Dealer enquiries welcome. Plus FREE
publicity for new software/fanzines etc. Contact us now!!
To place an ad on this page call Advertising on 01625 878888.
Free typesetting service available WANTED ???
A) 000 COMPUTERS New or Used (NTSC or PAL) Call Toll-Free: 800
595 5534 Telephone (914) 578-6522 Fax (914) 578-6550 PAXTRON
CORPORATION 28 Grove St., Spring Valley, NY 10977 1st Computer
Centre 25 Active Software..................50 Amiga
World.......................46 Dart
Computers..................89 Epic
Marketing.................8, 9
Gasteiner............................41 Golden
Image.....................13
HIQ.......................................89 Hi
Soft.....................OBC, IBC
ICPUG..................................78 Kew =
II...............................78 Moore Healy Marketing 73
NetCom...............................38 Owl
Associates..................89 Paxtron Corporation....15, 78
S&S Computers.................78 Siren
Software..............IFC, 3 Software 2000...............84,
85 Turtle Lightning..................33 Underground
PD................50 Weird Science..............26, 27 White
Knight.........................7 Wizard Developments........45
Neil Mohr dons his paintbrush and beret and tries desperately
to find some naked models for his 2D Paint We help you out
with the basic AmigaDOS commands and their uses Phil South
gives you some more Amos routines to add to your collection
Dave Cusick begs Web authors to stop being so snobby n, Paul
Overaa, talks about :s and sampling rates Paul Overaa
discusses the unlikely combination of Arexx and Midi The next
in the tutorial of creating a date stamping utility Cobbling
it all together With Photogenics, even Neil Mohr can be
creative ¦HHHHHHHI^H This will probably be the last instal¬
ment in this introductory Photogenics tutorial and we shall
¦fl^l look at some ways of blending images together to produce
a whole new design. It's a technique used by many people, the
results of which can be found adorning magazine and Web pages.
More than likely these graphics were put together using Photoshop on the Mac, but the same results can easily be achieved from within Photogenics by a number of different techniques.
Before starting a project it is a good idea to decide what size images you are going to have to work with, considering both how souped up your machine is and where the final work is destined for.
For video work you will more than likely be working at broadcast resolutions 768x566/482. For graphics destined for Web display, you can either work directly at the end resolution that is normally fairly low, or start off using a higher resolution and scale down the finished work. Quality work that is to be used in publishing will normally be out of the question for most Amiga users, the res¬ olutions needed are simply too high. Typically a full A4 page image would need to be 1200x1800 and would requite 16Mb and an 040 processor.
The first thing you need to do is sort out what pictures you will want to be using and get them ready, either scaling them to a size you can use or cutting out the bits you want, tt also helps if you know what end results you are looking for, as with Photogenics you have to add images in a laying process, one on top of the other.
Amiga Computing For the first step this involved using the RubThru paint mode. By selecting the type¬ writer as the secondary image, when you paint on to the main image, the typewriter shows through. This makes it straight forward to get the bottom of the typewriter to show through, and to get the fading effect by select¬ ing a large brush with a low pressure (around 5 per cent) you can quite easily create a good The finished article, a 640 x 4B0 image com¬ piled on a 6Mb A1200 running 20Mb of virtual memory, and being used by someone with very little artis¬ tic talent fade effect with little
effort.
The second technique is a little more involved and uses an alpha channel to control how the two images are merged together. Again, getting the general shape of the alpha channel is straight forward. To then blur the edges you can either airbrush on fuzzy edges or use the Defocus paint mode.
To get more control over the secondary' image, using the Compose mode can help. To add the telephone image I decide where on the main image I would want the dial to appear, and drew a rough semicircle. By then switching to the compose mode I could move the tele¬ phone image to the right position and fine tune the alpha to get the results I wanted.
Finally, I had a picture of some paper with confidential in the top left corner. By cutting out this top corner, and after touching up the surrounding area with the smudge tool, 1 cre¬ ated a clone and blacked this out so it could be come the mixing alpha. Using a large brush set to around 80 pixels and pressure of around 40 per cent I quickly drew a line the same length of the word that would mix in the confidential word, as it had a nicely blurred edge.
Setting everything up for a compose and using the compose alpha, I moved the compose box to the top left of the main image and scaled it to a suitable size and once happy, clicked OK, creating the final image.
Don't forget 2Mb of chip memory to play with. This on its own is fairly limiting, not only for the size of images you can deal with, but it will also greatly slow the operation of the machine even in 16 colour modes. Generally the largest image you could load would be around 320 by 256.
If you want to use Photogenics, even casually, you really need at least 4Mb of Fast RAM on top of your initial 2Mb of chip memory.
With this amount not only will you easily be able to use large 1x1 ratio screen modes, but you will be able to have multiple image windows open, allowing access to Photogenics' more complex alpha and composition modes.
Even with this amount of memory however, you will not be able to go too crazy on the size of images you can play with. ! Would think for a single image 800 x 600 would be quite comfortably handled by Photogenics and, at a push, 1000 x 800 could be tack¬ led. Problems arise when performing alpha channel operations with three equal sized images have to be all stored in memory at the same time. In this situation you will again be limited to around the 320 x 256 size. For real freedom you will want at least 8Mb of fast RAM which, if you are considering buying a new accelerator, should be the
minimum you go for as it now costs under £40.
If you are still stuck for memory, but do have a machine fitted with a MMU, there is always the possibility of using virtual memory, as Photogenics works perfectly well with it. Obviously you will have to put up with the slower image redraw but that is the price you pay. If you do try virtual memory make sure, you only allow virtual memory to be allocated for program data and also only allocate vir¬ tual memory for faSt memory not for chip.
It is important that when you start out on a project you do not fall at the first hurdle, that being insufficient memory. Depending on what system you are using and size of images you will be handling, you will have to make sure that what you are planning to do is wilhin you machine capabilities.
I am assuming most people will be using an A1200, giving you VMM VMM V3.3 Amiga Computing what m Tasks/Programs Memory Miscelaneous 1 Add Program 1 Mjjjifl Add Dir i wmm Addlask 1 Doanl Add \ Bottom] Delete 1 Sort I Code Data Tasks/Programs Y Y
- ----OEFAU N Y Photogenics N N PowerCache#?
N N mungwall#?
N N Enforcer#?
N N Fastcache N N inpul .device N N Dir#?Opus#?
Y A Cygnu3#?
Y A ced N N CON N N ToolManager N N ixemul.library N N xpk#?. Library N N Crmjibrary N N #?.device N Y AdPro Virtual memory free; 5202024 Pub Itc Fast Mem f ree: 7831320 Number of pagefaults: 8 Number of pages read: 0 Number of pages written: 0 Number of page frames: 20 Pages used on device: 0 |Photogenic3 Code [?| Don't use VM Data g| Use VM Save Use Neil Mohr takes your AmigaDOS education to heart D*y do do dot, don't dey?
It has just occurred to me that it may be a good idea to cover the basic AmigaDOS commands and ¦¦¦1 what their uses. Generally com¬ mands can be split into different categories that dictate when, and on what, you would use them, The first group we will look at are file sys¬ tem based commands that allow you to manipulate files, get information about files and the file system and alter certain aspects of how the file system works. Other types of commands include task based commands that allow you to change things about cur¬ rently running tasks and AmigaDOS script based commands. Remember that
with just about all these DOS commands, wildcards can be used to include or exclude files. To check any of the following commands para¬ meters, just type the command named fol¬ lowed by a space and a question mark.
Assign - Used to control, list, add and remove devices from the current AmigaDOS assign list Due to the extensive use of assigns and device names under AmigaDOS, the assign Monitor emergency Normally this column is more concerned with giving you the knowledge to fix and avoid problems that can Amiga, but for once, h health problem that could occur.
Recently, an EU directive was passed that said the vertical refresh rate of any computer monitor used in an office should be no less than 70Hz. The point is not to give people nicer screens, but reduce the possibility of eye strain and headaches caused by low refresh rate screens. On the Amiga there is only one monitor driver that can do this - Euro72. I imagine most people would be using DblPAL mode that only has a 50Hz refresh rate, far below the recommended level.
You may be think this is a load of hokum brewed up by the busy body EU bureaucrats, but one of our art editors gets an almost instant migraine from just looking at a DbiPAL screen and since switching to a Euro72 screen mode, I can¬ not bear to use a DblPAL mode, so you may want to consider a switch yourself.
;Y gjpr* command is widely used, and a good knowl¬ edge of how the assign command works comes in very handy. I covered one use of the assign command back in the Christmas 96 issue CD - Change Directory, allows you to change which Shell's current directory. Remember that any AmigaDOS commands will only work on files in the current directory, unless you specify the exact file path they need to use.
Really this command is only now used in AmigaDOS scripts as you can enter directories straight into the Shell and it will switch to it Copy - Allows you to copy files and drawers to different locations. Specify the files to copy and then the location. Use the ALL switch to copy all the sub directories and their contents.
The CLONE switch is used to keep the files current creation dates and the QUIET switch turns off any output text Delete - Deletes the specified files, so do not do delete #? Unless you are sure. To delete sub-directories and their contents use the ALL switch, and to include delete protected files use the FORCE switch Dir - List the files in a directory. You can use the FILES and DIRS switches to force the com¬ mand to only list files or directories Execute - Use to run AmigaDOS script files Info - Returns information about all the cur¬ rently mounted disks Install - Used to write, remove and
check the boot blocks on Amiga floppy disks, making them bootable List - Can be thought of as an advanced DIR command, not only giving much more infor¬ mation about files, but providing much more advanced ways of controlling its output Lock - Allows you to software write protect any mounted disk. Enter the drive name and whether the lock should be ON or OFF. You can also add password protection MakeDir - Creates a new directory Path - Lists and allows you to alter the current command path, this is a list of directories that AmigaDOS will search through when a com¬ mand is typed in to the
Shell. If added to the command path you need to update Workbench to use the same one, type LoadWB NEWPATH Rename - Rename a specified file, specifying a new file path will move the original file to the new directory Version - Returns, if possible, the version information of a file Which - Will return the directory location of any file name you give it. This command only searches the current command path, not your entire hard drive. You can use the ALL switch to tel! The command to return every occur¬ rence of the file, as normally it stops at the first file it finds Ctrl C/D - What do you do
if you accidentally start a delete or copying process and need to stop the computer before you totally devas¬ tate your machine? Bang your head against the table, swear very loudly, reset the machine? Nope just press the control and C keys to break the current Shell process Amiga Computing Hypnosis Made Easy Phil South presents some more AMOS routines for your collection.
IiKJi #ipi
• vs m mm;/ ' V. PsS si ¦ its?
Great effect's can be created easily These excellent routines from Marcin Szumiela @pdi,lodz,pl> are really very nice indeed, very groovy. They all do ; pretty much the same job with a few variations, but they are great to watch and have a lot of nice routines for you to use your own programs.
The programs draw a range of lines on screen and then colour cycle them to make a hypnotic spiral. I love programs like this and 1 could look at them all day. Except of course 1 would probably go a bit bonkers. Okay, more bonkers.
The programs start simply enough, with a HIDE and DECREE command, to conceal the pointer and set degrees as the measurement of arc rather than radians: Try a few values yourself and see what comes out Another way to make the program go crazy is to try fiddling with the big variable list at the start, which originally looks like this: Try adding numbers to the RX and RY values: X S1=160*2 TS1=128*2 R*1=100*2 RY1=1G0*2 X S2=160*2 TS2=128*2 R*2=50*2 RF2=50*£
* ROK2(=590 Hide Degree Then they open and interlaced screen for
the highest resolution, and turn everything else off: Screen
Open 1,610,512,16,Hirestleced Curs Off : Flash Off : Cts 0
These two variables are flags, which will be tested later on:
K0HlEC1=Falss : K0NlEC2=Fatsf 'Palette 0,SFfF You will notice
the Palette command is REMmed out. Then we begin the
calculations.
We are calculating an arc which curves around and meets itself. Around this arc we are draw¬ ing a set of lines, so we are effectively drawing two arcs - one for one end of the line and one for the other end: 151=160*2 TS!=12S*2 1*1=100*2 RT1=100*2
* *0*11=0.5
* 52=160*2 YS2=128*2 1*2=50*2 R1Z=50*2
* 10*21=1.05 Degree Now we set up a loop to set up the colours:
For 1=0 To 15 Colour 1,1*256 Next K0LQR=1 I0NIEC=Fatse !
*0NIEC2=Fatse Now we can make the drawing based on those
calculations using the main REPEAT/UNTIL loop: Repeat Odd
COLOR,1,1 To 15 : Ink KOLOS ALFA1f=ALFA1«*KR0K1J If ALFA1X>=360
Then ALFA1M) : KHUEt1=Trae ALFA2*=ALfA?f+*R0*2?
If ALFA2(>=360 Then AIFA2(=0 : (0(IEC2=True
* 1=*S1+R*1*Sin(ALFA1dl : Y1=TSl+RY1*Cos(ALFA1dJ
X2=XS2+R*2*Sin(ALFA2d) : Y2=TS2*RY2*Cas(ALFA2i) Draw XI,Y1 Ta
*2,T2 Until K0NlEC1=True and *0NIEC2=True You remember that I
said we'd test those flags some time? Well, there they were.
Finally we shift the colours along as we said, and wait for a
key press to drop us out of the program: Shift Up 1,1,15, Wait
Key You could substitute a wait and a specific amount of time
if you wanted this to be part of a title screen of a game for
example.
To get a different effect try changing the KROK2# variable: KROK2“=5.05 or:
* R0*2«=0.5 1 don't know for sure, but it could be that the
variable has to be all 5s, but as each example we have has this
as the basis of the shape, we should look into that, KR0K2(=5D
I like that one, or even 11X1=100*3 Rf1=100*2 RX2=50*3 Rf2=50*2
This changes the shape of the circle to an ova!
And adds detail to the centre. I like these ones: RX1=100*2 RT1=100*1 5X2=50*3 ST2=50‘2 but there are many others you can try. I wouldn't advise going much out of the range 1- 4, as you don't really have much space to play with.
This is a nice effect, sure, but what are the applications? Title screens are one thing to look at, where you can have a nice hypnotic thing happening behind the title of your game. You could even have these things in the background of the game itself or as a warp effect when you go to another level, with a suitably warpish sound sample on the audio tracks. Where you use it is up to you, but this is a devilishly useful effect and congratulations are due to Marcin for coming up with it.
You should now, having seen the effect, be able to figure out how to change the settings to make the shapes change. As a little bit of home¬ work, try making an oval which is tallest from top to bottom (as opposed to left to right) and try making a square or a triangle. Or both! How about the colour? If you can figure out how the colour mapping works you can alter the base colour and make it all shades of blue or green.
The best listings I receive will get a copy of my book “Mastering Amiga AMOS" and, if you're really lucky, I might sign it too! (the cheek of the man! - Ed).
Amiga Computing PL&ssFsero rous obdeu to ether of these distributors YOUR ORDER WILL BE SAME DAY DESPATCH VIA FIRST CLASS POST ALL OUR PD DISKS ARE SOFTWARE 2000 Dept (AC04) 8 FALCON WILNEC0TE TAMW0RTH B77 5DN TEL/FAX: 01827 287377I SOFTWARE 2000 Dept (AC04) 9 WILLS STREET LOZELLS BIRMINGHAM B191PP TEL: 0374 678068 We stock over 6500 QUALITY PD & SHAREWARE PRICES SINQLE DISK..............99P REF* DISK LATEST CATALOGUE DISK........70p PACK ........... (PRICE AS STATED) EASE ADO 70p TO TOTAL FOR UK POSTAai ALL ORDERS SAME DAY DESPATCH Please make cheques payable to: Software 2000 Pteaeo send
order to address listed top right Wp uleo accept postal orders or orders loss tf-*«n C3 In fitnmps How to order To order any disk just write the disk title and the disk code, EG U01 Against Some titles have a number in (). This means the title come on (x) number ot disks.
To order PACK just write down the pack TITLE name.
ALL DISKS ARE COMPATIBLE WITH ALL AMIGAS UNLESS STATED AG A Disk means tor A1200/A4000 onty WITH ORDER OF 10 OR MORE DISKS OVERSEAS POST I PACKAGE RATE (Europe add 25p per disk (Dr PSP) (Worldwide add 50p per disk PSP) TEL OR FAX: 01827 287377 Va 10 UB01 Uul?l-PRWT VI Jot cl printing ul U0H OABKSTM no2 (y. _ ___ DOM DISK U AG CREATOR created Aik U1I7 N0RTMC " “ U122 SO 1A . _____ 11131 TETRA CbFtpliy letrtz while copy d U135 HOST USE LrfiUTESfT) wry usefuI your loot coBttdOA. HtCOUUED (H30 POOL WIZARD-ifootfcoili predawn UttJ OWBOENOWWNER ¦ Prtrfchenrwame la use wiBi bTTLE WOOD, YERMCH, ZETTEF
let tnxu.to* ringlanguage U5» ICON raetty made J4dfcU U590 AfiOO MUUfiEfUC PAD EMULATOR fA8» only) UH1 DEGRAOER frvst WB 1-3) AK* Mtebtor US32 KILL ADA-mat* older program* run on A1200 U600 CM EMULATOR If u6t 4 document UtM F0RCA5TER 2.02 New Hacw Ul» AuttO MAGIC 4-Prsetffcker | UfOAUOlO IMGK 8'Octsmed afl i MOUSE MAT worth £2.991 1 FREE MOUSE MAT worth £2.99 with every order £12 or over. To claim your | I free mouse mat just cut & return this token with your order + enclose a extra 19 33p stamp to cover the mouse mat postage & package, ofler only available | d payer* IMM C64 srmiats-r V3
(2DISK) Cm er-.uiltcrlj»*t UMS SPECTRUM EMULATOR V2 Spectrum emuisior latest U1T0 BIORHYTHMS VI 01 dkHW your own btarhyttim* U1W MASTER SEKA VI 6 complete* Assembler language UIK UNLTIMATED DISK CREATOR si toolOrt s(« hero U1B7 M COMPUTER AID DESIGN - W»* commercial product DIM SH0WIZ slide show mskcr 24* wipe eWeet 0131 SO II copydelets/Ruvs'run file using s mouse U220 AUQS-PAWJ VG^ojrt|>ain 1 package tots oUSelurv.
U226 MOST USE U ^ U6JJ THE CHEAT U620 HOW TO CC0E IN C I2*sk) * meny eiarfpto* U6» ACITOH REPLAY VI fiASO&MOVesrtridgs on dJI^™ UC23 ACTION FEPLAV V4TilTOOONCYj semenM»<* UMS PC EMULATOR V.E31(WB3 Only) SVGA PC emulslor U6W COPY A C RACK TOOL 2 more powerful eppy program U6W HEW SUPER VIRUS KlOER(W wB3)klA 316. Vlrui 1- i 'i- -• i uimg pfMHaAMOgraM U690 ASS AS IN COPIER ItolstoKJudo XcopyYdtopy «d U6M SUPER DUPER 3 fNDT Wsl ^ Vl«t dirt Copw* U6K AMITCCL PROFFESiONAL disk database tool U6M MEGACHEAT V3 Hmora gasws cheat even lor) IT700 ANIMATION CONSTRUCTION KfT Y12 * good iffS
POOt.RTO3^<2(Li»*i^radi^ib<?M^t»]. UTOS TRONl-CAD-bevtcreateciroAboerdras»ipgs _ lited 1 Mouse Mat per order exclude any other offer) ! It F with this token (III UBU Oprmuis T-Crveu 38 disk CopieriOpdmi____ UUSUfTUTION BENCH MARK V5S(Noi WD1.3) sysinlo — ---"“¦> 'lilMlcoi U222 GRAPHIC UtlUT7l3|lat ol graphic conw U2» 50» MOST USE UTH load ol wry uwtul util U229 SUOE-SHOW CONSTRUCTION KIT easy to make U240 ARCHIVER TOOLS pack more file on to your disks U747 WPL00ER 4 0 disk psek more program m dsk U243 The A-T CCPER (not WhJ) 13 disk copier.wQw PRINTER MANAGER U427 PRJNTER-STUDIO exceflent
print results U599 PRINTER TOOL - In etude* typewriter. Spooler eta UTM PRINT LABELS print disk labeteAannef* U793 STAR PRINTER STUDIO - for all star printers U794 SEIXOS STUOIO - For al Seiko printers more ipecac printer driver tor the above printer U7J3 PANASONIC STUOIO - 9 A 2* pin printer driver 4 utt WM CANON PRINTER STUOIO not AMO (141 U735 PRINTER STAR 24700 FONT DESIGNER - shareware U7S2 CITIZENPRINTER MANAGER for tel Dttmjfintw owners containir- * J “ "* "*JI 1 •*—— U8S4 CANNON P______ with Cannon printers U757 I SO*- PRINTER DRIVER k UBBOSTttEfrSCOPfc V£a hot fSmSl This a the RAMDOM
DOT STEREOGRAM a «S1 FORTH FftOGRAMMWG^OT WB iJl MUSIC JW00I BEASTY BOYS - We Want Some Puisy song* U002 MICHAEL JACKSON - Song BAD M0Q3 DO THE BARTMAN U00S 100 C64 TUNES (not A12D0) MOOA BAT-OAKCE REMIXED M017 GUNS 4 ROSES - YOU RE CRA2Y U01« MONEY FOR NOTHING ¦ DIRE STRAITS HIT SONG M027 BLUES HOUSE (2 disks) M029 SAFE SEX DEMO • Very funny M03I BETTY BOO (2) needs 2 drives (brilliant) M053SGT PEPPER (2D) MG72 MADONNA • Hanky Panky Song MOM CM GAMES MUSIC M115 MAHONEY & KAKTUS 2 -40 tunes compilation M125 ADAMS FAMILY M150TIFFANNY ¦ I Think We re Alone Now M171 MADONNA ¦ (Like a Virgin) M173
JANET JACKSON ¦ RHYTHM NATION M177PET SHOP BOYS M1B4SAM FOX {Pleaae Me) M18S MADONNA (Rescue Me) M188 JOE LE TAXI M1S9 MICHAEL JACKSON (Smoei Crbnhil) M194 JESUS ON E'a (2 disks) M20S RAVE • More Rave M262 A TO Z OF CM GAMES MUSIC (4) Brilliant M31S DICK TRACY (Madonna) (2) M335 STAR TREK & STAR TREK NEXT GENERATION (2) U2S2 LAND BUILDER {restete.—--- U2S4 COPT A CPACK TOOLS back up your softest* U300 MESST s« K raedr-riis PC/MAC tet Me*.
U301 AUTO DISK LOGGER ciUtogue yowdctk U»1 GRAPHIC Util 1(3) load of bn: graphic if U32* GRAPHC uW 2f3[n*n taora GrapMc to U333 SCENERY UAKEH more lenKfpe U3M EMULATOR COLLECTION I {lot of U33S FREE CORt beck vp cenvnsrcisl pm U33T MODEL 30 BriAenl 34 ot>f*tt deijgne* U335 MULTI VISION (2) diikTJe* udMie* U340 HACKER-TOOLS nuny rippar tool U3S0 POOL TOOL ot edict hora* with best eft xx* U351 RACE RATER Similer to sbove. But both U35S STAR CAT t<m\* tatslogue disk «sy U359 SEEKER Rrd loti Ide on ftcpy 1 KsnMrrve U3S0 R.P.G (?) Idwnture crattor U363 DISK REPAIR KIT-Mlvjge A repsir damage disk
U372 WORD SORT pTOMM ASCII Die U377 NC0MU III -nor* modem »oftw»ra - pecker util U360 UNIC0PY Itnusw auk wpw U3» FRA CSC APE VI2 new frtcUl simSai lo VtSTA U40C SOUND TRACKER V2 6 rrsiwc maker UJ20 SPEED BENCH (not Wbl 3) cnete auto boot wb LM2S NIB 2 vsry popglsi copier U4» The RtPRER COLLECTlOfRnct WB3) lot rqper UU2 STSiNFO W*l 4 print Mo on your AMIGA sy* U4UFONT FARM font a ¦ ~ ¦ UK3 AMOS 4 AMOS PRO COMMA HO EXTEN UHT PRO-GAMBLE-Super Horae pref.cton program LN7B DELUXE PAWT 4 BUDDY SYSTEMh2i OH Ete ft out dekjia Pam Irmin on Ins ler evry fucrion UWI VWUS CHECKER VI S4-JOTTO UPDATE
UOHTF*.Y^ uw2 Directory opus va m ehra conwsi&BLrnoN UJS3 MAGIC WB 4 MAGIC MENU -Both Latest wrakm UWB VIRUS-WORKSHOP VS I-the best Virus kdter 13987 GRAPFftC-CONVERTER (20) Convert paaura act UWB TURBOCAT Auto catalocue your disk library UW9 AUTOBOOT DISK MAKER V4 mery useful UW3 rMAGlNE STUDIO V2J20) The besl PD image (picture) procesicr available rival even (he commercial ccttinq hundres ol pound, (noi kl J) UM3 POWER-CACHES Speed up disk loidmg Accetset WTO HARD0FIYE SECURITY Utvge ccltecitcn of HO Uh I MAGNUM t « REGARD n* best a** fnegazinee awtor urzi FONT FARM Yi. Toadef fo« • lorn
view*# 11723 EXOTIC RIPPER rate as thatest seund/gnpftx nper UTM ASSASW B-------- „ „ U730 SC FT AG- (AS-DOpiu* or *600) A rain 1,5 meg U731 A - 2 GAMES CHEAT for over 500 games U732 MINI MORPHS create TERMiNAT0R3 effect U735 AWARD MAKER «.hundred ol ready m*ds UT37 ASSASIN CRUNCH 4 COPY TOOL (W& 1J only) U7J8 S.WCK PROFESSIONAL *3-2 Various K-surt UTM TURBO IMPLODER V3.1 powerful dtsh Cruncher U740 CROSS DD5 5 1 P»«te nwdfRrtte PcoAMWA dhk U74t H&DISK TOOL BOX *nteny ft»«e Disk u«f ratowmtewd U742 HOW TO CREATE AUTOBOOT DfSKxnmriete * uB U743 Uui iJisk Makar vl. MAXE AUTO BOOT DESK U7U
FRACTAL MAWA.SIOMORPH BriBentcoBechon U745 AF WORK BENCH-------- U74£ 30 GARDEN--- U747 ASTHOm Y2 U749 OlSK REPAIR LITSOIWS4C CATIL U7S1 SYTEM CHECKER __ U7S3 KARO DftVE Utt.I« more Hard U754 PARSENCH InataAer {cfinpMe} U7S5 PRO CADHKircnJcuwicircuitbMrfldstigne* UTM WB MENU LAUNCHER-menu system, hit to use U7M ICON PUIS (IOt$K) Hundred* ol stunning ICONS VIDEO TITLERS/TOOLS § _I81 VIDEO NOTE daub*** for your video collection.
0431 VIDEO APPLICATION (2 disks) many vWeo titter prog U2S0 VIDEO TOOL (3) load* of video utlll. Recommended UK4 TELESUBTITLE - new video tiller UK5 VIDEO MAXE V4.33 .The latest In video U3S2 DESKTOP VIDEO 1 4 2 (heel video Mer tool) cata¬ loguing system. Dozen* of function* (jffl TELE TITLE 2 - Greet new VIDEOS title* U513 VIDEO TTTL6R |2 <P*k*| mote VTDEO THLER BEST US 20 TELESCROLL 2 (not Wli t J) Easy to use Video I tiler loads ol feeturse U321 WEDDING VIDEO AN1U (2 disks) Require* O-Pafnt 1 i, Very high quality US22 CAPTION MACHINE ssoeflerit Video tWet U923 VIDEO manager (Net AMO U)
Video eaatogteng *ys*m U325 Video TitOe* - very good video Utter UtJi HD GAMES WSTauER tVnsuil lops^oames u HO EGZ00L2. Rhe 01 me rcboLMorttl CombsQ 4 more I Ui75 0US V2.54 Pro. Crunch entire d-tk. (notlj) U»7S MAGIC SLECTOR Vl.^Cftswoe Msgk WB beck drop U577 MAGICWB ICON ARCMYE (3) lODCTs of Mgwb xcrn UJM X-PASSW ORD-proctect yuur hardfioppy dn« U*73 ICON ACHFUVEfSi 1300 s ol ncmai tconjar.y Arrvge) I U9W TEXTURE STUOiO. Render Various Tettuv U*57 WHOM 2 (IDtSK) Ds U4TD HNAL FONT i£ ft 1 (2 drtk) Sur-trsk magarifie 13473 FINAL FO.NTIER 3 I4idnki Slar.frek m*s4ine uaso MaftO OcSA
CuCX-HardOrive mwiue system Uajfl B-wt URL Amama pack woh 207 utiliaM U4»l PROTRACKER Vj¥r*l nvitit writer pr U4W WORK-SIATlON(7flisk WB13 on!
U4» HARO DISK UTIL bril toilectlon of U4» EASY PRINT (ASOOonty) tol ol print ul U4M W0RK-MATE-IS bnliant c&sk util compilation Uwi THE MUSIC CONSTURCTION KfTfstete smlga own) U504 KOT-STUFF-mOra ulil disk comtvistien U504 VIRUS-KILLER A DISK RESALVAG&REPAIRt KIT US07 DCOPY VI PROFESSIONAL -Escslem tt*k copw* U509 ULT B00TBL0CK 40+bodblock generatorin«k« U5I0 ULTIMATE B00T-B10CK Collection 1 »mom U512 ZIRCON UTIL-30 MOST USE UTIL 2 briBent U51S WTT COMPLETE UTIL 20 most use ubl NCH DISK ?
DAMAGE Uki ExOCTiC PisPER V3 3 Hint nop* ~ U999 HO MEM3RY (new eofhetion) require UIOOO MAGIC OPUS VOL 2 4 3 (20) rrort Dopas buttom UIOOi CAR DATA ANALYST-eneck your car psrlormance k writer proq-ane 3 oniyJWB-rvpUcerrwnl Ion of Harddisk uni REPLACEMENT (DUP) WORKBENCH 1 _3 & EXTRA DISK (£5.99 ) WORKBENCH 2.0 & ALL EXTRA DISK < £7.99) WORKBENCH 3.0 & ALE. EXTRA DISK (11.99) Ivm |*u i r <»-¦* pores I n HM » C (ikiii,u J ut*y workriu ncll ur Bvwtwm nJi*K only K:i |>wr ciInk , Not* orl(Jlool only r 1 q• vhen Mnd m ortglnc* cirF. In for rr_-pc*r please send qfifc via rt&ccrci meal U761 RELOCKH
i.a letest WB1J eewMer U762 FAKE FAST MEMORY make more older software run U7T7 TELE TEXT RECEVERp...... U761 DOST PACE VJ, dte * refute to run. Also mo nil UW POOL WINNER GOLD mu*! For sJI gamber U7J9 HAHD-DtSX MEMORY V2 u*e HD at memory ire eneuj U7« WINDOW BENCH V2{WB2/3) 2di*k new Kxrtbirxh.
Repteceritefit. Include tea el useful utifides Uhl COMPUTER DfAGWOSnC TEST VS smiga Fsiri lirvding UiOM BASIC-ELECTRONIC-Teech til tboul ehttonlo U100L LOTTO LUNACY V2 Update latest lottery predictor UtOOT ALL HEW HARIMfSK 8 FLOPPY DISK TOOL 2 (2) U100B HARO-WARE PROJECT 2 (2) BuM down or BOARD GAMES PACK lilhUa.e GAMES .’Atts 11 Printer Rack 5 disk pack wfttr all the latest printing programs specially designed for printing out high quality documents, text 6 pictures etc and it is even able to print out AS Booklets (very handy). Easy to use.
A. musUQLany Awias.0mer. with printer, Printer Pack (5 disks)
only £4.99 — - A super collection of the very be*! Boards
games ever released include monopoly jcrsbWe.ches*. Checker
cct 4 many mpre . HIGHLY RECOMME NO COMPATIBLE VVTTH AU. AMIGA
5 disk iy £4.99 ggmet all tplrct for it quality & ohgm.il,
higMy Addictive & ORIGINAL COMPATIBLES WITH ALL ArffGA 5 disk
£4.99 INI El00 LITTLE TRAVELER imlcmstlon on worldwide E101
WORLD GEOGRAPHY world with m*p 4 lavt, El03 OtSCOVEAY OF THE
ATOM, tutorial on the Atom (20) EI04 OESK TOP GUIDE TO
MUS1C(3D) Guide 6 tutorial E107 TRUMPTY FIREWORK ALPHABET Very
entertening way to leech your thBd Bte ALPHABET EIC8 HOW TO
DELOVOPE PHOTO t (2) Excellent El09 MR MEN OLYMPIC (2D) many
event to complete El 10 CULT TV DATABASE (2D) info cn early TV
sanes El 12 MOW TO DEVELOPS PHOTO 2 (2) detevspe your own.
G222 MEGA 21 GAMES amazing 21 games 0235 ORAGOM-CAVE bHilant 3D puulo gemes
- ----------- GS72 SCHNEBITZ Commereisl quslrty puzzle games G375
OELEXE Oala vS.ttpew jadd new fesiuro 4 bcuns gamme * 2 player
RECOMMEND, get it now 0376 THE KRIUJAN INCENDENT like
EllTE2/Eplc G373 OUANTUM-Maz* eoleci 4 escape lyp* game* G879
RAG TO RICHES • like MONOPLY E003 TREASURE SEARCH find the
hidden treasure.
G240 QUADRIX very addict eiceiie 0242 TAKE EM OUT like to Operation wolf Q2S3 DESTINE MOON BASE Arcade conversion 4 SUPERTOM CAT New vertical shoot em up.
5 KUNGFU CHARLIES mis with platform britf fl RAID 4 latest vertical scroll shoal am up S QUIZMASTER very 0«d quiz prodrome 2 ELEVATION gamas bat# on lift 77 0 IMPERIAL WALKER -Base on STAR WAR games 7 STARBASE 13 (20) Bnl like MONKEr ISLAND 7 AMOS LOADSA MONEY best FRUIT-MACHINES 9 MR UEH OLYMPIC |20) many evant to complete 0 4 L-C-D DREAM 4 small hand held games A NEIGHBOUR GAMES (2D base on the TV series 5 TIME RUNNER (WB2/3) BriBent graphic 7 GOLF (2DiSK) One of the first 3 decent GOLF 3 AMOS CRICKET 2 New Amos crick* simulator 9 ULGSY REVENGE aengster grephic adventure 2 JIGSAW (ZDfSK) wry
clay able jigsaw games 3 BOBBY GARDEN * DIGGER (NEW) BriTteni 4 HIGH OCTANE Fail car racing (nohwtot.3) 5 TIME RUNNER amazing graphic adventure 0 SPACE-INVASIOH 2 - Fantastic Orilaiain 0300 O-BOID cross TETRIX and INVAOCRS.
0303 DIMENSION X 2 player LIGHT CYCLE GAME 0310 NEBULAR Excellent 3D shoot em up 03! S GALACTIC Excellent a levels arcade 0317 HYPER-0ALL Speed bau -level editor 0320 CHOST-SHIP Very good 30 adventure 0325 BATTLEMENT hunch bac« c>! Rotcha 0326 MEGA GAME COLLECTIONS ill 3 lop game* 0329 MADONNA NUDE PUZZLES for IB* onty E011 EDUCATION PACK T pack wllh dozens of education programs ranging Irom math*, scwric* ip educaUonei game* recommend tuH- able fpr any Amiga. 5 ask pack only £4.95 sate ^tra«*ry tec ^ as. Te* ewdtr?- telrv. Mc*oeey m r*a te rue k te Et 18 WORKBENCH 2 tutorial cn W Et 19 DINO
WAR Quiz on dinosaurs E120 JUNIOR MATHS Groat learning aid for taach kid on the math subjects. RECOMMEND E121 PICTURE PUZZLE brilian! JIGSAW type game* E122 WORD FACTORY BriltehL leach kid words E020 WORLD DATABASE requtf* (2*meg) E02T STORY LAND tl Interne! Puzzle games
- ------------ ¦ ^ t 0 BOOK I vo your k
- Ipfnyer. I E027 OSWAlDv*ry co^ourlul large cartoon game E022
LANGUAGE TU70R rriprovr E026 WORDS can help you aoivv the
crossword Only £9.99 ED73 TALKING COLOURING BOOK teiklng'Dpamt
bril F024 EASY SPELL Jl improve your kid spelling ED25 SCRABBLE
require 2-tpfnyer. BrilLant KID DISKS 1,2,3.4,5 Excellent
collection of education programs. Ideal for leaching kids
various subjects while retaining the fun lo?only 9 OSM WIPE
OUT-mindiesa blasting gamse GfiOS GODZILLA Another shoot cm up
G886 SUPER MEGA FRUIT- AH new Fruit Machine GR88 DRIVING MANIAC
3D (HU vector like IndiMO) car racing- very last. RECOMMEND
G669 PLANET FALL - Loner Lander clone 68S1 BUCK TOOTH ADVENTURE
Very good multJ revel shooL/coliect em up RECOMMEND 0344
STAR-TREK similar id RAID2 by I hsrdei 0355 DOODY very cule 4
ealremety addict 0358 WONDER LA/ID amazing graphic reconuned
0362 DELUXE PACMAN * beet pscman evwr release 0387 CARO GAMES
collodion 11 AUTOMOBILES - PD version al SKID MARK bril 12
BANDIT MANIA - Brillant Iruil machine de.no 15 PROJECT BUZZ BAR
Briildrit asteroid 19 GUN FIGHT (not ASOOfIJtt 0 THE REAL
POPEYE W |>500 1^ Only) 12 SYSTEM DEFEM>8riHent Dalendet clone
« AmlGA-BOY-Gsme boy amulaoi . TetrU 12 DETHELL IN SPACE.
Recemowd.
15GVEHLANDEH BrBlant arcade MOON ALERT J SERIOUS BACKGAMMON The best in PD BG 1 STAR WCKDG -----~ E125 JURASSIC PARK lot* of Info On dinosaurs E126 CHILDREN SONG 2 contain 5 excellent song £127 MING SHU IA500 only) Bril Chinese Astrologgy.
EI28 ASTRO 22 PRO V3-Tfe latest astrology program that accurately calculates the position ol the planet dtester' Should help you with bench.
11 j, uul 1 ¦ * uhi A BASE II (2 DtSK) info on earty TV F132 WORLD HISTORY BOOK E133 LITTLE TRAVELLER 11(2) Infonwttori on world wide £134 X-FILES-Gutde to the TV series very rite»e*llng E14S CHESS 4 TUTOR ¦ FULLtaach you how to play cheat £150 INTERNET -FULL guide to Internal 4 superhighway El61 CLI 4 SHELL TUTOR (help) ideal for begmn« G370 KALATRIZ (nctAf 200) arcade ti GO 73 AIR ACE II Very playable shoot em up G3W OTHELLO best PD version 0386 MOUSE IMPOSSIBLE very addictive puzzle G390 TETREN nvjw polish Teffa ever release 0392 STRIKE BALL bnir*nt base ball clone 0399 THAILBLAZER brlBant
fr.ol A12DQ) G400 FIGHTING WARRIOR fiki street flqhter 0*0* DOS*NOES Ohfy oweof it kind nn>t> 6 BASIC TUQQR learn about Amiga basic Prog EDUCATION & 21 GAMES PACK Collection of the very best of education programs and a 21 games pack, a very popular combination tor kids (run on eft Amiga) 6 disk* pack only C4.35_ G894 SUPER INVASION B -New SPACING INVADER GS97 THE SHEPERD Bril lent POPULUS clone. REC G898 AUEN GENOCIDE (2) Shoot aliens set la space.
' ™ """ " ” * >h* better PacMan arroubd.
Miniiuj LEMMING A---- :flfln*ij«Ti_____ CBBERTECH (2| HAN OMAN any i-----.
CSC7 ACE SPACE nice Platform garnet 0908 COLOUR MANIA cUdo/XMViZtype puzzle games 0910 HARRV-HADDOCK- Br.ltent plartormer gms 0312 MANGLE FENDER -BiMIMU. Woh up cDier cefrtsnk ect to win. Extremly addicted, get it 0913 ARCADE GAMES CLASSIC Volt 42 (2d) G914 HEUCOPTER-play l.ke Desert Strike 0915 COW WARS. Very addicted 2 player games G9I6 ISLAND -Play like Monoply 0919 COP THE LtJT Pro Lnteal Lottery Creditor 0920 LOTTERY PROFFESIONAL Thte vors.on us* 0921 MONOPLY. (board gemot) The bwst version G922 JET WILLY 3 - ezcelSm plettorm gantes 0923 FLAMMING ENGINE-Supoib car racing G924 POWER
MACHINES. Gramcaiy brUlanf shod G925 SUCIOE-MACHINE Operation wolf atyte 0926 ZAXXON 30 Superb C64 3D blaster games 0927 BoiNG V3. Great platformer. Recommend 0928 PUNTEH-Animate horme racing games 0929 ARCADE JIGSAW (2dl Include UON KING G930 WHEEL CHAIR GLADTTCR Very fun to play 0931 NiMBLE-Br4lent New arcade puole.
G933 BLACK DAWN 3- THE NEW BEGINNING (2) Superb 3D adventure RECOMMEND G934 R3 ROCKET INEWfvvry good rockel* games G935 BATTLE Shl^- ihe flneal PD verilon 0936 LAST LAP - Fail car racing n, /•/;: tea iHmi sw'te n teM is.:. CCTlMteiawwleM.te S»w wiatteiw m aw; to w* men.
M caw-m u pterin awtwetea V *awai ara MM Sen an aaay n at WW I*. Wit IE can<usala7rin *1AMS4 "oc* ori£J? Ffi-1 r.99 'Mr.
0773 FRUIT MANIA-Brilterit FfuKmaChlne.
0774 TRICKLE TREAT -flke DOOM on I he PC 0775 FOOT-BALL MANAGER-new version £038 AMIGA TUTORIAL 7 peri tutorial £039 COMPUTER CARE how to care about AMIGA £040 GUIDE TO LOWER BACK PAIN tutorial the spine 4 how to avoid back pain, (recommend) £041 KID ALPHABET display all alphabet letter ED42 FRACTION S SitOuEsT maths 6 games excellent £043 MATH MASTER teacMest you more on maths E044 STEAM ENGINE V2 graphic 4 tutorial £045 PETROL ENGINE tutorial 6 animate graphic E046 GAS TURBINE ENGINE tutorle 4 anim graphic E047 STIRLING ENGINE tutorial 4 anim graphic EOSO DREAM FOR ANGEL explain the meaning
of dream E051 INVISIBLE WORLD briliant recommend EOS2 FISH TANK turn your amiga into a FISHTANK EQ54 DEMOLITION MlisJON »i«fipie game for kid E055 WORD POWER solve crossword puzzle ect good.
E056 WORM HOLE simple game ideal for children.
E057 APPLE CATCHER eaten falling apple brilliant E058 CROSS MAZE * CHYPTOKIHG 2 excellent kid gamee E059 VERB QUIZ find the word 4 rt related. Bril E061 KING JAMES BIBLE (4fl) complete (Mbtes excel E066 TARROT clairvoyant m a instance E068 GALLOW fancy e games ol h*ng man?
E070 MATH DRILLS teach all basic math skill Vgood rri7. Rnnr.n turn nu. ... -... _—;--- _______________ rouiete a „ FRAEL BLAZER 2 C64 c G441 E-TYPE 2 vwy good a _ 0443 OLEMPIAO DtSK (2D) Olympic soon events 0445 DESCENDER GAME tonic, search A desend**
- --------------• taach you die ispanese language E164 PAINT IT
(not AS0Q1.3) iBtettCOLOURlNG BOOK E165 KEY BOARD TRAINER An
excellent luping tutor.
E166 WORD POWER- speiicheck/crossword solver/leoch E168 CROSSWORD CREATOR-deslqn crossword E169 CHESS II 4 TUTOR briliant Chess II G448 PARACHUTE JOUST G455 CASTLE OF DOOM VL 0480 WIBBLE WORLD GIDD’ IT quite playat VG graphic a. 0480 WIBBLE WORLD GIDDY Large platform gam* 0487 CASH FRUIT-good fruh machines 0478 AMOS CRICKET cricket game* 0488 EXT REAM VILONCE 2 player battle out 0489 ENOfMA MACHINE very chaflenglrsfl puzzle 0490 MEGA BALL 2 very playable break out clone 0491 BOUNCE 4 BLAST brUfont pledcrm 1IY10 0492 ZOMBIES 4 DEFENDER 2 fantastic game* 0494 MERCANERY SIMULATION 30 star* gamas
E170 HISTORY OF AVIATION Vot 1 Execllcn^ disk E171 CHILD FAVOURITE-Educatton prog El 72 ANIMAL LAND-Leam about onlmal E175 FRANTIC GUIDE TO COMPUTER(2D) briliant 4 funny Et 77 CYBER PUNK 2 lor cyberpunk freak oniy El 78 STAR-TREK 4 STARTTIEK NEXT GERE NATION GUIDE THE COMPLETE GlkOE COME WITH HUNDRED Of SCREEN SHOTS TAKEN FROM THE STAR-TREK SERIES SUPERS EI81 SIGINTURE CREATOR customise your own riglntura.
EI82 VIRUS WORKSHOP V4 eomprthensiv# guide Fiau luarttMFC uincr-i-7^1*1. 9 G7M NANO FLT Superb aiplorv game RECOMMEND G785 THE GREAT GOLD RAID- very addicted 0787 ANT WAR V1.9 (LATEST) net 1J 0788 7ENO-MORPH -Great grotec G78S TASK FORCE very good MIND SHADOW clone G790 GREEN FIVE Amaz.no 3D grapnlc irite G79I PROFFESIONAL BINfiO ClLLER 0792 MARTIAL SPRIT tike Sirwt fighter n G7« 6 EXCELLENT CARD GAMES collection G806 BLITZ 2 fast action 1 hooting games El64 IMAGINES VIDEO 2disk E185 WORKBENCH Z? GUIDE On Hne hetp/Completi E2I0 LEARN 6 PLAY 3 Latest Educabon I Gemes E240 BARNEY THE BEAR GOES
CAMPING (2d) Brrltont teach your child about animal E241 COMMS GUIDE V1.1 beginner modem user E242 GUIDE TO WEATHER (St) superb complete guide to the weather, recommend E245 MATH ATTACK- Maths relate games lor kid* E242 ANIMAL-LANWdeal lor young kid. Excel E243 PICTURE-MATHS-MaSts program for kldi ES46 BEGINEH GuiDE TO WB 3 (A1200 only) E247 GLOBE FACT(2) fact about planet osrth E248 KID ONLY. 6 eicelent garrw 10 play with £250 SANTA -Help Santa collect present games £251 BIR5THDAY HISTORY V2.2- E252 UAR-TENDER-reclpt for 1000 drink/cocktail E253 BEGINNER TYPING TUTOR- 0531 OPERATION
FlRESTORUS-b*m«nt GS34 CASTLE KUMQUAT similar to Alum breed 0535 BLACK DAWN brrllant graphic adventure 0538 MORIA 5.4 The latest Dungeon 4 dragon 0539 BRIDGE Good version of Bridges G540 ORK ATTACK bloody adventure G812 AO AY AT THE RACE-V.Ooodhorie racing games GB20 BOULDER ORIGINAL with 80 level 0821 BOULDERDASH c»vo/levtri Conalruclion kit 0822 BOULDER COLLECTION 20 1G0 level I2diik) G839 BOULDER PACK with 640 level on B disk QB60 ALIEN NET WORK-new Speclng invader G862 BATTLE FORCE excellent tail adventure.
0883 GNU CHESS the best chea* with 10 level 0868SWORD OF Y1GG Graphic adventure GMT POWER-TETRIZ for 1 bf 2 player Gmfi SUPER SMASHING TETRIZ 0870 CHESS I! 4 CHECKER One ol the best around must lor all CHESS or CHECKER player 0871 GRAVITY FORCE 2 1 or 2 player thrust clone TWIHHITil ( jlOniN ’rbtVfrirhtwJTlIjJwtjjeiJ.K^ ectei raw. RviV* 58*. N kS Tha p»-A :xL.n 90% 8lBeik131gM«l«tetaft Ugmi Certain or star position ect must lor ariyc who studies ostromy or hobby, great (4D _ £073 PICTURE S LETTER learn to reads- first t GAME HINTS & CHEATS II Hip ycuf favwte urn* for agel but cm! Gel lo the md
ol level Of game? Hnwg proWe* wllh«« 9«*t? 5 dak pci with tub ol ga-TM cTwa'hfr'plevef code aoon rtpz? PoM k;.. thoi)d!«p you ftnsh, nary 5i75« - bUbfe br tS Xiu5« Xlf U3i E081 D T P FOR KIO easy to uio, e cuifl « nvuiaee- ^. -J *nf\Q TLTTOI----- ....iRN (20) Thi ____________ E097 BACK TO SKOOL vot 1 collection of the best E098 BACK TO SKOOL vot 2 in education program* EDM BACK TO SKOOL va 3 A game*. RE&qQmED E092 SING A RVHMES ti EQ94 HIGH WAY CODE T EQ96 READ 4 LEARN (20) THREE LITTLE PtcGY Story EDUCATIONS' i j —. V C 21 GAMES PACK J~ \ Latest education pack & new 21 game S I collection (5
disk packs) only £4.95 —j only E1 -I.Qft WE ALSO STOCK THE ENTIRE COLLECTION OF LSD LEGAL TOOLS 1-150 SCOPE 1-220 FRED-FISH 1-1000 ASSASSIN GAMES 1-200 ETC Allspoclrum pick are comjutiMe k with all AMIGA Spectn nes pack (ki!y t29.99 +£2.S0 |p&p) (All on floppy diet , Want to play IDOOa of 5p«trum games on your Amiga? All pack below are complete with SPECTRUM emulator t pointed initnictlon . Ready to run on your Amiga, no {her other hardware require.
50 SPECTRUM GAMES PACK...............£ 4.00 100 SPECTRUM GAMES PACK............„£ r.99 200 SPECTRUM GAMES PACK...............£1 0.99 400 SPECTRUM GAMES PACK...............£19.99 vaiUble iktiich yo« cart choose ehidi version nut and your machine ipw Note: tha spaed of the game Is *1 depend on ye* AMOAPROCESSOft . I: Hi -0 WgJW £4.99 es 3 CARDS saifeS tMik it Bund now onrda prime puck Ml, Thlp pack conlain 51 nil nuw cit'd* fljiwi, include- blackjack, poker, Klondike eel onvoxing value recommend Brand ne* sreade tpnej pad: 3. This pick Include anewcoleclionoftiiebeslsrcsds garas, just like pack!
HIGHIV RECCMEhO 5 disk set only £4.99 The vary latest Boards pama a pack 3, Thie pack iionlaln23 at I new board* pom* a, M lmI fv HI board game a fan RUNOM lit MOQA you chance of winning * tack pot.GOOD-LUCK AG AMI-»8 AQA GAME-GALORE AGA 01-11 kk of g*rrn AGA»1 PACKMAN AGA Hh* best pacman yet 6qntlnue wHcirc ot»r liral CE> o1f4 r>ltoe title & ifc* SbfTYIARtiZC^^%yszr:- Order now to take advance of our special pre-releee prices of only £ 14. W +70p (p&p) order must reach ue iOapril 97, (notesaleprice£1B.99) lb *» as niei r' o iff *• AOAZH HTCL-OUl anrth. V,^ ***. Oct* AOAM0 SotiCJ-JtnCH hm oi
Ih, rmnth bnlunt whirl effete. RECOMMEND AGA’62 TO THE DEATH very gocd STREFT- FIGHTER clone with very good gtjphie AGA763 GEORGE GALA1C0 (2<fbK) bri**r.l mutUOVal shoot/pf iHarm game FSCOMUEDN AGA2C5 MISSILE OVER 2EWOh (2<kck) Srrtlfcfl AOA41 ADULT 5UOE VoM-9 {? Dak each) 'see beknr AGAZ66 TEAM-HOI QvtO PLATFORM nrwhent fine AGA52 BOOT SHOP VOL 1-7 (7 d..h eacn) W» Omow pidfr.m Hcltrtftli dish wa» « commercial game* AGABO RTCHICK voi 1 -3(2d!»k each) wi below AGA274 MUSIC 2 SURVIVE 2dl*k » ezcdlent to order any disk above |u*t alnte dtak code & music nutitr piace. Wen worm pelting volume no?
{remember 2 Chk per volume) ACA271 RAVE MAXIMUM OVERDRIVE H 12ditk)
- -- AGAI7# CHANNEL I ISSUE 1 (AGA) |2disk| DEGRADER AGA
bee* dick magazines. RECOMMEND AGA09C Ai200 FIX DISK
CollFTCiCh 1 AGA disk magazine topic. DemahnuMc AGA091
A1200 FIX DISK 2 COLLETCION 2 AGA245 WORKBENCH BACKDROP
VOL 3 AGA094 RELOCKIT VI ia latest, run A{jumi [dataz/press_magazine/Amiga_Computing/HTML_TXT/Amiga_Computing_Issue_111_1997_Apr.htm]} SOFTWARE
AGA24S DE-LUXE MONOPOLY- Board gama.V addicted AGA306
A1200 HX DISK VOL 3 (new July 95) AGA296 DONKEY KONG
Arcade #***« conversion All d.tk *03*e are design to make
any old A500-A600 AGA297 BOMB PAC Ealraamfy good to play
Arr. ;a prograrr e'game* etc to run on ysur AtJOOrASOOO
AGA298 ROCKET 2 set deep underground brManf MUST FOR ALL
AGA AMIGA OWNER RECOMMEND graphic even bener with 2
playet
- ----AGA299 SC RABBLE-Now lully rut an afl Amiga AGA097 A1300
UTIL - AGA TESTER, SYSWFO etc AGAJO0 MAOlC WB V2. Demo of
version 2 AGAOSS ACTION REPLAY V4 Complete ACTION REPLAY.
AC.AW? TUTANKHAM ll(2) Cducarion-Cgypi.an MUMMY AGAttt
MAOFlQHTER 2 bflllanl itieel fighter clone AG A 30 3
PAWLA.AH0EHSON.(2) 1B+ only BayWalch Babe AGA100 AGA BUTZ
SCREEN BLANKER AG A 304 B0DYSH0P VS (3) mora Bikini beautita
AGA 101 FAST GIFF 7 display GJFF pic In Workbench, AGA30S
T1ME20NE (2J V.Good graphic adventure* AGA 102 AGA DtAGNGSr.C -
NEW ayalen tester AGA307 DENTAWOLF dooms demo AGA103 BLACK
BOARD AGA decent Image processor AGA308 NAXIS -Rcefly show what
AGA graphic co do AGA 105 QUICK GRAS AGA -grab AGA screen
PICTURE AGA310 FEARS (2d)-doom* clone demo AGA110 WORLD BEYONOS
1 (3) stunning 256 COLOUR AGA312 JINX (2d) Fantastic arcade
ptuxle fantasy art. Leave trisri usetbresthleM AGA313 RAM JAM
THE TASTE OEUO.very wtekrt demo.
AGA114 SMELL LIKE CHANEL NOS brtlien! Demo AGA315 ILEX MYSTIC. Haw AGA demos ray trace picture ever retaaie on Ifw A1200 AQA320 KLONDIKE 3 (Adsah) Hd require A 2meg AGA121 MAGIC FACTORY 1 STAR TREK (5 disk) *m «k> have a lief of 25 cards tv above AGA 133 AGA URL v1A2 (2) AGA util compilation AGA321 HOT-BABE 1 (2) MUST BE OVER AGA135 AGA UTIL V314 (2) nwa of above AGA322 HOT-BABE 2 (2) U AGA137 MULRBOOT- 4 various version A500 EMU AGA323 HOT-BABE 3 (?) BEFORE AGA13B OFFICIAL WORKBENCH 3 HARDDRIVE INSTALLER AQA324 HOT-BABE 4 (2) ORDER ANY AQA139 WB3 HARDDISK PREF 6 INSTALLER Installing AGA325
HOT-BABE 5 (2) OF THE HOT-BABE PACK AQA140 CROSS DOS PLUS v3.t reed/wr.le PC lllai Hundred of quality Magic wb Icon A back drop AGA142 SUPER LEAGUE 3 -latest manager game* AGA3U DESK-TOP MAGIC- 32 animated screen blanker AGA1A4 SPEAK & SPEU. - educeiwnN software for kid AOA3B9 WAR OF THE WORLDS -fufi 3D games AGA14-5 BIG TOPS (IB * onlyJHMMmm AQAJ90 FEAR 2. SrvRant 30 graphic game* like AGA14C KELOG LAND -bnllant platform games AGA351 PSSST Amiga version of Spectrum games AGA 150 ACTION REPLAY V5 - NEW UP DATE TO V4 AGA390 FEAR ll -Bnllant 3D game play |uil likt AGA160 GlflER TR12 very
playable 256 colour let rla DOOM on the PC Garrenteed you imprets AOA162 FATAL-BLOWnew STREET-FIGHTER 2 dona AOAJ93 PC EMULATOR V3- Lairs! PC amulelor AGA164 CINDY CRAWFORD Vol1 (2 disk) latest release AQA400 HYPER RACE (2) Super racing game* AGA166 INFESTATION (3 disk) The ultrmated AGA demo AQA410 C1HDY CLAWFORD (3) new AGA170 CtNOY CRAWFORD Voi II (2di*k) «nazing AGA4I1 ELLE MACPHERSON (3) AGA 172 VIDEO TRACKER AGA-ultimdte tlemo meher AOA412 CLAU0U SCHlFFER (3) AGA174 MAGIC WB EXTRA voll S 2 (2disk) AQA413 BIG GIRLS II (3) AGA1&0 Gif BEAUTIES Vd (11-18) 6 mere girls dish AGA414 GIRLS GIRLS
(?)
AGA189 FRIDAY AT 8 another brillartl AGA demoi AOA415 NIKY TAYLOR (?)
AGA 190 ASSAStN MULTIVISION AGA pic viewing util AGA4IT KYL1E MINOUGE (3) AGA192 AUEN FHENZE 2 player blasting rpowtf up AOA416 FEMALE BODY BUILDER (3) AGA194 BIG TIME SENSUAL (2dl*fc) SPACE BALL 2 AGA4I9 EXCELLENT CARD GAMES 3 latest A GAZOO MASQUERADE 2dith briltant puzzle games. AG4420 POKER A BLACK JACK DELUXE (3>4MEG AGA202 RAM JAM 94 it cat be done (2dsk) AGA421 COLOUR WB maka your WB more colourful AGA203 EXPUXIT 2 DEMO new effete weudone AOA422 RIDGE RACER Demo on (ha Amiga, AGA204 COMPLEX ORIGIN 2d.sk require 2 diskdrive AGA423 DRUG STORE DEMOS <2di*k) AGA?06 TREASURE OF TUTANKHAMUN-
educUlon tool AGA424 DREAM WALKER (2) Osmo* AGA230 LOVE 2 dlsk-slmply brUlart DEMOS AGA425 MYSTIC 0EM0S(2) 95 eacellltnl demoi AGA231 AGA UTIL 7 A 8 (2 fliik) More USEFUL utlf AGA426 ORIGIN 2 (2 DISK), Amazing <--SEE PAGE 1 FOR MORE SOFTWARE FOR YOUR AMIGA UMTTt GO OPRPATCHFO aollwaro for both m acbirve Special cable only (£15.00) feature very very fast transfer, share device between Amigas Amiga A Pcsoflmrs I cables suppled, Very fast transfer upb 57600bps IwicefaslerihaJi ttefasled modem (PCrequte wrj»dow95)on^E19S9 All pack > ora 5 disk only - per pack To order any pack below just write the
pack name & if more than one pack available please state eg: Cgfont pack3 to order CG font pack no:3 ect An *111*100 ft diskpack with 100‘a of dooiwwrani A nfrheiaJ UfdT Allan, abuciion. Animal multliaoon, lop sacra I govarmanl oovarup many wtlhpictura lo tH«ck up lh« otainw, p*olur» Ukan ditool from thia pock higNy ifcwnvnSi, cpmpwbbfa v*«h Wi Amiou (A13SO A Asooo Mflsr patM stale lor spociaf AGA v*r*4on) .
Allsai & UFO (9 disk) only £0.99 NEW TITLES | Mono cl ip art pack 1,2,3.4,or 5 .
Colour dlp-art paok 1,2r3,4or 5 » | (please state pack require 1-S) | Fonts pack ¦These ton poet we sutfoOe for crn/pomi piogrcn-* eg Cfposv, fTxsr.i ect | I WorKBenchfont pack 1 ..(5 disk full of fonts) Work Banch font pack 2..(S disk full of fonts) I | Large Colour & logo type font pack 1 (S disk) | , Large Colour & logo type font pack 2 (5 disk) CG-FONTS I I These high quality fonts fuel' sea la Wo A are computable with all version ¦ of DT P, wordsworth, Page-stream, WB3, ProPaQt 2. FinahNrtter, act I Computer Graphic FONTS pack 1 >2,3,or5 .
{5 disk per pack pleoae atnte packs reqlre) I I I | Imagines object pact I oi J (5dW( per pock| .
Imagines true 3d font pock 1 [5 disk) I Callgarl object or liue 3D fonts (state*) |5 aisk eocn; | | Light Wave object pack I or 2 (5 dsk pet pock) i Light Wave true 3D fonts [5 disks) ¦ fteal 3D ct Hue 3D fonts Coect (stole) 6 disk per pack;] I All pack in these box cense an S disks S cast £4.93. Per psck. All peck are eempetnbl* with ell smige G938 ULTIMATE TOUR TENNIS - (2 d.tki) EzcoUaAt lennli game G939 DARK ANGEL - (NOT W8l 3) Supart) iruds advantur* G940 RAISE THE TITANIC - Good 30 Advertur* game 0941 PHANTOM - Excetant shooting games (DNenosv 96) G942 MACDONA-LANO - BnlUanf gam* anWar
to Zoc4 (not A13G0) G543 JOUST HI - BnBsand C64 game with updsteO Amiga graphics G944 DELUXE GALAGA V2.6 - The v«*y latest Oetega Highly recommended G955 LA2ER RACE - Good Tron type, srttemely addictive to play G956 TRAIN-DRIVER SIMULATION - The noil faafiatlc train aim.
0957 MASTER BUSTER - Kill various monster* wtth bombs G958 KNOCK-OUT Mini derby destruction, very addictive G9S9 DUNGEON HERO - 30 Graph* advwtur* similar to Doom G960 MORTAL KUMQUAT 3 - Weud but tun baai-anvup G961 COOt NAME NANO - Superb Thruat Clone (Nano F»y 2) 0963 POKER MANIA -t you Idea poker than this la tor you G965 LEATHAL FORMULA - Adventure similar lo Monkey Island E253 BEGINNER TYPING TUTOR E2&4 WORD PUZZLE PRO • Create CroaaWord puzzle lo solve puzzle E256 K ID DISK 7 - Another vary I me education program £257 A Z COUNTOCS OF THE WORLD E25S UK COUNTIES Simitar lo ofxnr* but abs
is based artiraly on ENGLAND.
WALES. SCOTLAND AND NORTHERN IRELAND E259 BASIC ELECTRONICS VI4 (2 Disk) - For electronic Ians E2S1 MASSIVE GUIDE TO THE WTERNET V2J AGA429 POWERDROID * 96 New Atwvolds with brilllarri graphic* AQA430 ULTIMATUM • The ultimata 3D Tank Ban Is U1010 WB2 WSTALLER ¦ Install ASC>L'A600 workbench lo HD U1011 TURBO-CAT PRO V1^ (not WBUl - Crsst* catalogue* UT012 TEXT-ENGME VS (not Wbt J) - Th* vary lafasl word processor «Wi apetl LOTTERY WIIUniER j EXCELLENT COLLECTION OF VARIOUS LOTTERY WINNER.
Xi ij PRE0ICT10N PROGRAMS MTHNAl (OITiBT 1^15!^” BUSINESS SOFTWARE 18 DEMOS MUST BE 18 AND OVER XBO CINDY CRAWFORD (2) X74 MADONNA (SEX) (3) X01 SHOWER GIRL X03 BODY TALK (2) XO0 MARIE WHITTAKER X24 SABRINA SPECIAL X25 DIE FlLKlNGER X26 MADONNA EARLY DAYS X28 KATHY l_l_OYD X30 MEGA-MAID X31 CALENDAR GIRL X32 MAYFAIR X33 UTOPIA (4 DISKS) XdS GIRLS OF SPORT X49 PAGE 3 GIRLS X70 QON GON GIRL X71 TINA SMALL X91 CINDY CALENDAR 'OS XB6 HOT BABE 1 XD7 HOT BABE 2 X9B HOT BABE 3 XOD MOT BABE 4 XIOO HOT BABE S XT OT BIG GIRL II XT 02 FEMALE BODY BUILDER XT 03 GIRLS GIRLS XT 05 ELLE MACPHERSON XT 06
CLAUDIA SCHlFFER ¦ daWbem-VrerdpioceeBcrMcraMehMI :SS JOUBHAL - taiy to um&UCWM 3AIABASE many rbC+lpt IT Ai-count program _ dad n th. Bnl aecduM prog. Cicsaam foS? S^'m.p>TTS to.
U1013 DIAflY 2000 - Use this |ual like a ml diary U1014 TOTAL ECUPS - Disk magsaina 1 Uioll NEWCHEAT DISK V2.1 (2 dlaJu) -Inciuda* aoma games. FU U1&16 ULTRA ACCOUNT - Another very good account* program U1017 PRO LOTTERY 96 - The very latest A beat Wery program U1&18 PRO GREYHOUND - Lika Pro Gamble but 1« dog* U1CF19 AUTO STEREO GRAM V4 - Latest Magic eye generator U1C21 electronk: address book U1C22 PRO FOOTBALL 1.1 (2) Football predictor like Pro Gambia U1023 REMOATE - Reminder lor important daias U1024 SHAPE SMFTER V3.3 • The vary lata*! Mac emulator U1025 MESSY SB 3 - The (Meat PcoAmlga
dlak convatlar U1026 HO GAME INSTALLER 4 - Inatall toad* more game* lo HD Ut 027 SOFT MEMORY - Double your computer memory. Tht» veraion doe* not require HO or MMU. Give thia a by. Recommended U102S MAGIC USER INTERFACE VI.I - Update to version 13 U1029 DRIC 4SK EMULATOR (not 1 J) At Mat H worts U10» MSX U Emulator V2.1 - (WB3.0) MSX computer on U1031 900 AMIGA GAMES HINTS A CHEATS V4 (2 Disks) U1J32 VIRUS CHECKER VBJ (not WB1 J) - Latest _ LITTLE OFFICE 2 New Release Includes 550 Bualne** Letter* Word Processor Calendar Name & Address Database All this for only £1.99 .-,u„ r.,i f h!l uxus
HARD DRIVE & DISK DRIVE Space Double.
Tp/cteaoBtiraifai'Oi lo >r. Srqe sts Ftcrwoir U971EPU ¥« ONLY p SlffTAaLEFOflWB2.3 Build dozen eT prejaot Ineludad »r. Aocerater for £1 put your Amiga In loweroaaa, um TC perf >g Ol-At drive, wot H rocommend, not suitable for bwQlnnwi ___3j4isk*»t only ES.OO PLEASE ORDER A DISK CATALOGUE ADD 70P OR 3 X FIRST CLASS STAMPS WITH You've Framed i»o«n frames; download Netscape or lExplore now!".
Of course, the majority of PC and Mac owners already use one or other of these browsers, and users on other platforms cannot employ them anyway, so such messages are a waste of time and effort.
Even now that frames have come to the Amiga, 1 would not recommend adopting such an approach if you feel the need to use frames on your home page. Not only are there plenty of computer users out there without access to a frames-capable browser, who you would be alienating completely by ignoring (and as Amiga owners, we ail know how irritating being ignored by the masses can be); but there are actually NS and IE3 users who prefer not to browse using frames because of the way they cause the forwards and backwards navigation buttons to misbehave. The best approach is sim¬ ply to cater for frames
and no-frames browsers at the same time. This is easily achieved with a little bit of extra HTML The most straightforward solution to the problem is to include a separate section that redirects frameiess browsers to an alternative index - even if this is only a simple text affair.
Alternatively you could indude the frameiess Genuine Interactive Content! Honest Have you have been getting annoyed at seeing vague headlines like that splashed all over the Web, ranting about the possibilities of Java (which admittedly are many) when it doesn't look like we'll be getting the oppor¬ tunity of seeing them realised on the Amiga in the forseeable future)? Well, soon it might be possible to get your own back. A new Ibrowse plug-in is under development which should make Amiga-specific Web games and applications a reality. It is called PlugSocket, and you can find out more about it
at http://www.innotts.co.uk/~ntcholas/socket/main.html. With HTML developing at such a phenomenal rate, there has been a marked increase in what I see as Web snobbery among the HTML cognoscenti, with their high-end PC work¬ stations and state-of-the-art superbrowsers. Their message is simple: Certain machines and soft¬ ware configurations are superior. Nowhere is this snobbery more obvious than with frames, which seem to be taking over the Web despite being, in this writer's opinion at least, about as useful to the surfer as a chocolate teapot.
Frames are, of course, something of a novelty on the Amiga still. The pre-release demo of Voyager NC, which has just become available at the time of writing, offers the first genuine frame support for an Amiga browser. As you wifi know if you have tried it out or read a review, the Voyager implementation of frames leaves a fair bit to be desired. However, it's nice that at long last all those badly written sites which do not offer a no-frames alternative will finally be acces¬ sible, and even if Voyager's handling does not improve by the final release, at least Ibrowse and Aweb promise frame
support soon.
The problem with frames is that Web authors who use browsers such as Netscape Navigator and Internet Explorer 3 (which can handle frames easily) have a tendency to put messages on their homepages saying "This site requires Dave Cusick wishes that Web authors wouldn't play Jeremy Beadle so often... index within the tags, thereby avoiding having to create a whole new HTML document - although this would have the minor drawback of slightly slowing the loading speed of the page for everyone.
Even if your site uses fancy split-screen frame effects, with a separate HTML document in each part, then catering for no-frames users need not be an impossibility with a little bit of lateral thinking. After the frames code simply add a section containing a table and then use table rows or columns containing the data from those Other documents, Example HTML code can be found on AmigaPhil’s Frame Page (http://www.axismun-
di. org/Cf/spiraea/amigaphil/frame.html), which largely inspired
this rant. It also contains details of how authors testing
their pages with certain browsers might unwittingly be
allowing bad HTML through, making their pages unreadable to
many other surfers.
I'd advise all HTML authors to take a look at this page and try to adopt the attitude that al!
Surfers should be catered for. It is fine to throw in a few enhancements here and there for users of particularly advanced browsers, but make sure that everyone else is able to get as much as possible out of your site in terms of content.
Don't be a Web snob.
Contact If you wish to contact me, my e-mail address is dave@dcus.demon.co.uk. Questions, suggestions and feedback are alf more than welcome. I also have a homepage, which can be found at http;//www.dcus.demon.co.uk/. Itensfe mmte ffo© Paul Overaa clears up a few misconceptions about sound samples fctathemotician It's often suggested that a good rufe of thumb when taking sound samples is to use a sampling rate ¦¦¦Ml at least twice that of the frequency of the note being sampled. This stems from a piece of mathematics known as the Nyquist theorem and whilst the theory itself is sound enough -
in practice everything goes pear- shaped.
When you listen to a piece of music, you are listening to masses of sound waves of varying frequencies and amplitudes. Sound samplers measure the amplitude of the various parts of such waveforms and so build up numerical, or digital, copies of the original sounds. Obviously one major factor as far as the final, absolute, sample quality goes is the quality of the original source. If however we restrict ourselves to being interested only in duplicating whatever 'quality' is present in the original sound then, at the end of the day, there are two fundamental variables to consider - sampling rate
and the resolution of the numbers used to define the amplitude.
Fast sampling rates would intuitively be expected to give better waveform detail as would increasing the range of numbers used to represent the amplitude measurements. The Amiga's 8 bit digitisation then is not as good as say CD technology sampling which uses 16 bit amplitude resolution. The bottom line, however, is that the very process of any sampling of a continuous waveform always leads to informa¬ tion loss!
Nyquist relationship The question now is how much information is likely to be lost, and what factors govern such loss? This is where the Nyquist theorem comes in. Before you start wondering why so much effort has been put into the mathematics of sound sampling let me hasten to add that it wasn't interest in sound sampling (in the musi¬ cal sense) that provided the driving force for the mathematical research.
Physicists, instrumental chemists, and many others scientists have been interested in the ins and outs of continuous waveform sampling for a long time. In recent years research into radar signal processing, ultrasound and sonar signal processing, image processing (robot vision and so on), broken signal recovery techniques and even speech recognition have all involved the mathematics of sampling continuous wave¬ forms.
Therefore when low-cost sound sampling took off, all manner of generalised results and theorems were available for re-application. The one you hear mentioned the most, the Nyquist theorem, provides the basic relationship between the spectrums of continuous and dis¬ crete time signals.
The Nyquist sampling criterion relates charac¬ teristics of a sample to those of its original waveform. In fact the general Nyquist criteria is obtained by taking a mathematical representa¬ tion of a signal's frequency spectrum and apply¬ ing some quite complicated Fourier transform mathematics.
The result is a relationship which, though it can be stated in many ways, essentially says this: A continuous time waveform, when sam¬ pled at a frequency greater than twice the maxi¬ mum frequency component in its spectrum, can be reconstructed completely from the sampled waveform. This is often (wrongly) taken to imply that if you are sampling a sound with a frequen¬ cy of, say, 2KHz you need to collect your sample at a frequency of at least twice this, ie 4KHz, to get decent results. In real-life things are not quite so simple.
The snag Suppose you wanted to take a sample of the open sixth (E) string of a guitar. With a normally tuned guitar this string has a frequency of about
82. 4Hz and, according to the Nyquist relation¬ ship, you would
actually expect that a sampling rate of 165 samples per
second (or as near above that figure as your sampler can get)
would be fine. In practice, these sorts of predict¬ ed
sampling rates lead to samples that, sound- wise, are a
complete and utter dead loss!
Why? Because when you hit something like a guitar string you don't just get the fundamental note frequency, you get a whole range of other frequencies produced. These harmonics (some¬ times called overtones) can include frequencies which are a factor of ten or more higher than the main note. Harmonics affect the timbre of the note and are in fart what make the charac¬ teristic sounds of a particular note a guitar dif¬ ferent from that of an oboe, harpsichord or other instrument. Anyone thinking they can get away with low sampling frequencies, just because they are sampling sounds that have a
low fundamental tone frequency, are in for a nasty surprise.
The Nyquist relationship tells you that you must use a sampling frequency at least twice the frequency of the highest frequency compo¬ nent present in the original waveform. The Nyquist relationship, as a practical tool for esti¬ mating sampling frequencies is effectively use¬ less because you can never really be sure of the frequencies present in the harmonics of a par¬ ticular musical instrument!
The Nyquist theorem does however tell us something that is qualitatively useful - It sug¬ gests that when things start going astray it is the higher frequency information which is lost first.
This in turn suggests that when checking the sampling quality of guitar note, for example, we should be listening not to the fundamental note but for the presence, or absence, of those all- important harmonics that give the note its sparkle. The only real solution then is to forget any ideas of calculating sample rates and so forth, and do what musicians have always done
- listen to the sounds and let your ear tell you whether you have
a good sample or not!
Amiga Computing Paul Overaa illustrates a use of Arexx for Amiga users whose interests lie in music & Midi sequencing liexx and Mia Amiga's Sarial Davie* o clock clock clock clock c lock c lock c lock c lock c lock found found f ound found f ound f ound f ound f ound found n the face of it, Arexx and Midi are a rather unlikely combination. The very fact that Arexx is an interpreted language means Arexx script execu¬ tion is relatively slow making it far from ideal for writing Midi programs. And it's true - no one in their right mind would think seriously about writing a fully-fledged Midi
utility using Arexx!
This does not mean, however, that Arexx is unsuitable for all Midi applications. It is perfectly feasible to create small Midi diagnostic utilities, scripts that allow you to deliver Midi clock mes¬ sages and so on and, best of all, these types of things are not difficult to do once you under¬ stand some of the Arexx/Midi ground rules.
In order to transmit or receive Midi informa¬ tion you must firstly set up the Amiga's serial device. Arexx, unlike languages like Basic, doesn't have any built in instructions for control¬ ling serial port characteristics so you have to dive into your Workbench and use the serial Preferences editor. Select 8 bits+1 stop bit transmission at a Baud rate of 31250, with no handshaking and no parity and then save the settings to disk.
Once the serial device has been properly configured, AmigaDOS provides two high-level serial device handlers that can then be easily used from Arexx - SER: provides a stream-ori¬ ented, buffered, interface whilst AUX: gives unbuffered serial I/O (in other words Midi infor¬ mation will be transmitted immediately you write it to AUX:). If you want to use the AUX: handler you must ensure it is up and running - on new Amigas you just drag the AUX icon from the Storage/DOSDrivers drawer to the WBStartup drawer. The AUX: device will then be available from the time you switch on your machine.
Message transmission The actual Midi message transmission and reception issues are reasonably straightforward because both SER: and AUX: serial device han¬ dlers are treated just like conventional disk files.
For example, to open, the AUX: device this sort of coding arrangement couid be used: if Open<l,'aux:','n')) then do I* serial device now open! */ end For transmitting bytes of Midi information you don't get a choice - the character-based WritechQ function must be used. If you try to use the line-oriented WritelnQ routine things will fall to pieces because this latter function generates a terminal linefeed character whenev¬ er data is transmitted. To transmit a message As an example, suppose you wished to create a program change 1 message on Midi channel 1.
Internally Midi channels 1-16 are represented by the numbers 0-15 and the 128 program change settings by 0-127. Since program change messages on channel n have a status byte Cn hex followed by the program change setting, we therefore need to transmit CO hex followed by a zero byte. This string could be defined using the Arexx concatenation operator (||) like this... ¦ idt_aesaage=1 CO1x111DO1x Put all these ideas together and you end up with a short script shown in listing 1 that opens the serial device and transmits the required message.
Collection Loops The Arexx ReadchO function needs to be used for reading incoming Midi data and this requites both a file handle and the number of bytes to be read. In this case, since you’d not normally know how much Midi information was going to appear at the serial port, you'd need to loop-read incoming Midi data one byte at a time. Listing two gives some skeleton example code and notice incidentally, how we force entry into the collection loop by setting an exit flag variable to zero and using the Arexx logical NOT (~) operator to 'invert' the sense of the do-while conditional test!
It must be said that midi message collection, call (Ht«ch(l,iidi_iess»ge) you've placed in a variable called midi_message you would use a statement such as: since it normally involves both collection of bytes and the identification of status byte values, is always the more difficult task as far as Arexx scripts are concerned (this however is purely a speed thing - you’ll find that it's difficult for the loop to keep up with incoming data).
Least worth a try OK, so on the collection side you might hit a few snags but if you're into Midi there’s little to lose by experimenting (other than some of your time). Those of you who take an interest in things like Midi sysex message creation and so on will also find that practice in transmitting and receiving simple sysex messages is a great way to come to terms with hexadecimal number conversion.
I* prog_ehange.rm */ if <0pen(1,,at>x:,,,u*)) then do «idi_iessag(s'CD’i||'OO'x call nMt«l(1,»tdi_iMMge) call Closed) end Listing 1: A nice easy program change message transmission example I* byte_collection.rexx */ exit_f lag-0 if (OpenO,1 ser:*r*r*)) then do do while '"exit_flag byte=Readctid,T) say 'Nidi byte collected1 /* ie do something with byte */ I* and set exit flag when finished */ I* with loop collection *1 end call Closed) end Listing 2: A typical Midi message collection loop Amiga Computing BLACK A ms trad DMP2WHQM Aimtrad DMP4000 Amstrad PCW 8156/8512/I.Q3500 Brother M 1009/
1024/1109/1209 Citizen 120IVLSP10/Swift 24N Commodore MRS 12201230 Epson LQIOO Epwm LQ20Q/«0/50(Wm50 Epson FX/.MX/RX80/FX/L.X800 Epson LXM/W90 Msnnrsmann Tally 80/81 NEC Pinnriter P22Q0 OKI ML1S2/I&V192/193/I95 Est 16 Years j Inkjet / Bubbteiet Cartridges I off 2± 5± Canon B.1lQ/10ex/20 Cartridge 1630 16,10 15.90 Canon BJC 4000 Black Refill 7.00 6.8(1 6.60 Canon BJC 4000 Colour Refill 11.00 lOJtO 10.60 Commodore MPSI270 Cartridge 10.80 10.60 10.40 HP D'jet 500 Series Black Cartridge 21.00 20.80 20.60 HP D'jet 500 Series Tri*CblourCart. 22.50 2230 22.10 HP Thinkjrt/Quietjet Cartridge 10.80
10.60 10.40 A500/600/1200 PSU A1200 Keyboard A600 Keyboard A500 M/Board v6 CD-32 PSU Inkjet / Bubbteiet Refill Kits Apple Sljtmtler 830 for 2 x 20ml Refills Canon BJ !0.l0ex/20 Canon BJ 200/230 Epson Stylus 400/800/1000 Epson Stylus Colour Black Epson Stylus Colour Colour HPD’Jel 500 Series Black HP D’jel 500 Series Tri-Col Star SJ4S 830 for 2 x 20mJ Refills 830 for 2 x 20ml Refills 830 for 2 x 20ml Refills
8. 00 for 2 x 12ml Refills 1030 for 9ml of each Col
11. 00 for 2 x 40ml Refills 1100 Tor 12ml of each Col 830 for 2 x
20ml Refills DRIVES ¦ PCBS Postage & Packing add £3.00
- M/a-1 Computerfcervu a dswri fi O A tontn US I
* Price Includes PARTS, LABOUR & VAT
* 90 Day Parts and Labour Warranty
* 24 hour turn-around on most repairs
* Includes FULL DIAGNOSTIC, SERVICE & SOAK
* Upgrades fitted free with repair
* If drive/keyboard needs replacing + £10 (add £6.00 for return
carriage) AMIGA A1200 Repairs only €48.99Fully Inclusive
* ***** Repairs while-you-wait add £10.00 ****** mipomnmm We are
the largest distributor and retailer of Amiga spares ft! In the
UK with an inventory of some 150,000+ parts. Large quantity
discounts and catalogue available to tra AS00 Internal Drive
A600/1200 Internal Drive KickStart 2.05 Super-Buster IC A520
Modulator Xchg 8520 CIA mm EHEKHEEl EEH33 WESm \ AMIGA PC
KEYBOARD ADAPTOR (All Jtflilott) • V PC hrtoanl -t. I DART
Computer Services SALES 105 London Road (0116)247 0059 tfe
LEICESTER _ fax<0116)2558643 tg LE2 0PF Ehj EE ^ JS- MtlW FIXED
PRICE ONLY £38.99 inclj (A500/+, A500 and CD32 Only) Printer
Ribbons Loir 2± 5+ 10+ BLACK ioff 2+ £+ 10+ 230 16 5 145 125
Panasonic K-\ PI 11V1124/1140
3. 46 331
3. 11 19]
3. 66 331 331 3,11 Panasonic KXPKWII BOW 1592 239 174 154 134 185
2. 70 230 230 Panasonic KXP212.V2I80 4,95 430
4. 60
4. 40 3,90
3. 75 35 335 StlkoshaSI.90/92/95
5. 70 535 535 5-15 185
2. 70 230 230 Star LCMONIM 239 114
1. 94
1. 84 430 4J5
4. 15
3. 95 Star I.C200
3. 00 185 165 145
4. 10
3. 95
3. 75 335 Star I.C24* IQ/200 186 171 151 131
3. 45 330
3. 10 190 COLOUR Lflff 2± 5± 10+ 190
2. 75 235 235 Citizen Swift 24
11. 95
11. 80
11. 60 1130 112
1. 97
1. 77 1,67 Panasonic KXP2123/21S0
10. 63
10. 48 10,28
9. 88
3. 90
3. 75 335 335 SurLCl&TQhOO too 535
5. 65
F. 25
3. 03 238 168 148 Star I.C200
9. 78 9,63
9. 43
9. 03
3. 17
3. 02 182 zt>: Star LC24-10/200
9. 63 9,48
9. 28 838 Thest- arc just a small selection of our Ribbons - Ring
for those nnt listi'il Various njrt.CoyersjtYailahlc from
C3.99 Ring Fnr Cartridges & Refills nnt listed Normal UK
Delivery £2.00, Next Day £7.50 Prices INCLUDE VAT (@ \TA%)
Lowest Priced Top Quality Ribbons, Inkjets, Toners & Disks
01543 250377 Ring us or send cheques to: 01543 250377 Owl
Associates Ltd. Dept 515, Owl House, 5 The Ii ram hies,
Lichfield, Staffs VVSI4 9SE Official GmrmmenI A Fihu uiitmul
urilei Bulk Branded
l) D HD DD
111) io Disks £5 £6 £6 £9 25 Disks £10 £11 _ _ 50 Disks £16 £18
£24 £36 100 Disks £29 £33 £41 £66 250 Disks £65 £76 £96 £153
500 Disks £125 £148 £187 £288 AU Disks Certified 1007c ERROR
FREE & INCLUDE FREE Labels Lockable 34" Boxre/Praws Other
Boxes & Wallets 100 Capacity Box 5.99 3H" 10 Cap. Boxes 1.50
50 Capacity Box 4.99 W fi Cap. Wallets 3.99 240 Capacity
Draw 18.99 Lockable CD Drawers 30 Capacity 16.99 3#" Disks &
Disk Boxes Ring us and WE WILL BEAT all other Ribbon prices
HiQ Limited Tel 01525 211327 Tryourwebsiteatwww.hiq.co.uk
email steve@hiqltd.demon.co.uk 9tA%kisi^L Siamese System
V1.5 The Siamese System was designed to enable Ihe computer
user lo have multiple platforms (Amiga WB3+, Windows 95,
MacOS) appear as if they are a single machine, so as to make
the user more productive. It does this by taking the two
machines and a possible MacOS emulator on the Amiga and
using one keyboard / mouse / monitor. Once this is setup you
operate one keyboard and mouse on all ol your software, look
at one suitable monitor that can handle all the screen modes
you wish to use and then as far as you are concerned you
just run software, you need not worry if that software is
Win95.
MacOS or Amiga software because it justs runs in front of you. Obviously this is backed up by the fact that the Siamese System has all of the drives from the different operating systems mounted within the Amiga Operating System so that you can share files instantly belween applications.
With the standard pack, tile transfer is via serial, but if you have a suitable SCSI card on the Amiga and PC and a shared SCSI drive for buffering, you can send the flies via a very high speed SCSI network developed for and included in the standard Siamese System software. Rates of severa; Mb/sec.
Have been recorded with a high speed SCSI network setup between Ihe machines. Please note that it you have the SCSI network installed you still need the Serial connection for the Siamese control software link.
You can cut and paste text between applications and other functions are available to make the syslem integrated, sharing ol printers, programs like Winexe or MCI which allow the Amiga to launch PC applications from the Amiga or control PC MultiMedia devices, even from Oopus. There is also a full Arexx port for calling Siamese functions from olher programs. , One more feature to be added in March as a low cost upgrade is RTG. This system opens Amiga screens on the PC graphics card enabling from 256 up to 16M colours, RjMP higher resolutions and a flicker free display for all Amigas .. , with
WB3+. 0 4 a r\r- So you want a Siamese System but need a PC?
Buy your Pentium PC from HiQ, the people who understand both the Amiga users needs and the advantages of using both platforms.
Or as Mat Bettinson from CU Amiga wrote: “I consider this to be the most revolutionary product of the year for the Amiga" Includes Siamese v1.5 rrp £149.95 Free On Site Warranty Siamese System V1.5 voted Hardware Product of 1996 by Amiga User International Siamese Pentium PC Systems include Siamese System vl.5, Mouse, Keyboard, Windows 95, Free VldeoCD Player, 12 Month on site Warranty, 16mb EDO Ram,
1. 2gb Hard Drive, 2mb PCI Graphics, 16 bit Sound card, 256k
cache.
The Siamese System is developed in the UK by HiQ Limited Gable End, 2 The Square, Hockliffe, Bedfordshire, LU7 9NB Tel 01525 211327 fax 01525 211328 Payment can be made by Visa, Mastercard, Cheque. 2.5% Surcharge applies for credit cards except Connect or Delta, StampOnlT!
Part 2 Paul Overaa continues development of his date stamping utility For anyone who missed the first instal¬ ment here's a brief recap of the story so far. For this particular project we're creating a utility that can identify all files in a selected directory and build an addition¬ al set of files that hold extracted date stamp infor¬ mation in ASCII form. As a framework for the utili¬ ty I've chosen to use the skeleton Intuition code, originally provided on the February issue coverdisk and, last month, a directory handling routine was added to this that locked a user-spec¬ ified drawer and
looped through all the entries present.
StfllcrjaE DateSta»p,0 LONS ds, Oars
1. 1.7!
LONS dsjinute LONG dsjltk LABEL ds SIZEOF Nuiber of days since Ninutes past aidnight Ticks past minute Listing 1: Within the FiielnfoBlock date stamps are stored using this internal form ever used, I've chosen to copy 32 bytes of each entry and have therefore set up the filenames buffer like this: fitertsmes ds.b 100*32 Collecting the file information is reasonably straightforward and, having performed an initial ExamineO on the directory itself, details of indi¬ vidual files are obtained from a FiielnfoBlock structure that is being modified as successive calls are made to the D05 library's
ExNextQ function.
Within the FileinfoBlock there's a field called fib_FileName which holds the filename and another called fib_OateStamp which contains the date stamp information. Our task this month is simply to extract and store copies of these items in readiness for creating the date stamp files themselves.
Which allows this long-word copying loop to be used... Lea tib_fiLeNaoe(a2l,a6 filename pointer ¦oveq *8-1,dQ long uord count-1 .locpZ aove.l (a61t,(a3)t dbra dO,.loopZ This isn't an earth shattering improvement but it is quicker than copying 30 bytes individually. The same approach, incidentally, has been used with the date stamps and, since the size of the OaieStamp structure size is available as the sys¬ tem constant ds_SIZEOF (see listing 1 for structure details), I've defined the datestamps buffer using... Vou might, at this stage, be asking why we don't just create the date stamp files
during the initial directory searching loop. The reason is that any date stamp files created would then also be detected by the ExNextO calls being made - and this would result in the file searching loop then picking up those new file entries as well, Needless to say, this Is something we definitely do not want to happen!
100*ds_SIZE0F datestanpsds.b and copied each date stamp using.,. lib pointer ¦oveq count-1 ,loop3 move.I dbra fib_0ateSLamp(a2),adfilenaie Kds_$IZE0f/<)-1,d0 ton} uord [a()*,(aA)t dO,.loop3 Buffer creation For filename and datestamp storage I've opted for setting up Static buffer areas with space for 100 files (an arbitrary value but one I thought would cope with most potential applications). Although a maximum of only 30 of the 108 characters available for a filename in the FiielnfoBlock are All these copying operations occur within the main directory examining loop and, by increment¬ ing a
count variable (fiiename_count), it's possible Convert&ates PmtFileNaie iovei.1 dS-d1/aO-a1,-(a7) loveq 10, dO ¦ oveq 10,dl ¦ove.t inndou_p,aO ¦ove.t vd_RPort(aO),aO tea iteit3,a1 CALLSYS PrintlTeit, InteltionBase ¦ove.t
* 10,dl CALLSYS Delay,JOSBase jsr ClearFileNaie aovei.L
ta7f+,dO-d1/a(J-a1 rts window's rastport restore registers
Listing 3: Intuitcxt based routines like these are being used
to display both the selected drawer and the fifes found .loopC
details Conver t Da t e lea fit(nz»ei,zO fez dztestaips,z1 Lea
iteat3,a3 lea imt(,zA love.v filenaee count,dO sub q J1,dC
¦ove.t aO,i t_ITex t(a3> »ove.1 zO,it_ITeit[a4) Jzr
PrintFileNaae j zddz.l 132,aO zdda.t «ds_SIZE0F,a1 jsr
CcnvertDate dbra d0,.toop4 rts rts print Listing 2: Once the
filename anti tlate stamp details have been col¬ lected this
loop code processes the individual entries to keep track of the
number of files that have been dealt with. This count can then
be used with more loop code in order to process the individual
pairs of frlename/datestamp entries and the framework for this
section of the code can be found in listing 2.
Healthy pessimism Any low-level coder who tells you they never get things wrong ain't to be believed. Silly slips are all too easy to make and because of this, I'm a firm believer in always ensuring that some sort of visi¬ ble output is available during development. A few well placed temporary routines are usually all that's necessary to keep you alert to anything strange your code might be doing.
For this particular application it's obviously use¬ ful to know that files present in the chosen draw¬ er are being correctly identified and one check is to print the filenames which are copied to the filename buffer.
What I've done with this month's code then is to modify the IntuiText print routines so filenames appear briefly on the screen as the filename buffer contents are examined. It is easy enough to do - the filename is displayed using PrintlTextf), then a small delay is produced using the DOS library's DelayO function, then we remove the filename by re-displaying using the screen's back¬ ground colour.
Listing 3 shows the type of print routine changes that have been made and when you experiment with the latest version (code and source for these are on the coverdisk) you will indeed see that the correct filenames are dis¬ played. This of course is pretty fair confirmation that we're now able to choose a drawer, fill up buffers with the required pieces of file informa¬ tion - and properly extract those items!
Before creating the new files for holding date stamp information we need to convert the date stamp info into text form. This can be done from the same loop that is displaying the filenames and if you look back at listing 2 you'll see that 1 have in fact included a dummy ConverlDate refer¬ ence within this loop. Needless to say the task next month is to expand this area of the code so this conversion process actually occurs.
Preserve registers Amiga Computing I k X 100 MEGABYTES OF REMOVEABLE STORAGE ON ONE CARTRIDGE INCLUDES £30 OF EXTRA HlSoft's Amiga zip Tools software 25-50 wav SCSI lead converter One FREE zip cartridge lmz NEW NEW NEW NEW 2jt cd-rom Drive Classic Squirrel £fCAg* fliree cd-roms with cd-rom Drive THREE ItmcSSs CO-ROMS
• .. t2x CD-ROM Dfive Classic squirrel ^ Taree CD-ROMS —'-:J
CHOOSE ANY THREE FROM: Personal Suite C.4 Sweet Touch Clobai
Amiga Experience Utilities Experience ACA Experience !
* 4 w,tti surf squirrel m esq HiSoft Systems The Old School
Greenfield Bedford MK45 5DE phone 01525 718181 Fax 01525 713716
Email sales@hisoft.co.uk CALL OSOO 223 6GO FREE HiSoft
Systems—Your Safe Passage Through The Jungle iS®ft SYSTEMS NEW
LOW PRICES [Browse V1.1 0 (i*i1h frame suppod) £29.95
Net&Web............................£39.95 m Net&Web
2.........................£69.95 >
Termite................................£39.95 q
TermiteTCP.........................£39.95 life S Cinema4DV3
...............£199.95 UJ g CinemaWORLD..................£39.95
q CinemaFONT......................£39.95 I fe Studio II
Professional..........£49.95 o DiskMAGIC
2......................£39.95 ^ MaxonMAGIC
.....................£29.95 I fe
MediaMAGIC......................£49.95 BL q- Hi Soft C+
+.......................£169.95 ^^1 g HiSofl
C++Lite..................£79.95 g Devpac
3.............................£49.95 = Highspeed
Pascal...............£79.95 HiSoft tiASIC
2....................£49.95 I s
Ganiesniith.........................£79.95 | ^ ;e Twist 3
Database.................£99.95 5 ProFlight
Simulator.............£19.95 Aura
8..................................£34.95 M/M g Aura
16..................... £99.95 Clarity
16..........................£129.95 5?
ProMidi Interface................£24.95 ^ Megalosound......................£34.95 VideoMaster........................£69.95 flfe o VideoMasler RGB..............£109.95 M lu VideoMaster AGA................£79.95 S VideoMaster AGA Rgli .....£129.95 ||| ColourMaster......................£69.95 III sc Jar Drive leased)...................£449.00 o SMD-100 MPEG decoder .. £199.95 hL g Classic Squirrel ...............£69.95 Surf Squirrel........................£99.95 Iflfc > 2x CD-ROM Drive ic«-d> £89.95 l|fe 5 4x CD-ROM Drive <«.«» .... £129.95 ^ " 12x CD-ROM Drive <«stdi .. £229.95 ALL MAJOR CREDIT
CARDS ACCEPTED r NEW LOW PRICIS sail® Cinema4D V3 ... CinemaFONT ... CinemaWORLD Termite........................ TermiteTCP................. Studio II Professional .. DiskMAGlC 2.............. MaxonMACIC ..... MediaMAGIC.............. Upper Disk Tools ........ HiSoft C++................. HiSoft C + + Ute.......... Devpac 3..................... Highspeed Pascal....... HiSoft BASIC 2............ Gamesmith................. Twist 3 Database......... ProFlight Simulator..... Aura 8.......................... Aura 16........................ Clarily 16.................... ProMidi Interface .....
Megalosound .............. VideoMaster................ VideoMaster RGB........ VideoMaster AGA........ VideoMaster AGA RGB ColourMaster.............. Compatible with Ibrowse and most other browsers INCLUDES 120-PACE COLOUR/BW MANUAL TWENTY THOUSAND WEB PAGE SIZED GIFS AND JPEGS ON TWO COMPACT DISCS INCLUDES 10,000 Buttons 1,000 Dividers 500 Bullets 250 Textures 750 Backgrounds 1,000 Photos 250 Banners 7,000 Clip art images rowse HiSeft Zip Drive (inc all extras) .... £159.00 jaz Drive (cased) ..... £449.00 SMD-100 MPEG decoder .. £199.95 Classic Squirrel ...................£69.95 Surf
Squirrel........................£99.95 2x CD-ROM Drive <r.n«n £89.95 4x CD-ROM Drive (CAted) .... £129.95 12x CD-ROM Drive iu«d> ..£229.95 ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED POSTAGE £2, COURIER £4 (NEXT DAY £6) (IIP, JAZ, SMD-100 & CD-ROM DRIVES BY COURIER Ontff FREE SURFIN' BOOK WITH NET&WEB2 HiSoft Systems The Old School Greenfield Bedford MK45 5DE Phone 01525 718181 Fax 01525 713716 Email sales@hisoft.co.uk CALL FOR OUR COMPETITIVE PRICES ON 33.6BPS MODEMS HiSoft Systems—Your Safe Passage Through The Jungle 1 . Fs 7 1 his tTstmcti farife- by wjerietar, 1ft tiir. It this jbge ¦ ¦ twe vc
fears.it is -s.to *1* -mrt In tcait than o;i. :f Un . Up'- dvr-yr sh? Tits out a 03*1 am cry,the nici then rHCTUt tut dwwr i*1 st?u au?j fron it in fut^eTrey Uarn to liri- ft Satlt df MT kith 2 fllTui* •>' Uwelw-UJt they fc*« to Urr. How. I>» fn a , JH *r- intoHi'wl »>*. 3->t stilt hw to a t*i*t to twit.
3 f ’S ’he vLKan r.i s* frees re* thr or. The ci; tientv*

Click image to download PDF

Merci pour votre aide à l'agrandissement d'Amigaland.com !


Thanks for you help to extend Amigaland.com !
frdanlenfideelhuitjanoplptroruessvtr

Connexion

Pub+

31.5% 
18.4% 
6.2% 
5% 
4.9% 
4.5% 
2.8% 
2% 
1.4% 
1.1% 

Today: 21
Yesterday: 104
This Week: 324
Last Week: 762
This Month: 2880
Last Month: 2931
Total: 63948

Information cookies

Cookies are short reports that are sent and stored on the hard drive of the user's computer through your browser when it connects to a web. Cookies can be used to collect and store user data while connected to provide you the requested services and sometimes tend not to keep. Cookies can be themselves or others.

There are several types of cookies:

  • Technical cookies that facilitate user navigation and use of the various options or services offered by the web as identify the session, allow access to certain areas, facilitate orders, purchases, filling out forms, registration, security, facilitating functionalities (videos, social networks, etc..).
  • Customization cookies that allow users to access services according to their preferences (language, browser, configuration, etc..).
  • Analytical cookies which allow anonymous analysis of the behavior of web users and allow to measure user activity and develop navigation profiles in order to improve the websites.

So when you access our website, in compliance with Article 22 of Law 34/2002 of the Information Society Services, in the analytical cookies treatment, we have requested your consent to their use. All of this is to improve our services. We use Google Analytics to collect anonymous statistical information such as the number of visitors to our site. Cookies added by Google Analytics are governed by the privacy policies of Google Analytics. If you want you can disable cookies from Google Analytics.

However, please note that you can enable or disable cookies by following the instructions of your browser.

Visitors

Visite depuis
03-10-2004
Visite depuis
23-02-2014