Sponsors

FacebookTwitterGoogle Bookmarks

The general intellectualt moral, and cultural climate of an era. 2) Words of dubious u isdom from the editor of Amiga World. Starting off the new year I thought that I would begin by explaining why, what and where Zeitgeist came from. I get asked about the title of my editorial page often. There are usually twro kinds of questions: first (usually from European types), “Where did you come up with ‘Zeitgeist?’ It is such a perfect word”; and second, “I enjoy reading your column, and. . .by the way, what does ‘Zeitgeist’ mean?” I think the dictionary definition above nails it fairly well, but as it relates to this column, I use Zeitgeist to mean the current state of the Amiga, the magazine, Commodore and anything else that I can think of. And, well.. .read on. Video is the topic of our feature article in this issue and I think we went a long way toward demystifying the new phenomenon of desktop video. With the thousands of VCRs and video cameras being sold, it seems natural that Amiga owners would start putting all this equipment together to come up with some very interesting results. If you have an Amiga and some kind of video equipment (or plan to buy a video camera or VCR), you will definitely wTant to read this issue carefully. We are also finishing up the buyer’s guide started in the last issue. (What? There’s more?) In this issue you will find the first of our hardware buyer’s guides. We plan to be continually updating both the hardware and the software buyer’s guides from now on. By Guy Wright As far as the magazine is going, we are doing fine. All of you have helped make Amiga- World the best publication for the Amiga owfner. We wanted to go monthly with a March issue, but the economics just aren’t there yet. Double your costs without doubling your income and you’ll go broke pretty quickly. Since we aren’t going to double your subscription price and we aren’t going to charge the advertisers twice as much, we have to wait until there are enough advertisers willing to run adds 12 times a year rather than six. I think it will happen by the summer, but I have been wrong once or twice before. Commodore seems to be doing better these days. They announced a profitable quarter. Sales of the Amiga, C-64 and 128 were good, and there has been talk about a new Amiga or two scheduled for release in early ’87. We’ll keep you informed about any new developments. The genlock was just about ready for shipping at the time of this writing (see the sidebar on page 19 for more about Genlock), and the Sidecar should be along any month now.

Click image to download PDF

Amiga World Vol 03 01 1987 Jan Feb

Document sans nom Video
Sanpling Sounds
Buying
Hardware
Creating Intuition
Menus
TH70 65 B
Digital Solution* Inc. brings yog the light with easy lo use software specifically cFfrrigned fo use the power of your Commodore Amiga
Announcing LRD’W Writer LPD* Planner LPD* Filer loch ol th**e programs give you all ftie functions you would Onpfrct Siam piroduclMtv sett- ware plus the following unique features:
UPD tf Writer, LPD'" Planner and LfD'* Filer can run Individually or together When running together information can be transferred fiom one appiicafian 10 anoihcr manually, or automaticalty using "links'', a transfer procedure unique to LPD Software.
The software allows you lo see all projiecfe and applications through windowing. Each application can then be doomed" up to Full screen size. Vbu -can execute a command by using the mouse, function keys or short cut" com mand sequences A "suspend" feature allows you 10 pul away all applications you are cur rently working on and a "resume” command will restore the application* to Ihe presuspended stale. Ajso featured is on line memory resident help In addition, LPD* Writer,
LPK> V Planner and tPP ""Fiier each have their own very special
characteMstics
Powerful software lhairs simple to use.
Digital Solutions Inc.
3U Wcfl+inim Co >rr Nr.- ?
Richnwna Nil, Ontario
Carincja L4t! 16v
feepr-iO
1414] 731-0775
UPO1 Wuil-bt
- ii.iii j.iIh 4a£umeril5 can t4 id ten cn »tin samofeM ¦¥i£h o Ihu-i jHw w-rdcw can to* ope ned c-pi a document doj scioen rapro onimon al document os- Ihcywfl tx- pnniM Imcludmg line spacing. -superscript and HfcKnphl cm screen hooders and taolw? Underlining bofcfl&cc and italc entrance it** n I “• +« *1
Word Processor
Iff} ' PLANNER 5p'P«l3lTMt1
rnjftpio spiacdsnne'iscan tw msnjw- lalcda! Ona imra morn- lhai one- wr-dcw can m :.ip«ni :i cm anf scr-ood jfiwi ipia-dd npir ct 2commas 6*534 r:.:w>. p rlHwnjn. F* nioy
stfh rtn M dh0kiY*d urtdwlrtttd
h. ril:Hi>-+i :?rcl *fctajGiS c-i* d-mi%. Brw-:jiui ii. Fib- -sphiand iIikSck j Dai Gi'aJablt
vuiiublu nisfhcoljmn5 horizontal vincal and'smoT racatajtallnr
Upn PILE V thu I'j Lh!xk Li1
h. jii piiH dalabaua cari bo- used ol Omlfli
more Iha ane wrdcw can oc?n«j oam w
go a vpccil-: database muili p-agc- rcca'd laipouh t-xholdlvcc-s nurrypnc. Chprw*?!. KHjnnl
dalf lime- nortf USCr-JjC rot-lp- O'dfl! N* htiI-ihi -::rd ¦¦Inlni.i I In? I-:! -TnU«fc
:!i,rrnj Mwjr
rviv I m visiWd ufi ffiuli ilA
tii'lit-. -ini;11:i=iIF lt*> a I iplJh.t IiUi!. IO- tlffl OCCASS.
I h1.1u11 qoi-iaiaiisn including hcadaf i
Vhyeis and pocard by rcccxd coJculG onb
Why Electronic Arts is Committed to the Amiga, Part II
The Class of ’86
Last year, we challenged our best software artists with the audio-visual horsepower of the Amiga. They responded.
DeluxePaint is now the standard in personal computer graphics. DeluxeVideo is mak- ing "desktop video” a reality. Marble Madness is the first arcade game you can take home in your shirt pocket.
And that's just the beginning.
Brian Fargo The Bard’s Tale
The best new dungeon fantasy of 1986, impressively redesigned for the Amiga. See now ugly an ogre can be.
R. J. Mical (seated)
Co-designer of the Amiga has a top-secret game in the works. Can he really make the Amiga stand on its head ’
Glenn Tenney
Adventure Construction Set
Build your own adventures. Or let the computer make them. Or play the nine built in.
Larry Reed Marble Madness
Race marbles through wildly-colored 3-D mazes. Amaze your friends.
Rick Koenig (seated)
Grand Prix
See pixels fly at 250 mph. Hear the turbos whine. Taunt tailgaters in your rear-vieu mirror
Damon Slye Arcticfox
Tanks at war. Arctic storms with lightning. 3-D smart opponents. Rumbles
Eddie Dombrower (seated)
Earl Weaver Baseball
The crack of the bat. The voice of the coach. The seams on the ball.
Moses Ma
Next generation typing instruction. Built-in artificial intelligence gives your fingers tips.
R. D. Rosenberg DeluxePrint
tor full-color greeting cards, stationery, calendars, and more What you see is what you print.
Vrismtmena.
Music.
Mike Wallace Return to Atlantis
A 3-D undersea “interactive movie* Water-tight animation.
Anne Westfall, Jon Freeman Archon II: Adept
An action-ssrategy classic. With panning hi-fi stereo.
Adventur:e'Cc cr itofi Set, Arctidbx.THe Bard's Tale. BeiuxeMuiic, DeiUxeBasnt. DeluxePnm. DeluxcVjdeo. Eari Vvfeaver Baseball. Ir»wni Music. Return to Atlantis and Electronic Am arc trademarks of Eeciroruc Am. Ami a is a trademark of Commodorc-Amiga. Inc. Marble Madness is a registered trademark of Atari Games Corporation For more mrormanon about these product* or to order direct, call Soi>2-t5-t525 fin California call S06'562 'IH2)- For a complete product catalog. Send 50c and a stamped sear-addressed f iO envelope to Electronic Am Catalog Offer. 1820 Gateway Drive, San Mateo. CA 94404 Thanks for your support.
AMIGA
Saw 1
Sounds
Buy
ng
Hardware
Creating In tui t i on Menus
AUDIO
, IN ,
R L
AUDIO HORIZ MIX POS
VIDEO
IN
AUDIO
r IN ,
R L
Commodore’s Amiga 1300 Genlock lets you overlay computer graphics on a video source: a powerful tool for Desktop Video. Cover graphics by Roger Goode: David Letterman video image courtesy of NBC, New York.
Publisher
Stephen Twombly
Editor-In-Chief
Guy Wright
Managing Editor Shawn Lafiamme
Review Editor Vinoy Laughner
Tecnnical Editor Robert M. Ryan
Contributing Editors
Peggy Herrington, David T, McClellan
Art Director
Rossiyn A. Frick
Designers Anne Dillon Roger Goode Karla Whitney
Production Advertising Suoervisor Hov ard G. Happ
Advertising Sales Manager
Stephen Robbins
Sales Representative Kenneth Blakeman
Ad Coordinator Heather Paquette 1-800-441-4403
Marketing Coordinator Wendie Haines
Customer Service Manager Barbara Harris
Secretary Sue Donohoe
West Coast Sales Giorgio Saluti, manager
1-415-328-3470 1060 Marsh Road Menlo Park, CA 94025
President CEO
James S. Povec
Vice-President Planning and Circulation
William P. Howard
Vice-President Finance
Roger Murphy
Director of Operations
Matt Smith
Executive Creative Director
Christine Destrempes
Special Projects Director
Jeff DeTray
Special Projects Manager Craig Pierce
Director of Corporate Production
Dennis Christensen
Typesetting Manager Linda P. Canale
Typographer Doreen Means
Manufacturing Manager
Susan Gross
Circulation Manager
Frank S. Smith
Direct Marketing Manager Bonnie Welsh
Single Copy Sales Manager Linda Ruth
Telemarketing Manager Kathy Boghosian 800-343-0728
Audits and Statistics Manager Susan Hanshaw Director of Credit Sales & Collections
William M. Boyer
AmigaWorld (ISSN 0883-2390) is an independent journal not connected with Commodore Business Machines, Inc. Amiga World is published bimonthly by CM' Communications Peterborough. Inc.. 80 Elm St.. Peterborough. N'H 03458. U.S. subscription rate is $ 19.97, one year. Canada and Mexico $ 22.97, one year. U.S. funds drawn on U.S. bank only. Foreign Surface $ 39,97. Foreign Air Mail $ 7-1.97, U.S. funds drawn on U.S. bank. Second class postage pending at Peterborough. N'H. And at additional mailing offices- Phone: 603-924-9471. Entire contents copyright 1986 by CM' Communications Peterborough, Inc. No part of this publication may he printed or otherwise reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Postmaster: Send address changes to AmigaWnUl. Subscription Services, PO Box 951.
F. irmingdale. NY 11735. Nationally distributed by International Circulation Distributors. Amiga World makes even- efTbrt to assure the accuracy of articles, listings and circuits published in the magazine. AmignU'mld assumes no responsibilits for damages due to errors or omissions.
JANUARY FEBRUARY 1987
S
T
C
N
E
T
N
0
VOLUME 3, NUMBER 1
FEATURES
als and folks like you and us. What desktop publishing is to the printed page, desktop video will be to the audio visual world.
ARTICLES
Caligari: Software for the Video Professional
By Stefan B. Lipson
This software for high-quality 3-D video animation and modeling will let you do things you didn’t know could be done on a microcomputer.
Digital Sound Samplers
By Peggy Herrington
Amiga music-world specialist Peggy H. introduces and discusses some sound sampling hardware and software products, Peggy thinks the Amiga is a “powerful electronic musical instrument, with an even more powerful built-in computer.”
Creating Menus with Intuition
By Vincent M. Hopson
A hands-on tutorial for the more serious Amigaphile on how to program Intuition menustrips and menu windows with C language.
Amiga Book Roundup
By Lou Wallace
From featherweight beginner’s intros to the megaton ROM Kernel Manuals: A survey, with brief descriptions, of books about the Amiga.
COLUMNS ? Zeitgeist
What do Amiga World and 19th-century German ghosts have in common?
Info.phile
The Amiga World New Year’s Hardware Buyer’s Guide
Compiled by Bob Ryan and
Vinoy iMughner
All the stuff we could find out about for interfacing with, expanding, hanging on the side of, plugging into the front or back of, speeding up, digitizing with and in general souping up and dressing out, your Amiga system.
By Mark L. Van Name and William B. Catchings
Look What’s New in 1.2! Version 1.2 of the operating system has important additions and improvements, and makes blazingly fast even faster.
DEPARTMENTS Repartee
The “I didn’t believe they’d print it” department.
Hors d’oeuvres
Hints and tips on little crackers.
Digital Canvas
Personal statements in light and color.
Reviews
Digi-View
Scribble!
Instant Music DeluxePrint Infominder G rabbit
Mean 18 and Leaderboard
Little Computer People Discovery Kit
What’s New?
New products worth knowing about.
Help Key
Answers from just above the Up-Arrow key.
Index to 1985-86 AmigaWorld Articles
Everything we’ve published since before the beginning.
Coming Attractions
CompuServe. You Dont Have To Know How It Works To Appreciate All It Can Do.
Ti-
You don't have to know about hardware. You don’t have to know about software. All you have to know is that CompuServe is a computer information service. You subscribe to it.
And in return, you have ™ access to an incredible amount of information, entertainment, communications and services right at your fingertips.
Here are a few of the hundreds of things you can do with CompuServe.
COMMUNICATE
Even beginners can compose, edit, send and file messages the first time they go online with CompuServe’s EasyPlex"' Electronic Mail. Friends, relatives and business associates anywhere in the country can stay in constant, convenient touch.
CB Simulator features 72 channels for “talking” with thousands of other subscribers throughout the country and Canada. The chatter is frequently hilarious, the “handles” unforgettable and the friendships hard and fast.
More than 100 CompuServe Forums welcome your participation in discussions on all sorts of topics. There are
Forums for gourmet cooks, golfers, musicians, pilots, sailors and more, all designed to show you how easy and fun it can be to get the most out of your computer.
If you want to learn more about your computer system, CompuServe’s at your service. Our Users Forums cater to specific computer makes and models, and offer information and expertise on many different types of machines. You’ll find electronic editions of popular computer periodicals. You can even find free software.
And if you need answers to software questions, seek out a Software Forum. You can often find solutions quickly and easily online.
Bulletin Boards let you post messages where thousands will see them. Use our National ’O Bulletin Board or the special- & _ ized bulletin boards found in almost every Forum.
HAVE FUN
You’ll find Q' sorts of sports and entertainment trivia -• £ games, plus brain-teas- v- ing educational games. You can go it alone or compete against C
players from all over the country. Test your wits in the only online TV-style game show with real prizes. Then, when you’re ready, go for the ultimate in excitement and get into one of our interactive space adventures.
CompuServe's movie reviews keep that big night at the movies from being a five-star mistake. Soap opera * updates keep you up on all the latest turmoils and tragedies on your favorite daytime dramas.
For leisure-time reading and relaxing, look into the electronic editions of some of your favorite magazines, including OMNI On-Line,
SHOP
CompuServe’s ELECTRONIC MALL1"
lets you take a coast-to-coast shopping spree without ever leaving home, it’s an exciting and easy way to shop online, buying name-brand goods and services from nationally known merchants.
SAVE ON TRIPS
CompuServe's travel services let you control your own travel arrangements through the convenience of your personal computer. Scan flight availabilities on almost any airline worldwide. Find airfare bargains, then book your own flight online.
Ll
HI-
111
131 mt
1a a
mm
mm m
mnii
|ll
[HE
X.
CompuServe'
Information Services. P.O. Box 20212
5000 Arlington Centre Blvd.. Columbus. Ohio 43220
An H&R Block Company
EasyPlex and ELECTRONIC MALL arc trademarks ol CompuServe, Incorporated
With CompuServe you’ve got direct and connecting schedules for national and international flights. Plus complete listings of over 28,000 hotels around the world.
MAKE PHI BETA KAPPA
When you run out of the answers at homework time, it’s time to turn to CompuServe for the complete set of continuously updated encyclopedias that doesn't take up an extra inch of shelf space.
The College Board, operated by the College Entrance Examination Board, gives tips on preparing for the SAT, choosing a college and getting financial aid.
KEEP HEALTHY
HealthNet will never replace a real, live doctor but it is an excellent and readily available source of health and medical information.
On a more personal note, Human Sexuality offers information on a variety of topics concerning this very important aspect of human behavior. Hundreds turn to it for honest, intelligent and candid answers.
BE INFORMED
CompuServe puts all of the latest news at your fingertips. Our sources include the AP news wire (coveringall 50 states, plus national news), the Washington Post, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, specialized business and trade publications ¦;A: and more.
Find out instantly what Congress did today who finally won the game and what’s happening back in Oskaloosa, with the touch of a button. And, our executive news service lets you tell us what to watch for. We'll electronically find, “clip" and file news for you., .to read whenever you’d like.
INVEST WISELY
Our comprehensive investment help just might tell you more about the stock you’re looking at than the Chairman
of the Board already knows.
(Don’t know who the chairman is? Chances are, we can fill you in on that, too.)
CompuServe gives you complete statistics on over 10.000 NYSE, AMEX and OTC securities. Historic trading statistics on over 90,000 stocks, bonds, funds, issues and options. Five years of daily commodity quotes. Standard & Poor’s. Value Line.
And more than a dozen other investment tools.
SUPERSITE facilitates business decisions by providing you with demographic and sales potential information by state, county and zip code for the entire country.
The national business wire provides continuously updated news and press releases on hundreds of companies worldwide.
GET SPECIALIZED INFORMATION
Pilots can get personalized flight plans, weather briefings, weather and radar maps, etc. Entrepreneurs use CompuServe too for complete step-by- step guidelines on how to incorporate the IBM s of tomorrow. Lawyers, doctors, engineers, military veterans and businessmen of all types use similar specialized CompuServe resources pertinent to their unique needs.
So much for so little.
CompuServe makes the most out of any computer, and all you pay is a low, one-time cost for a Subscription Kit (suggested retail price $ 39.95). Usage rates tor standard online time (when CompuServe is most active) are just 10C a minute.
In most major metropolitan areas you can go online with a local phone call. Plus, you’ll receive a $ 25.00 Introductory Usage Credit with the purchase of your CompuServe Subscription Kit.
So easy the whole family can go online.
CompuServe is “menu-driven.’' so beginners can simply read the menus (lists of options) that appear on their
.
Your phone) and, in some cases, some simple communications software. Now you’re ready to order your CompuServe Subscription Kit.
For your low, one-time subscription fee, you’ll receive:
• a complete, easy-to-understand, 170- page spiral-bound Users Guide
• your exclusive preliminary password
• a subscription to CompuServe's monthly magazine, Online Today
Ail this, plus:
• a $ 25.00 usage credit!
To order your Subscription Kit or to receive more information, call 800-848-8199 (in Ohio, 614-457-0802). CompuServe Subscription Kits are also available in computer stores, electronic equipment outlets and household catalogs. You can also subscribe with materials you'll find packed with many computers and modems sold today.
CompuServe. You don’t have to know how it works to appreciate all it can do for you.
Screens and then type in their selections. Experts can skip the menus and just type in GO followed by the abbreviation for whatever topic they’re after.
If you ever get lost or confused, just type in H for help, and we’ll immediately cut in with instructions that should save the day. Plus, you can always ask questions online through our feedback service or phone our Customer Service Department.
Here’s how to subscribe.
To access CompuServe, you need a computer, a mo- _j ... dem (to connect your computer to
Zeitgeist
Zeitgeist’tsit-gist, ’zit- n, [Old High German, from, zeit (time) + geist (ghost or spirit)] (1884): 1)
The general intellectualt moral, and cultural climate of an era. 2) Words of dubious u isdom from the editor of Amiga World.
Starting off the new year I thought that I would begin by explaining why, what and where Zeitgeist came from. I get asked about the title of my editorial page often. There are usually twro kinds of questions: first (usually from European types), “Where did you come up with ‘Zeitgeist?’ It is such a perfect word”; and second, “I enjoy reading your column, and. . .by the way, what does ‘Zeitgeist’ mean?” I think the dictionary definition above nails it fairly well, but as it relates to this column, I use Zeitgeist to mean the current state of the Amiga, the magazine, Commodore and anything else that I can think of. And, well.. .read on.
Video is the topic of our feature article in this issue and I think we went a long way toward demystifying the new phenomenon of desktop video.
With the thousands of VCRs and video cameras being sold, it seems natural that Amiga owners would start putting all this equipment together to come up with some very interesting results. If you have an Amiga and some kind of video equipment (or plan to buy a video camera or VCR), you will definitely wTant to read this issue carefully.
We are also finishing up the buyer’s guide started in the last issue. (What? There’s more?) In this issue you will find the first of our hardware buyer’s guides. We plan to be continually updating both the hardware and the software buyer’s guides from now on.
By Guy Wright
As far as the magazine is going, we are doing fine. All of you have helped make Amiga- World the best publication for the Amiga owfner. We wanted to go monthly with a March issue, but the economics just aren’t there yet. Double your costs without doubling your income and you’ll go broke pretty quickly. Since we aren’t going to double your subscription price and we aren’t going to charge the advertisers twice as much, we have to wait until there are enough advertisers willing to run adds 12 times a year rather than six. I think it will happen by the summer, but I have been wrong once or twice before.
Commodore seems to be doing better these days. They announced a profitable quarter. Sales of the Amiga, C-64 and 128 were good, and there has been talk about a new Amiga or two scheduled for release in early ’87. We’ll keep you informed about any new developments. The genlock was just about ready for shipping at the time of this writing (see the sidebar on page 19 for more about Genlock), and the Sidecar should be along any month now.
We have been getting a lot of positive feedback from you about the way that the magazine has been going for the past few issues, and we intend to keep doing things the way you want. As always, if there are things that you want to see in upcoming issues, let us know’ and we will try to get something in.
And, as always, if you wTant to write something for us, we will welcome your input. (Send a SASE for a copy of our author’s guidelines.)
Next issue, among other things, wc will be looking at supercharged Amigas, for all of
you hard-core hardware types. So, until then, stay tuned for the next episode of Zeitgeist.
In-cheek parody of cliff-hanger adventure comics that I thought was great. Written by Michael O’Donoghue and Frank Springer, it had the titillating title “The Adventures of Phoebe Zeit-Geist.” It sits on my desk, along with my sword and battle axe. That’s the truth folks.¦
Which brings me back to answering the first most asked question about the title of this column. The real reason I picked the word is that in 1968, Grove press published a tongue-
Buyer’s Guide Update
In last issue’s software buyer’s guide, a few’ tilings mistakenly slipped by, and a few things we wish had, didn't. So here we are, cap in hand, to set the record straight.
The number we gave for Geodesic Publications, makers of Triclops Invasion, was incorrect. Call them at 916 629-2514.
The address and phone we listed for Clockwork Computers, makers of the CCI Integrated Merchandiser System, was incorrect: they can be reached at 4612 Holly Ridge Road, Rockville, MD 20853,301 924-5509.
The address for Scientific Software, makers of the Equation Plotter nowr called EQPLQT(Ll) was not in our companies list; the address is: PO Box 202, Rexford, NY 12148.
The address we printed for New Horizons Software was also incorrect; their address is PO Box 43167, Austin, TX 78745.
The price we listed for Pro Video CGI from JDK Images, 2224 E. 86th St., Suite 14, Bloomington, MN 55420, was misleading; the price we gave ($ l,500-$ 2,000) included the cost of an Amiga. The price of the Pro Video CGI software itself is $ 199.95.
One product we should have mentioned is the Graphics Editors from Scott Lamb. The disk contains two sprite editors and one block graphics editor. Write to Scott Lamb, 205C Heights Lane, Fort Worth, TX 76112, or call 817 485-9179.
A file manager not mentioned in our Database list was Foxfiie from Foxware. Foxfiie uses menus and key combinations, allows up to 50 fields, and will be around $ 50. Contact Foxware at 1554 Park Creek Lane, Atlanta, GA 30319, 404 885*8960.
An entertainment product w?e missed was Quintette, a game based on an ancient Chinese strategy game. It’s available from Miles Computing, 7741 Alabama Ave., Suite 2, Canoga Park, CA 91304, 818 341-1411.
The price we gave for the game Chessmate. From Dark Horse, was incorrect; instead of $ 32.50 it is $ 29.95,
Metacomco's languages, Cambridge Lisp and MCC Pascal, though listed in Utilities Languages under Commodore’s heading, are available directly from Metacomco. The address we gave for Metacomco has changed; Metacomco’s current address is 5353 E Scotts Valley Drive, Scotts Valley, CA 95066, 800 252-6382.
BBS Boo-Boos
A few wrong numbers were printed in last issue’s BBS directory.
On page 20, the number for Micro Systems Software’s BBS should have been 305 737-1590. On page 22, the number listed for Micro-SysSof in Victoria, BC was also incorrect; we have been unable to get the correct number so far.D
A Timeless Game of Skill and Tactics.
T f you think good entertainment is h I to find in the 20th Century, imagine
you into capturing go for broke, alldv,
ou to snatch
people along the way. And now. Thanks to Miles Computing, you can share the intrigue on modem man's most vivid game board, AMIGA;
We think Cdrtfucius would be proud.
Nearest hot spot wasn't stone's throw away.
Were, tie ancient C veiopea a game to
Miles Computing, Inc.
77% t AteaMS Ayehue, Suite 2 igaPark, CAS5364* (Sl8> 541-1411
ggg--------------------- V. . .... .¦ ¦ ...l.
Repartee
Kudos
Please continue to publish articles like the one on astronomical drawing [Iiagen, Sept. Oct. '86, p. 26]. The pictures were fantastic, and only serve to demonstrate further the immense graphics power we Amiga owners possess within our machines. Kudos to the author for his fine contribution to Amiga World
Patrick W. Simmons Whitby, Ontario, Canada
Two problems I had been having were accessing my printer and using library functions from Amiga Basic. Your article on “Using Libraries from Amiga Basic” [Sept. Oct. ’86,
p. 50] and the piece on printer commands (with the table) in the Help Key section were great. I felt like my subscription had already paid for itself. I feel the last two issues have been very good as more data and articles become available. My only suggestions are to keep up the tutorials on Amiga Basic, Amiga DOS, etc., and I do enjoy programs accompanying articles, such as those with your articles on sound in the July August issue.
Earl Davis
Marion, OH
Developer’s Dilemma
Amiga World, why are you so naive? Giving an award to the Amiga Technical Reference Manuals is like giving an award to William Carlos Williams for writing concrete, concise, easy-to-understand and precisely detailed poems.
Anyone unfortunate enough to purchase these nebulous monstrosities knows that in order to decipher the information as it is presented requires nothing less than round-the- clock studying and intelligence equal to or greater than that of a supernatural being.
The manuals are sloppy, and in
many cases the information is sketchy, incomplete or just plain urrong. The program examples, what feiu there are, are totally worthless from a tutorial standpoint. The documentation accompanying these programs is so bad, it seems almost a cruel joke! To drive the point further home, even the Editor-in-Chief of Amiga World Guy Wright, admits that he could not progress beyond the second chapter of the ROM Kernel Manual.
You mentioned that the manuals brought vital information to those without Developer Status. What I want to know is, how does one attain developer status? Tm sure it must be granted only after long periods offasting, physical exertion, and finally, divine intervention.
John Bushakra Isla Vista, CA
Anyone interested in obtaining developer status should call Commodore at 215-431-9180. The above description of the requirements for developer status is probably a bit exaggerated. Rumor has it that the fasting period is only three days, and divine intervention is optional.
Editors
Oversight
I am writing in regards to the review of color printers in your Nov. Dec. issue [Kalisher, p. 30], 1 was rather shocked when I turned to page 34 and saw a printout of a picture called ",MerlinThe reason I was shocked is that this is my picture. I was excited to see it in your magazine, but when I checked to see if my name was mentioned as the artist, to my dismay, it was not. The picture had my name on it originally, but this part was cropped out. Since I was not even given credit for the picture, I got rather upset. I don't know about the artists of the other pictures, but no credit was given to them either.
I would like to know if this is standard practice or just an oversight.
Jeff White
Tampa, FL
Sorry! This was an oversight on our part. All of the artists should have been credited for their work. The pictures were cropped to show detail, not to eliminate the artist’s names. Once again, please accept our apologies for this oversight.
Editors
Transformer Rebuttal
The sharpness of tone used by authors Van Name and Catchings in their review of the Amiga Transformer [SeptJOct. '86, p. 97] indicates that they were not aware of Speedy3, a speed-up program for the Transformer. It should have been available to the authors during their use of Transformer, as it was on several Amiga BBSs before last summer. They ought to use Transformer again with Speedy3 and offer a postscript to their review. For the occasional IBM program user who does not need IBM graphics display, the Transformer is a cost-effective choice. If and when I purchase a Sidecar, the Transformer drive will simply plug in the back, providing me with dual 5 inch drives, creating an IBM clone that is, except for size, better than the original IBM.
Bob Schaeffer
Anchorage, AK
Miami Vice Fans
When I got my September October issue of Amiga World I saw your article about AMIGAs on Miami Vice. I was the Industrial Designer (product designer) of the Amiga. 1 was responsible for the aesthetics arid mechanical design of the Amiga. After spending a gnteling year on the R iff D and manufacturing, it is this kind of recognition that makes it all worthwhile, not to mention having worked on the most fantastic computer ever designed. My wife and I are also ardent fans of Miami Vice!
Howard W. Stolz
Soquel, CA
Assembler Solution
Concerning the letter entitled “Dismal Afternoon ” in the July A 11- gust '86 Repartee, Mr. Carlisle has my sympathy. I too don 7 feel like buying another disk drive, and I share his enthusiasm for such creatures as the Mandelbrot set. Since my main interest in assembly-lan- guage programming is to speed up iterative portions of BASIC programs, a fairly primitive assembler meets my needs.
Solution: write one in BASIC. I did. It’s not pretty, but it permits me to fill a screen with the Mandelbrot set in half an hour or so. If Mr. Carlisle or any of your other readers are interested, they are ivelcome to a copy. They can call me at (505) 522- 6408 or write me at 2989 Sundance Circle, Las Cruces, NM 88001.
Martin F. Combs
Ims Cruces, NM
Gentle Persuasion
I just want to tell the cockeyed world that the Amiga is the best damn machine to come along this side of costing fifty really big ones, and you may inform the management of Commodore Business Machines, Inc. that if they discontinue the Amiga note, I will personally come down there and beat the crap out of each and every one of them.
Howland Clarke Parry Sound, Ontario, Canada
Send your letters to: Repartee, AmigaWorld editorial, 80 Elm St., Peterborough, NH 03458. Letters may be edited for space and clarity. ¦
Rated 1 by Amiga® Users
THE MIRROR
DISK COPIER
_ $ 49.95
The Mirror Disk Copier is the Amiga’s most powerful and effective disk copier. It was the first copier to produce unprotected copies of most software on the Amiga and it is still the leader in this field. No other copier can copy as much software as the Mirror. Other copiers only claim they can copy most schemes. ONLY THE MIRROR DOES IT ALL!
The Mirror Disk Copier is specially designed to back up heavily protected disks. To date it’s 100% successful! It’s completely automatic, no knowledge of Amiga DOS is required. It requires no drive modification.
The Mirror Disk Copier is Technically Superior. It employs its own operating system. It uses no routines from Kickstart or Workbench. It is the fastest copier available for the Amiga.
Our liberal update policy lets you make backup copies even when protection schemes change. It works on single or dual drive systems with 256K or 512K.
The Mirror Disk Copier consists of four highly advanced functions: Deep Copy - copies all protected disks; Fast Copy - an ultrafast dual drive copier; Write Check - checks drive speed; Alignment Check - checks drive alignment.
The Mirror Hacker Package is a flexible disk utility designed for serious disk analysis. It is a tool that can be used for a variety of uses, from disk repair to disk ‘breaking.’
It allows the user to access his disk drive on 4 exceedingly higher levels.
.
1ST LEVEL: This is the lowest level, allowing the user to read and write MFM or GCR in any format, indexed tracks and tracks of various lengths. You can view and edit any type of protected track. Complete flexibility is achieved.
2ND LEVEL: At this level is the system formatted track. You can look at a track and edit in ascii, hex, or with a direct memory assembler of your choice.
3RD LEVEL: At this level system formatted tracks are arranged so you can look at them as file system blocks. This module allows you to change system checksums, copy blocks to different disks, and trace file origins. This tool will easily allow you to patch a corrupted diskette.
4TH LEVEL: This is the highest level of disk structure, the Amiga binary file. You can study and edit data arranged as hunks, outputs from compilers, assemblers and linkers.
At any level you are able to fully edit and change your diskette to your liking. A powerful direct memory editor is included or you can use any other memory editor or disassembler of your choosing.
As a bonus this package contains a few extra ‘hacker’ type tools.
COPYKICK: A tool that will customize any Kick- start disk allowing the user to save memory after a reset and be placed in any external memory or expanded memory section. It may then be viewed by a disassembler or memory editor.
DISKSEARCH: A tool that will locate any pattern of Ascii or Hex on a diskette.
ERRORCHECK: This routine will check your disk for any errors or strange formats and report them back to you. It will also tell you the gap length of every system formatted track on the diskette. (A common protection scheme is to write a track with an extra long gap).
DUMBCOPY: A disk copier that will copy a disk without stopping on a track that it doesn't recognize.
AVAILABLE NOW!
Compumed
MasterCard, Visa, M.O. or check + $ 3 shipping and handling.
(408) 758-2436
P. O. Box 6939 Salinas, CA 93912
C. O.D, or foreign orders add S3. California orders add 6% sales tax. Phone orders accepted 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Mon.-Fri.
AMIGA is a registered trademark of Commodore-Amiga, Inc.
Hors d’oeuvres
Ideas and advice from the buffet of yo ur experience.
Notepad Textcraft Combo
If your clever idea is chosen to grace these pages, you will be one of the few, the proud, the elite, who own official AmigaWorld T-shirts (suitable for wearing in public). With your submission (addressed to AmigaWorld Hors d’oeuvres, 80 Elm St., Peterborough, NH 03458) be sure to include your T-shirt size. If anyone has a bone to pick with one of these tidbits, let us know the problem. And always, always use backups ofyour original disks for experimenting. Dig in, arid oh yes.. .
Bon Appetit!
You can easily load files created with the Notepad into Textcraft. All you have to do is select the Textcraft icon and the Notepad project icon together (by holding down the shift key during the mouse clicks), then go to the menu bar and select Open. Textcraft will load and then will automatically load the Notepad file that was selected. (Double clicking on the notepad icon, even if the Textcraft icon is also selected, will not work.)
Riiss Jacobson
Urbana, IL
Editor's Note: Other text files, as mentioned above, can be loaded into Textcraft. This includes files created with Ed in AmigaDOS, or files from other word processors, as well as Notepad files. To load other files that don't have icons into Text- craft, use the CTRL-D method of breaking into the CLI when the credits screen appears while the Textcraft disk is booting. Simply type in Textcraft followed by a space, and then the name of the fie to load into it. (Remember to follow the format for identifying files; for example, if your fie letter is on a disk in an external drive, you would type TEXTCRAFT DF1 .LETTER. If it is in a subdirectory on the external disk, named for instance mail, you would type TEXTCRAFT
DFI:MAIL LETTER.) Once your file is in Textcraft, saving it will assign it an icon.
Circuit Design With Graphicraft
While fooling around with Graphicraft, I discovered that the Brush files can be easily edited and changed to electrical symbols and saved. This will allow you to create electrical circuit designs. The easiest method I have found to keep things orderly is to keep groups of similar parts (e.g., wires, resistors, diodes, etc.) on the same brush palette. Shifting between brush files is not difficult, but it is time consuming.
One word of advice: Draw all parts facing four different directions in order to be able to place them anywhere in the design. This method is much cheaper than the commercial programs and is only limited by your imagination. The only drawback is not being able to test your designs functionally on the computer.
Daniel W. Ruht
Jacksonville, FL
Point Finding In Amiga Basic
Here is a tidbit I wrote that is very useful to me as an Amiga Basic programmer. At times I need to know the location of specific points on the screen. I allow my main program to draw objects on the screen, then STOP the program and run this little routine. Clicking the left-mouse button produces the coordinates. This way I can easily find the vertices of any object on the screen.
POINTFIND;
IF MOUSE(O) = 1 THEN PRINT MOUSE(l),MOUSE(2)
END IF
GOTO POINTFIND
MOUSE(l) returns the X coordinate and MOUSE(2) returns the Y coordinate.
Jeff Kerschner Berwick, ME
Easy Chair Amiga
How many times have you wished you could sit back in your easy chair while typing letters, playing games or just hacking? I found a simple way to do this and it only requires a few cables from your local Radio Shack store. You can replace the keyboard cable with a Modular Handset phone cable of any length and the mouse cable with any joystick-extension cable. You must be sure that you get the Modular Handset cable because the Base Unit cable uses different connections.
Steve Palm Cheboygan, MI
Editor's Note: Extending keyboard and mouse cables might cause RFI interference (this can produce a fuzzy picture on the monitor or TV) if the cables aren't shielded or if there is a strong radioemissions source nearby. Also, when you use any non-Commodore-approved cable or peripheral, you are taking a chance of harming your Amiga. And, see the warning below.
Don’t Unplug
Do not disconnect the keyboard from the Amiga in the middle of a project! If you do,
Now Look At Word Processing In A Whole New Light.
V
• • -¦ 1
lijj fSI
:
mmm
ProWrite: All Others Pale By Comparison.
0
R
You chose Amiga4'because you wanted something more. Now you choose your software for the s;une reason. Which makes choosing Pro- Write word processing a very bright idea.
The Full Spectrum of Capabilities,
ProW'rite lets you select more than just a typeface: You get proportionally spaced character fonts. Brilliant color. Unsurpassed graphics capabilities. And no surprises. Because what
you see on the screen with ProW’rite is a letter- perfect picture of what you’ll see printed on the page from header to footer, right down to tire last pixel.
Creative Control: A Brilliant Stroke. With six pulldown menus, just a click of the
mouse or a few keystrokes is all
*
you need to create, delete, copy, alter, move and otherwise manipulate text. Multiple selections create a limitless choice of character fonts, colors, sizes and styles. Customize everything from a daily diary to an annual report, including color graphics. And with headers and footers always clearly displayed, ProW'rite makes even advanced formatting as easy1 as dragging a mouse.
Ease of Use: Another Bright Idea.
ProWrite delivers more of what you bought .Amiga
for; Professional output. Multi-tasking power.
A "creative edge." You cut open up to eight windows at once and perform a variety' of editing tusks between them. With ProW'rite, you'll al- vvavs know exactlv what vou're
4 **
doing, because you see it done in living color 'right before vour eves.
4 *
See for yourself what you get with ProWrite. Llien, just for fun, take a look at the others and watch them pale by comparison.
New Horizons
I w
First In Personal Productivity And Creativity.
New Horizons Software, Inc. PO Box 43167, Austin, TX 78745 (512) 329-6215 ProWrite is a trademark of New Horizons Software. Inc. Amiga is a registered trademark of Commodore-Amiga. Inc.
the Amiga might perform a warm start as if you had pressed Ctrl-Amiga-Amiga. While this doesn’t happen every time the keyboard is disconnected, it seems more likely to occur during "keyboard intensive” operations, like word processing. The manual doesn’t mention this, so I thought I would.
Kevin Allen
Ventura, CA
Apple Connection Fix
Your July August issue was, by far, the best so far. Andrew L. Hollander’s "The Apple Connection" was great, but one problem was immediately evident. After opening a window, the default width is infinite. So the first line of the data being transferred will appear on the screen, but all subsequent lines will not. This is easily corrected by adding a WIDTH statement after opening the window, such as WIDTH 80 or WIDTH 128.
Joe Conte
N. H.P., NY
RAM Disk Icons 1.2
One of the many nice additions in the version 1.2 release of AmigaDOS is an icon for the RAM disk. The icon is generated when you first access the RAM: device from the CLI. This icon does not automatically appear when you boot on a normal Workbench disk, but von can make it do so bv adding the line DIR RAM: to the startup* sequence.
The RAM: device is empty when you boot, so this command docs nothing but make the system "build” the RAM disk.
Assuming you have already used IconEd to create your own personal disk icons, you may be disappointed to see that the RAM disk icon is the old default disk icon. To change this, use the following command in place of the do-nothing Dir command suggested above:
COPY DISK.INFO TO RAM:
This command copies your system disk's icon image into the file Ram:Disk.info, where it will be used to draw the RAM disk's icon. You could instead create a customized icon just for the RAM disk and keep that icon in a separate file on the system disk. If your RAM disk icon were called, say, Ramdisk.info, you would use this startup-sequence command:
COPY RAMDISK.INFO TO RAM: DISK.INFO
Some notes: First, Intuition apparently ignores the extra disk-type info file on the system disk. Next, since the RAM disk icon is created only once each session, there is no need to leave the Disk.Info file in the RAM disk after it’s been used. Third, a Snapshot of the RAM disk will not he permanent unless you copy RAM’s Disk.Info file back to its file on the system disk. Of course, fdes in the RAM disk will he lost when you reboot or turn off your Amiga.
Let me mention once again that this trick will only work on version 1.2 system software. I was using the Beta-4 release: Kick- start version 33.667, Workbench 33.33. The behavior of the RAM disk icon might conceivably change, hut I hear that developers have been told to conform their software to the Beta-3 release, whatever that means!
Marcus Brooks Austin, TX
Ed Prompts
If you’re like me and you use Ed a lot, you also keep forgetting what keys do what.
I end up overusing the “easy-to-remember” keys and wasting a lot of time thumbing through the manual. Here is a better way. Using Ed (what else?), make a cheat sheet with all the info you think you’ll need.
Make sure that it doesn’t fill up more than one screen and then save it as EdHelp, or something you’ll remember. Before using Ed for another project, just enter TYPE EDHELP. You'll see your screenful of information appear. Next, use Ed as usual, and anytime you need some help, simply click the window depth arrangement gadget in the upper right-hand corner of the screen; your list will appear. Click the window gadget again to return to your Ed project. The only drawbacks to this technique are that you have to do it for each Ed session and the help screen can only take one screen or the info at the top scrolls off,
James Nakakthara
Utsunomiya, Japan
Transferring Preferences
Some Amiga software will not load if your Workbench disk has been loaded before it; therefore, the most obvious way of using the same Preferences settings as on your Workbench disk is to open the Preferences on the new disk and reset everything. However, there is an easier way. Although it doesn’t say so anywhere in the manual, everything saved in Preferences resides in the system configuration file. To easily transfer all your settings to a different disk, just enter the following line from the CLI:
COPY WC) RKBEN CM :1) EV S SYSTEM - CONFIGURATION TO YourNewDisk Volu meNa wc:DE VS SYSTEM - CONFIGURATION
Don’t forget to make a backup of any disk that you are writing to before using this technique.
Mark Cashman Windsor, CT
Better Video
I have a tip on how to get a sharper picture from your Amiga to your VCR. You’ll
need to buy a normal Commodore 64 mon-

itor cable and a Y adapter. (Commodore’s own 64 cables have three connectors to the monitor; some third-party ones have a fourth, an additional audio jack.) Plug the cable into the Amiga's TV modulator output (TV MOD on the hack) and, after identifying the chroma and the luma sources on the other end, plug them imo the Y adapter. Plug the other end of the adapter into the Video In on your VCR. I found that this nearly doubled the sharpness of the picture.
Shawn Farrell
Hastings, MN
Assembly ROM EXEC Erratum
For all of you ROM EXEC function- minded assembly-language programmers; The documentation for the AmigaDOS developers manual indicates that the prefix LVO_ should he used for the ROM EXEC subroutines. Through ingenious programming techniques, I’ve found that the prefix should instead he _LVO. Also, this error is not indicated in the sensuous errata pages in the manual.
Captain Bytes
Los Angeles, CA
Scrambled Snapshots
In the last issue of Amiga World, I noticed some tips on using Snapshot. Most of the time these tips worked fine, but every once in a while I found that my icons were stacked and scrambled even after I had cleaned them up and “taken” the snapshot.
I finally tracked the problem down; it appears that if any of the files are write-protected, you may get unpredictable Snapshot results. You would think that only the write-
J
protected file icons wouldn’t move, but this seems not to he the case.
Robert L. Pleatman Cincinnati, OH ¦
The Mirror Copier Can Now Back Up A Disk Almost As Fast As Marauder II,
And It Only Costs About 25% More!
Duplication Speed
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
$ 49.95
:ji ' >
Marauder II is the most powerful copier ever produced for Amiga. It will automatically copy ALL software released to date , and it requires no hardware modification of any kind.
It produces completely unprotected copies of most Amiga software faster and better than any other copier.
No other copier can copy as much software as Marauder II.
Marauder II also has the most advanced user interface your money can buy. If you have an Amiga you already know how to use Marauder II. You never have to reboot your machine to use Marauder II, it is completely compatible with
the Amiga's multitasking operating system.
Marauder II has been designed with your future needs in mind. As protection schemes change you can update the program yourself with our unique "‘Strategy Files."
The Strategy Files are developed as new software is released so that you can get them quickly and easily when you need them
Compare the features of Marauder II to our competition and you*!! See that Marauder II is quite simply the best copier you can get, at any price! And for only $ 39.95 you can rest assured that your software investment is safely protected against damage, loss or theft.
Don’t wait, order now!
Upgradable With Strategy Files
Mouse Driven User Interface
Exit Without Restarting Amiga
Runs From Workbench or CLI
Makes Multiple Simultaneous Copies From One Original
Copies Itself
Copies The Mirror
Price
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
$ 39.95
83 Sec. 1 Minute 48 Sec.
Marauder II Mirror
This amazing keyboard macro processor is just what you need to give your fingers a rest. The Genie is always at work to save you time and keystrokes. Complicated or repitious keyboard sequences are easily assigned to a key you choose through the Genie’s Pop-Up Macro Definition Window. You can also load and save your
NOW YOU GAN SAVE ANY SCREEN, FROM ANY PROGRAM, ANYTIME WITH GRABBIT.
With GRABBIT you can capture exactly what you see on your screen in an instant, regardless of what programs you’re running. GRABBIT works with all video modes, including “Hold and Modify." What’s more, GRABBIT runs completely in the background, transparent to your other software. GRABBIT is always ready for you to use, even when you’re in the middle of another program. As if that is not enough, GRABBIT requires only about IOK RAM to operate, and it supports dozens of printers. GRABBIT is truly a productivity power tool for your AMIGA!
With Key Genie One Key Launches 1000 Strokes!
Favorite macro sequences on disk. Once saved, the macros can be automatically installed at startup to save time. In addition to the Genie’s powers, Discovery Software has added a bonus program "Turbo-Shell". The Shell is an AmigaDOS performance enhancer that you shouldn’t be without! The Shell gives you the capability to recall previous CLI
GRABBIT is far superior to other screen-printing “programs" because of its small size and quick performance. No complicated setup is required, just install and go! Also, GRABBIT doesn’t require the screen to remain visible during printing or saving, and stopping the print operation is as easy as starting it.
GRABBIT supports all standard Amiga printer drivers. GRABBIT also supports full color printing.
In addition to GRABBIT’s printing capabilities, the package also includes a powerful utility program “ANYTIME." The ANYTIME bonus
commands with the arrow keys so that mistyped commands can be quickly corrected, and frequently used commands can be easily repeated. Fast AmigaDOS command replacements give you UNIX-style performance from your Amiga.
What other software does so much for you at such a low price. Only $ 49.95 4- $ 5 shipping and handling.
Program is a “Preferences" style palette requester that allows you to change any colors of any screen, anytime! With ANYTIME, you are NOW capable of customizing all colors to match your printer’s hardcopy to the screen’s colors.
Once you start using GRABBIT and the bonus program ANYTIME you will want it on every disk. You get all the power of this sizzling new software for an unbelievably low $ 29.95 + $ 5 shipping and handling.
QeiNif
mm
1 1 : I i | 1
ii MM1*
• i 1 h1
1 F
* I H
Tum
n 1
f r 1
I'.;.-]
m
When ordering from overseas, add an additional $ 5.00 shipping for
first class airmail.
11-1-86
Circle 89 on Reader Service card.
262 S. 15TH STREET, PHILA., PA 19102 (215) 546-1533
Am'faTM Is a retf'.sterpr! Trademark of Commodore- Ami tfa Tnr TTNTY ' ? A refj tereri trad pm ark of Bell I ahnratorief
Desktop Video
More than a new buzz word, Desktop Video is an affordable reality. And your Amiga is the perfect video computer.
By E. E. Eric Erzitiger
Desktop video is a brand new application for personal computers. Instead of a monitor or printer, desktop video uses a videotape machine as its primary output device. A desktop video system may consist solely of an Amiga used to generate graphics-animation sequences, or it may include a battery of devices that let you combine computer- and video-generated pictures into a finished video product. The fact that the Amiga’s video output can be synchronized with external video sources makes the Amiga the best choice for people interested in desktop video. From just-for-fun home video production to professional graphics and character generation, the Amiga gives you the power of systems costing ten times as much,
hi ibis article, II! Present an overview of video product ion and applications. I'll examine how the Amiga makes video production an affordable reality for individuals, and take a look at the available video hardware and software. I’ll conclude with a took at how some people are already making use of desktop video.
Here* There and Everywhere
Strictly defined, video is the electronic medium for recording and retrieving visual and audio information on magnetic tape. For most people, contact with the world of video means a visit to the local movie-rental store.
T he movies are usually stored in J .-inch VHS (video home service) or Beta format, or on 8mm cassettes. In addition, many people now own video cameras and produce their own videos. With the cost of cameras decreasing steadily, video production is coming within the means of more and more people.
Outside the home, the use of small-formal video is most apparent in education, starting at the elementary level, where videotape decks have all but replaced 16mm film projectors atid slideshow presentations. Continuing on into intermediate and high school classrooms, students become involved in producing videos for class projects, theater arts departments and personal sports training. These videos, while often innovative and creative. Are usually technically crude. The inability to add graphic artwork, titling and animation, and the prohibitive expense of a $ 4,000 %-inch-iape editing system, keeps the quality of such efforts low.
In contrast to home and educational applications, professional video production is dominated by expensive, industrial equipment. T he term “industrial” is somewhat misleading in this context. It doesn’t refer to steel mills or auto plants, hut to the X-inch U-matic and Betacam formats that are mainstays of professional video production. (When used for broadcasting, these formats generally get “bumped up” or edited to one- inch tape.) Besides the quality of the tape format, the other substantial differences between low-end and industrial-strengih video production are the quality of cameras, lighting and special-effects capabilities wipes, fades, dissolves, titling, etc.) available to professionals.
One-inch and X-inch video decks are used for the production and viewing of videos in a myriad of fields: business presentations, training, safety, general teaching aids, sales, real estate, in-store promotions, remote television recording, commercials, video art, and video assist and special effects in feature filmmaking. These are in addition to the better known applications in the cable and broadcast television industry. In many cases, videos produced on professional equipment are transferred to J(-dnch format for large-scale distribution. This represents the hierarchy of video production: Professionals use expensive, large-format equipment to produce products that are widely distributed; individuals and small companies have limited access to good equipment and little chance to produce high-quality work. Desktop video, of course, changes all that.
Form and Freedom
Whether you’re a network producer or a home enthusiast, the nuts and bolts of video production depends on two things: what you have for equipment and what you want to do. No matter what your budget or project commercial, educational or just for fun basic video production routines remain the same. T hese routines fill the space between your bright idea and the finished videotape. And the key routines are those that you follow in pre-production.
After project outlining and script writing, pre-production is focused on the development of a storyboard. Storyboards are similar in format to comic books; they are made up of scene-by-scene sketches, often with text,
irGsapttes & a ifft vOy grfw vfldS eolor on your Amfbk compute* It $ wr'ike in itei language w ieri came free wife your Qp30yt§r«MiQio9©n
£3U*&>«w«i
9*99191"
is?!yd?* co-?:e:e5 x;rce code and acwwpanyng docur enta- lien. New you gan read, write and print IFF ties compatible with peluxe WdnV-' Aegis Images as weil'as have access to the Amda ROMi Jnek ’
Avdfee for immediate d ivsry. C y$ m9f ||?ap3gst?ge and handling.
C ifomia read's.-® add 6% srtstjx.
Fgyxe Pa t and Images ar§
yfe arkef
S«etrond Arts and De oo ent
* =sseetvefy.
Wf oca»si(jn?l'y make ©up mailing list avails eth@r eempanres er grgariizgtions with product;* cr s®r-
vi$ ®§ whifh wf fffi m cht df ft infp.-eft tf y®y, W y ?y prefer thft ypur flsm| df deleted frpm suqh % list, pleas® fill out the coupfw pelow or affix a pppy of ygyp mgiling 19 5! End mgil it g:
A 6OT»munications Petf (borough
PO Box 868 Farmingdale. NY 11737
late my r-am* m§;img 'ilti sen! ;
.. iSl0
¦ 'W
gtpropamgs or grg§niz®tl§m§. " 4»ifi|Werta
Nam®___
pjjowing the flow of the planned video. Storyboards hsjp further in designing the look of a video. In large prpjeets, th$ f$ ar $ y lighting, S$ t gnd cog,
ttjme designers is ceordinafi»| $ |§i? Individq I contri. Butions to a project They are used by the producer and director to map out the production logistics and general flow pf & jfrejpct. Qf eours§, if you igj*j| your fw prody$ *F, IffWI, "Titer, etc,, you only n?c i one ff py of the storyboard,
Special effect such a$ overlay titling (character generation), artwork and audio tracks are created in advance. If you have the tight equipment, these effects fan be mixed, merged with or cut into your video durr tot Iffia! Taping through elthvr an aydio mixer or video switcheF (speeiai-cflcct*. Generator) in the form of hides, wipes and keying. After actual taping, the process
'
V iaeo m
the Amiga played a part In the production of a unique outdoor video festival produced in New York City in August 1986. The event, li!!fd Wm SB Park. Attracted more people than any pftff pul'iici,-sponsored event held in the New York City parks. About. }0 different videos were shown on consecutive evenings on 20-fopt video screens using Eiophur projectors. Funding fipf m a non-profit organization and §mf
mf r mimrimm,
for the evept. ABC producer Bob Brakestone hired Brian Stein and Oreg Tzadilas to create fulLframe. Anb mated logos and production credits with the Amiga.
The work wa$ dong with DeluxePaint and DeluxeVideo. Brakf$ tpflf see Amlgi i» eh r-
mW traditional system* ximi m
and brp deast fost around S9Q.9Q0. Mfor a lot of applir cations,** Brakestone said, “the Amiga and DeluxePaint or DeluxfVi fp can substitytf fpr the Quantel Paintbox p Ghmn ruetfr Qsr&mm« .but, with PelVBeVidep, imaps can be jgrky=it doesn’t smopth- cr wl nd scroll lik$ other character genfrator$ r §0 whf n tl?d Vidgo in the Park, we used fulhframe anima
tion instead,
“For the SI,100 to 51.200 price, the Amiga has a lot of posttprpdtif tlpn applic tioni, J$ gm in di |pi sync §nd iii thf Amiga will
be just as good or better than existing products on the market.” Brakeftone added that Independent video producers espfSliUy could benefit from the systfm. The Amiga’s use in vjdeo and tV production, he said, ! “ver)r. Veryr exciting *
Other atmoifhew§§ whfrf thj AulSpt I?
Uifd irft auadaN CIS TV Station, wh re it being used for stpiybqaFdlng and framesby-frame anit matjon dumped to vidfpi TV Arts Video (Jompany, whjeh Js us|ng d|f Amiga w|th § laserdisc? And Gran- stfU Csuri Pff di|ctfpn| and Ohio ftate wlup
are jointly developing a Sip system for the Amiga.
Abigail Ckri$ topher
State
liSf
Amiga Genlock
AUDIO i OUT i fi L
AUDIO HORIZ MIX POS
VIDEO
IN
AUDIO
- IN-
AUDIO VIDEO
r IN i OUT
R L
EXTERNAL SOURCE
COMPUTER
Called a sync by people in the video industry, a genlock is vital in combining the graphics output of a computer with the video output of a camera, laserdisc or v ideotape deck. The Amiga Genlock 1300 from Commodore synchronizes an external video signal with the video output of the Amiga, allowing you to overlay Amiga graphics onto the external video picture and to display the result on your monitor. You can also output the combined video computer signal to a videotape
goes into post-production editing, not unlike film editing except that the tape isn’t actually cut and spliced, but rather the images are transferred from one tape and machine to another. On a simpler level, an edit controller allows precise timing of the electronic and mechanical events necessary to achieve insert and assembly. Insert and assembly editing is exactly what it sounds like: scenes from one tape are inserted between scenes on another, or scenes are assembled one after the other in the desired sequence. More sophisticated installations use A-B roll. A-B roll is the procedure that allows you to edit from two or more machines down to one master tape for your finished product.
Enter Stage-Left: Amiga
The traditional role of the computer in video production is found in two basic areas: as a graphics titling tool and as an edit controller. That baseball game score that flashes across your home TV screen has been ere- ated using a sophisticated and expensive character generator. The computer graphics you see on the evening news are the products of computer systems much larger than the Amiga. As it turns out, the Amiga is very capable in these areas.
Many people involved in video production find it hard to believe that a personal computer can be a powerful tool in their work. Like computer enthusiasts who know little about video, video professionals are not well informed about the potential of using Amigas in video machine or to a cable system or broadcast transmitter.
The Amiga Genlock works by substituting color 0 from the current Amiga palette with the picture from the external video source. For example, if you use the Genlock to overlay the Amiga Workbench screen onto a shot from your video camera, the picture from the camera will replace the blue (color 0) of the Workbench screen, and the resulting combined picture will show up on your Amiga monitor.
The Amiga Genlock connects to the RGB port of your Amiga. It combines the RGB signal with whatever is connected to its Video In port and sends the result to both an RGB-Out port and a Composite-Video Out port. The Genlock also has four audio inputs and two audio outputs. These let you combine the audio output of the Amiga with an external audio output, in stereo. Switches on the Genlock let you control which signal (Amiga, external video, or combined) gets output.?
Production. Until the advent of the Amiga, comparable computer-generated graphics, animation and design have been limited to machines costing from $ 10,000 on up that require the talents of highly-trained programmers and technicians. And character generators usually start at three times that price.
Desktop Video Hardware
Your desktop-video system begins, of course, with the Amiga computer and a videotape deck. The Amiga can interface with any tape deck that accepts an NTSC input. Depending upon your resources, you can use anything from a $ 250 VHS VCR to a mammoth 1-inch professional editing deck. Once you have the basic hardware, you can expand your system with more specialized products.
Special hardware designed to take advantage of the video potential of the Amiga has been eagerly awaited (and somewhat slow in corning). The most important of these, and consequently the most eagerly awaited, is Commodore’s Amiga 1300 Genlock.
The Amiga Genlock is the first consumer-priced, stand-alone computer genlocking device of its kind. In a nutshell, the Amiga Genlock permits the graphics and audio created on the Amiga to be overlayed on an external video source. This source can come from a camera, VCR or laser disc. The resulting combined image can be displayed on your monitor or TV set, or recorded on videotape. The ability to combine com-
PHOTOGRAPH BY LARRY DUNN
puter- and video-generated pictures is the cornerstone of desktop video. And the Amiga is the only widely- distributed personal computer that can perform the feat.
Although the output of the Amiga Genlock is not broadcast quality, you can still build a powerful desktop video system around it. For hroadcast-quality genlock- ing, Associated Computer Sendees is developing Genkey. Designed by the award-winning Sci Tech in Miami, this genlocking device will he broadcast quality and will sell for under $ 1,000 a price within die range of any broadcast or cable TV station.
New Tek’s Digi-View and the long-delayed Amiga Live! From Commodore are also invaluable desktop video tools. These products take external video sources and digitize them (i.e., turn the analog signals of the video camera into the hit-planes used to display graphics on the Amiga). Digi-View sells for $ 199.05; Amiga Live! Should come in between $ 300-$ 400 once all the bugs have been ironed out in design and manufacturing. Amiga Live! Is a more complicated device than Digi- View; it digitizes images in real time.
Like other Amiga graphics, digitized images can be combined with other video sources and output to video tape. Digitizers provide one more input and a very high-tech one at that for your final video project.
Beyond a genlock and a digitizer, you should probably look for some way to edit your video products. This can involve purchasing a second VCR (and doing a lot
Companies Mentioned:
Aegis Development
Interactive Microsystems
2210 Wilshire Blvd. 277
PO Box 338, Cambridge Center
Santa Monica, CA 90403
Cambridge. MA 02142
Associated Computer Sendees
JDK linages
839 South Glennsione
2224 E. 86th St., Suite 14
Springfield, MO 65802
Bloomington, MN 55420
Byte by Byte
New Tek
3736 Bee Cave Road, Suite 3
701 Jackson, B3
Austin, TX 78746
Topeka, KS 66604
Brown-Wagh Publishing
Octree Software
16795 Lark Ave., Suite 210
1501 Broadway, Suite 1800
Los Gatos, CA 95030
New York, NY 10036
Commodore Business Machines
Sony Video Communications
1200 Wilson Drive
Sony Drive

West Chester, PA 19380
Park Ridge, NJ 07656
Electronic Arts
Very Vivid
1820 Gateway Drive
1499 Queen St. W. 302
San Mateo, CA 94404
Toronto, Ont., Canada M6R 1A3
Futureware Computer Products
PO Box 94276
Richmond, BC, Canada V6Y 2A6
of button pushing) or even acquiring a professional editing deck. Another option is the Sony RME-100V Edit Controller, which, for about $ 200, lets you control two 8mm decks at once. As the popularity of consumer- oriented video expands, watch for such editing hardware for other popular home decks.
One final area to touch on is that of video sources. Unless you plan to make videos that are entirely computer generated, you need alternate video sources. The most common, and most important, is a video camera.
A good video camera gives you the flexibility you need to produce quality videos. Whether you’re a realtor taping a listing of available houses or an industrial training officer creating a new training video, a video camera is a virtual necessitv.
J
Video Software
The success of desktop video depends upon powerful, easy-to-use software to create the graphics and drive the hardware. Aegis Development and Electronic Arts are at the fore of Amiga desktop video development. Both companies produce paint programs (Images and Deluxe- Paint, respectively) that are excellent sources for desktop video images, and both have animation products designed with desktop video in mind. Animator from Aegis concentrates on polymorphic tweening, while DeluxeVideo from Electronic Arts is superb in animating BOBs. Both are excellent character and special-effects generators.
More specialized video software is also showing up for the Amiga. Caligari, from Octree Software, is a professional 3D-animation scene creator for the Amiga. [See our description of Caligari in this issue on page 24.) Mandala, from Very Vivid, features interaction between video images and any computer-controlled process. Mediaphile, from Interactive Microsystems (sec p. 21), in its current version lets your Amiga control a Sony 8mm tape deck and in the future will let you control two decks for editing purposes.
JDK Images produces Pro Video CG I, a package designed to let your Amiga function as a video character generator. It retails for $ 199.95. Other companies such as Futureware of Richmond, British Columbia, and Brown-Wagh Publishing, in California, are offering font sets for the Amiga that can he used in video titling. Infominder 2 from Byte by Byte is able to control videodisc players. You can use it to add videodisc-based images to your video productions.
Station Manager, a product of Associated Computer Services of Springfield, Missouri, sells for $ 1,995. Station Manager does exactly what it says from payroll to programming (the television kind). It even produces weather-rcport graphics. In this function, Station Manager supports hi-res, IFF, color cycling and an interface with a national weather service. The weather graphics are also available separately. This system has been tested at a network affiliate with exceptional results.
Coming into Play
Is Amiga desktop video a viable alternative or adjunct to traditional video production? A lot of professionals think so. Richard Lewis, Art Director at Atnblin Produc-
MediaPhile
For people interested in interfacing their Amiga with the latest video equipment available for the general consumer market. Interactive MicroSystems, in Box- ford, Massachusetts, has a complete audio video system that is quite unique.
MediaPhile is centered around the new Sony EVS 700U Video 8 Deck, an 8mm VTR that has some features not found on your normal VCR. Not only does the Sony deck have the standard freeze frame, slow motion, frame step, flying erase head and other VCR recording and playback goodies, it can also record up to 24 hours of digital stereo sound on one cassette, (about 36 LP albums). Throw in a 181-channel tuner, MTS and FM simulcast reception, IR remote control all cable ready and you have a pretty versatile little deck that sells for $ 1,329 retail.
So where does the Amiga come in? MediaPhile is a combination hardware and software interface that lets your Amiga act as a remote-control device and database. With MediaPhile, you can do just about everything that can be done with the Sony deck, with a few added niceties like mouse control, talking feedback, full-screen display of everything going on, and nicest of all, programmability. MediaPhile lets you store and recall databases of information about your 8mm tapes and control the deck features through mouse and keyboard commands. For example, you could create a database of 36 albums of music stored on a single 8mm cassette tape (each song listed separately); then, by clicking on an individual title, the program will activate the VTR, search for the right counter number and play back the song.
That is the simplest thing that MediaPhile does. You can enter an entire string of commands so that the VTR searches and plays back any number of songs, sections of video, or both, in any order, no matter where they are on the tape. You can also use the MediaPhile system for video and audio editing. (The next version of MediaPhile is intended to include dual VTR control features.) For putting it all together or just playing it back, MediaPhile is a pretty slick system for multi- media buffs, but it is not for everyone, unless you were thinking about buying the Sony EVS 700U deck anyway. Otherwise, MediaPhile might be better left for those who have a particular application in mind or who love new tech video audio computer equipment.
The price tag of $ 1,329 includes the software, cables, interface unit and a modified Sony EVS 700U deck.
You can’t use the deck without the modification. Interactive MicroSystems will modify your deck for $ 120.
For customers who already have a deck or choose to buy it elsewhere, they offer the MediaPhile software, interface unit and a deck modification kit for $ 279.
The System requires a 512K Amiga with two drives. A second monitor certainly helps, unless you have a genlock. ( If you do have a genlock, you only need one montior and MediaPhile will superimpose the VTR control icons over the video image. A very nice touch for editing purposes.) Interactive MicroSystems is also developing MediaPhile systems for other decks (VHS and Beta) and is continuing to add new features. If you’re interested in MediaPhile, write to Interactive MicroSystems at Box 272, Boxford, MA 01921, or call 617 887-9607.?
Tions, creators of Amazing Stories, has been using the Amiga to storyboard and design sets for episodes of the show. Recently, through the assistance of the creative services department of Aegis Development, real-time, Amiga-digitized video images have been used in actual broadcast. Dick Shoemaker of Entertainment Tonight uses the Amiga as does Louis G. Friedman, late of Lucas Films, now head of Production Logistics in L.A, He calls the Amiga the "most incredible machine available at the price,” Producer Bob Breakstone of ABC in New' York, who masterminded Video in the Park (a six-day outdoor video fest), used Amiga art by Greg Tzidaia and Bryan Stein for the opening logo and rolling credits of the event. (See p. 18.)
One interesting testimonial comes from Linda Windier of Topeka, Kansas. Last February, Linda was a freelance artist who hated computers. One night her husband, who works at a local computer store, brought home an Amiga, a paint program and Animator. Two weeks later, she was hired as graphics art director for NBC affiliate KSNT. In addition to her work at the station, Linda used the Amiga to create "The Land Oz," a Halloween attraction at the local mall. This trip down the yellow-brick road is lined by Amiga-designed artwork and large-screen video projections.
The Rewind
I saw my first videotape deck at Electronic City some 25 years ago. It was a huge, black-and-white, reel-to-reel, “steam-powered” affair. After buying a monitor, cables and such, it cost about $ 3,000. Today, for about the same price, you can have completely automatic, full- color video recording and editing capabilities, with stereo sound and the latest in digital special effects.
The Amiga fits beautifully into the existing creative world of video.
That’s Desktop Video, On the low end, it’s a means of adding titles, sound and fancy graphics to home videos and films. On the high end, it’s a valuable, practical tool in video art, business presentations, education and training, television shows, commercials and motion pictures. Desktop video is to our increasingly audio visually-oriented world what desktop publishing is to the world of print. It brings several powerful technologies, and the potential of creativity with their combination, within the grasp of those individuals who want to create, work and play at the forefront of new technology'. ¦
Write to Erie Erzinger at PO Box 2181, Bullhead City,
AZ 86430.
Brings the world into your Amiga !
R
i
V V your Amiga can see! Faces, logos, artwork .. . Anything you can imagine!
Simply point your camera and click the mouse. In seconds, whatever the camera sees is painlessly transformed into a computer image that can be printed, stored on disk, or transferred to other programs. Imagine how quickly and easily you can generate stunning video art and animation when you start with high quality digitized photographs or artwork.
ith Digi-View and a video camera.
Sophisticated software included with Digi-View makes it easy to produce dazzling, broadcast-quality color images. Intuitive, on-screen controls are as easy to use as the knobs on your T.V. set. Digi-View can capture images in several modes, including 320x200 pixels with up to 4096 colors on screen (“hold- and-modify" mode), and the incredibly detailed 640x400 high resolution mode.
Orders Only (800) 358-3079 ext. 342 Customer Service (913) 354-9332
• IFF disk format works with Digi-PaintIM, DeluxePaint1'1, I)eluxeVideo1 *V|, DeluxePrint. Aegis Images1'1. Aegis Animator, and more!
• Saves time! No more hours of freehand drawing and redrawing.
• Send photos over the telephone with your modem and terminal software.
• Capture images for scientific image processing or pattern recognition. . . .
• Spice up business graphics slide show program included. i W I vll*A vl
• Incorporate photos in posters and greeting cards. I Will V -L t-r
¦ includes video digitizer module.
• Use Digi-View pictures in your BASIC programs. ¦¦¦ color separation filter. Software and manual.
• Catalog images with IFF database programs.
• Make red blue 31) photos.
• A powerful tool for commercial graphic artists!
N=wT=k
Panasonic WV-1410 video camera wlens ....S280
CS-1L Copy stand w lights .....$ 75
INCORPORATED
701 Jackson • Suite B3 * Topeka. KS • 66603
Amiga is a trademark of Commodnre-Amiga. Inc. Digi-View and Pigi-Paint are trademarks of NewTek. Inc. DeluxePaint. DeluxeYideo. And DeluxePrint are trademarks of Electronic Arts. Inc. Aegis Images and Aegis Animator are trademarks of Aegis Development. Inc
' Digi-View software version 2.0 (or newer) required to use color camera. For maximum resolution use monochrome camera with 2.1 interlace. High-res color modes require I Meg expansion RAM.
G) 19S6 NewTek. Inc.
From the creators of Digi-View comes Digi-Paint, the first paint program to take full advantage of the Amiga’s exclusive “hold-and-modify” mode. No longer are you limited to 32 colors. With Digi-Paint, you can use all 4096 colors on screen simultaneously. Features include brushes, smooth shading, magnify, cut & paste, output to printer, and full IFF load and save. Digi-Paint was programmed completely in assembly language for the fastest possible response. Give your Amiga the graphics power of systems costing thousands of dollars more. See your Amiga dealer today or call toll-free for Digi-Paint, the 4096 color paint program.
Only $ 59.95
Orders Only (800) 358-3079 ext 342 Customer Service (913) 354-9332
N=wT=k
INCORPORATED
701 Jackson • Suite B3 • Topeka, KS • 66603
Amiga is a trademark of Cnmmodore-Amiga. Inc. Digi-Paint and Digi-Vieware trademarks of NewTek, Inc. DeluxePaint ts a trademark of Electronic Arts. Inc. ¦t 1386 NewTek, Inc,
CaligarpAmiga Software For theCVideo Professional
High-quality video animation used to require a system costing over $ 60,000. Now, Caligari can do it at a fraction of the price.
By Stefan B. Lipson
Caligari is the First Amiga-based software for three- dimensional animation and modeling. Developed by Octree Software of New York, it sets a new standard for three-dimensional video animation. Displayed in the Commodore booth at the August SIGGRAPH show in Dallas, the Caligari system attracted considerable praise, and with good reason; Taking advantage of the excellent graphics capabilities of the Amiga, Caligari can achieve the type of video animation that could previously be created only on workstations beginning at around S60.000.
Not only does Caligari represent the most inexpensive professional system available, it is also probably the easiest to use. The software includes an interface that features pull-down menus and easily identified icons for accessing the various editing features.
Shapes and Modes
Basic objects such as spheres, cubes and other assorted polyhedra can be selected from the Objects Menu. (For those of you who’ve forgotten, polyhedra are solid shapes bounded by polygons.) These shapes may be
altered and combined to create a library of objects to be used in future animations. Using the objects in the library, you then set up the scene in which the objects appear, specifying how and where the objects are to appear, the camera angles, the speed of animation and other script- related details. You can then preview the ani
mation with the Preview Option and store the segment on videotape if you are satisfied with it.
Caligari takes full advantage of the Amiga's exceptional graphics, providing three different modes in which to work. The high-resolution mode provides 704 x 440-pixe! Resolution with any 16 colors displayed on the screen at once. (Normally the Amiga provides a resolution in hi-res mode of 640x400 pixels with a border around the image. This border is unacceptable in video animation since it also gets transferred to the videotape. In Caligari, the border has been removed, increasing the dimensions of the image to 704 x 440 pixels.) The medium-res mode gives the user 360 x 440- pixel resolution with up to 32 colors displayed simultaneously. The hold-and-modify mode is also a medium* resolution mode, but it allows for 4,096 colors on the screen at one time.
For smooth shading, Caligari uses the Gouraud Shading algorithm. This algorithm defines an object as a series of planar surfaces and then illuminates each plane’s surface by specified light sources directed at them. The color intensity at the center point of each plane is calculated, the values are summed across the object, averaged, and then used to determine the color shading across the entire surface. This smooth shading option requires a wide range of colors and is therefore available in the hold-and-modify mode.
System Components
The menus give the user access to the three basic modules of the software: an object-design module for creating and storing three-dimensional objects; a scene- design screen for designing the scene in which die objects are to appear; and a script-editing video module for previewing a skeletal version of the scene and for sending the image to a video recorder. Brief descriptions follow.
7. The Object-Design Module. The object-design module
lets you create and store any number of three-dimensional objects, which can be used individually or pieced together to create more complex shapes. For example, a number of tetrahedra could be pieced together to create the name “AMIGA." The new shape may then be stored in the library for later use. Editing commands such as stretch, rotate, extrude and compress allow you to alter the objects in ever)7 way imaginable.
2. The Scene-Design Module. The scene-design module lets the user lay out the entire scene. The design screen initially appears on the monitor with a three-dimensional checkerboard receding into the distance. Distances are clearly marked along each of the three planes. Even the mouse crosshairs simulate three dimensions.
Menu options for the scene-design screen allow the user to traverse any of the axes and to view the scene from any specified angle and distance. The user may then call an object or group of objects up from the library and place them anywhere on the set. A wide range of editing commands allow you to move or change location of the objects. You can view the scene from any angle and from any axis with a quick press of a mouse button. Once complete, the scene is saved in much the same way that an object is saved in the object-design module.
3. The Script-Editing rideo Module. With the scene complete and the objects in place, the user can instruct the system to display an on-screen preview of the animation, For example, by selecting two points on the screen, Caligari will animate the scene as if the camera were moving from one point to the other, moving at user-defined intervals. The program takes care of all of the essentials, such as angles of rotation, perspective and hidden surfaces.
The Script Editor also allows you to enter commands in hatch mode. This allows you to create a file containing all of the necessary commands to be run in
sequence. Written in a format similar to that of a move in the game Adventure, a command such as “Move from 0,0,0 to 10,10,10 in Arc” would simulate camera movement between the designated points following an arced path.
Caligari’s Script Editor can even accommodate the placement of multiple light sources as well as diffuse and specular lighting. The system is flexible enough so that the user can, for example, revolve around a scene while simultaneously reducing the camera’s angle to the horizontal and changing the location of any and all light sources.
Real-time Animation Previewing
Complex layouts with elaborate animation routines have in the past required an inordinate amount of computing time, making it difficult to construct individual images quickly enough to provide a sense of animation. To address this, Caligari has employed a unique preview system that shows only a skeletal sequence where the objects appear to he built out of wire frames. If fully rendered, each image would otherwise take from one to sixty seconds to realize. By drawing only the wire frames, the user can see a facsimile of how the animated segment will appear without getting bogged down by computing time.
Once satisfied, the user can send the sequence of images to the video recorder in a fully automated sense: The sequence of images and scenes are “queued up,” or listed in order of creation. The machine draws one, the single-frame video controller transfers the drawn image to the videotape, the next image is drawn and transferred, and so on until the entire sequence is saved on tape.
Image Reproduction and Format
Due to the complexity of the images, Caligari would require enormous amounts of memory if conventional storage and data-rctrieval techniques were used. The problems surrounding disk storage and retrieval have been circumvented by employing a unique three-dimensional database in which the elementary components of the objects are stored in hierarchical fashion. With the database concept, the images to appear on the screen are not actually stored on disk, but are instead fetched and assembled from the database. This approach makes the creation and composition of each screen much faster because the database is very- compact, and disk access (which slows down processing time) is eliminated. The database approach also allows multiple users to share full libraries (i.e., a database of objects that you have created) without having to copy and reload numerous disks.
Caligari will also allow you to store the scene to disk if so specified. Using IFF format, the image may then be transferred and altered using any of the Amiga graphics packages. This also allows you to output hardcopy excerpts of your videotape animation.
In the Right Place
Who’s interested in a product like this? Everyone who ever wanted to get involved in video animation, of course, but the system requires the patience of an individual who can put in several hours of work to produce a high-quality segment that has a short running time. Several advertising agencies have already inquired about Caligari as a means of creating in-house animation mock ups. Art schools and television studios also stand to benefit tremendously from a system that offers so much for so little. In fact, Roy Kissin, co-producer of Bruce Dern’s recent movie, On The Edge, has made inquiries into Caligari for his own use.
Hardware Requirements
In order to animate the images and capture them on videotape, you must also have a single frame controller, a piece of hardware used to transfer the image created by Caligari onto the videotape. Any of the available frame controllers work with the Octree software, and they range in price from $ 750 to about $ 3,500. The system can work with a variety of video recorders as well as a variety of formats. To operate the system, the video recorder is plugged into the frame controller and the frame controller is plugged into the serial port of the Amiga. For professional applications, Octree recommends using 1.5 megabytes of RAM. Although the cost for the hardware and software may seem high for the home user, it is extraordinarily low for the professional who is in need of such a tool.
Caligari for the Home
Caligari was originally conceived for the professional video market, but a second version of the Caligari system will also be made available at a reduced price for home users. The low-end version of the software will require 512K and act primarily as a three-dimensional modeling system. It will offer the same editing features as the professional version, including the smooth shading option. Interestingly enough, the Caligari video demo We Built A City, shown in the New York SIG- GRAPH video show in June, was created on an Amiga with 512K.
The home version will not include the modules for scripting and video interfacing, and so it will not allow you to animate your three-dimensional images or send the images to videotape. Instead, the home version will allow you to create the image and store the completed product on disk. Because of its modular design, you will be able to purchase an upgrade to bring the home version up to the professional level.
The price for the software had not been determined as of this writing, but the underlying philosophy at Octree is firm: to deliver what no microcomputer has delivered thus far and at a fraction of the cost of presently available graphics-animation workstations.
"We’re really very excited about Caligari,” says Roman Ormandy, President of Octree Software, "Our field is analogous to the field of desktop publishing; the market for low-cost, high-quality graphics animation software is mushrooming beyond our wildest dreams. Caligari is the first system that allows the user to create video animation previously unobtainable without a system priced over $ 60,000. Our system costs a fraction of that ” So far, the response of everyone who has seen Caligari has confirmed this excitement.¦
Stephan B. Lipson is a writer and a staff consultant for the Yourdon Software Group. Write to him at 88S Union St.,
D3, Brooklyn, NY 11213.
Octree Software is at 1301 Broadway, Suite 1800, New York, NY 10036.
Uittice® C Compiler $ 225MO
Circle 23 on Reader Service card
Software designed for AMIGA.
New version 3.1 of the AMIGA DOS C Compiler replaces version
3. >3. Major enhancements include the addition of: I MU, an assembler, a faster linker and version 3 MS-IX )S.
With more than 30,000 users worldwide, Lattice C Compilers set the industry standard for MS-DOS software development. Lattice C gives you all you need for development of programs on the AMIGA. Lattice C is a full implementation of Kernighan and Ritchie with the ANSI C extensions and manv additional featu res.
Professional Lattice® C Compiler $ 3 75.00
A new product called the Professional Lattice C Compiler is now available. It includes the C Compiler package (complete with TMU). Plus LMK, LSE and the Metascope Debugger.
AMIGA C Cross Compiler $ 500.00
Allows AMIGA development on your MS-IX )S system. Price includes the Professional lattice C Compiler described above.
Lattice Screen Editor (LSE™) $ 100.00
Designed as a programmer's editor, lattice Screen Editor (LSE) is fast, flexible and easy to learn. L.SE's multi-window environ* ment provides all the editor functions you need including block moves, pattern searches and "cut and paste." In addition, LSE oilers special features for programmers such as an error tracking mode and three Assembly Language input modes. You can also create macros or customize keystrokes, menus, and prompts to your style and preferences.
Lattice dBC III™ Library $ 150.00
The dBC HI library lets you create, access and update files that are compatible with Ashton Tate’s dBASK system. DBC Ill's C functions let you extend existing dBASE applications or allow your users to process their data using dBC III or dBASE III.
Lattice Text Utilities (TMU™) $ 75.00
Ixd l ice Text Utilities consists of eight software tools to help you manage your text files. GREP searches files for the specified pattern. D1EE compares two files and lists their differences, EX TRACT creates a list of file names to be extracted from the current directory. BUILD creates batch files from a previously generated hie name list. WC displays the number of characters and optionally the checksum of a specified file. ED is a line editor which can utilize output from other 7'A L software in an automated batch mode. SPLAT searches files for a specified character string and replaces every occurrence with a specified string. And PILES lists, copies, erases or removes files or entire directory structures which meet the specified conditions.
Lattice Unicalc* Spreadsheet $ 79.95
Unicalc is a simple-tu-operate program that turns your AMIGA computer into an electronic spreadsheet. I 'sing Unicalc you can easily create sales reports, expense accounts, balance sheets, or any other reports you had to do manually.
Unicalc offers the versatility you've come to expect from business software, plus the speed and processing power of the AMIGA.
* HI92 n )w by 2s0 column processing area * Comprehensive context- sensitive help screens • Cells can contain numeric, algebraic formulas and titles • foreign language customization for all prompts and messages • Complete library of algebraic and conditional functions
• Dual window capabilities • Floating point and scientific notation available • Complete load, save and print capabilities • Unique cusn >mizati( in capability for your even- application * Full compatibility with other leading spreadsheets • Full menu and mouse support.
Lattice MacLibrary ™ $ 100.00
The lattice MacLibrary'* is a collection of more than sixty C functions which allow you to quickly and efficiently take advantage of the powerful capabilities of the AMIGA.
Even if your knowledge of the AMIGA is limited, MacLibrary can ease your job of implementing screens, windows and gadgets by utilizing the functions, examples and sample programs included with the package.
Other MacLibrary routines are functionally compatible with the most widely used Apple® Macintosh1'1 Quickdraw Routines™, Standard File Package and Toolbox Utility Routines enabling you to rapidly convert your Macintosh programs to run on the AMIGA.
Panel™ $ 195.00
Panel will help you write your screen programs and layer your screen designs with up to ten overlapping images. Panel's screen layouts can he assigned to individual windows and may he dynAMIGAlly loaded from files or compiled into a program. Panel will output C source for including in your applications. A monitor and keyboard utility is also included to allow you to customize your applications for other systems.
With Lattice products you get Lattice Service including telephone support, notice of new products and enhancements and a 30-day money- back guarantee Corporate license agreements available.
Lattice. Incorporated
Post Office Box 3CT2
Lattice
Glen Ellyn, Illinois 60138
(312) 858-7950 TWX 910-291-2190
Digital Sound Samplers
A survey of four products for the Amiga that alloio you to digitally record and manipulate sounds.
By Peggy Herrington
A digital sound sample is a brief numeric recording that, when heard, is reminiscent of some real-world sound. Sound samples fool our ears into hearing continuous sound in the same way static photographs are used to fool our eyes at the movies. The technique of electronically converting sound into numbers was developed in the 1970s as a way of capturing acoustic instrument sounds to use in electronic music compositions. But because sampling requires gobs of computer memory which only recently became affordable it is only now becoming well known.
Sampling has been used on records and in movies for some time, but since sampled sounds can be extremely realistic, it’s not easy to distinguish them from acoustic sounds, though they are made and played electronically. Because the Amiga is a powerful electronic musical instrument with an even more powerful built-in computer, it makes the task of recording and manipulating sampled sounds relatively easy. Compared to analog recording, sampling offers more advantages than you can shake a drum stick at, but due to limited usage, it is still, today, as much an art as a science.
Sampling Hardware
The Amiga can play digitized samples with four built-in digital to-analog converters. These D-to-A converters reside on Portia, the audio chip, and each functions independently of the other three. That means the Amiga can play up to four different sampled sounds at once, (memory permitting), each one being literally anything you can hear, from a drop of rain on sheet- metal to a jazz band chorus. A couple of ways exist for getting the numbers that make up samples into computer memory so the Amiga can play them. One way is to load them from disk, either as programs or sound libraries (which is unavailable as I write this, but very well could be available by the time you read it).
Another way is to download samples that other people have made available on commercial networks and bulletin board systems; some user groups have public- domain libraries with samples on disk. Another way is to “roll your own.” To do this, you'll need an external hardware unit called a digital sound sampler, some software and, depending on the unit you buy and how serious you are about quality, perhaps some audio equipment. If you're gung-ho, you'll probably need RAM expansion beyond 512K.
In addition to other parts, a sampler contains, as mentioned above, an analog-to-digita! Converter, a device that turns sound into numbers. Although you'll need only one, four Amiga samplers are on the market now. Theoretically, they provide the same results, but in actuality these samplers and the software that comes with them are just about as different as you could imagine. They attach to three I O ports; two to the parallel port (FutureSound and MicroGraphics), one to the second mouse-controller port (SoundScape) and one to the system bus (Micro Forge). Since peripherals such as printers, RAM memory expansion cards and video digitizers also attach to these ports, unless you're fond of plugging and unplugging things, pass-through connectors that let you switch between devices using a common port are a must. FutureSound offers a ?
Replacement parallel port for your printer. Should physical clearance between the SoundScape sampler and something attached to the system bus be a problem, extenders for the mouse port are readily available at Radio Shack stores.
Altering Samples
Samples are most commonly created for use in music compositions as both imaginative and realistic instrument voices, and as such, typically require 30K to 100K of memory each. They can provide the basis for all sorts of other sounds, too. Helicopters, sea gulls, thunder rolls, racing motors, sirens, crying babies, rhaspber- ries and pealing bells can be as readily fashioned as alien blasters. You can sample anything you can hear, either from the original source or a recording, using only one of the Amiga's four audio channels, or two if you want separate stereo effects. (You’re not in violation of copyright laws as long as you use samples of commercial recordings strictly for your own enjoyment.) Sound is fed into the sampler through a microphone or from the output of a tape player or compact disc (actually any electronic device that will boost the signal to line level), where it is converted into numbers and stored in computer memory. Once there, software for altering it comes into play. You can stretch the sound out, add all or parts of it to other samples, speed or slow it without changing pitch, change the pitch without altering it’s characteristic nature, loop it to
. .. 7 ".7‘ 7 "'"v." •: : •
Products mentioned:
DIGITAL SAMPLING DEVICES:
SAMPLE EDITING SOFTWARE:
FutureSound ($ 175)
SoundShop ($ 49.95)
Applied Visions
Revolution Software
15 Oak Ridge Road
PO Box 38
Medford, MA 02155
West Chester, PA 19831
617 488-3602
215 430-0412
MicroGraphics Digitizer ($ 79.95)
RAM EXPANSION:
MicroGraphics Images
1 Megabyte ($ 399)
20954 Osborne Street
Academy Computers
Canoga Park, CA 91304
1720 Juan Tabo Blvd. NE
818 407-0571
Albuquerque, NM 87112
505 296-4886
Micro Forge Sound Digitizer ($ 349)
Available for less in kit form
The Micro Forge
398 Grant Street SE
2 Megabytes ($ 799)
Atlanta, GA 30312
RS DATA Systems
404 688-9464
7322 SW Freeway, Suite 660
Requires single-slot expander, $ 85
Houston, TX 77074
713 988-5441
SoundScape Sound Sampler ($ 99.95)
Requires expansion box, $ 99
Mimetics Corp.
PC) Box 60238, Station A
Palo Alto, CA 94306
408 741-0117
repeat internal sections, play it backwards, add reverb and echo effects, enhance what's there or make it into something entirely different. The only limits are the manipulations the software will perform and your own creativity. A little experience wouldn't hurt, either.
I made and altered samples with the following devices on a 512K Amiga, with and without two RAM expansion boards: a 2-megabyte board from RS DATA Systems and a 1-megabyte board that’s available in a kit from Academy Computers. Other configurations are available from these companies, as well as some others. [See our hardware guide iji this issue.] The ones I tried use auto-config, but offer no pass through access to the system bus. The software that comes with the samplers will allow multitasking and, unless otherwise noted below, function with expansion RAM. Typically, I set up an internal RAM disk and store samples there, making them instantly available for playing and editing.
Amiga Sampling Devices
FutureSound, from Applied Visions, offers the most complete package. Included are a microphone, the sampling device (5x IX Xinches) with preamp and RCA phono jacks for microphone and or line-level input (signals are mixed if both are attached), a knob for adjusting the input level, a toggle switch for a printer connected to the built-in parallel port, an instruction manual and the program disk. The sampling rate is adjustable to the Amiga's maximum of 28kHz for both making and playing samples, four of which may be loaded into memory concurrently and sounded separately or in any combination. Besides recording, the main program offers many features for altering samples, among which are copying, blanking, adjusting the volume and mixing all or parts, along with flipping. It saves samples to disk in FutureSound’s file format or two IFF formats (one-shot and 3-octave with repeat). Also on the disk are C-language routines and a Basic program that will access and play samples. Registered owners will receive an upgraded program that will allow access to RAM expansion memory when Version
1. 2 of the Amiga operating system is available.
MicroGraphic’s Digitizer also plugs into the parallel port. It's a tiny device, being not much bigger than the connector itself, and comes with a program disk and instruction manual. 1 worked with a prototype unit and software that accepted only amplified sound input at up to 22kHz sampling rate. Sample editing w!as not completely functional; MicroGraphics plans to provide software upgrades at no charge to registered owners in three stages: the first is a recording and editing program, the second is music sequencing in a graphics-oriented, program-like language and the third will provide full MIDI capability and accept note input from externally connected keyboards for 20 channels of sound (16 MIDI, -1 Amiga). MicroGraphics assured me the programs will save IFF-compatiblc disk files and function with expansion RAM, but the unit I used was not quite far enough along to test those capabilities. If this one turns out as advertised, it will be a very good deal indeed.
The Micro Forge’s Stereo Sound Digitizer stands on
LOGiSTiX
Spreadsheet*Tlme Management*Database*Graphlcs
?
LOGiSTiX is a powerful spreadsheet, its 2048 row by 1024 column worksheet is large enough to handle serious business applications. LOGiSTiX takes advantage of the Amiga's unique multi-tasking ability and can even use the Amiga’s interlace mode to display 44 rows of your worksheet in 640 * 400 resolution mode. That’s powerful!
Tic II
LOGiSTiX is a powerful database that lets you store, sort, find and edit data like a stand-alone database does. The true power of the LOGiSTiX database is its ability to integrate with the spreadsheet, graphics, and time and project management functions. LOGiSTiX can also read dBase, ASCII, CSV and many otherfile formats (such as Lotus and Supercalc), so data compatibility won’t be a problem. LOGiSTiX is fully integrated software!
LOGiSTiX is a powerful time and project manager. You don't have to be a "PERT master" to learn LOGiSTiX. Simply decide on your time frame, break down your job into tasks, decide which ones need to be compieted first and which tasks get done next. Then LOGiSTiX can take into account job dependencies, calculate Critical Path, and display float. You have complete control over your planning. You can plan your schedule in time units from half hours to years, while completely tied into your worksheet.
It's easy to construct Gantt charts and print them out to most popular printers and plotters (with sideways print abilities). The LOGiSTiX timesheet can be fully integrated with cash flow projections, income statements, etc., all in the same worksheet area so you can see the effect of time and schedule changes on your bottom line. No other project planning program offers you so much flexibility, letting you plan your time, resources and money so easily.
LOGiSTiX is powerful color graphics. It’s easy to translate complex facts and figures into understandable presentation quality graphs. Your on-screen graphs take full advantageof the Amiga’s amazing graphics capabilities, and can also be output to the Polaroid Palette system for super high-res text and or graph slides and transparencies.
WHEN H QUALITY COUNTS! I
LOGISTIX
Thtt Integrated Softwqr© 5yatwm thjI idda The fourth Dimension of 7!ME
BEST ipEA IU SliSINESS £GF SINCE Th£ SPREADShEE'
PROGR&OWC
P€RIPH€RALr
bJOFTUJfiR€
OIUF0X
LOGiSTiX and many other innovative products are now available at your favorite dealer, or directly from Progressive Peripherals and Software, Inc. LOGISTIX is also available for IBM PC and compatibles, Atari 1040 ST and the HP-150,
464 XALAMATH STREET DENVER. COLORADO 60204 303-825-4144 TELEX: 888837
LOGiSTiX, Amiga, Atari 1040 ST, dBase, Lotus, IBM. HP-150, and SuperCalc are registered trademarks of Grafoxof England. Commodore Amiga Inc Atari Inc.. Ashton-Tate Corp., Lotus Development Corp., International Business Machines. Hewlett Packard Corp., and Sorcim IUS Inc.. respectively
Software for Editing Sounds
Making your own samples can be a lot of fun, but it can be frustrating if you don’t have access to a pretty good microphone, tape player, stereo or compact disc player. If you can't beg, borrow or buy audio equipment, you can still enjoy altering sampled sounds garnered from the public domain.
SoundShop, from Revolution Software, a sound editing program, won’t help you record real-world sounds, but it will let you synthesize, alter and manipulate sounds from disk files and put together four-part songs. (The disk also holds BobShop, an animated sequence creator and editing program for blitter objects.)
Edge in their single-card expansion slot on the right side of the Amiga. It comes with a very brief instruction manual and six (!) Disks, five of which contain over 200K of samples. Separate RCA jacks at the back of the unit connect channels 1 and 2, which provide true stereo input from either line-level or amplified sources. Samples can be recorded from eight to 18kHz (at maximum, for a duration of 16 seconds with a 512K Amiga), but editing features are limited to adjusting the playback rate, cutting portions from the beginning and end and some filtering of noise. The documentation is directed at developers. It covers installation. IFF file formats and C-language subroutines for making and playing monophonic samples from chip RAM. Again, 1 was assured that the unit and software will function with expansion RAM, but since both RAM boards I have, like this sampler, connect to the expansion bus and do not have pass-throughs, I am not able to verify it.
SoundScape’s Sound Sampler connects to the second mouse joystick port and is about the size of a pack of cigarettes. It fits flush against the Amiga and has three audio input jacks: one for microphone (not included), and two for stereo patch cords. The unit mixes inputs into a monaural signal, however thereby defeating stereo output. Sampling rate is fixed at 18kHz per second (for up to 18 seconds in a 512K machine), but since companding is utilized (see below), samples made with it are of superior quality. While adequate, the instruction manual is nothing to write home about. The program disk has two programs, one for recording parts of songs and sound effects and the other for making and editing musical instrument-type samples. The latter is a portion of Mimetics’ SoundScape ProMIDI Studio (SI49) music-sequencing software (a major sampling program upgrade is to be provided free to registered owners) and offers editing of one sample at a time with looping and or applying a 3-stage, 4-level amplitude envelope, although samples thus altered cannot be saved in IFF file format (only in Mimetics’ format). Samples can be played on a MIDI-connected keyboard with pitch wheel and velocity sensitivity under program control, and the software takes full
SoundShop offers easily twice the sample-editing power of the software that comes with the sampling devices mentioned here. Not only does it have the popular cutting, combining and looping stuff, it lets you change individual overtones, add sine waves and fade portions of up to four sampled or created sounds displayed graphically on-screen at once, making most changes while any or all are playing. It saves edited sounds in IFF file format, and the disk includes a SMUS-compati- ble four-track music composition program (500-note maximum per voice) in nonstandard music notation, with editing. The manual is the best of the bunch.?
Advantage of expansion RAM memory.
Garbage In, Garbage Out
The overall quality of a sample is affected greatly by the clarity of the input signal. If you sample a noisy signal from an old tape deck, you’ll get a distracting hiss from the Amiga. And get ready for a lot of buzzwords. It’s true that the rate at which a sound is sampled must be twice the highest frequency in that sound including overtones, but if someone remarks that the human hearing range goes to 20kHz while the Amiga’s maximum sampling rate is 28kHz, remind them that almost nobody over 30 can hear anything above 15kHz anyway. Should someone try to dazzle you with quantization, mention that that’s dependent on the accuracy of the digitization method used by the sampler as opposed to the Amiga, and inquire politely how much sampling devices for their computer cost. Few machines have built-in digital-to-analog converters, and you can probably buy at least two Amiga samplers for that amount, giving you two methods of quantization and sample editing programs at your disposal.
You can turn the tables on them by mentioning that these samplers and upgrades to their software work with expansion memory, and that although sound and graphics data must reside in chip memory, the Amiga is expandable to 8-megabytes of addressable RAM for program instructions. Mention, too, IFF compatibility between brands of programs. My tests were far from conclusive, but in general, 1 found that most samples of 32K or less were playable in Electronic Arts' Instant Music and DeluxeVideo, and some in a prerelease of the long-awaited Musicraft. As sampling becomes more popular, the IFF standard is sure to be expanded to full compatibility.
Should all else fail, invite them over to listen to some samples. Although the Amiga uses 8-bit resolution, it can do companding, a technique that produces a signal- to-noise ratio (program material compared to background hiss) of 70dB rather than the usual 48dB from similar systems, which makes it capable of the 14-bit sound quality of a compact-disc player. That should fool somebody’s ears! ¦
AMIGA
Precision
Software
Mdi Crmti Jan I ian Viitw
Slntw
Efflsas'
EEEEEiL
E0EJEI

RETAIL PRICE
$ 14995
Progressive Peripherals and Software Inc.,
464, Kalamath Street, Denver CO 80204 USA Telephone (303) 825-4144 Telex 888837 PPS DVR
Precision Software
Circle 159 on Reader Service card
First in a new generation of database systems, Superbase Personal benefits from the latest ideas in ease of use - pull-down menus, multiple windows, poinl-to-click selections - as well as the full power of relational database management.
Easy lo set up
Type in your Held names, add details like length or date style. With the easy-to-understand menu selections and control panels, you can create a database in minutes. What’s more, you can alter your formats at any time without disturbing the data already held on file.
Manage your data
Superbase displays your data in easy-to-read tables or page by page in Form vtew. There’s practically no limit to the number of fields in a record, but you have full control over what you choose to show. Select fields, select index, then use VCR style controls to vie your data - fast forward, rewind, pause or stop - it’s as easy as playing a tape. A unique Filter system lets you select and work with any category of recorcs from your file.
Working power
Define reports and related queries across multiple files, with multiple sort levels if you need them. Import data from other databases or applications. Export data to your word processor or join several files to form a new database. The advanced B+ tree file structure and disk buffering ensure high performance - Superbase reads a typical name and address record in less than three hundredths of a second.
The Picture Database
Use Superbase’s special picture reference facility and powerful data handling to create a unique picture data library application. You can even run an automatic slide show.
BRINGING THE WORLD OF AMIGA" PRODUCTS TO YOU... FAST!
AMIGA 1010 3.5" DISK DRIVE
(Call For Current Price)
AMIGA 1000 COMPUTER AMIGA 1080 COLOR MONITOR
(Call For Current Price)
AMIGA MODEM 1200 RS
(Calf For Current Price)
AMIGA 5.25" DISK DRIVE WITH TRANSFORMER SOFTWARE Available Now!
AMIGA GENLOCK Available in December
(Call For Current Prices)
pandere
• Autoconfiguring
• Optional Pass Thru Bus
with 2 megabytes RAM * Expandable to 4 MB
installed and tested 2MB • Other Options Available
rX t
i r
POSTER
• Revolutionary Entertainment Breakthrough
• Movie-like 3D Graphics
• Nonlinear Different Every Time You Play
'With the purchase of any CINEMAWARE'" title AND another Mindscape title. See opposite page for complete list. Offer ends 1-31-87.
JUKI 5510 with Color Kit
$ 499
SONY DS DD Disks
Box of 10 Disks
Modem Special
300 1200 Baud On-Line software Cable
$ 199
Free Blue Label Shipping
* On all software orders over $ 100 to destinations east of the Rocky Mountains. This is two-day delivery from shipping date.
SOFTWARE
ABSOFT
AC Basic
S239
AC Fortran
S239
ACCESS SOFTWARE
Leader Board. . .
S 31
Tournament Disk
S 17
Tenth Frame......
S 31
ACCOLADE
Mean 18 ..
$ 32
ACM
Grade Manager. . .
S 69
ACTIVISION
Borrowed Time
S 29
Champ Basketball
S 29
Gamestar Titles
Call
Hacker
S 29
Hacker II
S 29
Little Comp. People
Call
Mmdshadow .....
S 29
Music Studio
S 43
Shanghai .
$ 29
ToneTown .
$ 29
ADEPT
CompuCuisine
S 29
AEGIS
Animator Images ..
S 89
Art Disk.....
S 42
Draw .
Call
Draw Plus ......
Call
Images. . .....
Call
Impact
S125
Sonic......
Call
AMIGA
Lisp ..
$ 149
Assembler
S 79
MinoWalker
$ 44
BATTERIES INCLUDED
ISGUR Portfolio
$ 129
Paperclip Eiite
$ 89
BTS .....
$ 49
DEGAS Elite ......
$ 56
BAUDVILLE
Video Vegas......
$ 28
BROWN WAGH
Zurna Fonts
1. 2, or 3
$ 26
BYTE BY BYTE
Financial Plus
$ 250
InfoMinder
S 69
CAPILANO
Logic Works
S159
CENTRAL COAST
DOS 2 DOS
S 45
CHANG LABS
Accts Payable
$ 109
Accts Receivable
$ 109
AR AP GL
$ 219
General Ledger . .
$ 109
Payroll . ...
$ 109
Sales Analysis
$ 109
COMPUMED
Hacker Package .
S 39
Mirror ....
$ 39
COMPUTER CLUB
Nancy
$ 45
COSMI
Super Huey
$ 32
CREATIVE SOLUTIONS
MultiForth
Call
DARK HORSE
Chess Mate
S 25
DELTA RESEARCH
Forth ...
Call
DELUXE HELP
Deluxe Help
For Dpamt
S 20
DIGITAL CREATIONS
D'Buddy
S 58
Digital Link .....
S 49
Gizmos
S 39
D1G1VIEW
Panasonic Camera
WV-140
$ 225
Panasonic Camera
WV-1410
$ 275
DigiView Software
S185
Light Stand
S 69
DIGITAL SOLUTIONS
LPD Series
Call
DISCOVERY
Grabbil
$ 25
Exactly1 . . .
5 19
Marauder II
S 39
ELECTRONIC ARTS
Adv. Conslr. Kit
$ 29
Archon......
$ 29
Arctic Fox . . ,
$ 29
Auto Duel .
5 39
Bard's Tale
$ 39
ChessMaster 2000
$ 35
Deluxe Music
Call
Deluxe Pamt
S 69
Deluxe Print
S 69
Deluxe Video
$ 69
Dpamt Data Disk
5 25
Dpnnt Data Disk
$ 25
Financial Cookbook $ 35
Instant Music
S 35
Instant Music Data
S 25
Maxicomm
$ 38
Maxidesk
$ 52
Maxiplan .
$ 109
Marble Madness
$ 37
New Tech Coloring
Book
S 17
One on One
S 29
7 Cities of Gold .
S 29
Skyfox......
$ 29
Starfleet 1
$ 44
Ultima III ......
S 49
EPYX
Roque . .
S 31
Temples of Apshai
S 31
FIREBIRD
Pawn
$ 32
FIRST BYTE
First Shapes
$ 34
Kid Talk
$ 39
Math Talk
$ 39
Speller Bee
$ 39
FINALLY SOFTWARE
Dr Xes .
$ 39
Talker ....
$ 54
GEODESIC PUBL.
Triclops Invasicn
$ 27
GO AMIGA
Printer Drivers
Call
GRAFOX OF ENGLAND
Logistix
$ 174
HARVSOFT
Infobase
$ 36
INFOCOM
All Titles Available .
Call
INTERACTIVE ANALYTIC
Expert System Kit
S 56
Explorer .
S 39
JENDAY
Conv. W Comp
S 24
JHM
Talking Color 3ook
S 24
KENT ENGINEERING
Macro Mocem
S 55
LATTICE
C Compiler .
S129
dbC III Library
$ 119
Dos X Compiler
$ 199
Make Utility . .
S 99
Panel ....
$ 149
Screen Editor.....
$ 89
Text Utilities
S 62
MARK OF THE UNICORN
Hex .....
S 31
MANX
Aztec C Comm.. .
$ 389
Aztec C Devel.
$ 239
MEGASOFT
A-Copier
S 29
A-Disk
S 24
A-Filer .
S 34
A-Repori
$ 34
A-Term ...
S 34
MEGATRONICS
Trivia ....
Call
SoellCraft
Call
Mergemaster.....
Call
MERIDIEN SOFTWARE
Zing
Call
METACOMCO
Pascal......
S 80
Shell .....
Call
Toolkit ...
Call
METADIGM
MetaScope ......
$ 79
MetaScnbe
$ 73
MetaTools I
$ 61
MICRO ILLUSIONS
CAD System......
Call
Discovery Math
$ 31
Discovery Spell .
$ 31
MICROPROSE
Silent Service
$ 31
MICROSMITHS
TxEc ...
$ 32
MICROSYSTEMS SW
Analyze 2.0.....
Call
BBS-PC
S 65
Online ...
$ 47
Scribble ......
$ 65
Organize
$ 65
MIMETICS
Soundscape .....
$ 130
NEW HORIZONS
Flow ....
5 85
NORTHEAST SOFTWARE
Order ...
. Call
Publisher.....
Call
MINDSCAPE
Balance of Power $ 37
Bralacus ..$ 35
Deja Vu $ 37
Hailey Project S 37
Keyboard Kadet. . . $ 30
Mastertype S 30
Ractor . S 35 SAT Preparation . . , $ 61
CINEMAWARE " SPECIAL1
B ., sn, . Ir maWaic t ‘ e AND jfiy other M r.dscape i He fir'd get a FREE Poster
UNISON WORLD
Art Gallery I. II . . Call
Printmaster Plus $ 49 VERSASOFT
dBMAN ..$ 99
VIP TECHNOLOGY
Professional Call
WORDPERFECT INC. WordPerfect Call
ADDISON WESLEY
Intuition Manual ... $ 24
Hardware S 24
Rom: Libraries ... $ 34
Rom: Exec......$ 34
SYBEX Progr.'s Guide $ 24
ACCESS ASSOCIATES
Alegra 512K $ 335
AKRON
A-Time . ..... $ 59
AMIGA
A1000 CPU Call
External 3.5" Call
Monitor . Call
Transformer Call
Genlock Call
Mooem Call
ANCHOR AUTOMATION
Omega 80 S165
APPLIED VISIONS Futuresound Call
ASDG
Mmi-Rack Call
Memory Banks Call
BYTE BY BYTE
Pal Jr ......Call
Tick ......Call
EPSON
JX-80 Ribbons $ 17
GO AMIGA
Printer Cables $ 25
Modem Cables $ 25
Disk Head Cleaner S 15 30-Disk Case . ... $ 10
Mousepad $ 10
Sony Monitor Cable $ 35
GOLDEN HAWK TECH.
MIDI Gold $ 69
JUKI
5510 Color Printer . $ 399 MICROBOTICS
Siarboarc 2 Call
MAS-Drive 20 Call
MIMETICS
Audio Digitizer .5 89 MIDI Interface S 45 OKI DATA
Okimate 20 Ribbons $ 7
TECMAR
Tcard 256K.....$ 585
Tcard 1 meg $ 69S
Tdisk ...$ 1199
Tconnect ..... $ 349
o* 800-BE-AMIGA
Orders
In California: 800-843-2842
Customer Service: 415-322-0686
Deiivery subject to product availability. Ctfde on Reader d
Prices subject to change
Send Mail Orders to:
GO AMIGA
508 Waverley Street, Palo Alto, CA 94301
(Money Order. Casnier's Check, or Qualified PO. Only)
SHIPPING INFO: We ship UPS ground On orders less than $ 100. Sh ppmg is S3 per item (limit S6) For software orders over 5103 FREE UPS 2nd Day Air shipping Call tor hardware shipping costs RETURN & REFUND POLICY: All returns must have an RMA-*. Call Customer Service and request a RMA-2 Defective merchant: ise under warranty will be repaired or replaced We do not offer refunds for defective products or for products that do no! Pedorm satisfactorily We make no guarantees for product performance Any money back guarantees must be handled directly with the manufacturer
Amiga is a trademark ol Commodore-Amiga
The AmimWorld New Year’s
o
Hardware Buyer’s Guide
Compiled by Bob Ryan and Vinoy Laughner
Hardware products you can use to enhance your Amiga system.
Third-party hardware for the Amiga has been slower in coming than software, mainly because it took longer for Commodore-Amiga to settle on a standard for hardware expansion. Now that the 100-pin, auto configuration expansion specification has been established (and incorporated into version 1.2 of the operating system), expansion products for the Amiga are showing up on dealer’s shelves. The products listed in this guide are those that we had information about on October 1, 1986.
The Hardware Guide is divided into eight sections:
Ci iassis and Expansion Be>ards
NAME
COMPANY
TYPE
PORT
PRICE
AVAIL.
AMEGA Box
C Ltd.
Chassis
Bus
S599
Dec 1
aMEGA 2
C Ltd.
Memory
t
Chassis
S449
Dec 1
AM 100
Ameristar
Memory
Chassis
S799
Oct 15
ComboBoard
AS DO
Multfunc.
Chassis
NA
Nov 1
Convertible .5M
ASDG
Memory
Chassis
$ 450
Oct 1
Convertible 1M
ASDG
Memory
Chassis
S650
Oct 1
Convertible 2M
.ASDG
Memory
Chassis
$ 900
Oct 1
Expan. Sys. 100
Ameristar
Chassis
Bus
$ 699
Oct 15
Extender Board
Ameristar
Board
Chassis
$ 49
Now
Mini-Rack
.ASDG
Chassis
Bus
$ 500
Nov 1
Mini-Rack B
.ASDG
Chassis
Bus
$ 300
Oct 1
Multi. Module
Microbotics
Multfunc.
Starboard
S99.95
Nov 1
PAL
Byte by Byte
Chassis
Bus
$ 1795*
Now
PAL-20
Byte by Byte
Chassis
Bus
$ 3195*
Now
PAL-42
Byte by Byte
Chassis
Bus
$ 3995*
Now
Parity Board
Byte by Byte
Memory
PAL
S300*
Now
PiggyBack
RS Data Sys
Memory
PowRCard
S299.95
VT
Now
Prototype Board
Byte by Byte
Board
Chassis
S63*
Now
RAM-EXP-1
Techni Soft
Memory
t
RAM-BOard
$ 299.95
Now
SCSI Interface
CSA
Interface
Chassis
$ 695
Dec 1
ST 506 Controller
Ameristar
Interface
Chassis
$ 399
Oct 15
Turbo Amiga
CSA
Chassis
Bus
$ 5475
Dec 1
Turbo Chassis
CSA
Chassis
Bus
$ 895
Now
Universal Prototyping
Ameristar
Board
Chassis
$ 49
Now
Upper Deck
Microbotics
Memory
Starboard
$ 99.95
Nov 1
2Mbyte RAM
Byte by Byte
Memory
Chassis
$ 1195*
Oct 1
32-bit Memory
CSA
Memory

Chassis
$ 1800
Now
NA = information not available at press lime =: not applicable Opt =s optional
* = substantial discounts if purchased with a convertible memory board
* = subtract 20% Ports
bus = Amiga side parallel port
from listed price if purchased direct from Byte by Byte expansion bus
The two largest reflect the two primary ways you can expand your Amiga. Chassis and Expansion Boards lists the products that expand your Amiga via expansion slots provided by a standard expansion chassis. Hard- Dish Drives and Stand-Alone Memory Boards lists products that don't go into slots. Rather, products in this category come complete with their own cases and power supplies (if needed). Expanding your Amiga with an expansion chassis and boards is usually more expensive than buying stand-alone boxes, but it is also more flexible. In addition, hardware developers report that it is nearly impossible to daisy-chain more than two expansion devices on the expansion bus; you can attach many more devices to your Amiga if you use a multiple-slot expansion chassis rather than stand alone boxes.
The other categories list more specialized expansion products, although many of these use the expansion bus or an expansion chassis in the same way as the memory cards that predominate the two main sections. For each product in the guide, we’ve listed its type, the port it attaches to and the price. Where it applies, we’ve also listed whether the product is auto-config, whether it uses the 100-pin expansion specification, and whether it has a pass-through design, thereby allowing other products to plug into it and also use that port or bus. Finally, we’ve included a brief description ot each product.
Don’t base your purchasing decisions solely on this
guide. The information here provides a good starting point for learning about products in your price range and area of interest; it docs not. However, provide a complete picture of each product’s capabilities and quality. In future issues of AmigaWorld, we'll provide more detailed reviews and comparisons of many of these products.
Although we tried to include information about every Amiga hardware product scheduled for release by January 1, 1987, we know that some of these products will probably be delayed and that, for one reason or another, we've missed others altogether. Look for information about additional hardware products for the Amiga in upcoming issues.?
AUTO-CONFIG
100-PIN
PASS-THRU
DESCRIPTION
Yes
Yes
Yes
6 slots. 150 watts
Yes
Yes
* • •
2Mbytes external memory, 0Mbyte board also available
Yes
Yes
2Mbytes external memory
Yes
Yes
...
Mix and match; 68881, IEEE 488, four serial ports
Yes
Yes
...
512K bvtes external memory
Yes
Yes
m * %
1Mbyte external memory
Yes
Yes
...
2Mbvtes external memorv
i J
Yes
Yes
No
5 slots, 185 watts continuous power
...
Yes
...
Extends slot out of chassis for prototyping boards
Yes
Yes
NA
3 slots, 9 amp power supply
Yes
Yes
NA
2 slots, 6 amp PS, may not work with all boards
Yes
...
Clock. 68881 socket, parity check hw, attaches to Starboard
Yes
Yes
Opt
5 expansion slots, 1Mbyte memory
Yes
Yes
Opt
PAL plus 20Mbyte DMA drive and controller
Yes
Yes
Opt
PAL plus 42.5Mbyte DMA drive and controller
...
...
...
Provides 512K of parity memory for PAL; see PAL
Opt
...
Yes
0Mbyte memory, up to 4Mbytes; attaches to PowRCard
No
Yes
...
Naked expansion card for developers
Yes
...
...
2Mbytes memory, fits into RAM-BOard-1
Yes
Yes
...
Interface for hard disks, etc.
Yes
Yes
...
Controls 4 IBM-type disk drives; 2 floppy, 2 hard
Yes
Yes
No
Turbo Chassis, 68020, 32-bit memory, and 20Mbyte drive
Yes
Yes
No
5 expansion slots
No
Yes
...
Prototyping board, for Amiga expansion
Yes
...
...
Sockets for 1Mbyte memory, attaches to Starboard
Yes
Yes
• **
2Mbvtes external memorv
J
Yes
Yes
...
512K, 32-bit static RAM for use with 68020
serial port
RGB = Amiga ROB port
Chassis ¦ a slot in an expansion chassis off the- expansion Mouse = second mouse port
Front “ Amiga Front panel connector (for chip memory only) Motherboard = Plugs directly into the Amiga motherboard SCSI = requires separate SCSI interlace in expansion slot Pal.t Starboard, RAM-BOard. Etc. = works exclusively with these products
Hard-Disk Drives and Stand-Alone Memory Boxes
NAME
COMPANY
TYPE
PORT
PRICE
AVAIL,
Alegra
Access Associates
Mcmorv

Bus
$ 379
Now
aMEGA
C Ltd.
Memory
Bus
$ 549.95
Now
aMEGA 20
C Ltd.
Drive
Bus
$ 995
Dec 1
AX 1000
Comspec
Memory
Bus
S729
Now
AX2000
Comspec
Memory
Bus
$ 899
Now
Business Partner
Micro Forge
Mem Drive
Bus
NA
NA
Hard Disk System
Micro Forge
Drive
Bus
NA
NA
MASdrive 20
Microbotics
Drive
Parallel
$ 1495
Oct 15
PAL Jr
Byte by Byte
Mem I)rive
Bus
$ 1495
Nov 1
PowRCard
RS Data Sys
Memory
Bus
$ 599.95
Now
PowRCard
RS Data Sys
Memory
Bus
$ 799.95
Now
PowRCard
RS Data Sys
Memory
Bus
$ 1129.95
Now
PowRCard
RS Data Sys
Memory
Bus
$ 1399.95
Now
PowRCard
RS Data Sys
Memory
Bus
$ 1675.95
Now
RAM-BOard-1
Techni Soft
Memory
Bus
$ 499.95
Now
Starboard 2
Microbotics
Memory
Bus
$ 495
Nov 1
Tape Backup
Micro Forge
Tape
Bus
NA
NA
Twin Floppies
Micro Forge
Drive
Bus
NA
NA
1 Megabyte RAM
Academy Comp.
Memory
Bus
$ 399
Now
l,05Meg Memory
Skyles Electric W.
Memory
Bus
$ 699.95
Now
20 Mbyte Drive
CSA
Drive
SCSI
$ 895
Dec 1
2. 15Meg Memory
Skyles Electric W.
Memory
Bus
$ 999.95
Nov 1
Clocks
NAME
COMPANY
TYPE
PORT
PRICE
AVAIL.
A-Time
Akron Systems Dev
Clock
Parallel
$ 49.95
Now
ClocWAmiga
Skyles Electric W.
Clock
Bus
$ 69
Nov I
Mousetime
Microbotics
Clock
2 Mouse
$ 49.95
Nov 1
Tic
Bvte bv Byte
Clock
2 Mouse
$ 59.95
Nov 1
NAME
COMPANY
TYPE
PORT
PRICE
AVAIL.
Arcnet Board
Amcristar
Network
Chassis
$ 399
Now
Arcnet Box
Ameristar
Network
Bus
$ 499
Now
Ethernet Board
Byte by Byte
Network
Chassis
NA
Jan 1
Ethernet Board
Ameristar
Network
Chassis
$ 699
Now
Ethernet Box
Ameristar
Network
Bus
$ 749
Now
Proto 5K
AC DA
AID Conv.
Bus
$ 275
Now
Proto 40K
AC DA
AID Conv.
Bus
$ 1795
Now
Third-Party Chip Memory Modules
NAME
COMPANY
TYPE
PORT
PRICE
AVAIL.
AM256
Ameristar
Memory
Front
$ 129
Now
256 Memory Expansion
Starpoint SW
Memory
Front
$ 99
Now
256K RAM Expansion
Microbotics
Memory
Front
$ 149.95
Now
256K RAM Expansion
Michigan SW
Memory
Front
$ 159
Now
262 Board
Skyles Electric W.
Memory
Front
$ 69.95
Now
AUTOCONFIG
100-PIN
PASS-THRU
DESCRIPTION
Yes
No
5I2Kbytes memory
Yes
Yes
1Mbyte memory
Yes
Yes
20Mbyte SCSI drive and controller
Yes
Yes
1Mbyte memory
Yes
Yes
2Mbytes memory
NA
NA
1 or 2Mbytes memory + 10, 20 or 40Mbyte
NA
NA
1 or 2 hard drives; 10, 20, or 40 Mbytes
...
Yes
20Mbyte SCSI drive and controller
Yes
No
20Mbyte DMA drive and 1MB memory
Opt
Yes
0Mbyte memory, up to 4Mbytes
Opt
Yes
2Mbytes memory, up to 4Mbytes
Opt
Yes
4Mbytes memory
Opt
Yes
4Mbyte card + 2Mbyte Piggyback
Opt
Yes
4Mbvte card + 4Mbyte Piggyback
Yes
Yes
2Mbytes memory + slots for 3 RAM-EXP-1 boards
Yes
Yes
512Kbytes memory + sockets for another 512K
NA
NA
High-Speed tape backup for hard drives
NA
NA
two 5.25-inch floppy drives
Yes
No
1Mbyte memory; cheaper in kit form
Yes
Yes
1Mbyte memory'
...
...
20Mbyte drive; plugs into SCSI interface
Yes
Yes
2Mbytes memory
AUTOCONFIG
100-PIN
PASS-THRU
DESCRIPTION
...
Yes
clock calendar with battery
NA
No
clock calendar with battery
...
Yes
clock calendar with battery
...
NA
clock calendar with batten'
AUTOCONFIG
100-PIN
PASS-THRU
DESCRIPTION
Yes
Yes
...
Connects Amiga to Arcnet network
Yes
...
No
Side-mount version of Ameristar Arcnet board
Yes
Yes
...
Connects Amiga to Ethernet
Yes
Yes
...
lOMbits sec; includes Cheapnet connector; NFS SW Si49
Yes
...
No
Side-mount version of Ameristar Ethernet board
No
...
Yes
Multichannel analog digital converter
No
...
Yes
16-channel version of Prot 5
AUTOCONFIG
100-PIN
PASS-THRU
DESCRIPTION
Yes
256K internal memory
Yes
256K internal memory
Yes
256K internal memory
Yes
256K internal memory
Yes
256K internal memory
bus
Coprocessors
NAME
COMPANY
TYPE
PORT
PRICE
AVAIL.
NCP Math Coproc
N etch
CoProc
Motherboard
$ 529
Now
Sidecar
Commodore
CoProc
Bus
NA
NA
68020 Board
CSA
CoProc
Chassis
SI 480
Now
Sound Hardware
NAME
COMPANY
TYPE
PORT
PRICE
AVAIL.
Digitizer
MicroGraphic
Digitizer
Parallel
$ 79.95
Now
FutureSound
Applied Vis
Digitizer
Parallel
SI 75
Now
MIDI For Amiga
Skyles Electric W.
MIDI
Serial
$ 49.95
Now
MIDI-Gold
Golden Hawk
MIDI
Serial
$ 79.95
Now
MIDI Interface
ECE R&D
MIDI
Serial
$ 59.95
Now
MIDI Interface
Mimetics
MIDI
Serial
S49
Now
Perfect Sound
Sun Rize
Digitizer
NA
S79.95
NA
Sound Sampler
Mimetics
Digitizer
2 Mouse
S99
Now
Stereo Digitizer
Micro Forge
Digitizer
Bus
S349
Now
Video Graphics Hardware
NAME
COMPANY
TYPE
PORT
PRICE
AVAIL.
Amiga Genlock
Commodore
Sync
RGB
NA
Nov I
Digi-View
New Tek
Digitizer
Parallel
$ 199.95
Now
EASYL
Anakin Research
Drawpad
Bus
$ 499
Now
Imprint
Liquid Light
Slide maker
Serial
$ 2495
Dec 1
Penmouse +
Kurta
Drawpad
Serial
$ 350
Now
Company List
Academy Computers
Ameristar Technologies
Byte by Byte
Comspec Communications
1720 Juan Tabo Blvd. NE
PO Box 415
3736 Bee Cave Road, Suite 3
153 Bridgeland Ave., Unit 5
Albuquerque, NM 87112
Hauppauge, NY 11788
Austin, TX 78746
Toronto, Ontario
505 296-4886
516 724-3344
512 328-2985
Canada M6A 2Y6
416 787-0617
Access Associates
Anakin Research Inc.
C Ltd.
491 Aldo Ave.
100 Westmore Drive, 11C
723 East Skinner
ECE Research and Development
Santa Clara, CA 95054
Rexdale, Ontario
Wichita, KS 67211
1651 N Monroe St.
408 727-8520
Canada M9V 5C3
316 267-6321
Tallahassee, FL 32303
416 744-4246
904 681-0786
ACDA
Commodore Business Machines
220 Belle Meade Ave.
Applied Visions
1200 Wilson Drive
Golden Hawk Technology
Setauket, NY 11733
15 Oak Ridge Road
West Chester, PA 19380
427-3 Amherst St., Suite 389
516 689-7722
Medford, MA 02155
215 431-9100
Nashua, NH 03063
617 488-3602
603 882*7198
Akron Systems Development
Computer System Associates
PO Box 6408
ASDG Inc.
7564 Trade St.
Kurta Corporation
Beaumont, TX 77705
280 River Road, Suite 54A
San Diego, CA 92121
4610 S. 35th St.
409 833-2686
Piscataway, NJ 08854
619 581 0316
Phoenix, AZ 85030
201 540-9670
602 276-5533
100-PIN
PASS-THRU
DESCRIPTION
No
Digitizes sound input
Yes
Digitizes from mike or audio system; mike included

NA
MIDI-Ih, 2 Outs, 1 Thru

NA
MIDI-In, 2 Outs, Sync
...
Yes
MIDI-In, Out, and Thru
iU
NA
MIDI-In, Out, and Thru
Ui
NA
Stereo Digitizer
...
No
Digitizes inputs from mike or audio system
No
Digitizes in stereo; requires §85 single-slot adapter
video source and Amiga video output pictures from video camera tablet with optional animation pegs Palette Image Recorder System + Amiga remote Stylus
MA
Suit
OX
go Station, 46-1311
Mimetics Corporation PO Box 60238, Station A Palo Alto, CA 94306
Murray, UT 84121
A
231-E South Whisman
View, CA 94041
Yreka, CA
From Brushes to BOBs
Converting IFF graphics files to Blitter Objects
for use in your Amiga Basic programs.
By Louis R. Wallace
Amiga Basic has a large number of support commands for animating objects, both sprites and BOBs. However, before you can animate an object, you must be able to create one. For that purpose there is an object editor included on your Amiga Basic disk. Unfortunately, it is not very powerful, since it is limited to only the Workbench resolution mode (four colors, 640 X 200). It has some simple drawing functions, blit is only capable of very crude design. Since a good object editor has not been released commercially, the options are to make do with the one we have, write a new one, or wait. But there is another solution.
The Amiga absolutely excels at graphics, as shown in graphics-design packages such as DeluxePaint from Electronic Arts and Images from Aegis. These are extremely powerful graphics editors that work in sev-
eral resolution modes. They both use the IFF file standard (developed by Electronic Arts and adopted by Cotnmodore-Amiga), so pictures made with one can be used with the other. It occurred to me that there could be no better object editors than these two programs, so I began to investigate the possibilities of using Deluxe* Paint brushes and Images windows as BOBs ( flitter Osjects).
My first discovery was that Amiga Basic does not use IFF standard forms for animation objects, simply because it was written before the EA standard was developed. When you use the standard Amiga Basic object editor, the files have a structure that is completely different from IFF. For one thing, the IFF header information, which is data that describes the file, is missing. Instead, there is some specific informa* ?
The Serious
Alternatives To Playing Games.
Y SCRIBBLE!
The professional word processor
for the Amiga
FEATURES:
• Pull down (mouse-driven) menu interface
• Multiple windows
• Preview; see final form on screen before printing
• Spellcheck; expandable 10,000 word dictiotiarv
• Maiimerge; print form letters, mailing labels; create data file with Scribble! Or Organize!
• File Icons; access documents via icons or names; copy documents by pulling icons across Workbench
• Expanded Memory Support for larger documents
• More Amiga Keys; menu commands from keyboards or mouse
• Flexibility; familiar commands; scrolling while cut paste; and more.
Retail Price Only $ 99.95
ANALYZE!
The serious graphic spreadsheet for the Amiga
FEATURES:
• Pulldown (mouse-driven) menu interface
• Business Graphics: print bar. Stacked bar, pie graphics in 2 or 3-D: line, X - V, area graphs; all in I or cS colors; data from spreadsheets; IFF format; view up to -I graphs at same time; instantly redraw graphs when data changes; ranges, labels, titles, legends, rotation, scaling; fast and effective!
• Dedicated function keys for common commands
• Command Macros; save keystrokes; create templates
• Sorting; rearrange row or column data quickly
• File Icons; access via icons or names
Retail Price Only $ 149.95
ORGANIZE!
The new Amiga database for the serious home and business user
FEATURES:
• Fully integrates with Scribble! And Analyze!; print form letters with the Maiimerge function of Scribble!; calculate Fields and do statistical anal- vses of your files with many of the built-in functions from Analyze!
• Pulldown (mouse-driven) menu driven interface
• Scans files, locates information, and display or print in the format you want in seconds
• Format is compatible with the industry standard dBASE format
• Abbreviated entries for simplified searches; and more
Retail Price Only $ 99.95
ONLINE!
The ultimate telecommunications program for the Amiga
FEATURES:
• Communicates directly with mainframes, minis, other computers, and most commercial databases
• Uses pulldown (mouse-driven) menu interface
• Supports 300 baud up to 19.200 baud!
• Send telex messages and electronic mail worldwide
Retail Price Only S69.95 With CTS Datacomm (TM) 2424 ADH 2400 Baud Modem and Cable $ 429.00
BBS-PC
The versatile electronic bulletin board system which transforms your Amiga into a communications network
FEATURES:
• lets you work on other projects while it takes incoming messages
• Supports 2400 baud
• Integrates with On Line!
Retail Price Only $ 99.95
MICROSYSTEMS Software
Is dedicated to supporting the serious Amiga user with sophisticated software. Our software is supported with complete and informative documentation. If this is not enough, our trained technical service representatives are just a phone call away. If voit have new product ideas for the Amiga, please write to our Research and Development Department.
See your local dealer or call 1-800-327-8724 In Florida
305-391-5077
For dealer inquiries call 1-800-451-0900 1-408-395-3838 (in Calif.)
MICRO SYSTEMS SOFTWARE INC.
4301-18 Oak Circle. Boca Raton. Florida 33431
Amiga is a liaiicin.uk, i| CamnmdnreAmiga, Int. Wind star is a nailt-in.tik ul Mitmpm Inlernatiuii.il
lion about the object that Basic requires for its own use. Also, the data for the bitplanes are not interleaved, or mixed, as in IFF. It consists of contiguous data for each bitplane. IFF has the various bitplanes interleaved together based on the length of the object or screen in pixels. In addition, the IFF files may (or may not) be compressed data, which further complicates matters.
For graphics, IFF offers a very defined data structure. This allows different applications to read in only the areas of data that are of interest to them. For raster graphics, the IFF structure is called an Interleaved BitMap (ILBM).
Before we begin to look at this structure, it is necessary to define the terms we will be using. A byte is an 8-
Table 1. A hexidecimal AS('II listing of an IFF graphics file.
0000:
464F524D
00000A24
494C424D
424D4844
FORM.. .SILBMBMHD
0010:
00000014
0043003E
00000000
05020100
.....C. > . .
......
0020:
00000A0B
014000C8
4 3 4 D 4 1 5 0
00000060
.....0..CMAP...’
0030:
000000F0
FOFODODO
D0A0A0A0
80808050
P
0040:
50403030
30E00000
E04000F0
7010FOD0
P@000. . . . @
..p...
0050:
1000F000
00COO000
A0000070
00502000
...
.p.P.
0060:
703000A0
50000000
7000CODO
0090E000
p 0 . . P . . . P .
......
0070:
60E00030
E 00020A0
6 0 5 0 F 0 4 0
30B03020
* . . 0 . . . ’ P .
@0.0
0080:
80F07070
40404030
00000000
00F0A010
. . Pp@@@0 . .
0090:
47524142
00000004
002 100 IF
424F4459
GRAB.....!.
. BODY
00AO:
00B0:
00000988
F700F700
F700F700
F700F700
F 7 0 0 F 7 0 0 F700FC00
F7OOF700 0080FD00
'Fable 2. A byte-by-lryte explanation of WIZARD.
BYTES FUNCTION CONTENTS
00-03 Spells FORM, indicating an IFF file
04-07 Number representing number of bytes in file
08-OB Indicates an Interleaved Bitmap file
0C-0F Spells BMHD, indicating that Bitmap Header information follows
10-13 Represents number of bytes to the BMHD
14-15 Indicates width of the brush in the horizontal direction
16-17 Indicates depth of brush's scan lines
18-IB Pixel position (ignore)
1C Number of bitplanes (stores exponent of 2), here 2 or 32
ID Mask flag, $ 02 indicates 'maskhastransparentcolor' (ignore)
IE Compression flag, SOI indicates body is compressed
IF $ 00, used for padding the ILBM BMHD file
20-21 $ 0000, a value for transparcntcolor (ignore)
22-23 Pixel aspect values (ignore)
24-27 Screen resolution of this brush ($ 0140 = 320ln, S00C8 = 200,,,)
28-2B Spells CMAP, indicating following data is the values for the color
registers for the palette in use when it was saved 2C-2F Number of color registers next (here, 32x3 for each color = 96)
30-8F 96 bytes for color registers
90-93 Spells GRAB, marking location of the handle of the brush
94-9B Value for the handle of the brush
9C-9F Spells BODY and marks beginning of the bitplane, or image data
A0-A3 Indicates size of the body (here, $ 988 = 2440,,,)
bit number (0-255). Word indicates a 16-bit number (0-65336). A long word is 32 bits wide (four bytes).
If you would like to examine an IFF graphics file, from CLI type:
TYPE filename OPT II
This will list the file in both hexidecimal and ASCII code, allowing you to examine its different parts. Table 1 contains an example of such a listing. It is the beginning of the DcluxePaint brush called WIZARD, found on the DeluxePaint disk. An explanation of Deluxe- Painfs brush format is given in Table 2.
The structure of the Amiga Basic BOB is much different, as mentioned. Briefly, it starts out with a long word indicating the coloroffset. It is usually zero. Next is the long word dataoffsct, again zero. Then we have long words indicating the number of bitplanes, the object width and the object height. Then come three words (two bytes each) indicating information on object flags, planepick and planeonoff (always 0). Then comes the bitplane data, only here it is not interleaved. All the data for plane I comes first, then plane 2, etc.
While the file structure between brushes and Basic BOBs is very different, all the information needed for a BOB is contained in the IFF file. So I wrote a program (Listing 1, BRUSHTOBOB) that will read in the IFF file and write it back out as a BOB file usable from Amiga
Basic. To use it. The brushes or windows vou want to

convert must be in the same directory as the Basic program. (Copy all the brushes and or windows to your Basic work disk. Never write to the DeluxePaint disk; you will destroy its copy protection and the program itself. Images is not copy protected, so there is no problem with it.) Load Amiga Basic, and in direct mode, type CLEAR. 100000. This will allocate 100K for Basic variables, enough for most brushes or windows. (The program uses large arrays to hold the data in memory.) Then load the BRUSHTOBOB program and run it. It will prompt you for the brush or window name and begin the process of creating your BOB. When it is complete, you will have a file on the disk with the same name as the brush, but the extension “.bbob” (Basic BOB) will be added to the end. You can then use the BOB in your own programs. As a simple example. Listing 2 will take any BOB that is 5 bitplanes (320 x 200 mode resolution) and move it across the screen. A small warning: While the Amiga can manipulate BOBs as large as the size of the screen. Basic only allows arrays up to 32,767 bytes long. A 320 x 200 five-bitplane BOB would be 40,000 bytes, so it cannot be used. However, by splitting it in half and using two BOBs, you could display whole screens as BOBs. Think of the possibilities of animated background displays, as well as regular BOBs and sprites!
This program opens up whole new areas of exotic graphics tools for the Basic programmer. DeluxePaint and Images have graphics tools for the artist unheard of before the Amiga. Now you can use that power to design complex and beautiful animations. I
Address all author correspondence to Louis R. Wallace, 612-fB SW11 Place, Gainesville, FL 32607.
FREE ? FREE
Media-Mate 3 -Jt
with purchase of any 100 diskettes
(Boxed in tens)
31 2” SS DD.... 1.22 Ea 31 2” DS DD.... 1.85 Ea
Boxed in tens minimum order 20 (FREE Media-Mate 3 with each 100)
maxell
31 2” SS DD ..... 1.22 Ea.
I® 31 2” DS DD ..... 1.85 Ea.
Boxed in tens minimum order 20 (FREE Media-Mate 3 with each 100)
31 2” SS DD ..... 1.15 Ea
31 2” DS DD ..... 1.65 Ea
Boxed in tens minimum order 20 (FREE Media-Mate 3 with each 100)
MAC
PAC’s
BOXED in 50’s
Includes
Labels
Holds 30 3.5”
$ 8.95
With Lock
$ 10.95
s'
Imagewriter. Ribbons
Black (2-5) 3.45 (6+) 2.95 Color Packs 20.70
order now 1 800 351 - BEST(2378)
1 800 451 - BEST (in California)
Visa, Mastercard, C.O.D. or Prepaid. Corporations rated 3A2 or better, government agendesand schools may send in purchase orderson a net 30 basis. Minimum order S25.00, Shipping charges are S3.00 per 100 diskettes (minimum shipping order $ 3.00) (within the continental U.S.), APO, FPO, AK, HI, PR and Canada Orders add 10% to cover PAL and Insurance. All other countries add 20%. C.O.D. Orders Add $ 4.00.
No Sales Tax outside California.
Satisfaction guaranteed on all products.
SUPPLIES
2148-A Bering Drive San Jose, CA 95131
(408) 435-3866
AmigaWorld
BACK
ISSUES
Premiere A comprehensive first look at the Amiga and some amazing graphics.
November December 1985 The
Amiga in the business world, music by MIDI, programming in C, video digitizing.
January February 1986 The
Creative Issue: artists and the Amiga and an interview with Andy Warhol. A look at Cambridge Lisp and TLC-Logo.
March April 1986 Interactive video, laser-disk technolog)-, using Intuition. Amiga software programs listed.
May June 1986 Artificial intelligence. Window on AmigaDOS, using the Amiga Editor and an overview of Amiga Basic,
July August 1986 Music issue: interview with sound chip designers, making music with Amiga Basic, digital sound synthesis. C-programming tutorial.
Each back issue costs $ 3.95 plus 51 for shipping and handling. On orders of 10 or more back issues, there is a flat $ 7.50 shipping and handling fee. Quantities are limited and we cannot guarantee that all back issues are available. Orders must be prepaid. Send your orders to AmigaWorld, Attn: Back Issue Orders. 80 Pine St., Peterborough. N.H. 03458,
Mouse-Pad
$ 5.95
Red- Blue- Gray- Brown
maxell
• Nashua
MAC PAC’s
Boxed in 50's
3Y2” SS DD.. 3Y2” DS DD...
31 2” SS DD.. 3V2” DS DD..
31 2" SS DD... 3Y2" DS DD...
50+ 100+ 400+
1. 20 ea 1.15 ea 1.10 ea
1. 55 ea 1.50 ea 1.45 ea
1. 15 ea 1.10 ea 1.05 ea
1. 60 ea 1.55 ea 1.50 ea
1. 10 ea 1.05 ea 1.00 ea
1. 55 ea 1.50 ea 1.45 ea
Deluxe Roll-Top File
Holds 55 3.5"
$ 15.55
• Cuts 94% of Screen Glare
• Enhances Contrast
• Optically Coated Glass
$ 34.95
Glare Guard
With Lock
$ 17.95
NT
PRINT
COLOR
COLOR
COLOR
COLOR
COLOR
COLOR
COLOR
l:PRTNT 1 :PRTNT 1: P RIN T 1: P RIN T 1 :P RIN T 1: P RIN T
in file called filenames
screen width screenheight
' colorset ' dataset depth bob width in x bob height in y ' flags that have ' plane pick ' planeOnOff
been set
it tt
Listing 1. BRUSHTOBOB program.
Convert DeluxePaint brushes & Images windows to bob files compatible with A mica basic.
Also saves a file for color*
July 1, 1986 by Louis R. Wallace DIM red(32),green(32)1blue(32) saveback=8 ' flags
overlay=16
savebob=32 '
flags=saveback-i-over]ay+f V Sprite ’ask for brush file name INPUT ’’What is the brush's name’’;fOename$
OPEN filenames FOR INPUT AS HI 'get word FORM a$ =IN PUT$ (4,1)
’find number of bytes nbytes=CVL(IN PUT$ (4,1)) bodysize=nbytes-l 51 'get unneeded bytes a$ =IN P U T$ ( 1 2,1)
' bob width in pixels bobwidth= C VICIN P U T$ (2,1))
' bobheight in pixels bobheig ht= C VI(I N P U T S(2,1))
' get unneeded bvtes a$ =IN PUT$ (4,1)
' number of bitplanes in image np = ASC(INPUT$ (1,1)) planepick=2'snp-l ' mask flag mask = A S C (IN P U T$ ( 1 (1)) nwords= bob width 8
IF INT(nwords) (nwords) THEN nwords=INT(nwords)+l
IF (TNT(nwords 2))*2)0nwords THEN nvords=n words+1
n w perplane=n words*np
total nu m =n w per plan e* bob height
DTM new array (totalnu m -f 1)
DIM bobarray(totalnu m + 1)
' compress flag compress = ASC(IN PUT$ (1,1))
' get pad bvte
a$ =IN PUT$ (1,1) ’
' gettransparent color flag transparent=C VI(IN P U T$ (2,1))
' get aspect ratios a$ =IN PUT$ (2,1)
' width of screen screen width = C VI(IN PUT$ (2,1))
' height of screen screenheight = C VI(IN PUT$ (2,1)) a$ =IN PUTS(4,1)
’ get number of colors num berofcolors=C V L(IN PUT$ (4,l)) 3 1 get colors for pallete FOR i= 0 TO (nu m berofcolors)-l red(i)= A S C(IN P U T$ ( 1,1)) green(i)=ASCaNPUT$ (l,l))
I) 1 ue(i)= A S C (I N P U T $ (1,1))
NEXT i
' look for word "bodv"
WHILE a$ O"B0DY" a$ =IN PUT$ (4,1)
WEND
'get size of bodv data a$ =IN PUT$ (4,1) count=0
PRINT:PRINT "Reading brush bitplanes ..*’’
PRINT "Each dot is 100 bytes read in."
’ get data from bob bodv into array COLOR 3
WHILE NOT F.OF(l)
a$ =IN PUTS (1,1)
IF compress=0 THEN
COS IB nocompression ELS RTF compress>0 THEN GOSl’B vescompression END IF
GOSUB decodebrush
C LOSE 1
PRINT
OPEN filename$ +".palette" FOR OUTPUT AS 1 FOR i=0 TO (2Anp)-l
PRINT 1,C 11 R$ (red(i));
PRINT lfCHR$ (green(i));
PRINT 1,C H R$ (blue(i));
NEXT i CLOSE 1
PRINT "Your brush has been saved as a boh called COLOR 3:PRINT filename$ ;".bbob";
COLOR 1: P RIN T
PRINT "It’s color palette was saved as COLOR 3:PRINT filena meS;". Palette";
COLOR 1 :P RIN T END
bobarray(counl)= ASC(a$ ) count=count-f 1 su m=su m +1 IF sum = iOO THEN su m=0:P RIN T ck=ck+l
IF ck=20 THEN ck=0:PR END IF
W E N D CLOSE I COLOR 1
PRINT:COLOR 2:PRINTT PRINT "Data for brush called COLOR 3:P RIN T filename$ ; COLOR 2:PRINT " is:" PRINTiCOLOR 1
nocom pression:
COLOR 2:PRINT "Examining data in memory..." COLOR 1
IF (INT(count 2)5‘'2)Ocount THEN count=count+l FOR i=0 TO count-1
newarrav(i)=bobarrav(i)
NEXT i RETURN
savebob:
bobna m e$ =filena m e$ +".bbob"
OPEN bobnameS FOR OUTPUT AS PRINT 1, MKLS(O);
PRINT H 1, MKLS(O);
PRINT 1, M KIS(O);M KI$ (np);
P RIN T 1, M KIS(O); M KIS(bob width); PRINT 1, M KIS(0);M KlS(bobheight); PRINT 1, M KI$ (flags);
PRINT 1, M KTS(planeoick);
PRINT 1, M KI$ (0);
"bob width=";:C 0 L0 R 3:PRINT bobwidth 1:PRINT "bobheight=";:C0L0 R 3:PRINT bobheight "nplane=";:C0LO R 3:PRINT np "rr. Ask=";:C 0LO R 3:PRINT mask "compress=";:C0LO R 3:PRINT compress
vesco m pression:
COLOR 2
PRINT "Decompressing data..." COLOR 1 index 1 =0 index 2=0
"screenwidth=";:C 0LO R 3:PRINT "screenheight=";:C 0 LO R 3:P RINT
IF (INT count 2)*I:2) >count THEN count=count+l WHILE indexKcount
V A L U E=bobarray(indexl)
IF VALUE 128 THEN
FOR kk=l TO VALUE+1 index! =index 1 +1
ne warray(index2)=bobarray(index 1) index2=index2+ i NEXT kk ELSEIF VALUE>128 THEN indexl=index1+1 anothervalue=bobarray(index 1)
FOR kk=l TO (257-VALUE)
ne warray( index 2)=a not her value index2=index2+1 NEXT kk END IF
iridexl=indexl + l W END RETURN
decodebrush:
COLOR 2
PRINT "Decoding bit planes...”
COLOR 1 counter=0 FOR k=0 TO np-1
PRINT "Plane "“COLOR 3:PRTNT k+l:COLOR 1 u p1i m=(t o t a 1n um-n w p e r p1 a ne + k * n words)
FOR i=(k*nwords) TO uplim STEP nwperplane FOR j=0 TO nwords-1
aS=C. H R S(newarray(j+i))
PRINT l,a$ ;
NEXT j NEXT i NEXT k R ET U R N
Listing 2. B(L$ ic program to animate BOBs.
’ a generic 5 plane 320X200 bob mover requires files created by brushtobob bS="ogre2" pn$ =bS+".palette" file$ =b$ +".bbob"
SCREEN 4,316,200,5,1
WINDOW 2,"Custom 5 bitplane screen",, 15,4 OPEN pn$ FOR INPUT AS 1 FOR i=0 TO 31
red!=ASC(IN PUT$ (1, l)) 240 green!-ASC(IN PUT$ (1,1)) 240 blue!= ASC(IN PUT$ (1 ,l)) 240 PALETTE i,red!,green!,blue!
NEXT i CLOSE 1
OPEN fileS FOR INPUT AS 1 0BJECT.SII APE 1,INPUTS(LOF(l),l)
CLOSE 1 OBJECT.X 1,1 OBJECT.Y 1,50 begin:
OBJECT.ON OBJECT.START FOR i=l TO 10
FOR x=0 TO 319 OBJECT.X 1 ,x FOR delay=0 T0 50:N EXT N E X T:C LS
NEXT
OBJECT.OFF WINDOW CLOSE 2 END
8 MEGABYTES
Now RS DATA'S New POW»R*CARD
Let's You
Playing games on your Amiga can be a great deal of fun, but let's be honest there's more to life than playing games. Now you can turn your computer into a real-life professional machine with the ROW*R*CARD from RS DATA Systems.
The POW*R*CARD is a powerful new expansion board which allows you to mature in your computer use with greater flexibility in multi-processing and multi-tasking.
POW»R«CARD starts you off with a 2 Meg capability and allows you to grow with upgrades to a huge 8 Meg RAM expansion, all on the same board so you don't waste valuable slot space. That means you can run more software without fear of Guru Meditation Numbers, out-of- memory crashes or any other small system
Circle 78 on Reader Service card.
Play Like The
boo-boos! What's more, you won't have to rob your piggy bank because POW*R*CARD offers this tremendous growth at a cost lower per megabyte than you'll find anywhere.
With your new POW*R CARD, memory expansion is as easy as 1-2-3. The POW*R*CARDand enclosure will pass through the Buss without modification for even greater expansion. So you don't have to play games with your data anymore. Graduate to bigger and better things with the POW*R*CARD from RS DATA!
Upcoming Products from RS DATA:
• New Hard Disk System, 20 & 40 megabyte memory.
• 4 Port Parallel card.
Big Boys.
• 4 Port Serial Card, allowing more serial type peripheral use.
• 4 Slot Expansion System with horizontal board placement for system height reduction.
• Much, much more!!!
The POW»R*CARD is available now
from your local Amiga dealer... or call
RS DATA today!
7322 Southwest Freeway Suite 660
Houston, Texas 77074
713 988-5441 AmigaWorld 47
Creating Menus with Intuition
For those serious about programming the Amiga’s visual interface, here’s a tutorial on programming Intuition with C.
By Vincent M. Hopson
Meapons
Morninsr star
Intuition is a flexible and powerful menu driver for the Amiga. It allows the programmer to concentrate on his program without having to write menu primitives. Intuition is also beneficial to the user since a consistent format for mouse and menu use can be maintained regardless of the program. This article will show you how to program menus with Intuition. All you need to get started is a copy of C or an assembler, and an example.
D afffif er None
Anyone who is serious about programming the Amiga should have the Amiga Intuition Reference Manual and the Amiga Programmer's Handbook. I used both of these documents extensively in the preparation of the example program. If you cannot get a copy of the Amiga Intuition Reference Manual locally, call Addison- Wesley directly (see number at end of article). The Amiga Programmer's Handbook is published by Sybex and is available at many computer bookstores.
The first tasks in programming are to figure out exactly what the program is going to do and how it will do it. Then comes the monumental task of information flow to and from the user. This is where Intuition makes the job easier. Menus allow the programmer to functionally group activities or information-gathering utilities to control program flow. Since Intuition also allows the programmer to specify substitute keystrokes for mouse activities, the menus do not become cumbersome for the adept. Instead of moving from the keyboard to the mouse and back to the keyboard, the user can elect to use the keyboard exclusively.
Menu Test Driver Program
Listing 1 is a driver program that can he used to test menustrips. It was written with Lattice C. Anyone using assembly language should he able to convert it easily. Comment out the “SetMenuStrip" and “extern struct Menu *MyMenu" lines before you initially attempt to compile it. The menu structures in the example must be created before using these lines.
This short program initializes die NewScreen and NewWindow structures, opens the necessary libraries in the Kernel and submits the menustrip for display. Any unnecessary gadgets (e.g., windowdrag, sizing and layers) can be removed from the window by taking their definitions out of the NewWindow structure flags and recompiling the program. This routine relies on CloseGadget to return control to the Command Line Interpreter (CLI); therefore, it should always be declared. All of the other flags dealing with the Intuition Direct Communication Message Port (IDCMP) are optional.
Once all of the structures are opened, the menustrip set and the appropriate pointers returned, this program enters a continuous loop and waits on the IDCMP for a message from either menu selections or CloseGadget. A CloseGadget message causes the loop to terminate, the menustrip to be cleared, and control to be returned to the CLI. MenuMessages (or IntuiMessages) cause the window to display the menu, item and subitem numbers. Note in particular how the message macros are used to extract menu-number information.
Unused fields in the IntuiMessage are set to their ?
Proudly announces
The Hardware
Product of the ear
gg«S
The aMEGA Board
One Megabyte Memory Expansion for the Amiga
¦ Full AutoConfig Compatibility
¦ Works With All Amiga Operating Systems
¦ Works With All Popular Software for Amiga
¦ Pass-Through Design for future expansion
¦ 6-month Full Parts & Labor Warranty
Proudly made in the USA Available NOW at Your Amiga Dealer!
Maximum value. Lf the right-mouse button (menu button) in clicked without selecting any items, a Null IntuiMessage is sent by Intuition. All fields of this type of message are unused. This feature allows you to keep track of menu usage, but a check must be made on every IntuiMessage to ensure its validity. A definition is provided for you in the Intuition header file called MENUNULL. The driver program uses it to check all messages in the wait loop.
Notice that the menustrip structures are not in the program, but their head is declared as external. Once this program is compiled into a ,o file, it is no longer necessary to recompile it to submit a revised menustrip; the strip is added during linking. Iterative attempts will be faster since only the menustrip initializations need to be recompiled.
When this program is executed, a screen titled Menu Test Screen, a window titled Menu Test Window and a Hello message will appear. When the right-mouse button is clicked, the Menu Test Screen title will be replaced by a blank title bar. This is where the menu selections that we design will appear. Familiarize yourself with the operation of the program, then click the left-mouse button (the select button) over the CloseGadgct to return to the CLI. Now, on to Intuition!
Intuition Structures
Intuition uses several basic structures for development of a menustrip: Menu, Menultem, Intuitext and Image. The Menu structure defines where on the title bar whatever text you wish to display as choices will appear.
Menultems may be textual or image (hence the last two structures) and appear whenever a menu choice is selected. Intuitext and Image structures define the imagery of the Menultem text or custom image, respectively. Currently, Intuition wilt display imagery in the Menultems, but text only in the Menus.
Menu structures point to the next menu of the strip, and to the head of a linked list of Menultems. Menultems point to other Menultems and subitems. None of the structures have any pointers to previous items, and thus form a unidirectional linked list. This makes troubleshooting the structure somewhat easier, since consistency is simpler to check in a one-way list.
Before working on the example, there are a couple of things worthy of note here. A good indication that you have made an error in the menustrip definitions can be seen in the length of time it takes for the mouse to become movable when the screen appears. After doing several menus that incorporate large menu structures, with many items and subitems, the delay should still be very short. Delays of a second or two is a bad indication. The message “Hello” will appear at the same time the mouse activates.
Another important observation is that the Menultem structure outlined on page 134 in the Atniga Intuition Reference Manual is incorrect. After the ItemFill field definition, SelectFiil should appear. It is a field defined by APTR, just as with ItemFill. A paragraph outlining the use of this field appears on page 135 in the text. If you create an initialization structure, and forget this field when you insert your definition for a subitem,
Infocom introduces four new gam
Mocom, ™ the crazy people who brought you “Zork”® and “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy,”™ has a habit of coining up with games that add a new dimension to interactive fiction. And the best keeps get- tingbetter. Case in point: “Leather Goddesses of Phobos”™ It has a scratch n’ sniff card and a 3-d comic book to excite all your senses. Once your interest is piqued, you’ll
embark on a rowdy romp through the solar system. This hilarious spoof of1930’s pulp science fiction has 3 “naughtiness levels,” for the prude to the lewd. “Leather Goddesses” is sure to amuse members of either sex.
One’s really warped.
Then there’s “Trinity.”™ It answers the question of whether a
game can be both light-hearted and profound. You journey through a time warp into a mischievous fantasy world where all atomic explosions are mysteriously connected.
TJ 4
“Trinity" takes you back to the dawn of the atomic age and puts the course ofhistory in your hands.
One’s a real circus.
It has been said that the circus is the only really mysterious thing left in civilization. One thing’s for sure, there is plenty of mystery in “Ballyhoo.”™ While trying to locate the circus owner’s kidnapped daughter, you arc somersaulted into a three-ring world of deception and ciime. To solve the ciime and save your hide from a permanent spot
Get S245 worth of coupons FREE at your retailer today.
Lattice C gives you errors 20 and 67 for that line. (Neither of these errors is very descriptive of the problem.) Don’t rely on the compiler to find your mistakes be careful!
Now, let’s create a menustrip with items and sub- items. We w-ill then create the structures required and test the result. Imagery may be created by not inserting the text flag (ITEMTEXT) in the Menultem flags, and defining the Image structure. The ItemFill field will then point to your Image structure and not IntuiText. Whichever type of item field you desire, be sure to cast the value you use with (APTR) to suppress compiler warnings.
Creation of an Example Menu
This menu design example will be for one window of an adventure game. Our character needs to be able to change his weapon, take inventory of his pack, or use any available magic. Wc will call these topics Weapons, Inventory’ and Magicks. To avoid creating many individual names for each of the structures, I decided to use arrays of structures. Therefore, numbering of the structures should be started at zero. If we tabulate the titles (Menus) and each action or function associated with them (Menultems), we can make an outline of the menustrip. I filled each Menu with a few appropriate items.
Menu[0]: Weapons
MenuItem[0]: Morning Star
Menultem[l]: Long Sword Menultem[2]: Dagger Menultem[3]: None
Menu[l]: Inventory
Menultem[4]: Possessions Menultem[5]: Pockets Menultem[6]: Backpack Menultem[7]: Personal Menultem[8]: Health Menultem[9]: Hits
Menu[2]: Magicks
Menultem[10]: Heal Menultemfl 1]: Light
I would place the above outline in a comment field at the beginning of the menustrip declarations. When updates are made to this file, the documentation will be less easily forgotten. Having this information close at hand should help avert errors in new declarations.
MenufO] is an attribute type menu. If the player wishes to find out what type of weapon he is currently wielding, this menu must be selected. If the player wishes to change weapons, he merely selects the desired one, and releases the mouse menu button. Intuition provides a checkmark that we will use to show the user which weapon is currently in use. Exclusion flags are also automatically processed by Intuition. These flags ?
S. One really smells.
1
involved with an eccentric cast of characters, including British nobility, while trying to save your best friend from a vengeful ghost. “Moon- mist” offers four distinctly different sets of clues, problems, solutions and hidden treasures. So you’ll die to replay it again and again.
All four are easy to get.
In the freak show, you’ll need to stretch your puzzle-solving skills to the limit.
One’s really haunting.
Wrapping up this new quartet is a classic gotliic mystery set in a Haunted castle on the mist-shrouded eacoast of Cornwall. In “Moon- nist” ™ you’ll explore the darkest ¦eaches of Tvesyllian Castle and get
Simply follow your nose to your local software store todav.
OTFOCOm
1- oi- more information, call l-800-262-(i868, x. 17X.
Or write to us at 125 Cambridge Park Drive, Cambridge, M A 0211(1.
'& Inloeum, Inc. Zork is a registered trademark and Ballyhoo,Trinity. Leather Goddessesof J ‘hobos and Moonmist are trademarks of 1 nfocom.
Inc. The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy is a trademark of Douglas Adams.
Tell Intuition which items cannot be selected at the same time. We will say that a Morning Star and Long Sword cannot be wielded at the same time, but a dagger may be used with both of them, or by itself. Selection of the None item drops all weapons.
Inventory is strictly an action menu. When the user selects it, Possessions and Personal appear. When either of these is selected, the subitems are displayed. If the user selects a subitem, we would open a window and display the contents of or status of the selected sub- item. Since we are only testing the menustrip here, the window will not appear; this must be done in the real driver program. Our driver will allow the user to select the subitems, and report the one which was selected.
Magicks is an action menu without subitems; the majority of the menustrips that I have created have been of this type. The declarations for it are simple, and are defined in Listing 2, a program for initializing the menustrip structures.
Menu Structure Initialization
As a personal note, I dislike using extern statements to do forward references (references to things that are declared later); therefore, I declare everything in reverse. IntuiText is declared first, followed by Menu- Items and Menus.
MyMenu Menu pointer is declared last. This line may be removed from the initializer file when testing is complete. It merely provides a consistent name for the pointer to the head of a menustrip for the driver program. I felt that a standard name was a small price to pay to avoid recompilation of the main driver with each test iteration.
The Weapons section of the menustrip uses the Intuition-provided checkmark and keystroke substitution sequence. Menu[0] is the head definition. The first parameter points to the next menu in this strip. Four size values are then provided for Intuition; LeftEdge, TopEdge, Width and Height. TopEclge and Height are presently ignored, since the current version of Intuition does not allow imagery in a Menu structure.
LeftEdge determines where the select box will begin.
It is defined in pixels from the left of the screen. Width specifies the size of the select box that is desired. It too is defined in pixels, hut starts from LeftEdge and continues to the right. The rest of the initializer tells Intuition that this menu is selectable (MENUENABLED), the name string to be used in the select box, and gives it a pointer to the first item of the Menu.
If you wish the name to appear, hut do not want to add any items, you will have to create a null Menultcm. Nulling the pointer to the first Menultem structure of a menu will cause a software failure, and subsequent system crash. The null Menultem is a structure with all of the parameters set to NULL. Intuition does not seem to care if the pointers to ItemFill or SelectFill are null, hut completely loses its sanity when a Menu structure Menultem pointer is nulled.
All of the other Menus follow the same reasoning as the Weapons structure. Each of the Menu structures points to its successor until the last, which is null. All of the Menu structures form a linked list, and each contains the head of a linked list of Menultems.
It is a good idea to define all of the horizontal size fields (LeftEdge and Width) in macros that are dependent on the previous field’s size and location, I did not do this since it would have required a substantial increase in the size of the initializer program. An example is outlined below:
define INVENTORYLEFT (WEAPONLEFT + WEAP O N WIDTH + SPACE)
Macros make reordering a little more difficult, hut introduction of new fields, or modification of the sizes of existing fields, will recalculate all other positions automatically.
Menultem Structure Initialization
Menultem structures define the attributes of the items that are selectable under each of the Menus. The first field points to another instance of a Menultem structure (NULL if no other items follow). All of the size specifications are important in this structure since imager)' is possible.
LeftEdge is defined in pixels from the left edge of the Menu select box. TopEdge is defined in pixels beneath the menu, starting with the last line of the titlebar. Width and Height are in pixels horizontally and vertically, respectively. These definitions are for the select box that you wish to allow for this item. Intuition will create a box to surround all of the items automatically, and cannot he controlled. The minimum width of the box generated will be the size of the select box defined in the Menu structure, A select box for each item may be any size you desire, but to maintain consistency within a menu, the width of all text Menultem select boxes should be equal to the largest.
Please look at the structures defined as MenuItem[0] and Menultem[I], Notice that the TopEdge of Menu- Item[l] starts at the height of MenuItem[0]. This will pack the text fields as closely together as possible and still appear neat. MenuItemfO] through Menultem[3] show how to declare enough space for your text a checkmark (CHECKWIDTH) and command-key sequence symbols (COMMWIDTH). Normally, when computing text widths in pixels, multiplying the number of characters in the text by ten will yield a generous select box width.
The flags field of the Menultem structure tells Intuition which services and attributes we desire. CHECKED says that this item is selected when the menustrip is submitted. CHECKIT indicates that selections have a checkmark that is generated and updated by Intuition. ITEMTEXT means the ItemFill field points to an IntuiText structure. Omission of the ITEMTEXT flag indicates that an Image structure is used. COMMSEQ alerts Intuition that keystroke substitution is possible for this selection. ITEMENABLED allows the user to select this Menultem from the list. Without this flag, the image or text of this selection will appear ghosted, and be unselectable. Finally, HIGHCOMP tells Intuition to invert the values of the color registers when this item is selected. ITEMTEXT, ITEMENABLED and HIGH- ?
Computer Discount
AQ °Sy 1s
998 W. 5th Ave. Denver, CO 80204
(303) 825-2943
S.
£mj -___(303) 825-2943_
Siderar y ems --Monitors...Drives SCALL
ar'-Genlock...Hard Drives $ LOW
SAVE EVEN MORE ON... --nara unves ..... ..... w
Hot New Hardware!
Alegra...Comspec...Copperstate...256K to 2MB r 9 g5
Digi-View Video Digitizer on y $ CAUL
Dot Matrix Printers . 5399.95
Hi-Speed Wide Carriage Daisywheel Printer 5219.95
Color Inkjet Canon PJ-1080A with driver wh(je they tastl
* CALL
Cables... Joysticks.. .Mousepads Disks
0 PROSE
NEW! LI Mat
at last, a mouse driven CLIj only *34.95
ACTIVISION
STOCK UP ON SOFTWARE
HI
iriFoconx
epyx
ALL E.A. TITLES AVAILABLE! CALL FOR NEW, LOWEST PRICE!
Inc.
NEW...CinemaWare ,or AM]ga NEW...Flight Simulator NEW...PaperClip Elite Deluxe Music Construction Set The Bard's Tale...NEW!
Deluxe Paint Print Video Marble Madness, Instant Music
* CALL
‘CALL
‘CALL
‘CALL
‘CALL
‘64.95
‘34.95
‘34.95
‘37.98
‘28.98!
‘34.98!
‘349.95!
* 119.95
‘CALL
‘34.95
Leather Goddesses AEGIS Images only MEAN 18 Golf now only The PAWN...slashed to Dynamic-Cad for AMIGA only Superbase Personal AMIGA only LOGISTiX for AMIGA only GIZMOZ only
Lattice
I I U H I
BACK IT UP!
«ik*HR»X
SA VE MORE ON
External 3’ s" and 5'A" drive £ 256K Memory Expanders AMIGA Monitors & Computers
Marauder II
‘29.95
The Mirror
‘34.95
Quick Nibble
* 29.95
w
BOOKS!
The Computer Discount Catalog...
The most up-to-date guide for AMIGA products at prices so low, even we don’t believe them! Includes a free listing of active AMIGA B.B.S.’s across the U.S.A.!
Amiga Introductory Guide ONLY ‘12.95 The Amiga Handbook ONLY‘19.95
COMPUTER DISCOUNT
MasterCard
VISA'
AMERICAN
EXPRESS
Vn0UF!S7n mct Means Rock Bottom Prices!
Mnn -Fri 10am to 7pm MST
Sat 10am to 5pm MST SHOP COMPUTER DISCOUNT AND
STAY IN TOUCH WITH THE LATEST FOR YOUR AMIGA!
Call Today (303)825-2943
C. O.D. charge only $ 2.00 per shipping carton. UPS ground, air. And overnight shipping available.
Cirde 161 an RaaOer card
COMP are used in all of the initializers. CHECKIT and CHECKED are used for attributes.
Mutual Exclusion is the field that allows Intuition to intelligently update selections that have checkmarks. Each bit position of this long word variable (32 bits) represents the selections that must be turned off when this item is selected. The zero bit represents the first item, the one bit the second, etc. Obviously, only the first 32 item declarations of a single menu may be mutually excluded. MenuItem[0] (Morning Star) must exclude MenuItem[I] (Long Sword) and Menultem[3] (None), per our previous discussion on weapons. There* fore, we must set bits 0 and 3, and set the mutual exclusion flags of MenuItem[0] to OxOOOOOOOA. All of the leading zeros are actually unnecessary, and were omitted in the listing. Menultem[3] mutually excludes itself, since None is not a wieldable item. The Weapons menu is the only area where these flags are useful.
The next line points to an instance of IntuiText (remember, we set the ITEMTEXT flag above) to represent this item. It is cast with APTR to suppress compiler warnings. Since we set the HIGHCOMP flag, the SelectEill field is unused, and is nulled to allow us to initialize the command-sequence value. This field holds a single letter that will represent this selection if the right Amiga key and this letter are pressed together.
The command-sequence value will appear to the right of the graphic rendition of the right Amiga key in a Menultem display. Letters that are chosen as command sequences will be caseless (e.g., S is equivalent to s). S was chosen for the Morning Star weapon because of difficulties with using M as a command-sequence letter.
I could not get M to work, even when it was substituted into known working structures.
Menultem[5] does not use checks or command sequences, but declares a subitem. The field after the command-sequence value is the pointer to another Menultem structure that will be used as a subitem. All of the size parameters of the subitem are referenced to the same point as items. Subitem lists are exactly like items except that the head of their list is attached to a Menultem structure instead of a Menu. Note that the select boxes of the item and subitem list must overlap somewhere. A system crash is possible if this rule is not observed.
IntuiText Structure Initialization
Intuitext structures are the simplest of the structures seen so far. They define all pertinent parameters for the placement of text into the window or item.
FrontPen and BackPen define the foreground and background colors to be used in the rendering. Background color is unchanged with JAM1 set in DrawMode, but is used with JAM2. LeftEdge and TopEdge are specified in pixels from the left edge and top edge of the select box that will house the text.
TextAttr sets the font of the text to be used. When this field’s value is NULL, the default text is used. The development and use of custom fonts is more explicitly defined in the Rom Kernel Manuals. The following field points to the actual text to be rendered in the custom or default font. From the example program it can be seen that the string pointer will be placed in the structure, and not the entire string; this is a normal C compiler operation, since C usually places strings into a separate initialized data area after compilation.
Summary
From the example, it should be obvious that an extensive menu may be easily created under Intuition. All of the work of checking and verifing selections and maintaining mouse data is taken care of for you. What impresses me the most about Intuition is its ease of use. Once I was familiar with menustrip creation, I could create complex menus quickly and relatively easily.
The program and example were written to assist any Amiga programmers who want to learn from my mistakes. The initial driver program was easy to w-rite, but testing different versions of menustrips was tedious. I finally made the driver program accept an external menustrip label and linked menustrips to the driver. After many iterations with imaginary strips, I worked out some of the fine points of menustrip creation. I hope the information presented here will clear up some of the nebulous areas in creating menus as well as provide a useful tool for testing. ?
[Amiga Library reference manuals may be ordered directly from the Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, (617) 944-3700.]
Vincent Hopson is a software engineer who works for Spectrum Digital in Herndon, VA. Write to him at 108 Andrew Place, Sterling, VA 22170.
Listing 1.
I
V- ¦>]:i'fi * sj; 5|esjc * * i)t :’.i * s’: s*c sjt sj: sj; sjc :J; £ i'fi :’csj:
Menu Test Driver program
.¦* s'- .V
O' O' O’ -I' -I* *!* ¦r|- 'i- '«•
These include files arc for intuition, and in tuition base.
* "graphics display.h" may be omitted unless you wish to
* turn on the INTERLACE flag. This flag will allow you
* to display your screens in the lli-resalution mode 640 x 400.
R
* Xm «V .»» .1. .IV .V J, **> .1. .L ,1* .V .1, .1, .1 *.•* ,1. .1. W -I. .V .1. O .U O. *1* .1. V- .V «.(* -I-
v 'i* ¦.* v o* v o' o- o' %* 0- v O' -i' *.* *.» *i' *i' 'c o' ‘i- o' o' ••• *.* *.* o' o' v -i* v 'i' 'i‘ v -i- o- o* o' 'i* v I
include "exec types.h"
include riintuition intuition,hM include ngraphics display.h"
«_'_¦ .lj >la .la .¦> .1. •*. » * .•» «•« .V «>. • V «l» «¦* «' *'» »-* .V .1. »¦*» s' »"* .1.
O' »,» V O' V V O' *«• O' O' V V V V V 'S' V v O' •«* O' *1* V V V -I- V O' V *.* O' •»* •!' -I' V O' *1' '•* O' V O' V 'I' V *4*
¦*4“
* These structure pointers are used to access the
* A miga libraries. They provide a base entry
* point that will not vary through different
* versions of the Operating System (OS).
V
..1. - I. J. .1. - I. .1. »lM «•» .«.•- •«». «l» .O •>« «l» «l» *lj. « • .1* .1* •!» «¦« • V .* *'• »'« «U »¦« J
4,> ?|s -,¦* V Y V V *f* -I- O' T T O' •>' O' v V O' O' -I- 'i' V ¦.* O' O' O' O' O' -l' O' O' O' O' O' O' O' O' O' O' *1* 'I'
struct Intuition Base Intuition Base; struct GfxBase *GfxBase;
j. J. J- .1, .v .1* s'- s'- s*-. SO si- J- s'- *'* ’>¦ s'- *•' •'* «rr
O' O' o'* O' O' O' O* Ol> O' O' O' O' 'I' O' O' O' O' O' O' O' O' O’ » O' O' O' O' 'I* O' O' O' O' O' O' O' O' O' O' O' V O' O' O' O O' O' *1* I o
a-
O'
* The MenuStrip program must supply the following pointer
* to the first object in its menu. This is to get a
* common name to submit to Intuition.
* Listing continued on page 102

The new Manx Aztec C is the most powerful and professional C development system in . The universe.
Reviews of Aztec C68k am v 3.2 were great.
Aztec C68k goes into overdrive for benchmark speed...
Byte November, 1986
Aztec C is more than just a C compiler... compiles programs significantly faster than lattice... options that for many applications. Will improve program execution performance dramatically... code generated by Aztec C was dramatically smaller than (hat produced by Lattice.
AmigaWorld November, 1986
Now, the New Aztec C68k version 3.4 is even faster, more flexible, and dramatically less expensive.
We did it! We moved all of the great development utilities from Aztec C68k am-c, our $ 499 system, to Aztec C68k am-d, our $ 299 system.
We packaged the same compiler, assembler, linker, libraries, and librarian that are in the $ 499 system into Aztec C68k am-p, The Professional System, and priced it at $ 199. Is that al! We did? Not by a long shot!
We also added new features, speeded up the already impressive performance, and we listened. We listened to what users were saying on the technical support lines, on the East Coast Bulletin Board, the West Coast Bulletin Board, and on BIX. Then we responded by correcting, adding and augmenting to satisfy every one of the major requests. The result is three carefully packaged and reasonably priced high performance development systems that will do everything you could possibly want with the Commodore Amiga.
To back up this claim, we offer a 30-day money back satisfaction guarantee. The system must be purchased by an end user directly from Manx to qualify for the 30-day return, but that's it. Less than one per cent of the systems we sell to end users are ever returned, and over 60% of the systems we sell are repeat sales or by recommendation of an existing user. That says a lot.
Manx has a reputation as the expensive system to use for high demand professional applications, but the new prices and reconfigurations make our high powered systems attractive to everyone. In addition,
Manx has aggressive site licensing, multiple purchase discounts. OEM. Educational, and other special purpose discounts. Call us today for more details. Join the over 50,000 satisfied end users who understand the Manx difference.
New Features: shorter development times * smaller faster code •support for 1.1 and 1.2 Amiga DOS • direct link of Amiga object modules and libraries •standard driver support »C and assembler support for 68020 and 68881 • scatter loading and support of overlays by segmentation »1.2 Amiga library* function support • debug utilities •enumerated data types
• stack depth checking code • Amiga assembly directives support • four floating point formats: Motorola fast float, Amiga IEEE double, Manx IEEE double, 68881 • dynamic memory allocation and window sizing for the Z editor • “touch” command •improved console window RAW and CON switching *stdio I O is buffered to console *68010, 68020 debug support • “exec”function supports Amiga PATH command •VTIOO emulator (source) • lots of examples
New Configurations and Pricing
Aztec C68k am-p (The Professional) $ 199
Optimized C, Assembler, Linker, Librarian, Libraries, Examples
Aztec C68k am-d (The Developer) $ 299
Optimized C, Assembler. Linker, Librarian, Libraries, Debugger,
Make, Diff, Grep, Support Utilities. Examples
Aztec C68k am-c (The Commercial System) $ 499
Library Source, One Year Of Updates, Z (vi) editor. Optimized C, Assembler, Linker, Librarian, Libraries, Debugger, Make, Diff,
Grep, Support Utilities, Examples
All systems are upgradable by paying the difference in price + $ 10. C.O.D., VISA, MasterCard, American Express, wire (domestic or international), and terms are available. One and Two Day delivery available for all domestic and most international destinations.
To ordert or, for information call today.
1-800-221-0440
Telex; 4995812
In NJ or outside the USA call (201) 542-2121.
Manx Software Systems One Industrial Way Eatontown, NJ 07724
Amiga is a registered TM of Commodore Int i. Lattice TM Lattice. Inc
info.phile
Look What’s New in 1.2
A look at version 1.2 of the Amiga’s system software.
By Mark L. Van Name and William B. Catchings
Some software systems improve with age. Others stagnate or even degenerate over time. The shaky and bug-ridden first release (version 1.0) of the Amiga’s system software and the better second release (1.1) were notable only for their promise of what might be. We are happy to report that, with the newest release (1.2), the Amiga’s system software has conic of age.
This is an exciting release. It rounds out the Amiga, improving it on nearly every front. We'll take a quick look at some of the most important features and discusss the new and changed AmigaDOS CLI commands. We’ll discuss most of the changes to the Workbench interface itself in our next column. (Please note: The information in this column is based upon our examination of pre-release copies of Kickstart 1.2 and Workbench 1.2. Some of the specifics we list below could be different in the final release.)
A Quick Look Around
This release includes new Kickstart and Workbench disks. You should use them together, or be prepared for some things not
to work correctly. The new software looks

pretty much the same as it always did. This is deceptive. This version is much more stable than the previous ones because the Amiga developers have fixed many of the bugs in the system.
One thing you will soon notice is that this version is a great deal faster. Open the Workbench icon and you will be pleasantly surprised at how quickly its window appears and is filled. Disk access speed has improved dramatically. Icons and windows open quicker than before. CLI DIR commands feel almost snappy. These improvements extend to any kind of disk, including hard disks. Accessing a file on a hard disk 56 January February 1987
with a hundred or more files using version
1. 1 could take a minute or more. The Amiga developers have improved the way disk sectors are found and allocated, so now hard disks with manv files behave reasonably.
If you have a little spare memory, you can improve your disk performance even more, A new CLI command, which we will discuss below, lets you cache disk sectors. A disk cache is memory in which recently accessed disk sectors are kept. The copy in memory is used rather than reading it from the disk on subsequent accesses. Since memory is much faster than a disk, the disk cache can mean substantial improvements in disk access time.
Unfortunately, you will have to spend some time getting your old disks into the new, faster format to take advantage of these performance improvements. The old format will work, but not as fast. You can change formats by using the CLI command COPY ALL to copy the files from an old disk to a new blank disk that has been initialized under AmiaDOS 1.2. Using the DISKCOPY command, or any of its Workbench equivalents, will give you an exact copy of your old disk, without the new format. The improved disk access speed is worth the conversion effort.
Besides improving the use of your old disk drives, this release lets you use different kinds of disks. In addition to entire hard disks, you can work with partitions of those disks and even with 514-inch drives, such as the Amiga 1020 drive. Assuming they come with the appropriate disk driver software, you can use 5J£-inch drives as limited-capacity Amiga drives. For those of us with the Transformer software or the Sidecar, this is a real bonus.
Though you could buy hard disks before
this release, you had to follow unusual and often difficult installation procedures to get the disk and your Amiga to work together. This was also the case for most other system
J
expansion options, such as memory beyond the first 512K. Version 1.2 makes this task much easier. You can make the connection to a hardware add-on a simple part of your Amiga’s startup process, 'l'his is known as automatic configuration of your system. Devices that come with the software needed to connect to your Amiga in this way are commonly called auto-config devices. Most good Amiga options are either already auto-con- fig or quickly will be. An auto-config add-on will come with a disk that contains a device driver file. This file is a program that the Amiga uses to work with that device. Copy that file into the new Expansion drawer on the Workbench disk to add the device.
When you next boot your Amiga, you can access the new device as if it came with the system.
Another kind of “disk" the RAM: pseudo- disk, has also improved with this release. Its 30% data transfer speed improvement is very noticeable. If you run out of memory, it now gives sensible messages. Also, when you first use RAM: during a work session, an icon for it appears on the Workbench screen. Unfortunately, this icon stays even after you delete the last file from RAM:. To
i
remove the icon you must reset your Amiga.
Version 1.2 also has some new features designed for the European user. Most important is the ability to change the characters produced by the keyboard. The characters printed on the keys are not the only ones that can show up on the screen. They only represent one possible interpretation, or mapping. This release offers alternate interpretations, or key maps. In the directory?
WARNING: Independent test results have determined that this game is habit forming.
Fourth and goal on the two. Ten seconds left and you’re down by five. The roar of the crowd is deafening as you scan the defense. Something’s not right. You call an audible...that special play you’ve been saving for a moment like this. You fake a hand off to the fullback up the middle and drop back to pass, but nobody’s open. You roll left, pursued by a 270 pound defensive lineman. Finally, the fullback breaks clear in the end zone. You squeeze a bullet between two defenders as your fullback cuts back to make the catch. The scoreboard lights up as the crowd goes wild.. .TOUCHDOWN!!
This is GRIDIRON!™, the most realistic football simulation ever developed for a microcomputer. GRIDIRON! Is TACKLE football played in real-time. Call a play from the Playbook, or design your own using our Play Creation Utility. You control the action with five levels of play, real time graphics, digitized stereo sound and an unprecedented level of game interaction.
Experience the game that’s winning rave reviews from players and critics alike. GRIDIRON!, the ultimate football simulator designed to unleash the power of your Amiga.
Nothing else comes close.
Requires 512K. For one or two players. Soon to be available for the Atari SU
Amiga is a trademark of Commodore-Amiga, Inc. i 1986 Bethesda Softworks
9208 Burning Tree Road, Bethesda, Maryland 20817 (301) 469-7061
Circle 57 on Reader Serv.ce card
H-
100+
1. 12
1. 74
1. 09
1. 69
SONY = = =
G=i
50+
100+
400+
1. 14
1. 54
1. 09
1. 49
1. 05
1. 44
1. 09
1. 55
Boxed in fifties _
3V2" DS 1.49
50+
400+
ROLLTOPS
GENUINE
TEAK
Holds 50 3' z' disks
517,49
Buff Tn Oak
CALL
TOLL
FREE
Shipping handling additional. Minimum order S50. Visa. Mastercard and Prepaid orders accepted. Corporations rated 3A2 or better and government accounts are accepted on a nel 30 basis. C.O.D. orders add an additional S5.00 special handling charge. APO, FPO. AK. HI & PR orders add an additional 5% to the total order amount to cover PAL and insurance. Ho sales tax outside of lllinos. All other countries add 20%.
1 800 USA-FLEX
(1 800 872-3539) 7 to 7 Central Time 10 to 3 Saturdays In IL 1 800 FOR-FLEX (1 800 367-3539}
Boxed in tens 30+ 50+
31 2"SS 1.19 1.15
31 2" DS 1.69 1.64
Nashua
SONY
MAC-PAC
Boxed in tens _
WSS 1.17
31 ?"DS 1.79
Packaged in fifties
31 z" SS 3Vi" DS
USA
100+
135 N. 8f»«ton Drive Glendale Heights, IL 60139
1,45 1.41
M :devs keymaps on the Workbench disk, there are maps for several other countries. There are new key maps for Germany, France, Great Britain and Italy. A new CLI command (discussed below) lets you pick the key map you wish to use. Typically, you pick a key map in your startup-sequence file, although you can change key maps at any time. You get only one key map for all the text in all windows, however.
The new maps support both the expected characters and any needed accent or other diacritical marks. To get a character with a special diacritical mark on your screen, hit first the key for that mark and then a normal character key. They appear on screen in a single character position, just as you would write them.
European Amiga users will find another pleasant feature in 1.2: support for the PAL television signal standard. Of course, you need the Amiga custom chip that supports PAL. If you have it, this release gives 256 horizontal display lines in the normal mode, and 512 lines with an interlaced display. It also refreshes the screen at the standard PAL rate, 501 Iz. Finally, the Amiga’s internal clock will no longer be messed up by 501 Iz AC current. Instead, the system detects whether 50Hz or 60Hz current is being used, and updates its clock
appropriately.
New CLI Commands
Version 1.2 offers new CLI commands to support some of the above features, as well as a few other useful nev ' commands. Here we will first give each command’s syntax and then discuss its function. We follow the same basic syntax conventions as the Intro- dnction to AmigaDOS manual. The notation DF i> is a shorthand way of saying that you may name any Amiga disk drive.
ADDBUFFERS DF i >: nn >
Earlier we mentioned that 1.2 allows you

to devote spare memory to extra disk sector caches. This command assigns nn> extra buffers, each containing 512 bytes, to the cache for the specified drive. You can use it in specific situations to improve performance, such as in a system command file for linking compiled routines. If you have enough memory, you can use it to increase the cache for your most frequently used drives in your startup-sequence file. We have found that an additional 32 buffers (16K of memory) significantly speeds up disk access.
BINDDRIVERS
You use this command primarily in your startup-sequence file. It is part of what you
must do to add an auto-config hardware op tion to your Amiga. It causes the Amiga to make a part of the system all of the device drivers in the Workbench Expansion drawer. By putting device driver icons in the Expansion drawer and placing this com mancl in your startup-sequence, you can make the software for your auto-config hardware additions a part of your Amiga system every time you boot.
DISKCHANGE DF t >:
The Amiga automatically notices when a new diskette is placed into one of its standard drives. However, not all disk drives, such as the typical 5' i-inch drive, are capable of detecting when you change the disk. For AmigaDOS to keep working properly, you must use this command to tell it when you have changed disks in such drives. While clearly not as nice as automatic detection, this command is necessary for the

ability to use other drives with the Amiga.
DISKDOCTOR DF i >
Disks occasionally fail. Usually when this happens only a very small part of the disk is damaged, but nevertheless, you can’t use the disk. To try to save such a disk, put it in a drive and issue this command. It will attempt to recover as much of the data on the disk as possible and will inform you of its results.
MOUNT device >
We now know that to use an auto-config hardware option with your system, you first put its device driver in Expansion, and then use BINDDRIVERS to make that driver part of the system software. To tell the system to start using the device, issue this command. This is called mounting the device. For example, if you want df2: to become the 5' ,-inch drive you bought with the Amiga Transformer, you type MOUNT DF2:. You also can mount devices other than disk drives.
There is one slight complication, however. For this command to work, the device you name must have an entry in the file :devs Mountlist on the Workbench disk. This entry should be supplied to you by the manufacturer of the device. There is a sample entry in that file, but it does not show everything you need to know to mount a new device.
NOTEPAD [ [ [ - Q] filename > ] | ? ]
We tend to think of the Notepad as a simple Workbench tool. As we shall see in our next column, the Notepad has become a great deal more powerful. You now can use this command to run it from the CLJ. The
Open the pod bay doors, HAL...
55
Programmers cast their vote!
Right now, leading software developers are hard at work on the next generation of Amiga® products. To add the spectacular sound effects we've all come to expect from Amiga software, they are overwhelmingly choosing one sound recording package...
FutureSound. As one developer put it, "FutureSound should be standard equipment for the Amiga."
FutureSound the clear winner...
Why has FutureSound become the clear choice for digital sound sampling on the Amiga? The reason is obvious: a hardware design that has left nothing out. FutureSound includes two input sources, each with its own amplifier, one for a microphone and one for direct recording; input volume control; high speed 8-bit parallel interface, complete with an additional printer port; extra filters that take care of everything from background hiss to interference from
Applied Visions, Inc., Suite 2200, One Kendall Square Cambridge, MA 02139 (617)494-5417
Amiga is a registered trademark of Corrmodore-Amiga, Inc.
Deluxe Video Construction Set is a trademark of Electronic Arts, Inc.
the monitor, and of course, a microphone so that you can begin recording immediately.
What about software?
FutureSound transforms your Amiga into a powerful, multi-track recording studio. Of course, this innovative software package provides you with all the basic recording features you expect. But with FutureSound, this is just the beginning. A forty-page manual will guide you through such features as variable sampling rates, visual editing, mixing, special effects generation, and more. A major software publisher is soon to release a simulation with an engine roar that will rattle your teeth. This incredible reverberation effect was designed with FutureSound's software.
„'APPLI
H V
Si
Question: What can a 300 pound space creature do with these sounds? Answer: Anything he wants.
Since FutureSound is IFF compatible (actually three separate formats are supported) your sounds can be used by most Amiga sound applications. With FutureSound and Deluxe Video Construction Set from Electronic Arts, your video creations can use the voice of Mr. Spock, your mother-in-law, or a disturbed super computer.
Programming support is also provided. Whether you're a "C" programming wiz or a Sunday afternoon BASIC hacker, all the routines you need are on the non-copy protected diskette.
Your Amiga dealer should have FutureSound in stock. If not, just give us a call and for $ 175 (VISA, MasterCard or COD) we'll send one right out to you. Ahead warp factor one!
MetaScope gives you everything you've always wanted in an application program debugger:
• Memory Windows
Move through memory, display data or disassembled code, freeze to preserve display and allow restoration.
• Other Windows
Status windows show register contents and program state with freeze and restore; symbol, hunk, and breakpoint windows list current definitions.
• Execution Control Breakpoints with repetition counts and conditional expressions; trace for all instructions or subroutine level, both single-step and continuous execution.
• Full Symbolic Capability Read symbols from files, define new ones, use anywhere.
MetdTools I
A comprehensive set of tools to aid your programming (full source included):
• MetaMake
Program maintenance utility.
• Grep
Sophisticated pattern matching utility.
• Diff
Source file compare,
• Filter
Text file filter
• Comp
Simple file compare.
• Dump
File dump utility.
• MetaSend
Amiga to PC file transfer.
• MetaRecv
PC to Amiga file transfer.
Metadigm products are designed to fully utilize the capabilities of the AmigaTV in helping you develop your programs. If you're programming the Amiga, you can't afford to be without them.
Dealer Inquiries Welcome
• Powerful Expression Evaluation
Use extended operator set including relationals, all assembler number formats.
• Direct to Memory Assembler Enter instruction statements for direct conversion to code in memory.
• and More!
Log file for operations and displays, modify search fill memory, etc.
MetaScribe:
The Editor
MetaScribe has the features you need in a program editor:
• Full Mouse Support
Use lor text selection, command menus, scrolling or use key equivalents when more convenient.
• Multiple Undo
Undo all commands, one at a time, to level limited only by available memory*
• Sophisticated Search Replace Regular expressions, forward backward, full file or marked block.
• Multiple Windows Work with different files or different portions of the same file at one time.
• Keystroke Macros
Record keystroke sequences or predefine, assign to keys you choose.
• and More!
Copy between files, block copy move delete, set tabs and margins, etc.
Metadi rp, be.
MetaScope $ 95.00 MetaScribe $ 85.00 MetaTools $ 69.95
19762 MacArthur Blvd. Suite 300 Irvine. CA 92715
(714) 955-2555
(California residents + 6%). Visa MasterCard accepted.
Amiga is a trademark oi Commodore-Amiga Inc.
filename> parameter specifies on which file to run the Notepad. If you add the -Q option, it will start up without reading any fonts from the disk, which will make it faster. As with most commands, if you supply a ? As its only parameter, you will be shown its syntax.
PATH [ SHOW | dir name > [ , dir name > ] ... ] |
MetaScope: The Debugger
ADD dir name > [ , dir-name> } ... ] ]
The PATH command is one of the new CLI commands that you will probably use frequently. Prior to this release, when you tried to execute a command or another program from the CLI, AntigaDOS looked for that program first in your current directory, and then in the directory assigned to C:. If it could not find it in either place, you would have to specify the program’s full path name. An easier answer is to tell AmigaDOS to look in other directories. For example, you might want to copy some but not all of the commands from C: to RAM:, conserving memory by putting only the most common ones there. This command solves this problem.
You use it to establish a list of places that AmigaDOS should search when you try to run a command or other program. AmigaDOS will search the directories on the list in the order that they appear there. This list is often called a search path. The ability to tell AmigaDOS where to look for commands and other programs allows you to customize your system and to take advantage of even a small amount of spare mem* ory for the RAM: pseudo-disk.
You define a search path by following PATH with a list of directories. This list replaces the previous search path. For example, to make AmigaDOS look first in the RAM: pseudo-disk and then in C:, you enter PATH RAM:, C:. You can add directories to the end of this list by using the key word ADD and a list of the additional directories. The key word can come at either the beginning or the end of the directory list. Thus, you tell AmigaDOS to check SYS:system after RAM: and C: in our example by using cither PATH ADD SYS:system or PATH SYS:systern ADD, If you want to see your current search path, type PATH SHOW. Finally, to return to the traditional defaults, enter PATH with no parameters.
SETMAP map file > | USA
This is the command you use to get alter
ENTERTAINMENT EDUCATIONAL:
Activision
Borrowed Time ......S29.00
Hacker $ 29,00
Hacker II .$ 35.00
Little Computer People $ 35.00
Mindshadow ..* . , . $ 29.00
Electronic Arts
Adventure Constr. Set...... . $ 29.00
Archon ..$ 29.00
Archon II: The Adept .$ 29.00
Arctic Fox $ 29.00
Auto Duel $ 35.00
Bard's Tale $ 35.00
Chessmaster 2000 ..... $ 35.00
Marble Madness $ 35.00
One-on-One .$ 29.00
Seven Cities of Gold ..$ 29.00
SkyFox ....$ 29.00
StarFleet I ...... . $ 44.00
Software Golden Oldies......S26.00
Ultima III: Exodus ...$ 45.00
Infocom
All Titles Avail ..S26.00-S36.00
Mindscape
Brataccas .S30.00
Defender of the Crown $ 37.00
Deja Vu ..$ 35.00
Racter ...S30.00
The Hailey Project ...S35.00
Keyboard Cadet ....$ 30.00
GRAPHICS VIDEO APPLICATIONS:
Aegis Development
Animator Images ...S89.00
Images . $ 31.00
Art Pak 1 S24.00
Art Pak 2 $ 24.00
Electronic Arts
Deluxe Paint ..... S69.00
Deluxe Print ......$ 69.00
Deluxe Video .....$ 69.00
D. Paint Data Disk ...S24.00
D. Print Art Disk 2 ..$ 24.00
New Tech. Coloring Book......$ 16.00
MUSIC APPLICATIONS:
Activision
Music Studio ......$ 43.00
Aegis Development
Sonix ..... $ 60.00
Electronic Arts
Deluxe Music Constr ..$ 69.00
Instant Music ......$ 35.00
It's Only Rock & Roll ..$ 24.00
Mimetics
Soundscape Midi Studio .....$ 125.00
Audio Digitizer ....$ 85.00
BUSINESS GRAPHICS:
Aegis Development
Impact! .$ 125.00
Drow! ...$ 95.00
Draw Plus $ 199.00
Micro-Illusions
Dynamic-CAD ....$ 320.00
BUSINESS FINANCIAL:
Byte by Byte
InfoMinder $ 69.00
Write Hand ......$ 42.00
Financial Plus .....$ 240.00
Chang Labs
Rags-to-Riches Series ...Call
Digital Creations
Digital Link $ 49.00
Electronic Arts
MaxiComm $ 36.00
MaxiDesk .$ 50.00
MaxiPlan $ 107.00
Financicl Cookbook ..$ 35.00
PAR Software
PAR Home $ 50.00
PAR Real .S99.00
SoftWoad Co.
MiAmiga File ......$ 70.00
MiAmiga Ledger ....$ 70.00
Versasoft
dBMAN ..$ 99.00
Presicion Software
Superbase Personal .$ 119.00
PRODUCTIVITY UTILITIES:
MegaSoft
A-Copier .S29.00
A-Filer ...$ 34.00
New Horizons
Flow $ 85.00
Digital Creations
Gizmoz (v 2.0) .....$ 52.00
Discovery Software
Exactly! ..$ 19.00
Marauder $ 29.00
Marauder II ......$ 29.00
Compumed
The Mirror S36.00
PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES:
Absoft
AC Fortran ......$ 235.00
Manx
Aztec C Commercial .$ 375.00
Aztec C Developers .$ 230.00
Prices may vary.
Delivery subject to product availability.
Over
no
us free T rift*** 'I1' n C.O-U
specv°
d°'e.uere, VK.'1ree
cV Of9e"
• seSES-
00 A S0- sk r a even So 9 p-m-
S9.0°' noen--.9° nooa Viso.
9 o.r°- v e
pori ar
nate key mappings so that you can enter the characters appropriate to other languages. The map .file > you name must be a correct reference (e.g., full path name) to one of the key map files in :devs keymaps on the Workbench disk. You also have the option of specifying USA. While not a file in that directory, USA tells the system to re- turn to its default key mappings, which are stored in ROM.
SETTASKPRI priority >
One of the Amiga’s great features is its multitasking ability, allowing you to have several different jobs running at the same time. Until this release, however, all of the jobs started from the CLI had the same priority. This meant that each had an equal chance to run on the CPU. This is not always what you want. For example, you could have a C program compiling while you are editing text. You would probably want the compilation to run only when you are thinking or pausing and do not want it to get as much system attention as the editing task. Now you can give different tasks different priorities.
This command sets the priority of the CLI task from which it is issued. Further, any tasks started by this CLI will inherit this new priority. For example, you could use the CLI RUN command to EXECUTE a command file in the background. This file could contain a SETT-VSKPRI command that causes it to be a very low priority task, one that works only when little else is going on.
Attention Subscribers
We occasionally make our mailing list available to other companies or organizations with products or services which we feel might be of interest to you. If you prefer that your name be deleted from such a list, please fill out the coupon below or affix a copy of your mailing label and mail it to:
CW Communications Peterborough AmigaWorld PO Box 868 Farmingdale, NY 11737
Please delete my name from mailing lists sent to other companies or organizations, AmigaWorld
Name_
Address_
City_State-Zip
You need to be careful with this command. The system does not check to see if
you supply a legitimate priority. You could pick a priority that is so high that it interferes with vital system functions. To avoid doing so, keep priority > an integer in the range from - 5 to +5.
Changed CLI Commands
In addition to giving us several new commands, version 1.2 offers improvements to a few of the existing ones.
CD and ASSIGN now provide full directory names when they give you information. This can help, for example, when you need to distinguish between several subdirectories in different places that have the same basic name.
In version 1.1, it w'as very difficult to stop the DIR command from displaying all of its output, even when you had already received the information you needed. Now, you can stop it at any time by typing CTRL-C, just
as you can with other commands.

The FORMAT command also has been changed to accommodate any disk that has been mounted on your Amiga. It will work with hard disks, hard disk partitions and 51 - inch drives. Further, its behavior has been changed slightly. If you use the old syntax, it correctly formats a disk, but it does not leave that disk empty. Instead, it places on your disk a Trash icon (and, therefore, director)) like the one on the Workbench disk. While this is often useful or at least acceptable, you may also want a completely empty disk. If you do, add the word NOICONS to the end of the FORMAT command. This stops it from adding the Trash icon.
If you ever need to stop the FORMAT command before it has finished, you now can do so in either of two ways. First, enter CTRL-C. Second, if you are working on a 5 .-inch disk, simply remove it from the disk drive. While this normally could hurt anv data on the disk, you lose nothing as an unformatted disk can contain no Amiga data.
FORMAT is not the only command that has been changed to accommodate new types of disk drives. The DISKED and DISKCOPY commands now work with any
drive that you have successfully added to
*
your Amiga. Remember that to do so you must add its driver to the system software and you must MOUNT it on your system.
Finally, two other commands, EXECUTE and EDIT, have been improved. Roth commands sometimes need one or more temporary files. These files are put in the directory assigned to T:. In the past, if there was no T: directory, neither would work correctly. Now, when one of them needs a T: directory and there is none, it creates one. This saves you the effort. However, it also means that such a directory may appear on your disks without you being aware of it.
Still More to Come
With just the above new features and commands, release 1.2 of the Amiga system software is an exciting new product. It improves performance, expands the range of devices you can add to your Amiga and the ease with which you can add them, better supports the European community, and offers new and improved CLI commands.
Next time around, we will focus on improvements to the Workbench interface, including the Notepad and Preferences.¦
Address all author correspondence to Mark L.
Van Name and William B. Catchings, 10024 Sycamore Road, Durham, NC 27703.
Talking Xbrd Processor
Talker does everything voir d expect from a full-featured word processor, plus Talker does just
that talks. It reads your text.
¥ '
word-for-word or letter-by-letter.
So, Talker is great for proofreading, learning to type and the sight impaired.
Talker’s pull down menus and simple commands make it easy to use, and at 569-96 it’s easy on tout budget
Bring your words to life with Talker.
Call coilea to learn more about Talks Or order risk tree, your satisfaction is guaranteed.
(714) 854-4434
SOFTWARE
4000 MacArthur Blvd. Suite 3000 Newport Beach, Caiiiomia 92663
Circle 5l on Reader Service card.
We Teach Your Computer Spanish. It Teaches You.
Shrink In Abox
A detailed psychotherapeutic game on a disk, Dr Xes takes the km of a Gestalt therapy session. Loam more about artifical intelligence, psychotherapy and yourself Dr. Xes even talks. More tun than a padded room, great tor panics. $ 49-95.
Call collect to learn more about Dr Xes. Or order risk, free, tout satisfaction is guaranteed.
Ffcfcur
S 3 r 7 W A 5 :
4000 MacAnhur Blvd. Suite 5000 Newport Beach. Caiiiomia 92663
(714) 8544434
Sehor Tutor leads a beginning Spanish student through self-paced, changing lessons. You learn greetings and phrases, household terms, and much more
Sophisticated speech svnthesis actually lets vour computer speak Spanish.
Turn your computer into your Spanish teacher with Sehor Tutor
;E1 Espahoi es radii
Call collect to learn more about Sehor Tutor. Or. Order
FviW
SOFTWARE
4000 MscAnhur Blvd. Suite 3000 Newport Beach, Caiiiomia 92663
AmigaWorld
Sophisticated, Stimulating, and System-specific
When von use the most sophisticated and exciting computer on the market today, you deserve an equally sophisticated and exciting companion magazine.
Introducing AmigaWorld, published by CW Communications Peterborough, the leader in quality computer publications. It’s the only magazine for Amiga users.
AmigaWorld's clearly-written features help new users take full advantage of the newest Commodore. Plus, lively and fully-illustrated articles offer inspiration to everyone who wants to be creative while learning.
You'll get outstanding color reproduction on high- quality, oversized pages. Instead of a reasonable facsimile. You'll see true-to-life examples of the Amiga’s colorful graphics!
UT
Magazin e
Making the Amiga Work For You
With unrivaled graphics and sound capabilities, the Amiga is already in a class by itself. AmigaWorld not only tells you why, it shows you how every incredible feature can work for you.
In each issue, AmigaWorld authors will guide you through a new frontier of computing!
Subscribe to AmigaWorld today and:
• Explore the speed and versatility of the Amiga for home and business applications.
• Learn about the latest and very best new hardware software on the market.
• Receive in-depth, easy-to-understand analyses of Amiga’s astounding features.
• Discover a regular buyer’s guide, timely reviews, and user hints and tips.
Become A Charter Subscriber And Save 25%
The cost of an AmigaWorld subscription couldn't be better! By becoming a charter subscriber, you'll save 25% off the basic subscription rate, and nearly 37% off the cover price!
As the world’s largest publisher of computer-related information, CW Communications unconditionally guarantees your AmigaWorld subscription.
If you’re not completely satisfied, tell us. We’ll refund the full price of your subscription no questions asked!
To order, please return the coupon or attached card. For faster service, call 1-800-258-5473, In XH, call 1-924-
9471.
YES.
§ I want to save 25% off the basic rate! Enter mv one year subscription (6 issues) to AmigaWorld for the low charter subscription price of $ 14.97. If I’m not satisfied at any time, I will receive a full refund no questions asked.
? Payment Enclosed ? Bill Me 371B2
Name
Address
City State Zip
Please make check payable to AmigaWbrld. Canada and Mexico $ 17.97,
1 year only, US funds drawn on US bank. Foreign Surface $ 34.97, I year only, US funds drawn on US bank. Foreign Airmail please inquire.
Please allow 6-8 weeks for delivery.
Amiga Book Roundup
An extensive library of Amiga reference books already exists, and it is growing rapidly. If you want to get more out of your Amiga, pick up a title that interests you and dive in.
You won 't regret it.
Ill response to the need for more information on the Amiga, the major computer book publishers are producing a number of books specific to the needs of the Amiga user and programmer. In addition, many general hooks on the 68000 and programming in C are of great value to Amiga owners. Below is a list of currently available Amiga-specific books.
Introductory' Texts
Amiga Applications by Brian Flynn (Compute! Books. $ 16.95) is a collection of 29 type-in programs that cover many different areas, such as games, education, science, business, math and general household applications. It could he used as a tutorial (by example only) on Basic programming as well as a source of programs.
Elementary Amiga Basic by C. Regena (Compute! Books. SI4.95) is aimed at the beginning and intermediate Basic programmer. It covers a majority of the Amiga Basic commands and contains many example programs demonstrating programming techniques and Amiga Basic capabilities.
Kids and the Amiga by Dr. Edward Carlson (Compute! Books. $ 14.95) is a gentle introduction to programming in Amiga Basic, aimed at kids from eight to 80. Well illustrated, it starts with simple examples and ends with more advanced Basic techniques using many small programs as examples. It is very well suited to classroom instruction for beginners.
DOS Information
The AmigaDOS Manual (Bantam Computer Books.
$ 24.95) is the commercially available version of the three AmigaDOS manuals suppied to registered Amiga developers. It includes the AmigaDOS User's Manual, the AmigaDOS Technical Reference Manual and the AmigaDOS Developer's Manual. It covers all aspects of AmigaDOS, ?
The Amiga Handbook by Markus Breuer (distributed in the U.S. by Progressive Peripherals and Software.
$ 24.95) is a detailed reference guide to the Amiga’s hardware and software for beginners to advanced users. Workbench, Intuition and Multitasking arc dissected and explained. It also has an extensive tutorial section.
The Amiga System: An Introduction by Bill Donald (distributed in the U.S. by Progressive Peripherals and Software. SI5.95) is a general introduction to the Amiga aimed at beginners.
Beginner's Guide to the Amiga by Dan McNeill (Compute! Books. $ 16.95). This book covers the same sort of general information as the Introduction to the AMIGA, but spends more time describing terminology that the Introduction assumes is already understood by the reader. It also devotes a great deal of attention to software in general, and gives specific examples for the Amiga. It is a very general introduction to the Amiga, not a programming guide.
20
02
MEGABYTES
MEGABYTES
Starboard2
Up to 2 megabytes of “fast RAM" in a sleek, highly compatible, self-configuring package residing on the buss of your Amiga™ Now you can have the memory space you really need without sacrificing the table space you started out with! StarBoard2 from MicroBotics lets you expand in easy stages: one-half, one, or two megabytes plus an exciting, optional MultiFunction Module that gives you a battery backed clock, parity logic, math chip socket, and warm-reboot-survivable
software write protection!
MASdrive20
20 megabytes of fast, quiet, reliable compatible hard disk: MAS-Drive20 from MicroBotics gives you the mass storage you need plus a SCSI port right on the back of its 14.5 " by 7 " by 3 " low profile chassis. MAS-Drive20 connects to your Amiga via the parallel port (which is duplicated for simultaneous use with your printer). Exclusive MicroBotics interface electronics are built-in, so there’s nothing extra to buy! Comes complete with diagnostic and configuration software to install the drive as a WorkBench icon.
SEE YOUR AUTHORIZED AMIGA DEALER TODAY!
STARBOARD2 (NOW AVAILABLE) with 512k installed: $ 495: with 1 meg: $ 595: with 2 megs: $ 879. MultiFunction Module: $ 99.95 (not including 68881). StarBoard2 uses 256k-by-1 by 150 ns RAM (user installable). Two StarBoard2‘s (4 megs) may be connected to the Amiga v ithout additional power via built-in bus pass-through.
MAS-Drive20 (complete): $ 1495.00. Note: requires final release version of AmigaDos 1.2 (or later) in order to operate. Average access time: 65 milliseconds: track-to-track: 20 milliseconds. Latency: 8.33 milliseconds, average. As many as six MAS-20's may be daisy- chained together on the SCSI bus provided by MAS-Dhve.
MicroBotics. Inc.
PO BOX 855115, RICHARDSON, TEXAS 75085 Dealers, please call: (214) 437-5330
AMIGA is a registered trademark of Commodo re-Amiga Circle 103 on Reader Service card.
And includes a general introduction that was not in the originals.
AmigaDOS Reference Guide by Arlan R. Levitan and Shel don Leemon (Compute! Books. $ 14.95) is a comprehensive DOS users guide aimed at those who wish to learn more about the CL1 and its operation. It covers all the DOS commands and has a complete explanation of the screen editor (ED) and the line editor (EDIT).
Mastering AmigaDOS by Jeffrey Stanton and Dan Pinal (Arrays Inc. $ 10.95) explains disk and directory structure, multitasking, the CLI and all DOS commands with example applications. It guides novices through field- tested sample sessions, and it introduces experienced users to the more advanced features of AmigaDOS.
Programming
Advanced Amiga Basic by Toni Halfhill and Charles Brannon (Compute! Books. $ 16.95) is a very comprehensive and serious book that offers much to the intermediate and advanced Basic programmer. It covers all aspects of Amiga Basic in detail, with many examples and useful programs. One of the best books available on programming in Amiga Basic.
Amiga Programmer's Handbook by Eugene P. Mortimore (Sybex Books. $ 24.95) is a detailed explanation and introduction to the Amiga ROM kernel libraries. It covers the Exec, Graphics, Animation, Text, Layers, Intuition and Workbench. It is an invaluable reference guide to the Amiga ROM kernel system, regardless of how many other books or references you might have on the subject. Each routine is discussed and its syntax and register usage is demonstrated. The glossary offers details on implementing many of the more advanced Amiga display modes.
Addison-Wesley Publishing Co.
Howard W. Sams 8c Co.
Reading, MA 01867
4300 West 62nd St.
617 944-3700
Indianapolis, IN 46268
Arrays Inc.
Microsoft Press
6711 Valjean Ave.
16011 NE 36th
Van Xu vs, CA 91406
Box 97017
Redmond, WA 98073
Bantam Books Inc.
666 Fifth Ave.
Progressive Peripherals and
New York, NY 10103
Software Inc.
464 Kalamath St.
Commodore Business Machines
Denver, CO 80204
1200 Wilson Drive
303 825*4144
West Chester, PA 19380
215 431-9100
Que Corporation
7999 Knue Road
Compute! Books
Indianapolis. IN 46250
324 West Wendover Ave.
Suite 200
Sybex Inc.
PC) Box 5406
2344 Sixth St.
Greensboro, NC 27403
Berkeley. CA 94710
919 275-9809
Amiga Programming Guide by Tim Knight (Que Corporation. $ 18.95) is a general introduction on using and programming the Amiga. It covers Amiga Basic, LOGO, C and AmigaDOS, and includes a discussion of some of the early software that was available for the computer.
It offers some good insight on a number of Amiga programming languages, as well as the CLI.
Amiga Programming Guide edited by Stephen Levy (Compute! Books. $ 16.95) is another book that covers a lot of territory in the area of programming on the Amiga. It covers Amiga Basic, C, 68000 Assembly and AmigaDOS, and contains some very specific chapters on graphics and sound. Each chapter is written by a different author; each offers their own particular insight to the Amiga. A good handbook for the programmar just learning the advanced aspects of the Amiga.
Inside Amiga Graphics by Sheldon Leemon (Compute! Books. $ 16.95) is a specific and advanced tutorial on programming Amiga graphics. Most of the discussion centers on C examples, but there are many Amiga Basic examples as well. Topics covered include screens, windows, drawing functions, text, sprites and BOBs, as well as advanced topics like super bitmaps and dual playfields.
Inside the Amiga by John T. Berry (SAMS. $ 22.95) is a comprehensive tutorial on programming the Amiga with the C language. It covers Intuition. Amiga data structures, lists and objects, interrupts, playfields and animation. It also offers a C-language refresher.
Music, Sound and Graphics on the Amiga by Mike Boom (Microsoft Press) is a detailed introduction to the Amiga’s sound and graphics capabilities. It should be on dealer’s bookshelves by the time you read this. Price was not available at press time.
From the Horse’s Mouth
Amiga Technical Reference Set (Addison Wesley). This is the public version of the documentation that, originally, only a chosen few developers could obtain. There are four volumes in the set: the Intuition Reference Manual ($ 24.95) is a detailed description of the Amiga’s Intuition user interface; the Hardware Reference Manual ($ 24.95) is a very detailed explanation of the Amiga’s sound and graphics hardware, as well as its communication devices (mouse, printer, serial, disk, etc.); the ROM Kernel Reference Manual: Exec ($ 24.95) is a detailed discussion of the Exec, the Amiga’s multitasking executive system; finally, the ROM Kernel Reference Manual: Libraries and Devices ($ 34.95) describes the graphics-support routines (including text and animation), Workbench, the system devices and the floating-point libraries.
These four volumes are absolutely essential for the serious Amiga applications developer. They are somewhat better than the original developer’s manuals in that they have had their examples corrected and now include an index.
IFF Technical Notes (Commodore Business Machines Technical Support Group. $ 20) is a description of the various IFF formats for sound, graphics and text.H
Suggested retail price $ 149.90
Educational site licenses available from Addison-Wesley Publishing.
TrueBASK LanguageSysiemis atrademarkotTrueBasic, Inc. Macintosh is .1 trademark t>f Apple Computer Corp.
Amiga is a trademarkol Commodore Business Machines.
IBM is a trademark of International Business Machines Corp.
You know John Kernenv and Tom Kurtz. They
developed the original BASIC. Now they’re
back with an even better version: a flexible,
easy-to-use structured programming language
they call True BASIC.™
¦
True BASIC offers a hill selection of control structures. External procedures can be compiled into libraries, making True BASIC faster and more powerful than any other programming language.
True BASIC has a complete matrix algebra package and the best graphics ever in a higher level language. And there are optional libraries for tilings like sorting and searching and 3-D
c? C c
graphics.
True BASIC programs run on anv computer which runs True BASIC, good news for users with more than one kind of PC.
You’ll love True BASIC. Whether you’re programming for vour own applications, teaching others, or developing products to go to market, send in the coupon below to receive a free demo disk.
Available for the IBM-PC " and compatibles, Apple Macintoshand Commodore Amiga.
To order, talk to vour local
dealer or call 603) r
643-3882TODAY! Igjgg
- OTYYiR*
V
9jL J ALV inc.
39 South Main Street,
Hanover,NI103755 (603) 643*3882 AW-1
My computer is: LIBM-PC compatible ? Apple Macintosh C Commodore Amiga ? I'D LIKE TO GET MY FREE DEMO DISK. U I'd like more information on the True BASIC language products.
U fin readv to buy. Call me and tell me how.
I I I'd like information on True BASIC Mathematics Series and other products.
N ame__
Title. -___
G >mpa ny U n i versity_
Add ress_
City, State, ZIP Telephone
DIGITAL canvas
This month’s exhibit features the work of James M. Shook. Jim teaches film animation at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston and does freelance work in computer animation.
Jim Shook has many years of experience in the area of graphics and animation. Although the courses that he teaches at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts do not involve computer animation, Jim says he uses the school's four Amigas on his own time.
Computer-generated graphics are becoming more and more involved in video technology, he notes.
“Video graphics and animation have taken over many of the functions that were done on film, such as movie credits and other things that are now being done by character generators."
Jim anticipates that computer animation will become a larger medium as computers become more powerful, mainly through the addition of increasingly inexpensive memory. “Animation that’s now done on expensive equipment will be done on much smaller systems," he says,
Jim has studied previously at Harvard's Department of Visual and Environmental Studies and has done freelance work on projects such as Suzan Pitt’s animated film “Asparagus” and various Nova presentations for Boston's W’GBH I V.I
D
N
¦apmn
Anemone
D I G
T
N
Anyone submitting artwork to be considered for exhibit in Digital Canvas should send the artwork on a disk and properly packaged to:
Amiga World
80 Elm St.
Peterborough. NH
03458
Attn: Art Director
Please include brief biographical information, relevant details about access to the pictures and any information regarding special products or procedures used in creating the artwork. Please do not submit disks with less than eight finished pictures.
$ 25,000
DATA MAT APPLICATIONS
CONTEST
oin us in our first ever contest to find the best application designed by you, the users of DATAMAT™ RELATIONAL DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM.
Prizes
One Grand Prize ...$ 10,000.00
One First Prize .....$ 5,000.00
Ten Second Prizes .. $ 1,000.00 each
Entries may win on any one of the following criteria: Creativity
Utility of Application Completeness of Application or Clarity of Documentation
The Rules Are Simple:
1. All entries must be postmarked by May 4th 1987.
2. Each entry must be submitted separately with a com- pleted entry form, application disk and documentation.
3. All entries must be made on Version 1.02 or later of DATAMAT™ AMIGA DOS or MS-DOS. Free up-grades will be provided upon request to registered owners of earlier AMIGA™ Versions of DATAMAT™
4. No purchase necessary entrant need not own or buy DATAMAT.™
5. No entry may be copyrighted.
6. All entries will be judged by outside independent reviewers. The winners will be announced by August 31, 1987.
7. Emplovees or family members of employees of TRANSTIME TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION are not eligible to enter.
8. ALL WINNING ENTRIES BECOME THE SOLE AND EXCLUSIVE PROPERTY OF TRANSTIME TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION TO USE IN ANY WAY TRANSTIME TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION SEES FIT.
9. Non-winning entries will not be returned to the submittor.
Contest winners will be notified by registered mail. A list of winners will be sent upon receipt of request and a self- addressed, stamped envelope.
Grand and First Prizes will be awarded at Fail 1987 Comdex. Transtime Technologies Corporation will pay the hotel and round-trip transportation costs to Comdex for the Grand and First Prize winners or their representative.
Send the completed entry form, application disk and documentation to:
DATAMAT™ CONTEST Suite 217
3380 Sheridan Drive Amherst. New York 14226
DATA MAI " is a ii.uUm.uk of Tuiutmie ethnologies GorjHir.it inn. AMIGA i' .i ir.utcinjrk of Commodore Amiga Incorporated MS DOS is .i trademark of Microsoft Corporation
J
Entry form
I have read and understood the contest rules and agree to them.
I am submitting my entry on DATAMAT™:
A-200_MX-200_Serial .__
_Serial
MX-300.
Tr
I AGREE THAT SHOULD MY ENTRY WIN, MY ENTRY SHALL BECOME THE SOLE AND EXCLUSIVE PROPERTY OF TRANSTIME TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION.
I am the owner of the application and documentation that I am submitting. I acknowledge receipt of a copy of the contest rules. I understand TRANSTIME TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION will not return my entry to me.
I have not copyrighted this material.
My application is:_
Signature:_
Name:_
Street Address:_
City, State, Zip:
Area Code, Phone(
DATAMAT™ is now available for AMIGA-DOS and MS-DOS.
)-
TRANSTIME
TECHNOLOGIES
CORPORATION
810 Sheridan Drive Tonawanda, NY 14150
(716) 874-2010
r
Reviews
Digi-View
By Stan Kalisher
Seeing is believing with this video digitizer. Digitize pictures in low and high resolutions and save them as black and white, 32-color IFF, or 4,096-color hold and modify files.
Digi-View is the video digitizer from NewTek of Topeka, Kansas. The product consists of a small flat plastic box (a little bigger than a Zippo lighter) with a parallel port connector on one side and an RCA pin connector on the other side, the Digi- View software and a filter wheel and holder with Red, Green. Blue and Clear filters. The user must supply a video camera, which should be a monochrome RS-170 video camera with 2:1 interlace. A standard color video camera will work, but the quality of the digitized images will be diminished by at least 50 percent.
Easy as One, Two, Three
The system is extremely easy to use; I had no trouble at all producing great full-color pictures in less than ten minutes! Unlike Amiga Live! (The frame Grabber), Digi- View does not digit:ze in real time or accept a color video signal (hence the monochrome camera). Digi-View uses the additive color method of producing full-color pictures. This technique is really quite old, but very reliable and was even used by NASA to send back some of the color Surveyor pictures from Mars. Three full exposures are made: one through a Red filter, one through a Green filter, and the final one through a Blue filter. Each exposure adds only the color that can pass through its filter, similar to adding it to a film emulsion. As each exposure takes about 8 seconds, the objects you digitize must be either flat art or still objects. (I have tried it with people, but I couldn't get anyone to sit still long enough for the 25 to 30 seconds needed for a full-color exposure.) There is a “Fast-Scan” mode, which cuts the time down to about 4-5 seconds per exposure, but it also loses about half the resolution of your picture.
Display Modes
Once the three exposures have been made, you can immediately display your picture in one of three inodes: 4096 IFF, 4096+ IFF or 2-32 Color IFF. The 4096 IFF mode is commonly called HAM mode (for Hold and Modify), a graphics mode unique to the Amiga that allows the entire 4,096 color palette to be displayed on the screen at one time. The 4096+ IFF mode sharpens the image a lot and eliminates most of the annoying speckles that sometimes appeared with the first release of the software. Even though the HAM pictures are lo res (320 x 200), the color saturation and resolution are so good, you’d swear that the picture is being broadcast. The 2-32 Color IFF mode transfers the image into a standard IFF picture file that can be read and modified by any of the various paint programs.
A Palette option that allows the user to ad- ?
Come In Small Packages
The First Second Generation 2 MEG RAM Expansion
Big things do come in small packages. Comspec's second generation AX2000 is the leader in its class. [The AX2000 one of Comspec's many products has been in production for over a year.] Many software developers worldwide are using the AX2000 with assurance. So can you.
The AX2Q00 provides a full 2 Megabytes now. You won't need to buy expansion modules later.
Standard Amiga bus architecture makes the AX200D fully compatible with all standard Amiga products.
The AX2000 is auto configuring*. All you do is plug it into your Amiga and turn it on.
The Comspec AX2000 is designed to enhance Amiga’s state-of-the art technology. Full pass through allows for complete peripheral expansion and expanded memory to 8 Megabytes.
Our compact design means fewer parts, less electrical interference. Results: greatly increased reliability.
Our new second generation expansions
• are physically smaller.
• provide 2.09 Megabytes of power.
• have been in use for over a year.
• produce no wait states, no delays. [Even one wait state can decrease speed by as much as 25%].
• are F.C.C. Type Approved.
• come with a One Year Warranty. The AX2000 provides “fast” RAM, giving you more room for program and data storage, faster program execution and fewer time-consuming disk accesses. You can use its memory actively, or as a fast RAM drive.
Listen to what the critics are saying: "... it’s a nice piece of hardware that lets you use the full power of some of those memory-eating programs.” 1 986 AmigaWorld Editor's Choice Awards.
"I was particularly impressed with the high standard of workmanship in this unit." Commodore Business and Amiga User Magazine, August 1986. The reviews are in.
The choice is obvious: The AX2000 2 MEG RAM Expansion. It’s a runaway hit.
* Using
1. 2 Workbench
Amiga is a
registered
trademark of
Commodore
Business
Machines.
153 Bndgeland Ave., Unit 5 Toronto, Ontario Canada. MBA 2YB (416] 787-061 7
Distributed worldwide by:
Run Informatique Microtron Ingemorfirmaet Precision Software Limited Nenka Australia Proprietary Ltd Southern Technologies Inc.
Pans. France. Pieterlen, Switzerland. Bagsvaerd, Denmark Surrey, England Sidney, Australia Dallas, Texas
33-1-45-81 5144 41 -32-87 2429 45-2-44 0488 01-330 7166 957-4778 United States
just any or all of the colors in the palette used, or load in previously created palettes, is included also. You can even specify the number of colors used, from two to 32; this is particularly useful when reproducing line drawings because you can specify that only black and white he used. I enjoy creating 3- D pictures using four colors.
Tweeking
Once you have the digitized image on the screen, various menus allow you to adjust every facet of picture quality from brightness, contrast and sharpness to color saturation and hue. You can even adjust individual colors as they relate to each other. Once you have your image fine tuned, you can save your picture to disk in the HAM mode or the standard IFF mode, or as raw RGB data for later readjustment. You can also produce very high-quality lores black-and-white IFF pictures with 128 gray levels in only one pass (about 6-8 seconds). If that’s not enough to get you interested, Digi-View has another nice surprise:
It can also digitize in black and white using the Amiga's hi-res (640x400) mode, and without that annoying flicker common to the interlacing!
I found a few drawbacks to the Digi-View system. For acceptable quality, a monochrome camera with a 2:1 interlace is really essential (an RGB broadcast camera is the exception), and this type of video camera is generally hard to Find, being used mostly for security systems. Fortunately, NewTck realized this and sells the cameras also. Because the HAM pictures aren’t in a format that can be read and modified by programs like DeluxePaint or Images, they can’t be altered with them. (However, at least two HAM paint programs will be on the market soon: one from NewTek and another from GeneSys Technologies. As I have only seen a very early pre release from GeneSys, I'll reserve comment for now.) Perhaps my only real complaint is that Digi-View lacks a pass-thru on the parallel port. I’d like at least a switch box; having to unplug the Digi-View in order to use my printer is a pain.
NewTek also sells a motorized filter wheel ($ 49.95) that plugs into the joystick port and cycles the proper filter into place before the next exposure, and a few other accessories like copy stands and lenses.
Conclusion
Considering that the price of Digi-View is only SI99, and black-and-white cameras are available for between SI00 and $ 300, this product is a must for any serious “graphics mechanic.” It’s easy to use and the results are very impressive.
Digi-View
NewTek
701 Jackson, Suite 3B Topeka, KS 66603 913 354-9332 S 199.95
Requires RS-170 monochrome video camera with 2:1 interlace (or RGB broadcast camera). Copy stand recommended
Scribble!
This reviewer hopes that the last word hasn't been written on this word processor.
By Douglas Watt
Although the name suggests a light-weight word processor, Scribble! Is a relatively powerful text editor and text formatter. Scribble! Was developed by Micro-Systems Software and is marketed by Brown-Wagh Publishing. Pending the release of the other announced Amiga word processors (some well-known, others not), it is safe to assume
that Scribble! Is currently the best of the cx-

isting (and admittedly small) group of word processors written for the Amiga. However, the program has some minor problems and a few peculiarities that I hope will be corrected in future rewrites. Fortunately, Scribble! Escapes much of the “icon-psychosis” associated with Textcraft. (Textcraft is so totally taken over by icons that one must assume that the program was written with the most computer-phobic of individuals in mind.) Scribble! Avoids going to those extremes, while offering some icon support for various functions such as cutting, pasting and copying text.
Literary Criticism
Overall, I think that the program reflects a competent effort that certainly deserves further polishing. In terms of its most serious faults, the program has just too little control-key command structure support it relies too heavily on a menu-oriented command structure. It also does not go far enough in establishing a page-oriented screen; it is not totally “page oriented." This means that the program forces the user to live with embedded commands to change
margins or spacing in the middle of a document, instead of the more elegant approach seen in the best word processors, in which each line has a separate buffer in which formatting directives can be placed (seen for example in the better MS-DOS and Mac word processors, and, on CBM operating systems, in Paperback Writer), In other words, with Scribble! What you see is not necessarily what you get.
Mostly Mouse and Menus
Scribble! Supports virtually all of the standard text-editing and text-manipulation operations that one has come to take for granted in even middle-of-the-road word processors, including icon-and-mouse oriented cutting and pasting operations. It is commendable that at least some of the menu-driven operations can be done just by using command keys (such as open Amiga-E for returning to the editing mode from one of the other modes), but I can only wonder why they didn’t provide that type of dual command structure support for all of the various editing processes. It is a chore to have to use the menus all of the time when you want to access cutting. Only editing, pasting and copying can be accessed via keyboard commands (search and replace, along with any cutting of text, forces you to go the “mouse and menu” route). Given the ease with which text can he highlighted in a mouse-supported word processor, it is a shame that the program forces you to first access a menu to change from the “crayon" editing icon to the “cutting" scissors icon before you can do any highlighting it takes away from the speed-of-operation benefits that are potentially conferred on the user by the mouse as a cursor control device.
Screen Formatting
Where the program also stumbles a bit is around the question of screen formatting and the fact that it doesn’t provide a fully page-oriented screen. Text formatting is controlled either via line length commands that can be embedded in the text (printing formatting commands arc preceded by a dot), or via the defaults that control spacing, line length, and other parameters such as justification, top and bottom margin and page offset. Cursor controls are fairly flexible, but there is no provision for moving the cursor a word at a lime or a sentence at a time, and this makes cursor movement at times more cumbersome than it might otherwise be. It would also be preferable to be able to control tlie default characteristics, so that, for example, you wouldn’t have to ?
Gold Disk reveal
Desk Top Publishing for
the Amiga
Welcome to the exciting world of Desk Top Publishing with PageSetter, the page composition and layout program foryour Amiga. With PageSetteryou can mix graphics and text in a variety of styles and fonts to create professional quality reports, forms, newsletters, flyers and more.
Here are some of PageSetter’s features:
An ‘intuitive’ user interface combines ease of operation with complete flexibility of page design. At all times ‘WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET'. Use magnification to zoom in for detailed work or pull back for the full page. Enhance text and graphics with a variety of different borders, shading and shadows.
Articles may be created using the built-in word processor or imported from other programs like TextCraft or Scribble! Similarly use the built-in graphics editor to create graphics or import them from programs such as Deluxe Paint or Aegis Images.
Other features include:
• Point size capabilities to 800 pt.
• Type may be centered, flush left or right and justified.
• Multi page documents with variable page sizes and formats.
• Rules, grids, column and margin indicators.
• Measurements in inches or picas.
• Prints on any printer in Amiga preferences.
Suggested retail price S149.95 US.
Requires Amiga with minimum 512 KB and one drive.
Coming Soon... POSTSCRIPT support for laser printers.
Contact your local dealer or Gold Disk Inc.
Hie
GOLD
DI6K
Manufactured and distributed by: Fabrique et Distribue par: GOLD DISK INC.,
P. O. BOX 789, Streetsville, Ontario L5M 2C2
PageSetter is a registered trademark of Gold Disk Inc. AMIGA is a registered trademark of Commodore Amiga Inc. Scribble' is a registered trademark of Micro-Systems Software Inc Deluxe Paint is a registered trademark ol Electronic Arts. Textcraft is a registered trademark of Commodore Amiga Inc. Aegis Images is a registered trademark of Aegis Development.
Start out with justification if you didn’t want to.
Help Screens
Help screens are available from two different function keys: F2 provides explanations of all of the dot commands that are used in printer and text formatting, and FI lists all of the screen-control and screen-formatting functions that the word processor supports. Again, in this area of on-screen help the program leaves me with the feeling that the program's many nice touches are just not fully carried through and polished, and that the rough edges still need some attention. It would have been much better to have the help screens function as windows that could be shrunken and moved, instead of stuck on one spot on the screen. For example, it would be nice to have the dot command help screen on-screen as a movable window that could be consulted while constructing the default files that control formatting. Instead of these screens being “non-windows” it would make much more sense to use the much faster approach of having the help screen cleared via just hitting the return key instead of the much more cumbersome route taken in Scribble!, in which the
mouse is necessary to move the cursor to

the relatively small Resume box.
File Management
Regarding file management, there are also some things that need some rethinking.
First and foremost is the fact that the software does not provide a means for linking long files together, despite providing multi- ple-text windows that can be opened at any- given time. I don’t think that windowing capability should he seen as an adequate replacement for either a virtual memory approach to long files or at least the ability to link Files together. Since there is only 64K of text per window there are some serious limits on the length of documents that the writer can work on. Given that most users are likely to be working with a 512K Amiga, there is no reason that the software couldn't trade some support of extra windows with the capacity to hold more text. I consider this a real shortcoming, and one that must be addressed in the program’s future updates.
Printer Support
There is also the problem of the lack of printer file support in the program itself; one must go back to Workbench to change printer files. Given that the current editions of Workbench support very few printers, this is potentially a very big liability for the program, despite the fact that Workbench
1. 2 is supposed to support a number of additional printers. Although one can get around this by using the dot commands to send printer control codes, this is really a cumbersome and tiring solution. In fairness to the program, there may he a tendency to neglect this issue in view of the supposed operating system support for printer selection. However, I think that any program that is aiming to be a general-purpose word processor should address the real lack of printer support given by the current editions of the operating system.
Memory Limits
The only other major problem is that if the user starts opening multiple windows they start to exponentially increase the chances of a system crash. This is often a problem on the Amiga in multitasking; as you get closer to the RAM limits of the machine, you run the risk of getting one of those infernal gimi messages, and losing whatever you’ve got in all of the windows if you haven’t saved everything. This is not really a criticism of the word processor, and you can (from CLI) set the error tolerence of the operating system so that it doesn’t do this so frequently, but frequent saving, if one is working within 60K of the RAM limits of the machine, is a caution to be religiously observed. It is also a real pain to have to reboot, even if you have been conscientiously saving as you go along and have not lost the whole works. Speaking of saving, the programmers should be commended for their one kev-prcss saving (hitting F4 saves the current file hack to disk under its original name and erases the old file). Given the speed of the DOS, this means that even fairly long Files are saved and resaved in a few seconds. This feature is something that should he available on all text editors, and it encourages frequent saving, definitely a smart idea. Hopefully, future editions of the operating system will allow the Amiga to be more merciful when it gets dose to its RAM limits, but in the meantime, the one-key press save is a saving grace.
Summary: Good to Better
Overall, I think that Scribble! Is a competent piece of work, hut I am looking forward to a future version, which, I hope, will have some of these problems ironed out. A more page-oriented screen, and the ability to chose whether one works from menus or from control-key sequences could make this good word processor a great one. At this writing, if you want the absolutely best text editing on the Amiga, you are still forced to run it as an MS-DOS machine and pick up something like WordPerfect, but the* progress in this area of support for the machine is encouraging, and a sign that hardware this powerful will soon have the software to match.
[Editor's note: Shortly before press time, we received Scribble! Version 2,0 at the offices of AmigaWorld It has built-in spell checking and mail merging features and, among other additions, expanded keyboard command control. We’ll let Doug comment on the improvements soon.]
Scribble!
Browti-Wagh Publishing
16795 Lark Ave. 210 Los Gatos, CA 95030 408 395-3838 $ 99.95
No special requirements
Instant Music
Two perspectives. The novice’s view from air guitar trainee Bob Ryan; the musician’s view from. Peggy Herrington, who actually owns real instruments and can read music.
By Bob Ryan and Peggy Herrington
The Novice’s View, or “I Ain’t Afraid of No Notes”
I can’t play a musical instrument and I doubt I ever will. Before I learn to read music, I plan to learn to read Gaelic; which means I’ll probably never get around to reading music. In so many words, I'm an average American: I love music, hut who has the time to learn all that stuff?
Computer music programs have always left me cold, mainly because they aren’t written for me. They’re written for musicians and composers and music students people who already know music.
Instant Music is the first music program for musical illiterates. 1 love it. Using Instant Music, I can play an instrument; 1 can compose songs; I can create my own orchestrations and arrangements (even though I’m not sure exactly what those words mean). In other words, I can have fun. In fact, playing with Instant Music is the most fun I’ve ever had with a personal computer.
Expansion
Memory
Without
The Wait
Introducing Alegra: The Amiga Memory Expansion Unit from Access Associates.
TM
512 K now.
Now you can add 512 K bytes of external memory to your Amiga. In the smallest package available, a footprint only 3 V'-wide. And Alegra's no-wait-state design lets your Amiga operate at its intended speed. No delays. With Alegra you get the benefit of fast memory at a surprisingly economical price. AND, BEST OF ALL, ITS AVAILABLE NOW.
Upgradeable to 2 MB later.
If you’ll need 2 MB of memory in the future, Alegra is still the right choice now. Our 2 megabyte upgrade (using 1 megabit DRAMs) will give you the memory you need in the same compact package.
Ask for Alegra at your quality Amiga dealer.
Ft ¦5 ,*
f I V ¦ ’ i | .i 1 • ) : '
r V.-’V % V ¦' '¦r •
.
N
Total system memory is approximately 1 meg with the addition ot our 512 K Alegra (depending on specific hardware configurations).
| ACCESS ASSOCIATES
491 Aldo Avenue
Santa Clara, CA 95054-2303
408-727-8520
Alegra loatuies a 90 day parts and labor warranty against manular.turmg detects "Amiga 15 a Uadpmark ol Commodore Amiga Inc
Circle 54 on Reader Service card.
JGMPDISK:
$ 8.50
JGMPDISK is the monthly Amiga magazine on a DISK.
Every issue has at least 10 ready-to-run programs and 10 articles.
Try one at no risk. If you don't like it. We'll buy it back.*
To get the current issue, send $ 8.50 check or money order to:
JGMPDISK 1493 Mt. View Ave.
Chico. CA 95926
Phone 916-343-7658
hot convinced? Then circle our Reader Service Card number and we'll tell you exactly what’s in the current issue.
+ After six issues of JGMPDISK. Three people have asked and gotten refunds. One thought JGMPDISK was for Ihe Alari ST. Hah!
Circle 188 on Reader Service card.
M LIONHEART
BUSINESS & STATISTICAL SOFTWARE
PC MS-DOS (5V4), MACINTOSH, AM'GA ATARI §J, C64 128, CP M, APPLE DOS 3.3
Explanatory books with professional compiled software; the new standard for statistical use. The influential Seybold Report on Professional Computing has this to say about Lionheart"... our sentimental favorite because of its pragmatic approach to the basic statistical concepts... The thinking is that the computer merely facilitates the calculations; the important thing is to be able to formulate a problem correctly and to determine what type of analysis will be most valuable." Let Lionheart help you get ahead of the competition! Spreadsheet compatable. _
• BUSINESS STATISTICS S145
• EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS ....145
• MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS ......150
• EXPLORATORY DATA ANALYSIS .75
• STATISTICS FOR MARKETING ...150
• QUALITY CONTROL & INDUSTRIAL EXPERIMENTS ....125
• FORECASTING AND TIME-SERIES 145
• SALES AND MARKET FORECASTING.....145
• DECISION ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES......110
• LINEAR & NON-LINEAR PROGRAMMING . 95
• PERT & CRITICAL PATH TECHNIQUES ... 95
• OPTIMIZATION ....110
VISA, MasterCard, AMEX. Check
P. O. Box 379, ALBURG, VT 05440
(514) 933-4918_
Instant Music is easy to use. You load a song, choose one of the four instruments, and pick mousejam mode. As the other three instruments play their parts, you improvise yours with the mouse. Moving the mouse up plays a higher note; moving it down plays a lower note. You can specify single notes or chords. You control the volume and octave of each instrument, and the general tempo of the piece. You can change instruments at will. ( I like to get four electric guitars playing a round such as Row, Row. Row the Boat). If you feel daring, you can even get the program to relax its grip, allowing you the freedom to mess up the tempo.
Snarednm Flute Steel cli'un Har * nil A Calli ope P iyeOi'£?An
ClecBoss I Drumkif
If you want, you can get the computer to play all four instruments. You can also alter the built-in songs to your heart’s desire. I’m sure that any two-bit note editor is a better composition tool than Instant Music, but I don’t care, I just want to play Baba O’Reilly.. .“Out here in the fields. ..”).
The Musician’s View, or “While my Mouse Gently Squeaks”
Instant Music is a lot of fun and is just about as instantly musical as you can get, because there’s so much music theory disguised by that flashy, color-coded display. Close scrutiny will help you spell chords and become familiar with progressions and harmonic relationships. And becoming a mouse virtuoso without relying on guides to stay within the rhythm and tonal center of the other voices will require some practice. There’s little doubt in my mind that Instant Music is intended for performance rather than composition. It's very flexible rhythmically, but I got frustrated transcribing sheet music into it, not because it doesn’t use standard notation (which it doesn't), but because it won’t sustain anything beyond one measure. Sustaining instruments are there Strings, SynGuitar, DoVoice (oh! That DoVoice!) And Pipe- Organ but it restarts all attacks at the beginning of every measure. This lends a
textural sameness to the music that effectively eliminates slower, legato pieces.
But don’t underestimate it. With a range of A'l octaves (which, I suspect, accommodates 90% of all music ever written) and 43 song files plus 22 rock and jazz progressions that really are fun to play along with, how can you go wrong? Most anything can be altered during play and voices are digitized samples of real acoustic instruments. Twenty voices arc provided and arrangements are made by any four sounding at once. They are instantly recognizable if you keep each in its proper register (don’t play Sax too high or Piano too tow) and put the sound through a home stereo system. Particularly good are percussive sounds (Vibes and Marimba) and the DrumKii which contains five drums implemented by octave number (from one to five): bass, tom, snare, high hat and woodblock. Only one drum can play at a time (unless you load the DrumKit into more than one channel) but you can switch between them at speeds your ears simply won’t believe.
One feature builds two- or three-part chords down from the tonic in the first inversion, which seems clumsy to me. A cou- pie of other nits I have to pick are that both sample and song IFF standards lack standardization, you must use RELABEL not RENAME to change the name on your backup disk; and good luck booting from a backup disk.
Instant Music is the first program I've seen for any computer that lets you make really good music with no training whatsoever. And believe me, if Bob Ryan can do it, you can, too!
Instant Music Electronic Arts 1420 Gateway Drive San Mateo, CA 94404 415 571-7171 $ 49.95
Requires Amiga monitor or other amplified audio
DeluxePrint
This reviewer isn’t sure that DeluxePrint will make a very good impression.
By Abigail Reifsnyder
First impressions can be deceiving. That’s why no matter what I think of a program
Giztnoz
Productivity Set
- rM
Begin using the full power of your multi-tasking Amiga with 15 GIZMOZT“ desktop ac£e**°t'about the ld one (or more) of the GIZMOZ™ and begin using it, when done just close the w‘nc oW'Afi G|7MOZT“ function methods of using computers and start using the added power of your new machine. AH with the Intuition workbench and with the Command Line Interpreter (CLI).
4 Black Book
1. Calendar
2. Rolodex
3. Memo Pad
rlAMUARY
r

.....
naewvo
x suor roepad raf W »ou jrimwl rows a7 i a s-ngif notebook. Memo P*Js Use i W teat ed text wt* tn *»>•» to edit wy ten fa*
Powerful muto-year ca’endat package Includes reminder system to inform you ol everts on each day Something no one car be without
A powerful fcee format rrjei system fot your phcre rjmbers. Addesses or anything1 includes autodial leave lot ary modem
_ ¦. % Vf 1 1 A
15 for only
* 4995
and a ,n PC ann ur Amiga, and bahpMeen an IBM
" «» SA 2g*ttfMhSffi ‘SSS *“
* so included is a , lhese P°Pu,ar „rf»
aZ %T- erm ™ tpmesa> emu,a‘™ t****
comm? Eo 925 lncloding VT52 VT100. ADM 3A,
a "toyo°u?*'!lre ” °,lice y0U CfLo
record your 'rarne computer system. Using
5. Calculator Set
A set d 3 calculators Soertfc, F rarcial. And Programmer
6. Hot Key
7. Free List Display
8. Cuckoo Alarm Clock
Add a highly yiimaad dd word doc* to you desrtoo Who sa o docks rad to De bonng7
A dean graphic display d what tasxs are in memory and how much memory toey are using. Lets you selectively change priority ol tasks so you can better control your muta-teskirg environment
9. Terminal Package
Advanced terminal emutabor accessory Supports all ma;or tern ral types irc-udmg VT52. VtlM. AOM 3A. And Tetendeo 925 log He leave 'ets you save your session m a We tor later review
11. Graph Package
An easy to use graphics package that enables you to make charts and graphs on your Am.ga Create p e. bar and exploding charts Ircm the rainbow ol colors on your Amiga
E
a ‘og tile.
DIGITAL UNK emire
?elP°hi 0Ur%tpula°syZms Zorlp01 telecommunications
Astern alk on your favnrJ c°mpuserve, MCI Mail.
Ite computer Bulletin Board
12. PopUp Cards
Handy telerence cards that will pcp-up over the workbench Includes A Base and ArsgaDos telerence cards and mote Too can also make yout own1
Wi Pa up 'format,
36. 91, a‘e fro
ion at
DIGITAL LINK only;
$ 69.95
any
bin9k baud TtT ?00 o rJn*rv Transfer raw
CS Usir 13,
? Un,cat,r? Several com.
XrHa'n9 Xm Plot0colsin-
MacB,narSaper Tcludes Programs for N KOfF. Cblnary and Amiga. Mac. And IBM PC.
?ib'es°nty SI9.9S each. Specilv Amiga-Mac. Amiga-PC. Or Mat pp J
Cable required.
Accessory to en crypt ana decrypt your data. Frcttct irformabon ard msue Tat your data remans secure Simple, easy and powerful'
15. Data Compressor
Thts accessory w.ll compress and decompress your data lies Very tandy when transnitfcng fres trom cne computer to archer
pi qilAL
.V
J344-4825) 95825
Sacramer,t0’ ,e,tified checks.
And A fully insured
money °r pPs 9r° Bfge.
Terms: We accept Mastercard. Visa*'jf’ ers sNPP£ Handling rommodore- California residents add 6% sales tax. All p add *' mark °f nfporation.
Unless otherwise specified. Visa MC . _; ia trs®. , h oe
iiii! Digital
to order call: (916) 1333 Howe Ave., Suite 208
¦ iiBi
ilia
mi____
as creations
- «¦ t".
Coo.
Me. Amiga;- aCi Macintosh trademark of Apple ComPut jjonai Amiga. Inc. IBM PC trademark of *nter *,nyite *-
Dealer inquir,e
AMIGA OUTLET
3V Disks (DS.DD)
10 S 19 95 10 S 17 95 Of 25 S42.25 S11.95
3'y Disks (DS.DD) Plain Label Brand ay Disk flip lop file Holds AO disks
CLASSIC IMAGE, INC.- PRESENTS DIABLO - Graphic mind challenge game S29.95
DISK LIBRARY - Now you can File, Catalog, Update Search, Cross Reference, Report S49.95
DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED
Amiga® System Covers - W mouse LOGO F2T795
Amiga© Disk Cover - 1010 or 1020 with LOGO S7.99
Paper T F-F F White, 9 x 11, 201b. 1Q00 S22.95
Paper T F-F F y" Greenbar,9* x 11,181b 1000 S17.99
Index Cards - T F-F F, 3x5 500 S7.95
Rolodex Cards - T F-F F, 21 6x4 500 S8.95
Labels - T F-F F. Address 1000 S5.95
S&H-S2.50 US S&H-54.50 CN Visa US 5's only Master
H. W. RUTH CO., AMWA5 510 Rhode Island Ave. Cherry Hill, NJ 08002
(609) 667-2526
We stock what we sell, for fast delivery.
Send for FREE CATALOG * AT 1 available AMIGA items AUG 6800 members - Just give us your membership number and deduct 10% off of all purchases.
ATTENTION PROGRAMMERS - Let us take over the headaches of publishing your software. We are looking for all items related to the "AMIGA®".
AMIGA© is a registered tracenark of Comedo re-Amiga, Ire.
AUG
AMIGA USERS' GROUP 68000
Join the 1 argest users' group dedicated to the Amiga. You will receive our official newsletter. Evaluations on software and hardware, Advanced updatings, technical information, Problem-solving, program exchange (over 5G disks in our PD library), Buying discount service, etc. Send S18.00 US for Membership to:
AMIGA USERS' GROUP 68000 Box 3761 - Attn: Jay Forman Cherry Hill, NJ 08034
(609) 667-2526 * Visa Master - Add SI.00
Circle 48 on Reader Service card.
A high performance programming environment designed specifically for the Amiga™
Multi ¦ Forth™ for the Amiga
Multi-Forth is a nev. Language which was designed to unleash the lull power of the Amiga, Multi- Forth provides complete access to all Amiga libraries including Intuition. It compiles standalone applications in seconds (other languages topically take several minutes). There are no royalties and no "levels." CSI provides the best support of any computer language vendor, including CSI technical hoi line, our own CompuServe net (GO FORTH i. and comprehensive documentation. Programming the Amiga is interactive and fun with Multi-Forth. Contact us fora technical data sheet with the complete list of Multi-Forth’s features.
. : Solution
4701 Randolph Road, Suite 12 1-800-FORTHOK Rockville, MD 20852 in MD (301) 08-1-0262
MulnTnfth i« a ir,wlvrij«» "f i r- aluc 'w«lui|.«nx |m
rs-.tiJ IN j CrailflTMfh
.f C.iinfni"!' Lie1 itUiid, In.
During my first session with it and no matter how long that first session is 1 always sit down with a program at least a second time. I gave DeluxePrint three shots. My first impression: DeluxePrint is limited and buggy (it kept crashing on me). My second impression: Same as the first (only at this point 1 was getting annoyed). Third and final impression: DeluxePrint is a deluxe pain in the neck.
Inking Up
But enough of impressions. Let's get to the facts. DeluxePrint requires 512K and Kick- start 1,1. It uses the “key" copy protection system, so you can make a working copy but must insert the original in the drive briefly to get started. (Before you open the program, you must set your printer options in Preferences.)
The initial screen gives you the format options: Sign, Label, Banner, Letterhead, Greeting Card, Calendar and Four-tile sign. When you choose one, you arc shown the appropriate workslate and a new set of options. Before you do anything, you will want to set the "Paths,” that is, where the program will look for and save information. T he initial settings have the program looking only to the internal drive (DFO:), so if you want to save things to a data disk in an external drive, you will want to change some of the options to DFL. DeluxePrint calls the four drive-dependent items “formal" (signs, labels and so on), “groups” (the pictures you use to create signs, labels and so on), “import” (pictures you want to bring from another program) and "export” (pictures you want to send to another program). This is about the most important part of the program and the source of many of my problems with it. If you make a mistake by requesting something that isn’t on the disk you specify here, more times than not, the program will simply hang in never-never land. But more on this later.
Artist’s Proof
Once you choose a format, let’s say Sign, you can very easily create your picture. There are three areas of a format: image, border and text. If you choose Image, you are shown the next menu of options. Before you can do anything else, you will have to select an image. A number of groups of images are included in the program as well as on the art disk that comes with the package. (If you want to look at the pictures on the art disk and that disk is in the external drive, you must be sure to set the "groups" path to DF1:.) When you select a group, a page of images is shown. If you select one, it is automatically placed on a clipboard and you are returned to the workslate. You can then place it anywhere on the workslate. If you are going to use more than one image, though, it’s much more efficient to go right back to select and keep selecting images to your clipboard. That way you can avoid scrolling through all the groups while you’re actually creating your sign (or whatever). All you have to do is choose Clipboard and select an image from there.
Once you have placed an image on the workslate, you can manipulate it in a number of different ways. You can move ii, copy it, flip it (in four directions), remove it, change its size (double or half) and change its color (using the palette of 16 colors).
HAPPY UTKTJI MY Juil£ '
Border Text
Pattern
Edit
Group
CLEAR
PRINT
PALETTE
You can also edit the image by either adding or erasing lines (using the background color). You cannot make an image more than one color, however; if your ice cream cone is red, for instance, it’s all red. If you want to make the ice cream a different color than the cone itself, you’re out of luck. (At least within the program. You can, however, export the cone to a drawing program, make the changes you want, and then import it back into DeluxePrint.)
When you select Border, the next image you choose will be made into a border automatically, whether it was originally intended to lie a border or not. Very simple.
Text offers more options. A one-line box at the bottom of the workslate appears into which you type whatever text you want. Several fonts are available and samples are displayed to the left of the selector box on that font. When you have placed the text, you can manipulate it in ways similar to an image.
Making An Impression
To print the sign, you simply select Print. You are then asked if you want to print “automatic,” “semi-auto” or “custom." Automatic, obviously, prints according to a standard format. Semi-auto lets you change the dimensions proportionally. Custom lets you make the sign any size you want. You cannot stop printing once it has begun (with- ?
Circle 60 on Reader Service card. 84 Ja n mry Febma ry 1987
TM
The D*Buddy set is powerful, affordable and useful." Use each Buddy separately or with another too! Or program. 512 K memory required. Can be used with hard disk or expanded L memory. NO COPY, PROTECTION.
* p>uzmei
X jBuddi
ORE ATI VIT
*
'Instantly ” %ra&" screen and
place tt in a* IFF fa fa ude you* *Paint pnc fteuft &i dend fa a
printer fa a "Aard c&py ¦ ‘Print qcur pictured cheated cvitA “paint p'iocf'ia+K*i quicAlq, *2UAen you tv&uld tiAe fa print a picture. Delect it and iet cfcur Print*?t 6uddcf dc the jo6. ((loutd you fa print one picture utAile you tvorA an another.
CfBudd
aau
CREATIVITY
Name . Address
¦
!
Ad*
- L -
&
¦S0
@ $ 79.95 ea
'rtyandif mini-paint accedd&uf fa uic&iy faucA cep a painting or draaunj. (?o*uAine dnacuinc d
faqetAe*t. And cede tAe Aandy
yfiapAic fade fa ncaAe cAum ed.
VoucA 'Zifef
Slouuep any IFF compatible picture fa pester dije
dimendfand. ‘yPoUt 6i J 7
'Tfou can dpecyfy diyc £na*H one paye fa tyiant podterd
8 fat wide *
'
a&tesi'TTttifaif
Payment:
? VISA ? MC ? COD ] Check _
Card Expiration Date Card * I I I L_
D*Buddy
CREATIVITY SET
Zip Code Country . Phone _
_ Money Order
City . State
Sude Sao-a
(d*cote Uidc-iA*6&4 cjaui picture-*
pyt jb't£4c«faCto*i‘i. 7(jc Jpccioi e ccte £ yi diJtdvcJ and 4Ctcch utipc4, pou4€4 and lepcctteHy 4c u€hcc4.
Scid4on&
dlip itxiXyt'J ep atttf jtjf pam a*ttf jcxec* a*tei j am (A cm itt (Ac dm tan @lip6oa%d ax (a a« IFF pte.
Scrap S> yai
OiaaHtjc 4m tan (?tip6oard and IFF pfad inta a texapAaaA £ax cojc
d U4C.
@ol yi TitatcA
t-iC (Ate Ouddtf fo met At’ (Ac catax4 d o«c imaqc mate A (Ac caiaxc a ciha(Acx imayc. “Zi cpd coAcn mcxyinp imaycJ i*t(a one picture.
Floy Ttfaccde,
use epucx payJteeA (tie a mau4c. £(i*MtH tte4 (Ac need (a dear ycwT dcdA ( * mou-ie moCi&H.
€Uttt
* 7Hue&
Quantity
Total
Tax
Handling
Shipping
TOTAL
Add 4% handling fee on Visa, MC, COD orders.
California residents add 6% sales tax.
Outside U.SA. add $ 20.00 shipping charge. All orders must be paid in US dollars.
Call:
(916) DIG-ITAL
!¦¦¦¦¦¦¦
IIIIIIBH
!!!¦¦¦¦¦
IIIHIII
Digital Creations
1333 HOWE AVENUE SUITE 208 SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 95825
Amiga trademark of Commodore-Amiga, Inc.
out rebooting the program, that is).
All of this sounds very straightforward, right? So what's my gripe? My first problem began with saving though I didn’t realize it at the time. I saved several things a greeting card, a sign and a calendar so I could print them all at the end. (The Oki- mate 20 I was using is painfully slow, so 1 wanted to be free to go off and do something else while my creations were printing.) Everything appeared to be going well when I saved them, but when I went back to load them, I was informed that my tlisk was unreadable. I was unable to trace the problem since nowhere along the line was I given any hint of a problem. But so what, right?
Fhe second time around, the program saved the workslate but not the images in the workslate. The third time, I finally had success. I’m not going to pretend I know what the problem was, because I don’t. (For what it’s worth, I had someone looking over my shoulder and he couldn’t figure it out either.)
Out of Register
The strength of a printing program such as this should lie in its ability to import images you create in a sophisticated graphics program. In fact, that is one of the selling
points of DeluxePrint its compatibility with DeluxePaint. So I pulled out my disk with pictures I’d drawn with DeluxePaint. Every time I tried to pull in a picture, the program crashed. This was for a very simple reason: All my pictures were in low resolution and DeluxePrint was looking for medium-resolution pictures. In other words, 1 had to create new pictures. Undaunted. I rebooted the system with DeluxePaint in
i
the internal drive and made mv medium-res

picture. In order to import it to DeluxePrint, though, I had to save the picture as a brush and not just any brush, a particular size brush (either 88 X 52 pixels or 264 x 156 pixels). Then, once the image has been successfully imported to the program, it cannot be manipulated. You can move it on the workslate, but you can’t change its size or color. And you can’t edit it. Let’s just say I’ve used more flexible programs in my life.
This led me to wonder about Electronic Arts’ claim that DeluxePrint is IFF compatible, so 1 pulled out mv Aegis Images disk.
In order to import a picture from this program. I had to leave the drawer name blank (under Import in the path menu). And sure enough, it imported the picture I requested. Of course, in order to import it, it cut out half the colors (to use only the first 16 of the palette) and squished it to fit in the workslate. As it turned out, 1 could import any picture from DeluxePaint as well if I didn't mind half the colors disappearing and the picture being distorted. Call me picky, but for $ 99 and claimed IFF compatibility, I want a little more flexibility. I also don't want to have to spend half my time guessing what drawer name will be acceptable.
The Cleanup
I understand that printing programs are very popular Broderbund’s Print Shop proves it. But the whole time 1 was using DeluxePrint, I kept wondering what it was offering me that I couldn’t do more easily and with more flexibility with DeluxePaint or Aegis Images (the two paint programs I have). The answer is brief: DeluxePrint puts the four panels of a greeting card in the right places so that when you fold the paper, it all comes out right. That’s the advantage. Beyond that, I'm still wondering.
DeluxePrint
Electronic Arts
1820 Gateway Drive San Mateo, CA 94404 415 571-7171 $ 99.95
Requires 5I2K, printer ?
Simply the BEST Database & Mail Merge for the AMIGA
Use Omega File for:
Invoicing • Check register • Mailing labels Recipes • Check writing • Forms - Tables Letters • Any type of mail merge application
* Speed
• 4 Part Harmony Music
* Animation
• Single or 2 Player Modes
Pull down menus, 200 characters per Held, 256 fields
per record, 5000 characters per record and up to 32000
indexed records per data base, multiple searches, plus many more
Thousands already in use $ 79"
• State Location
• State Capitals, Bird, Tree
and Flower
• State Abbreviation and
State Nickname
• Spelling of All Above.
NOW SHIPPING S 39"
? 55 North Mam Street
¦ ¦ Suite 301 -?
PO Box H
Logan Utah 0*3 331 Ask for a free catalog
Professional Software Series
See your dealer or Call
[SOD 753-7620 (BOO] 942-9402
KEEP-Trak General Ledger 5129.99
Accounts Receivable S 79.99*
Accounts Payable S 79.99’
Payroll S 79.99*
AMT - Amortization Cost Forecasting S39.99 ‘Available soon
Captain’s War Date
"Captain’s Log, October 1,1944.0250 Hours. Fleet submarine USS Hammerhead proceeding Southwest at cruising speed. Our mission: intercept enemy convoy off the coast of Borneo. Disperse and destroy.” _
Alan S20ST scfoons shown
immr
«II!4
"0300 Hours. Two hours until dawn. Radar picks up convoy, escorted by two destroyers. We believe that one of the enemy's valuable oil tankers is part of convoy formation." "0400 Hours. Lookouts on the bridge.
Target identification party reports one tanker, 6,000 tons, troopship of 10.250 tons, with two Ko ib ok an- type escorts. Moving into attack position.” "0500 Hours. Sound General Quarters!
Battle stations manned. Preparing for torpedo run. Gauge Panel OK. Periscope OK. Charts and Attack Pjot Board OK. All mechanical systems OK."
To tftl L»rt3««>
"0525 Hours. Torpedo rooms report lull tubes forward and aft. Battery at full charge for silent running. We hope water temperature will provide thermal barrier to confuse enemy sonar.”
"0600 Hours. We are a! Final attack position. Convoy moving at 10 knots. Target distance decreasing rapidly... Crash Dive! Escorts have spotted us and are turning to attack! Rig to run silent." » “0700 Hours. Deplh charged for one hour. Some minor damage, but repair parties at work. Destroyer propeller noises receding. Well come to periscope depth for our refurn punch."
"0715 Hours. Torpedo tubes 1.2.3 lired.
Two destroyers hil and sinking. One of the enemy's last tankers coming into 'scope view an ideal target position. On my mark Fire Tube 4! Fire 5!"
"Superb” raves Scott May in On en ciiT tine, “strategic
? Intensity and heart-
pounding action
f . have rarely been
|j merged this suo
I I cessfully." Analog
calls if flatly “the best submarine simulation so far," Compute comments "Silent Service's detail is astonishing." Join the more than 150,000 computer skippers who have volunteered for Silent Service, the naval action tactics simulation from MicroProse.
120 Lakefrant Drive • Hunl Valley. MD 21030 • 3011667-1151
Circle J9B on Reader Service card
Silent Service is available for Commodore 64' 128’ft Amiga”'. Apple II family, Atari XL XE. Atari ST, IBM PC PC Jr. And Tandy 1000. At a suggested retail price ol $ 34.95 (Atari ST and Amiga. S39.95).
Commodore, Amiga, Apple, Atari. IBM. And Tandy are registered trademarks of Commodore Elec* Ironies. Ltd.. Commodore-Amiga Inc., Apple Computer, Inc., InternationalBusinessMcchines Corp., and Tandy Corp.. respectively.
Available from your local retailer. If out-of-stock, contact MicroProse direcfty for further information on our lull range of simulation software, and to place Mastercard Visa orders.
GREAT AMIGA™ SOFTWARE AT LOW PRICES!
Samples from our public domain
library of over 60 disks for I he
Amiga. See below for free catalogue.
Carries
006,007: Mandelbrot pack. The 3 best versions of manddbrot generators plus excellent sample pics.
008: Assorted Games 1: Conquest. Blackjack, etc.
Ikmos
009: Graphics I: best graphic demos (Kobo. Fields, kinetic halls. Route. Fish, Molly, Colorful, Sparks, many more.) Oil: Sounds I: best sound demos (beeps, scales, Spock, Hal, StarWars, Twilight Zone, Spccchtoy, TalkDcmos, etc.)
01. 1: Interactive Graphics I: PolyDraw, Moire. D.uvle, etc. Utilities
1) 17: All purpose editor. Microemacs.
018: General user utilities: clocks, memory meters, file compressors, quickcopy. Scrcendump. Many more.
019: Unix type commands and utilities.
Telecommunications
021. 022: All the best terminal emulators (Kemiu, Amigatcrm, etc.) All you need to get on line!
Programming languages 025: MVP-Forth. + Forth utilities.
Pictures
033: II&M Images: Examples of Hold & Modify mode images.
All disks only $ 9 each.
API) Connection Catalogue
Your key to dozens of Amiga software bargains FREE!
To receive FREE Catalogue send us your name and mailing address, or circle indicated Reader Service Card number.
Any 4 disks plus catalogue $ 34.95
Add 5-1 postage and handling per diO. Order (SIO fnrngn) California rcinfcnls add state laies m.
All disks are double sided and filled to capacity nr near capacin Most programs are documented and'or icon driven
Some programs are user supportedt and request donations from satisfied sin nugs--i‘
' mjme may contain bugs-this is the nature of public domain. Send check or money order to:
Lamiga Tublic (Domain Connection
Box 117; 1400 Shattuck Avenue Berkeley, Ca 94709 _Telephone: (415) 644-3167_
Mean 18 and Leader Board
From bogeys to birdies: A comparative review of two golf simulations.
If you are a golf buff or just like to play a good computer game every now and then, you should seriously consider purchasing either Mean 18 from Accolade Software or Leader Board from Access Software. Both games are basically the same. They are golfing simulations where you control the players as they work through the various hazards, greens, putts, roughs, satisfactions and frustrations of a real game of golf.
The two games vary only slightly and each has its good points and bad. Both games allow up to four players at a time (the only way to play against the computer is to play against par). You use the mouse to control everything from club selection to aiming your swing (each game uses a slightly different system for controlling the club swing, but both systems are easy to learn, difficult to master). Both versions have the usual hazards and features you would expect to find on a real golf course, such as sand traps, water hazards, trees, roughs, fairways, greens, etc. They each feature realistic perspective graphics and four different courses.
Circle 170 on Reader Service card
Leader Board
Leader Board has better, more realistic graphics. The screen layout is much cleaner. It is also quicker to learn and easier to master. There are three levels of difficulty: Novice (ball is not affected by wind and will not hook or slice), Amateur (ball is not affected by wind but player must control hook and slice), and Professional (where player must adjust for wind, hook and slice). On all levels the player must decide which club to use. Each player can play at a different difficulty level for handicapping purposes. Playing with more than one person is a lot of fun, but you should pay attention to who is up because it is easy to play someone el- ses turn. Stroke power, hook and slice are determined by a small gauge (about 2 inches high on an Amiga monitor) which may be too small for fine adjustments of strokes. You aim your shots by dragging a cross above the player, so the view doesn’t change, just the aim.
Once on the green the steepness of slope is displayed rather crudely and while the perspective (as if you were standing right
Leader Board from Access
behind the player) is nice, it is hard to get a “feel" for the green. The greens on all the holes seem identical and it is simply a matter of getting to know how much power for the distance and how much aim for the slope. If you master those two things putting is no longer a challenge on any green. Two other points: The Leader Board disk is not copy protected but you must have the hardware key that comes with the game plugged into the rear mouse port (Mean 18 uses standard copy protection). This protection scheme has it’s pluses and minuses.
You can make lots of copies of the program for backup purposes, but it is also easy to misplace the key.
Mean 18
Mean 18 has elements that make it a better game, though the graphics are not as nice.
It has no adjustment for wind, and the sound sometimes is more distracting than enhancing (crowd cheers sound more like airforce jets taking off and the ball makes a dull thud when it bounces). It has three different forms of scoring (stroke, match and best ball), two difficulty levels (beginner, where the best club is suggested and you always have perfect aim, and experienced, where everything is up to you), a practice tee, green and hole (where Leader Board only lets you practice tee shots). The four courses, rather than generic as in Leader Board, are St. Andrews, Augusta, Pebble Beach and Bush Hill. You can create your own courses or modify the four with a program called Course Architect, ensuring that Mean 18 will never be mastered.
With the architect, you can modify everything down to the trees and skyline as well as the fairways, greens, hazards, etc. Creating new courses is very easy and can be a challenge, or it can be a lot of fun (by redesigning the trees and skyline I played on one of the first other-worldly courses).
Other features also make Mean 18 a bet-
Mean 18 from Accolade
ter game. When the ball hits the ground it takes a slightly random bounce. This ensures that you will never be able to play the same hole exactly the same way twice (with Leader Board it is possible to memorize holes, aim, and power settings to play a hole almost exactly the same way each time. Wind direction and strength are the only altering factors.) Mean 18 features an overhead view of the putting green that includes graphic representations (direction arrows) of multi-level slopes and pitches making each green unique, and much harder to master. The aiming system varies from Leader Board significantly. On the green in Mean 18, your aim is controlled by moving a line that extends from the head of the putter out. (This could have been much nicer if you could drag the line itself rather than adjust it’s direction by multiple clicks on “up and down” arrows.) Off the green, you can scroll the view in front of the player 180 degrees. Mean 18’s overhead view adds the feature of showing where your first shot went, then the second shot, etc. Finally, Mean 18 is closer to reality in it’s scoring. (Put the ball in the water and you can choose to reshoot with penalty strokes added or pick a “line of sight” drop. With Leader Board you just lose the stroke and must shoot again.)
The Nineteenth Hole
Conclusions? Leader Board has better graphics and sound. It is a “cleaner” game.
It is challenging and entertaining while being easy to learn. This would be a good choice for parties and kids. It is definitely one of the better games available for the Amiga and will provide a lot of fun for a wide range of people. It could have a bit more variety and complexity, could save top scores (Mean 18 saves top scores on disk), could provide a little more differentiation when playing with more than one person, and the power gauge could be bigger.
Mean 18, while not as graphically sophisticated, is harder to master, has infinite variety by letting you design your own courses, has more elements of chance mixed with skill, and is more true-to-life in play, scoring and variation on the greens. It does have faults: the sounds are poor and it would be nice to be able to drag the direction bar directly (during putts) rather than clicking on arrows at the bottom of the screen. The power gauge is big enough but inaccurate when putting, and because of the power, hook and slice system used by the program, it is almost impossible to click the mouse buttons fast enough to avoid slicing the ball during a short chip shot onto the green. (Chip shots should get easier the shorter the distance, not harder).
I suggest Mean 18 if you are serious about your golf or computer gaming, and Leader Board if you prefer nicer graphics and all around family entertainment.
Am iga World
Mean 18
Accolade
20833 Stevens Creek Blvd.
Cupertino, CA 95014
408 446-5757
$ 44.95
Requires 512K ?
YES, please rush my order right away!
FASTER THAN CLI! MORE POWERFUL THAN WORKBENCH! ABLE TO LEAP TALL TASKS IN A SINGLE CLICK!
I »**
Name
Street
Apt, o
City
State
Zip
1 )
MERIDIAN SOFTWARE
MC.
P. O. Box 890408 Houston, TX 77289-0406
Telephone
? Enclosed is my check or money order for $ __
(Make Check payable to Meridian Software, Inc.)
? Please charge my MSA or Master Charge (circle one!
Signal ure
ZING! Is a utility software package that gives YOU the power to access your AMIGA! You no Longer have to resort to typing cryptic commands through CLI. ZING! Uses Intuition which provides you with easy window, icon, menu and mouse controlled features.
Start flying through your system while copying, editing, deleting, renaming, sorting, searching and organizing files and programs. You can save screens to standard IFF files or the printer, monitor and control running tasks, and interface with other software applications.
TM Of course. ZING! Has many k other powers including a J print spooler and a built in J screen saver.
ZING! Offers these and hundreds of other capabilities without preventing you from running other applications simultaneously. ZING! Uses Intuition the wav it should be used!
Order ZING! And transform your mild mannered CLI into the fastest and most powerful computer interface ever conceived! It’s available now for the special introductory price of
S79.95 pius S3.00
for shipping and handling.
1
Date Expires
ITEM
PRICE
QTY.
TOTAL
ZING!
$ 79.95 eo
GAMES GALLERY 1
$ 29 95 ea
GAMES GALLERY II
$ 29 95 ea|
GAMES GALLERY III
$ 29.95 eaJ
Subfotal
Shipping Handling
$ 3.00
TOTAL AMOUNT DUE
GAMES GALLERY I, n, & m 15 Classic Games per Disk $ 29.95 each
ORDER
TODAY!
(713) 488-2144
Credit cards and dealer inquiries welcome.
AMIGA is a registered trademark of Commodore-AMIGA, Inc. WorkBench and Intuition are trademarks of Commodore-Amiga, Inc. ZING! Is a trademark of Meridian Software, Inc.
1 AMIGA DEALER
‘495
AMIGA
COLOR MONITOR
SPECIALIST IN
HOME AND BUSINESS COMPUTERS
612-938-3161
821 Mam Street, Hopkins. MN
Hors d’oeuvres
Unique applications, tips and stuff
You may be using your Amiga at work, at home, or in the back seat of your car, but somehow you'll be using it in a unique way. You will discover things that will let you do something faster, easier or more elegantly.
AmigaWorld would like to share those shortcuts, ideas, things to avoid, things to try, etc.. with everyone. And we'll reward you with a colorful, appetizing. Official AmigaWorld T-shirt (Just remember to tell us your size.)
Send it in, no matter how outrageous, clever, humorous or bizarre. We will read anything, but we won't return it, so keep a copy for yourself. In cases of duplication. T-shirts are awarded on a first come, first serve basis.
So. Put on your thinking berets and rush those suggestions to
Hors d’oeuvres AmigaWorld editorial 80 Elm Street Peterborough, NH 03458
Leader Board Access Software Inc.
A 2561 South 1560 West Woods Cross, UT 84087 801 298-9077
339. 95
Requires 512K
InfoMinder
InfoMinder is an information management system, and a conceptually important Amiga software package.
By Louis R. Wallace
InfoMinder, from Byte by Byte, allows you to create organized unions of text and graphics that can be efficiently retrieved and displayed. These text files can be created by you, or you can use and modify existing text documentation files as long as they are in an ASCII format, InfoMinder documents can also contain IFF graphics in the form of DeluxePaint brushes or Images windows. These IFF brushes can be inserted into the body of the text as illustrations. This is a feature many of us have wished for in a text editor, so finding it in an information processor is a pleasant surprise. The InfoMinder package also offers the programmer the ability to use its file system within programs as on-line documentation. (In this case, InfoMinder will have to be present as a background task, however).
Information Control
You control InfoMinder by using the mouse to interact with the InfoMinder menu interface. This interface is similar to the standard Intuition user interface found on many Amiga programs, but here the menu bar headings contain titles of the various topics InfoMinder finds on the current disk. Using the mouse, you can select a subject of interest, causing an index to be quickly loaded into memory. The index contains the names of the major sections found in the chosen topic. These section headings can also have indexes of subheadings, and those sub-subheadings, and so on. Once you have selected the area of the document you want, you can begin browsing through the text. At any time you can jump forward or backwards a page, or perhaps go on to a separate section (or a different document). And at any time you can place a “bookmark" to hold your place till the next time you get a chance to return to your reading. You can even have the Amiga read to you if you wish!
While InfoMinder can be used with any .ASCII text file, it is most useful with text files that have been created using Imaker, the text compiler. This program can be used to generate a document that uses the InfoMinder format, and allows you to manipulate the text color, font, size, position, spacing and a variety of other characteristics. You do this by embedding special commands into the document, which can take some time depending on the size of the document and the complexity of the display you are creating. It is here that the organization of your document is decided. Imaker has no idea of how the document should be arranged, so it is up to you to decide what and where the section headings will be in your file. You will need to have a firm idea of how the file should he organized in order to get a useful InfoMinder document.
By using Imaker you can make Info- Minder-style documents out of existing text files. For example, a friend made an InfoMinder version of the MicroEmacs (a text editor) documentation file. He gave me a copy, so I can now7 enjoy the fruits of his labor. And in fact, Byte by Byte expects a large number of InfoMinder files to be available in the public domain. Currently I have several others, including a restaurant guide for San Francisco, Amiga ROM kernel C include files, some IFF pictures and of course the InfoMinder documendon. As time goes on there will be many useful datafiles for InfoMinder users.
The main idea behind InfoMinder is to allow the Amiga user to organize his or her data into a usable and logical format. Since the Amiga has well-defined standard data types (IFF), InfoMinder was written to take advantage of these data standards. Future revisions of the program are already being planned, and they will allow the inclusion of full screen IFF graphics (not merely brushes), IFF sound files, and even CD-ROM interfaces.
All in all, I like InfoMinder. It is a relatively fresh idea, is w'ell thought out, and has the potential to add greatly to the Amiga user’s capability.
InfoMinder Byte by Byte
3736 Bee Cave Road, Suite 3 Austin, TX 78746 415 964-1860
S89.95
No special requirements
Little Computer People Discovery Kit
“Yes, Timmy, the truth is there really are little guys who live inside computers
By Bill Jacob
Long have I pondered the cause of all my computer-related misfortunes. Like when I couldn’t save a long Basic program that 1 just typed in, merely because I loaded an itsy-bitsy machine language routine over a portion of the disk operating system. And like the time when my keyboard produced regular characters when 1 held down the control key and control characters when I didn’t. I have suspected that something not exactly straight-forward has been going on in there.
“So Who Invited You?”
When I found out that Little Computer People (LCPs for short) live inside computers and have been the cause of all my misfortunes, I became malicious. After discovering that Activision had designed a home for them in my monitor (sort of an
electronic dollhouse) and even invented some commands so that I could communicate with them, I quickly tried pressing CTRL-R in hopes of placing the little guy on a rack in his basement. Instead, a record was delivered to his front door and he picked it up, waddled up the stairs, popped it on the stereo and smiled in appreciation. Still determined, I tried CTRL C, hoping that I could maybe confine the stubby fellow in a cage somewhere. But instead, his phone rang and he answered it and started talking to me in Chipmunkese. Finally, undaunted in my vengeance, I challenged him to a game of War. But, as my pile of cards slowly grew smaller, I had to swallow my pride and reach for his life-support system the Amiga power switch. But there he was, smiling, trying to be a friend. Somehow I knew I was doomed. And I know he’s still in there.
A Humble Abode
When the “house-on-a-disk” is first loaded, an LCP will enter the house and look around to see if he wants to stay. After careful inspection, he will leave and then return with his suitcase and pet dog. Although there are different LCPs, you can’t tell which LPC will move into your house and there is only one LCP per disk.
This program is cute. From the neat little house that is displayed on the screen to the way the LCP walks up the stairs, everything reflects cuteness. Even my LCP’s name is cute Myron. Myron can type a letter to me and picks up the phone when I call. He gets things that 1 leave for him at the front door and keeps himself amused by playing the organ, watching television, exercising, starting fires in the fireplace, computing, or reading AmigaWorld from his Archie Bunker-type chair (well, it might he Amiga- World). And when he seems to run out of things to do, he knocks on the screen and asks me to play a game with him. He can play anagrams (word jumbles), Card War, 5- Card Draw Poker (who said this was just for kids), Blackjack and Word Puzzles (guess a group of words that are represented by their initials in a phrase). About the only thing an LCP doesn’t do is work.
This program only has a few minor problems. First the tangibles: Perhaps the most annoying aspect of the program is the interface through which you communicate with your LCP. Typing any letter on the keyboard creates a two-line text box at the top of the screen, but as you continue to s-l-ow- 1-y type, you’ll soon find that letters tend to get lost somewhere. (Could Myron have a mischievous wife hiding in there?) Also, ?
STOP!! Don't Skip This Ad For Super AMIGA ™ Software!
!! IMPORTANT NOTICE !!
The new enhanced version of PAR Home I is nearing completion and will be sent free to all registered purchasers of the original *PAR Home I program described below. The new version will retail for $ 99.95 in retail stores across the country with all the original features plus enhancements to include:
* User definable check printing formatsl
• Compiled for high speed using all interface features!
* User may predefine automatic check transactions!
* Hundreds of user definable account categories!
• Sorting ability to aid in tax management!
• Dedicated credit card account manager AND MORE!
!! LIQUIDATION OF PAR HOME VERSION 1.0 !!
* PAR Home I Personal Financial Manager: integrated checkbook and budgeting with comparisons, personal worth statements, Hspendaholics exam", life insurance and college financing planner, lease buy, retirement contributions and annuities, complete loan amortizations, reports and graphic options with barcharts, and much more. Was $ 69 Now only $ 49.95
AMIGA is a trademark of Commodore-Amiga, Inc.
!! OTHER PRODUCTS !!
PAR Real I - Sophisticated but easy to use professional quality income property analysis program. Ready for the creative investor or home buyer! $ 149
Easy Loans (New!) - By far the most unique and flexible program to help you obtain and manage credit, loans and mortgages. Complete customization possible including negative amortizations, multiple loan summaries, balloons, variable rates and payments. Can save any amortization for easy recall and MUCH MOREI $ 39.95
$ 3.75
CALL
CALL
3. 5” Disk Holders (Holds 10)
3. 5" Disks SS DD (likely the lowest!)
3. 5" Disks DS DD (likely the lowest!)
FREE DISK HOLDER WITH ANY SOFTWARE!!
Call for prices on most other AMIGA hardware and software.
1-800-433-8433
major credit cards accepted
PAR SOFTWARE INC.
P. O. BOX 1089, VANCOUVER, WA 98666 * (206) 695-1368
We need 3rd party software submissionsI
LCPs don’t drop what they’re doing when you ask them to do something else. And since they have minds of their own, they do other things in between and appear to ignore you at times. I occasionally become frustrated with Myron, and can easily envision a five-year-old tossing a Mr. Potato Head at the monitor. The program also takes a long time to load: Myron must shower and dean up the house before he lets me in.
And now the intangibles: Why aren’t there any female LCPs? Could it be that Activision would have to take clown Myron's

bathing suit calendar in the den? And why doesn’t my LCP shut the TV off when he leaves the room? I always had to shut our TV off if nobody was going to watch it!
Before deciding to adopt an LCP, you must realize that they could provide a youngster (and quite possibly yourself) with many hours of entertainment and greatly increase the demand for your Amiga at home, so watch out. But don’t worry about having to pay a higher electric bill; simply send the bill to your Little Computer Person (I tried ASSIGN electric.bill LCP from the
CLI) . And if for some reason he doesn’t pay his rent and utilities (mine hasn’t), you could forward the bill to his natural parents at the address given below.
Little Computer People Discovery Kit Activision Inc.
2350 Bayshore Frontage Road Mountain View, CA 94043 415 960-0410 $ 49.95
No special requirements -
Grabbit
A screen, print and save utility that comes with a special bonus.
A lot of software for the Amiga is capable of producing colorful and interesting screen displays. Most programs, however, do not give you a means to print or save such screens. Grabbit is a utility program from Discovery Software that resides in memory with your application and lets you save screens to disk or print out a hard copy. Although it doesn't work with all programs, Grabbit is a very good utility that doesn’t interfere with the operation of other programs on your system.
Grabbit comes on a Workbench disk inside an eighteen-page manual. The manual clearly states how to install and run Grabbit. You can install Grabbit from Workbench or the CLI. During installation, the program checks on the availability of the printer device you specified in Preferences and makes sure that you have enough room for Grabbit. If everything is OK, Grabbit tells you that it has successfully loaded.
Once installed, you access Grabbit through HotKeys; you press three keys simultaneously to call a particular Grabbit function. Grabbit has five HotKev commands: Print, Save, Next, Cancel and Quit. You access the commands by pressing CTRL + ALT + the first letter of the command. Thus, to print a screen, you hold the C IRL + ALT + P keys simultaneously. Grab-
* i
bit is called from the nether reaches of your computers memory and activates its printer function. You don’t have to leave your application to access Grabbit; it’s always there.
Functions
When called, the print function first makes a copy of the current screen. It then becomes a low-priority background task that doesn’t tie up system resources while it prints the screen. You can continue to work on an application or even start up a new
STICK A HOT POKER IN YOUR PROGRAM!
v rotiucm W7M7S rm the creators of frEd.
FAST refers to faster display of text. When we designed TxEd, we found a way to speed up the display of 80 column text fonts by up to 500Cf. Now we have found a way to bring that advantage to other programs. The advantage depends a lot on the individual program, with the biggest speed improvements likely in efficiently designed WORD PROCESSING and TELECOMMUNICATIONS programs.
FONTS refers to giving you a choice of display fonts in programs which normally limit you to the default TOPAZ font. FASTFONTS gives you several alternative fonts specially designed for your display in various type- styles. But FASTFONTS doesn’t stop there you can also
MICPOSMITHS, INC.
PO Box 561
Cambridge, MA 02140
(617) 354-1224 BIX: cheath CompuServe: 74216, 2117
REPLACE the standard font with the font of your choice. If you’re not satisfied with the system font, now you can change it!
But that's not all. There is a pop-up help window which lets you define three “hot keys” to run other programs with a single keystroke. There are two “Window Cycle” keys which let you arrange windows with a single keystroke. There is a “screen blanker” which will dim the display screen if you leave it unattended, protecting it from permanent damage.
And perhaps best of all, FASTFONTS is very small, so you can run it along with most other programs without running out of memory!
INTRODUCTORY PRICE:
$ 3 .95
Mail orders, add $ 3 P & H. |jHK Mass residents add 59c. SHE
led Anythin
.rSrit; sftil
¦ft.
A
mm&n&
designate
itofy you
rilTJ
must lirsi use me j>
ftiil underlying Scnreeh t and sends S
opers Would rem
mm
m SoltW;
ing liivirtnmtts.
Cancel printing mm C TRL + Alr ¥ J HotKcy.
The Save function saves '
ilfiia in Iff f&fm&i Si Ifif Mil resolution!, v n Ififiensi It ilSlghs i unique filename to
resolution
HM to change scrttns lor orintmt 5? Saving. The Grabble function, ramw
from mimiry by MiiStjfup the memory II* Mlxied to it
The Siv furtfiiiift Wsi tfi fifiiiii If you win! To life a different iff hl y©
, This Brin®! !h
© me rront ana sends SI current ilriln to
Grabbit cannOt capture BOBs or sprites. These obica.-, art iifirtl •¦Part from ft |lt=
141 oicmrc tail uticri ft mimfci-r of Mt-pltalS Mil IP.
Ttvil iMMftl to ft.
Use mis mm
with iht
ive any me charaitefii I got irdund this by drawing th itefs by hind with DiluxdPftmt M id- u feribbit cati ©illy print dr iiv oh playficld trm I WS'piSyfleid display,
The biggil! Problem I had With Grabbit wil With misbehaving iiJtWIr i A lot Of software, especially games, insists upon taking over ill tfti feSoiircei of the Amiga, Many, in fai% irt Selfbootmg propam! That ©lily I® id with i iMHB boot WIA lu h
y M iiut iiii tfiy Oihir pflgflffij Grabbit included, inti memory' first. I also had problems with sifiWfcr that Would ©pin th printer diviii II loon M the Idft- Wife loaded, and nit just whin the Isfoviri
accessed the
These bfdbltm! Are not problems with Grabbit; they just showed up When I cried to use Grabbit; I wiift that software devei-
ml iilme me Amiga’s screens. I discdvired ihil when I lived i screen from
A (he
Attpimi jppfi up iiid Mm yita mod* the palette of the current screen. It has red, green, and blue sliders and lets you adjust ahy or all of the values of the Current py ttii Anytime il i neat little pfojfinl and I MM adjunct to Grabbit; It fill Ih
mu mMmi am GkbMi Ha wift &irte«
having sofrware.
Ment and produce better behaving softWafec
yswil II &iii I® ttii SMShit with m@f ahd
ihOri software,
k Ryan, AmigaV orld
Mciilifit way to siv* Artiga graphic:. IiSSf
41 It with ft CTRL + AIT ¥ A Hotkey
Once you’ve
environ
* inguryoy
h thefull potinnM
* of your Amiga,
Is J %M JfabfiM
I - * a-V V
h: mui ah
i ii| daftM a
P. O. Box 3475 Granada Hilii. CA 31 Dealer** eKjeires invi! (31$ ) 360-3715
_JVhat’s New?
F
New Amiga products we think you should know about.
7
11am - 9 pm (est) Monday - Friday
I'
Compiled by Bob Ryan
Educational
Discovery Mali (24
Discovary SpaEng (24
Fvsi Shape* (33
Kid TaX (35
Keyboard Cadel (29
LfBJeComputer People (31
Math TaX (39
Matter type (26
Spoilt* Dee (35
Talking Coloring Dock (23
C-juuo TiIji (44
Business and Home
2 +2 Homa Management (64
Aegis Impact (126
Analyze (63
Financial Cookbook (33
FkM (74
Giimoi (37
Maxi-Comm (32
Maxi-Oeck (4$
Maxi Plan (97
M. Amiga file (61
Mi Amiga Ledger (61
M Amiga Ward cal
On Unet (46
Organize (63
Rag* lo Riches A3L (139
Scribble (63
Textaofl (54
Unicalc (61
VIP PtolecxJonaJ $ 145
Sound and Graphics
Aegis ArlPakl Aegis Draw Animator Am ages Computer ArlGa'ery
DtJuxfl Music Deluxe Paint Deluxe Print Deluxe Video Dig-Vie-' Digit; or Digital Link
Dpainl Ar| and Uklity Disk
Dp*inl Art and Utlity Disk
Dynamic Cad
FuLru Sound
Gallery d Images
G abbH
GrapNcraR
Images
Instant Music
Midi Device
Print Master
Sound Digitizer
Sound Scape Pro
Zuma Fonts
(22
(111
(99
(14
(65
(65
(65
(65
(143
(55
(19
(19
(349
$ 129
(14
(23
(29
(62
(32
(36
(32
(39
(125
(23
Other
1200G Modern 3 5 DDDO 1 Cpack ISSS'DO 10 pack Cover s- Ten v Evcvrn Modem Cable Mousepad [small)
Mousapad [large)
Pocket PakDskHdder Printer Cable Oak Disk Holder (80)
Arw*«»»rfj Piuim add 5 .7 V. Irui Tai >
(176 (26 (18 (19 (14 (6 (7 (9 (14 (31
S3.00 MrSmunrSxt1'
Phoenix, Arizona 85075
v Ae.mc.visa
i)
Hardware
Camera WV1410 w .en* (225
Ext. 5 25’ Drive w Vnnt. (174
Exl. 3.5* Drive (212
256K RAW Expansion (73
2MD RAM Expansion (595
A-Tima (49
Penmouse Kura (240
RoOer • 0 pen Roland (423
Ptlntor - Oudala 292 (595
Piintar-Okimale20 (228
Sony KVI331 Monitor TV (469
T-Cnrd w 2£6K RAM (539
T-DUk (1,190
RF Modulator (30
Amlga Mortlor Ram Exp. Ul
Program & Utility
0QSPC (62
C64 Emulator ul
DDC 3 library (127
Ddman (106
DitkWik (36
Latice'C* Compiler (115
Usp (139
MacUbrory (64
Manx "C" (Developer t) (203
Marauder II (29
Minor (34
ModJa 2 (Developer*) (112
Patod (70
Schema be* (22
Saeen Eri-tor (65
Super bate Cal
ToxLUiity $ 64
Customer Support
(602) 258-4943
MAIL ORDERS TO:
We Compuler Best
Gladly p-°- box4S407 Accept
Advent* a Coottjuclon SU 126 A chon S2S
A chort II Adapt (26
Azctk Fox 126
A boji (24
Auto Duii 132
Oord’tTole (26
OortcM’Bd Time 126
Evateccat 130
Chewnatter 2000 129
Deop Space £32
Fighl Simulator £12
Hacker (29
Hack or II £12
HaJeyPioject (29
InlacomGame* (24 (32
M. vUe Marine** £12
Mindthadow (29
Iand*alkor (35
Rogue (25
Skyku (26
Slar Fleet I (35
Soper Huey (26
Temple ol Atphai Trlogy (20
Ullma III (39
Games
Push-Button
Telecommunications
MacroModem is the First in the Macro Ware line of software products from Kent Engineering 8c Design. MacroModem is a telecommunications package that gives you access to 36 macro strings at any one time, and it lets you switch to a new set of 36 macros at any time. Each macro in MacroModem can be up to 35 characters in length. These characters can be text, control characters, function keys, or other macros. MacroModem lets you automate your on-line sessions.
MacroModem supports Xmodem (checksum or CRC) and text transfers. It includes a File Filter that chops Amiga binary files automatically. It also translates between Amiga, Macintosh, and MS-DOS text files. The program supports baud rates from 110 to 262,000. It can emulate TTY or ANSI-standard terminals.
MacroModem supports autodial, and keeps a phone directory on disk. The program retails for $ 69.95. For more information, contact Kent Engineering 8c Design, 4215 Jordan Road, PO Box 178, Mottville,
NY 13119. 315 685-8237.
Wordy Programs
Gold Disk Inc. has two new programs for the Amiga. PageSetter is a personal publishing program for the Amiga. It lets you mix text and graphics on the same page and print them with any Preferences-supported printer. PageSetter supports multiple fonts and type styles,
multiple columns, proportional spacing and text justification. You can import text from a word processor, and the size of your PageSetter document is dependent solely upon the amount of memory you have in your system.
Gold Spell is a spelling checker for the Amiga, It includes a 90,000-word dictionary that you can expand. Compatible with most Amiga word processors, Gold Spell scans your word-processing documents and lets you change the spelling of words that are not in its dictionary. It even suggests correct spellings.
PageSetter lists for SI00; Gold Spell for $ 49.95. For more information, contact Gold Disk Inc., 2179 Dunwin Drive 6, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L5L 1X3. 416 828-0913.
More Hardware
C Ltd. Has announced three new hardware add-ons for the Amiga. AMEGA Box is a 6-slot, 100-pin, auto-config expansion chassis that retails for S599. AMEGA Box is about four inches high and sits under your Amiga monitor. It includes a pass through for further expansion and comes with a 150-watt power supply.
AMEGA 2 is a memory-expan- sion board that contains two megabytes of fast RAM for the Amiga. The board is 100-pin and auto-config, so it will work in any expansion chassis that meets Commodore-Amiga’s specifications. A board with two megabytes retails for $ 449. You can also buy the board without any memory chips.
Finally, C Ltd. Has announced
MODULA-2
the successor to Pascal
the aMEGA 20, a 20-megabyte SCSI drive and controller for your Amiga. The aMEGA 20 is a stand-alone box that attaches via the Amiga expansion bus. It is auto-config and contains a pass through. It lists for S995, For more information, contact C Ltd., 723 East Skinner, Wichita, KS 67211. 316 267-6525.
Big Daddy Database
Superbase is a new database
management program for the
Amiga that can handle a lot of
data. It supports databases with
an unlimited number of Files;
any or all of which can be open
at any time. You can have 16 .
Million records per File with an unlimited number of Fields per record. Text Fields are limited to 255 characters, and no File can be larger than 17 gigabytes 17 billion bytes).
Superbase lets you nest an unlimited number of sort keys and provides powerful searching tools. Superbase is menu driven, so you don’t have to know howf to program to use it. If you prefer the power of a command programming language, however, Superbase includes the dataBASIC language, a powerful Basic interpreter that includes database maintenance and query commands.
Superbase retails for $ 149.95. For more information, contact Progressive Peripherals 8c Software, 464 Kalamath Street, Denver, CO 80204. 303 825-4144.
Expanding AmigaDOS
The Metacomco Shell is an improved CLI that simulates many
features of a UNIX shell on the Amiga. The Metacomco Shell remembers command lines you enter for later editing and execution. It allows for easy creation of resident commands and aliases shorthand versions of AmigaDOS commands. The shell also lets you use variables in place of long sequences of text, to push and pop directories, and to search multiple paths.
The Metacomco Shell is a product of Metacomco, the company that wrote AmigaDOS. It retails for $ 79.95. Contact Metacomco at 5353 E Scotts Valley Drive, Scotts Valley, CA 95066. 408 438-7201.
Polaroid Palette Plus
Imprint, from Liquid Light, combines die Polaroid Palette system with Amiga-speciFic adapters, cables and software to create a system that lets you make a Polaroid print, 35mm instant transparency, or standard 35mm prints and slides of any Amiga screen. The Polaroid Palette is a recording system that, up to now, has worked only with IBM PC and Apple II computers.
Imprint is an expensive system it retails for $ 2,495 and it is directed towards businesses. The software allows you to reproduce any IFF picture or brush File in any resolution including hold-and-mod- ify. The color editor lets you customize the color palette of any image before you capture the image on Film. In addition to reproducing the screen, the Imprint software can also perform cyan-yellow-magenta separations.
Included with Imprint is
FULL interlace to ROM Kernel, Intuition, Workbench and AmigaDos Smart linker for greatly reduced code size
Supports real numbers and transcendental functions ie sin. Cos, tan. Arctan. Exp, in. Log, power, sqrt 2d graphics and multi-taskmg cemos
CODE statement for assembly code Error lister will locate and identify all errors in source code Single character I O supported No royalties or copy protection Phone and network customer support provided 350-page manual
True native code implementation (Not UCSD p-Code or M-code) Sophisticated multi-pass compiler allows forward references and code optimization
ReallnOut, LonglnOut, InOul.
Str ngs, Storage, Terminal Streams, MathLibQ and all standard modules
Works with single floppy 512K RAM
Pascal and Modula-2 source code are nearly identical Modula-2 should be thought ol as an enhanced superset ol Pascal Professor Niklaus Wirth (the creator ol Pascali designed Modula-2 to replace Pascal
2 not found in Pascal
Dynamic strings that may 0e any size
Multi-tasking is supported Procedure variables Module version control Programmer definable scope of objects
Open array parameters (VAR r ARRAY OF REALS.)
Elegant type transfer functions
Added features of Modula
CASE has an ELSE and may contain ¦
subranges
Programs may be broken up into s
Modules for separate compilation c
Machine level interface Bit-wise operators
Direct port and Memory access i
Absolute addressing
Interrupt structure ¦
Ramdisk Benchmarks (secs)
Compile
Link
Execute
Oplomized
Size
Sieve ol Eratosthenes:
6-1
4 9
42
1257 bytes
Float
67
7. 2
8. 6
3944 bytes
Calc
5 7
4. 8
3. 6
1736 bytes
Null program
48
4 7
-
1100 bytes
MODULE Sieve.
MODULE Float.
CONST Size - 8190,
FROM MathLibO IMPORT sin, In. Exp
TYPE FlagRange = [0 Size].
Sqrt. Arctan;
FlagSel = SET OF FfagRange;
VAR x.y REAL, i CARDINAL.
VAR Flags: FlagSet;
BEGIN r$ T-.$ A-.$ S-'|
i FlagRange:
x:- 10,
Prime, k. Count, Iter CARDINAL.
FOR ):= 1 TO 1000 DO
BEGIN CSS-.SR-.SA*- ’)
y:- sin (x); y:= In (x); y- exp (x);
FOR Iter = 1 TO 10 DO
y:= sqrt (x). Y - arctan (x).
Count;= 0.
X:= x * 0.01:
Flags - FlagSet(). F empty set ')
END
FOR i = 0 TO Size DO
END float
IF (i IN Flags) THEN
Prime = (i ‘ 2) * 3. K.= t * Prime
WHILE k = Size DO
MODULE calc.
INCL (Flags, k);
VAR a.b.c: REAL, n. i CARDINAL,
k: k - Prime:
BEGIN fST-.SA-.SS-')
END
n 5000,
Count:- Count - 1
a:= 2 71828. B- 3 14159, c - 1.0:
END,
FOR i - I TO n DO
END.
C:= c'a. C 7 c’b; c:- c a; c = c.b
END.
END.
END Sieve
END calc
Product History
The Tol Modula-2 compiler has been running on the Pinnacle supermicro (Aug. ‘84). Atari ST (Aug. '65) and will soon appear on the Macintosh and UNIX in the 4th Qtr. 86
Regular Version $ 89.95 Developers Version $ 149,95 Commercial Version S299.95
The regular version contains all the features listed above The developers version contains additional Amiga modules. Macros and demonstration programs - a symbol fife decoder - link and load file disassemblers - a source fife cross referencer
- the kermit file transfer utility - a Modula-2 CLI - modules for IFF and ILBM. The commercial version contains all of fhe Amiga module source files
Other Modula-2 Products
Kermit - Contains full source plus $ 15 connect time to CompuServe. S29.95
Examples - Many of the C programs from ROM Kernel and Intuition
translated into Modula-2- $ 24 95
GRID - Sophisticated multi-key file access method with over
30 procedures to access variable length records $ 49-95
73
SOFTWARE, INC.
10410 Markison Road Telex: 888442
Dallas, Texas 75238 ¦ 214) 340-4942 CompuServe Number: 75026,1331
Get Your Amiga a Money Mentor
Finally, there's a fully integrated personal finance system especially designed to run on the Amiga Money Mentor keeps track ot your transactions, remembers balances, allows you to project and budget expenses ard alerts you when you've exceeded your balance or budget
Smart Scrolls, an innovative feature based on artificial intelligence techniques, recognizes frequent transactions and can complete the logging of new entries based on recall. If the information stays the same. Money Mentor reduces your typing time more than 50%: or, you can overwrite the information to make changes.
Uniquely designed and affordable, Money Mentor is a fast, friendly, smart and powerful software package that produces extensive financial reports in both tabular and graphic forms
Money Mentor was written expressly tor the Amiga, and utilizes Its sound, voice, color graphics and mouse input capabilities.
MOVING?
Subscription Problem?
Get help with your subscription by calling our new toll free number:
1 -800-227-5782
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. EST, Monday-Friday.
If possible, please have your mailing label in front of you as well as your cancelled check or credit card statement if you are having probelms with payment
If moving, please give both your old address and new address.
Snapshot, a RAM-resident utility. With Snapshot installed, you can make a Palette image of any Amiga screen at any time simply by pressing the F10 key.
Imprint includes the Imprint and Snapshot software, the Polaroid Palette Image Recorder, a Polaroid camera back, a Minolta 35mm camera back, a 35mm instant slide processing and mounting kit, and Amiga-specific cables and adapters. An upgrade kit for people who already own a Polaroid Palette is available. For more information, contact Liquid Light, 2301 West 205th Street, Suite 106, Torrance, CA 90501. 213 618-0274.
$ 3.00 Test Drive
Shanghai, a computer version of the Chinese strategy game Mahjongg, is a new release from Activision. Shanghai is a challenging puzzle game that you win by removing 144 colored tiles from a Five-level, dragon-shaped pyramid. Shanghai offers an enormous number of starting configurations so the game is different each time you play.
Activision is offering a Shanghai trial disk to anyone who wants to see what the game is like before buying. The disk contains one Shanghai pyramid that you can try to solve. Unlike the retail version, the pyramid on the trial disk never changes. You can obtain your trial disk by writing to Activision Shanghai Demo Disk Offer, PO Box 7286, Mountain View, CA 94039. Enclose $ 3 for shipping and handling. Shanghai retails for $ 44.95.
Amiga No Trump
Artworx has released Bridge
4. 0 for the Amiga. This program lets you play bridge both with and against the computer. The program is mouse-driven and uses the Amiga's colorful graphics. It also uses the Amiga’s speech synthesis. Bridge 4.0 retails for $ 29.95.
Also from Artworx comes Hole In One Golf. This game lets you control club selection, strength, hook and slice, and spin. You can use the supplied course or edit it to suit your fancy. Hole In One Golf lists for $ 29.95. Artworx also sells Strip Poker for the Amiga for $ 39.95. Contact Artworx Software Company Inc., 150 North Main Street, Fairport, NY 14450. 716 425-2833.
VAX Connection
MiddleMan lets your Amiga emulate a DEC VT-100 terminal. It turns your Amiga keyboard into that of a VT-100 and your monitor into a VT-100 display. MiddleMan supports baud rates up to I9.2K. If your work requires that you communicate with a VAX or with any computer that supports the VT-100 standard, look into MiddleMan. Middleman is $ 59.95, For more information, contact Benaiah Computer Products Inc., PO Box 11165, Huntsville, AL 35814. 205 859-9487.
But Can It Understand Alexander Haig?
The Pawn is a new illustrated adventure game that claims to have the finest parser of any microcomputer adventure game. The basic object of Pawn is to explore the world of Kerovnia; other objectives will become apparent as you play the game. In addition to its parser, The Pawn features full-color pictures that bring the land of Kerovnia to life.
The Pawn sells for $ 44,95. For more information, contact Firebird Licensees Inc., 74 North Central Avenue, Ramsey, NJ 07446.
Product Updates
In last issue’s What’s New?, I reported that Byte by Byte was producing a multifunction
board for the Amiga. I blew it: The multifunction board 1 described is a product of ASDG Inc. For more information, contact ASDG Inc., 280 River Road, Suite 54A, Piscataway, NJ 08854. 201 540*9670.
Deluxe Paint 2 from Electronic Arts is nearing release. In additon to upgrading the program to work with expanded-memory configurations, Dan Silva has added some new features such as perspective. For more information, contact Electronic Arts, 1820 Gateway Drive, San Mateo, CA 94404.415 571-7171.
Gimpel Software has released version 2.00 of Amiga-Lint, the C language diagnostic utility. Amiga-Lint 2.00 includes support for ANSI C language extensions. Contact Gimpel Software, 3207 Hogarth Lane, Collegeville, PA 19426.215 5844261.
Multi-Forth 1,1 has been released by Creative Solutions Inc. It includes bug fixes, documentation corrections, a new floating-point package, and new sprite demos. Contact Creative Solutions, 4701 Randolph Road, Suite 12, Rockville, MD 20852. 301 984*0262.
Newsbriefs
At COMDEX Atlanta last spring, Commodore was showing three prototypes of a new Amiga to selected dealers and third-party developers. From some developer friends, I learned that the machine had internal slots, an internal hard disk and a megabyte of memory. Although it used the same custom chips as the Amiga 1000, at least one of the prototypes used a 68010 instead of a 68000 CPU.
I didn’t report on the new machine then tentatively called the Amiga 2000 in my COMDEX report because I heard subsequently that the project had been scrapped. Well, it now appears that reports of the 2000’s death have been greatly exaggerated and that it, or some other new Amiga, will soon see the light of day. Although I
don’t think the next Amiga will be the fabled 68020-based Ranger, any new Amiga will reinforce the notion that this machine is here to stay. We hope to give you details soon.
Strategic Simulations has released Computer Baseball for the Amiga. Computer Baseball lets you manage current major league players and teams. It is the first of many conversions of popular SSI games to the Amiga. Contact Strategic Simulations Inc., 1046 Rengstorff Ave., Mountain View, CA 94043. 415 964*1353.
World Games from Epyx takes up where Summer Games (I and II) and Winter Games left off. Events include Acapulco cliff diving, barrel jumping, sumo wrestling and log rolling. Contact Epyx Inc., 1043 Kiel Court, Sunnyvale, CA 94089. 408 745-0700.
Cardinal Software, 14840 Build America Drive, Wood- bridge, VA 22191, produces schematic drawings of the Amiga. A set of four costs $ 24.95. To order, call 800 762-5645.
Print’n Wear are specially treated sheets of printer paper that convert regular printouts into iron-on transfers for T* shirts. A Print’n Wear 4 pack costs $ 8.95; a 10 pack lists for $ 19.95. Contact Foto-Wear! Inc., 62 Herbert Drive, East Brunswick, NJ 08816. 201 257-6549.
MathTalk and First Shapes are two more "talking” educational programs from First Byte, 2845 Temple Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806, 213 595-7006. MathTalk teaches basic arithmetic skills, while First Shapes introduces youngsters to different geometric shapes. Math Talk retails for $ 59.95 and First Shapes for $ 49.95.
Head ’em up, roll ’em out Mouse-Hide! Lasso a real leather mouse pad for your Amiga, folks, just $ 15 from Pilot Enterprises, 5699 Kanan Road, Agoura Hills, CA 91301. 818 706-1818. Rollin’, Rollin’, Rollin’, keep them mousies rollin’ ¦
* No payments til February 1, 1987 * Some restrictions apply
Statement of Ownership, Management and Circulation
1A. Title of publication: AmigaWorld. IB. ISSN 08832390. 2. Date of filing: Aug. 22, 1986. 3. Frequency of issue: bi monthly. 3A. No. Of issues published annually: 6. 3B. Annual subscription price: $ 19.97. 4. Complete mailing address of known office of publication: 80 Elm Street, Peterborough, Hillsborough County. NH 03458. 5. Complete mailing address of the headquarters of general business office of the publisher: 80 Elm Street, Peterborough, Hillsborough County. NH 03458. 6. Full names and complete mailing address of publisher, editor and managing editor: Publisher, Stephen Twombly, 80 Elm Street. Peterborough, NH 03458; Editor, Guy Wright, 80 Elm Street, Peterborough, NH 03458; Managing Editor, Shawn l.aflamme, 80 Elm Street. Peterborough, N'H 03458. 7. Owner: International Data Group, PO Box 1450, 5 Speen Street, Framingham. MA 01701. 8. Known bondholders, mortgagees and other security holders owning or holding 1 percent or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages or other securities: Patrick J. McGovern. PO Box 1450, 5 Speen Street, Framinghma. MA 01701.9. For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at special rates: not applicable. 10. Extent and nature of circulation: (X) Average no., copies each issue during preceding 12 months; (Y) Actual no. Of copies of single issue published nearest to filing date; A. Total no. Of copies printed: (X) 137,970 (Y) 139,895. B. Paid and or requested circulation: 1. Sales through dealers and carriers, street vendors and counter sales: (X) 48,421
(Y) 41,986; 2. Mail subscription: (X) 17.429 (Y) 27,252. C. Total paid and or requested circulation: (X) 65,850 (Y) 69,238. D. Free distribution by mail, carrier or other means, samples, complimentary and other free copies: (X) 2,636 (Y) 1,709. E. Total distribution: (X) 68,486 (Y) 70,947.
F. Copies not distributed: 1. Office use. Left over, unaccounted, spoiled after printing: (X) 6,325 (Y) 3,877; 2. Return from News Agents; (X) 63,159 (Y) 65.071. G. Total: (X) 137,970 (Y) 139,895.
AMIGA SPECIAL IN MONTANA
sv icd -7
v Amiga .
SPECIAL PRICING ON AMIGA SYSTEMS
Amiga Computer Amiga Monitor 256K Expansion Cartridge Cables & Mouse
PLUS FREE SOFTWARE
Graphicraft Textcraft and eight more great programs.
Software At Competitive Prices For ALL Major Personal Computers.
901 - 14th St. No. 490 No. 31st St.. Suite 110
Great Falls, MT 59401 Billings. MT 59101
Phone (406) 761-5076
Help Key
By Bob Ryan
Basic Printing Revisited
Q: In your September October ’86 column, you dealt with the problem Id been having in getting my Epson FX-85 to print in different styles from Amiga Basic. Your explanation worked fine for me except for those escape sequences for double strike and near-letter quality that include a double quote ("). For example, I've tried the following Basic statements to initialize near-letter quality printing. None have worked.
PRINT if CHR$ (27) "[" "2"
n ff tt w.. n
PRINT if CHR$ (27) V "2" "
"z M
PRINT if CHR$ (27) V "2"
PRINT if CHR$ (27) "[" "2"
"z”
print m, chr$ (27) T "2" Icons Away
M I If II M
Can you tell me how I can send a double-quote character as part of an escape sequence?
Richard Booth
Joplin, MO
A: Amiga Basic regards double quotes as delimiters in PRINT statements; it doesn’t regard them as data to be sent to the screen or printer. To get around the problem, use the ASCII code for the double-quote character instead of the character itself. (You'll find a list of ASCII codes in Appendix A of the Amiga Basic manual.) Your print statement should look like this;
PRINT 1, CHR$ (27) "["
"2" CHR$ (34) "z"
While I’m on the subject, last issue I ran an elaboration of how to use printer escape codes from Amiga Basic (Basic Printing Revisited, Help Key, November December ’86, page 126).
Unfortunately, my elaboration was messed up because part of the escape sequence I used didn’t make it into the magazine. Anyway, the line that reads ’’Thus, ESC m from the table becomes CHRS(27) n " n ” "m" in your Amiga Basic print statement” should read “Thus ESC[lm from the table becomes CHR$ (27) "1" "m" in your Amiga Basic print statement."
I hope that clears up any confusion you might have with printing from Amiga Basic. If I wind up having to write an explanation of this clarification of my elaboration of using escape sequences to control printers from Amiga Basic (whew!), I’m going to pack it in and head to the Galapagos, where (I’m told) there be nary a computer.
Q: I recently discovered that, while directories created under Workbench have visual icons, those created under the CLI do not. Is this correct? Also, when working under the CLI, how can you tell if a given directory is on your disk? How can you review your entire directory structure for a given disk? Can you get a printout of the directory structure of a disk?
Computer Differ
Portland, OR
A: You’re correct: Directories created under the CLI do not have icons. This is a great handicap if you like to move between the Workbench environment and the CLI. To get a listing of all the files and directories on a disk, you use the command DIR OPT A. This command lists your current director)- and all files and directories below the current directory. To get a printout of your directory, you simply redirect the output of the DIR command.
For instance, DIR>PRT: OPT A
will list all the files at or below the current director)' to your printer. If you’re in the root directory, this command will list all files and directories on the disk.
Transparent Problem
Qj How can I transfer Amiga graphics to slides for presentations? Can I buy a high-resolution film recorder or a special CRT hood for taking screen shots. Do you know how much these items cost?
C. Wayne Caswell Gainesville, FL
A: A California company named Liquid Light is producing a system called Imprint that combines the Polaroid Palette with the Amiga. Imprint includes the Palette, software, cables and connectors. It will sell for $ 2,495.
The Polaroid Palette is an expensive system ($ 1,500 alone, last time I checked) that makes Polaroid prints, instant 35mm slides and normal 35mm slides and prints from the graphics in your computer’s memory. Currently, the Palette can he used with Apple II and IBM PC computers. See our What’s New? Section for a closer look at the Imprint System.
You can always take your own screen shots. These never look as good as slides created with the Palette, but you can get acceptable quality slides. Just set your camera on a tripod in front of the Amiga, darken the room, and take long-exposure (greater than one-thirtieth of a second) shots of your monitor screen. Experiment with various shutter speeds and f-stops to see what settings give you the best results, and use those settings as the basis of future shots.
Auto-Confusion
Q. ' I intend to add one megabyte of memory to my 512K Amiga. I would like to buy the memory and simply plug it into the side of my Amiga the same way I plugged my 256K memory upgrade into the front. I want the memory to be instantly available to my system. My problem is that all the ads I see for memory expansion products scare me: What is all this talk about expansion chassis, card inserts, passthrough, autoconfig, addmem, relocating memory? Sounds too complicated for a novice to warrant spending close to a thousand dollars. Perhaps this deserves a feature article?
E. Morris
Sparta, NJ
A; Damn right it deserves a feature article, and as soon as Mark Van Name and Bill Catch- ings finish their report on the new 1.2 Kickstart and Workbench for the next issue, they’re going to examine every memory expansion box and board I can round up for them. You’ll see their report in the May June issue of AmigaWorld.
In the meantime, let me try to clarify things. The most popular way to expand your Amiga is by using the expansion bus that comes out of the right side (as you face your Amiga) of the Amiga system box. An expansion chassis (also called a card cage) is a box that attaches to the expansion bus and contains a number of empty slots. You can put expansion boards (also known as cards) into these slots to give your Amiga more memory, a hard disk, or some other device or capability that you want. The primary job of an expansion chassis is to provide a place to put expansion boards.
Now, you may say to yourself
NEW! PUT YOURSELF IN THE 21st CENTURY
Experiment with Artificial Intelligence! We supply the Expert System
Kit including a knowledge base editor, an automatic trainer, a run-time driver, and examples. You supply the creative imagination.
Complete instruction manual guides you to creating your own application. The knowledge base editor lets your application exchange data with other programs and even run DOS commands and other programs. Included is a sample application that talks! The automatic trainer analyzes your data and learns to draw the correct conclusions. The driver lets you run your expert system standalone. Think of the applications! We will be supporting this kit with a newsletter so you can share knowledge bases, techniques and ideas.
Don’t wait any longer! You can get in on this exciting new field for only $ 89.95.
HOWTO WRITE BETTER PROGRAMS? EASY!
The key is having the right tools. The EXPLORER disassembling debug monitor steps you through code and shows the 68000’s registers as they change. You have complete control as you single step or set breakpoints. Have a live window onto memory. Watch what other tasks are doing. See where you are with an on-line memory map. Learn from code others have written by disassembling it, capturing it, and changing it to suit you!
The EXPLORER has other powerful features: display memory and files in Hex and ASCII, memory modify, search, move, fill, display and change registers, disassembly trace, load programs, disassemble to disk. Output to printer or disk file. Powerful commands: command loops, time-saving macros, logging to disk, text display, real-time RAM view, & more!
WW11 GATO-Closs Submarine Simulation
3-D Graphics with Sound
6 rile Edit Game Reports Settings Mission Special
• Control Room O EngT* Room
O Periscope 0 R*lar
Ofuel
224
• Surface Gun O Radio Room
Oforvard Torpedo • AH Torpedo
The EXPLORER is just what you need to take control of your program development, and at $ 49.95 it is a solid value too!
If your AMIGA dealer is out of stock on the EXPLORER or the Expert System Kit you may order from us directly. Shipping & handling $ 4. COD add $ 4. Orders: (800) 388-8328 Ext. 804. Info: (612) 559-6601. Money orders or checks to:
O Bell I oool Charge O Fuel 334 Dm
Macintosh Version
Available lor Apple lle c, Macintosh, IBM PC Series (includes Pcjr.), Commodore 64 & 126, Amiga, and Atari ST.
Interactive Analytic Node 2345 West Medicine Lake Drive Minneapolis, Minnesota 55441
Dealer Bnd distributor enquiries welcome. AMIGA is t trademark pf Commodore-Amiga Inc.
SPECTRUM HOLODYTE, INC., 1050 Walnut, Suite 325, Douldet CO 60302 (303) 443-0191. Macintosh is a trademark licensed to Apple Computet inc. IBM, Apple, and Commodore 64 & 126 ore registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corp., Apple Compute; Inc., and Commodore Electronics, Ltd. Respectively. Atari & ST are registered trademarks of Atari Corporation. AMIGA Is a registered trademark of Commodore-Amiga, Inc.
Hors d’oeuvres
Unique applications, tips and stuff
You may be using your Amiga at work, you may be using it at home, or you may be using it in the back seat of your car. But in some way or other, you are going to be using your Amiga in a slightly different way than anyone else. You are going to be running across little things that wi'l help you to do something faster or easier or more elegantly,
AmigaWorld would like to share those shortcuts, ideas, unique applications, programming tips, things to avoid, things to try. Etc., with everyone, and we'll reward you for your efforts with a colorful, appetizing, official AmigaWorld T-shirt. (Just remember to tell us your size.)
Send it in. No matter how outrageous, clever, obvious, humorous, subtle, stupid, awesome or bizarre. We will read anything, but we won't return it, so keep a copy for yourself, In cases of duplication. T-shirts are awarded on a first come, first serve basis.
So. Put on your thinking berets and rush those suggestions to
Hors d’oeuvres AmigaWorld editorial 80 Elm Street Peterborough, NH 03456
Shipping now, with special introductory pricing
from
StcCe Effects
Side ARM Amiga Resource Module):
- 5 s!ct back piano
• 85 pin bus pass-ihrough
- Attractive styling $ 799
• Small ‘ccipnn!
• space Jar 2 ha:f-he gnt drives
• 153 watt power supply
Side Store memory card):
¦ 2 megabytes per ca- 3
• no wa l states S699
• RAM cisk that survives rese'S'reficcts
Side Track Disk & Clock):
• DMA access :c the disk
• Reed-So!omsn error
correction code SB99
• 20 megabyte 1 2 he go; disk
• 5T-5C6 412 compatible
• Battery backed real-time deck
Side Store Special
¦ Sice Stcre $ 699
* Generic ARM
Generic Power supply: $ 79.95
for 3 Yg" Cnves
Generic Track 5V4" drive: $ 179.95
with power supply ard case
Generic ARM: $ 149.95
single slot Zorro expansion
S 1 D
EFFECTS TNC
65t3 Johnsdait* Pa Raleign, MC 276'5 Voce: ($ 19) 876-M34 BBS: (SIS) 47VS435
Tfre fzUz-.ving apply to all items:
"Self, why should I pay for five (or however many) expansion slots when I only plan to add 1 megabyte of memory (or one hard disk, or whatever) to my system? Aren't I paying for a lot of slots that I never intend to fill?” If you have a smart self, he she will respond “You don’t have to buy an expansion chassis and a memory board if you only intend to add one expansion device to your system; you can get by with adding a standalone memory box ’

Stand-alone expansion devices (also known as side-moum devices) attach to the Amiga expansion bus just as an expansion chassis does. The difference is that these devices don't provide slots that you can fill with whatever boards you desire. Stand alone boxes are complete self-contained expansion devices. Buy a memory box and you get ready4to-use memory' for your Amiga; buy a hard disk box and you get a ready-to-roll hard disk. You don’t have to buy an expansion chassis and then add a memory board or a hard-disk controller.
What are the advantages of stand-alone devices? Normally, it’s cheaper to buy a stand-alone device rather than an expansion chassis and a single expansion board. On the other hand, if you want to add more than one or two devices to your Amiga, or if you want to keep your future options open, consider getting an expansion chassis.
Once you've hung a chassis or a stand-alone box onto the expansion bus, you can't attach any other boxes to the bus unless the first one contains a pass-through. A pass-through simply passes the expansion bus through the device, providing other boxes with the same edge connector that the Amiga supplies. In a perfect world, if every box had a pass-through and its own power supply, you could daisy-chain an infinite number of expansion boxes together and expand your Amiga infinitely. Due to timing problems, RF interference, and the limited speed of electrons, however, you’ll probably have problems if you try to attach more than two expansion devices to your expansion bus. Since one or both of these devices can be an expansion chassis, your expansion options aren’t limited, although they’re not infinite.
Autoconfig and Addmem are two methods to get your Amiga to recognize the existence of devices that you have attached to the expansion bus. Autoconfig is built into version 1.2 of the Amiga operating system. At startup, the autoconfig routines tell your system what devices are on the bus. These routines also allocate memory space to the devices on the bus, thus incorporating the devices into your Amiga system. Autoconfig is the preferred method for getting your system to recognize the existence of expansion devices.
Addmem is a program that also allocates system memory to devices on the expansion bus, Addmem, however, is not automatic. Addmem requires you to designate what devices get allocated what memory in the system. Autoconfig automatically keeps different devices from using the same memory space; Addmem doesn’t. If you don’t plan to add more than one device to your system, then Addmem is adequate. If you want to avoid memory conflicts, stick with autoconfig devices.
In your case, if all you want to do is add 1 megabyte of memory to your system, turn to the Hardware Guide in this issue, go to the Hard Disk and Stand-Alone Memory Boxes section, and check off all the 1 megabyte, autoconfig devices. You should buy one of these products. Which one? I don’t know, I haven’t used most of them. Until Mark and Bill complete their report, you’ll have to rely upon word of mouth (which usually isn’t that far off). Good Luck.B
In lost issue’s Help Key, page 127, column one, line four, ESC m should have been ESC[lm
Circle 180 on Reader Service card
Well moke your Holidays Hoppy...
MODEMS
1200 BAUD
H09.00
2400 BAUD $ 019.00
JOYSTICKS:
I l
MOUSE PAD 00
V
FREE GIFT
Printer
$ 18.95
» SOFTWARE:!
• Talking Trivia « •
' *19.” «
Spellcraft ( N
J *24.” J I
MergeMaster f I
; *24.” •
: $ io offV.
| When you buy Spellcraft 11
and MergeMaster together " get them both for 39. F q
Valid until 1 15 67 f q
i
n
CARRYING 11 CASES: ||
Amiga Monitor |l
s75.°° ? I
Amiga J
Computer J 1
s79.00 •
®Amiga L a V |
registered *
trademark of ' *
Commodore-AMIGA, 9 m Inc. $
COVERS: *,
* 14.” »
Blue or Gray |
MEMORY IF EXPANSION: •*
256K PAM JJ
s85.°° ;
Vi to 2 MEG | v
Coll for price | J
CABLES: ,
Modem or J
%
i
Standard or the ®
New Infra-Red |
Wireless. G
AMIGA Dos ED ®
Keyboord Template' with every order |
Regularly s4.95 g
Valid until 1 15 67 M
STEREO: %
Amplifier and I
speaker systems | that let you hear - all the sound your y computer puts out.
To Order: 600*232*6342
NATIONWIDE
601*752*2642
IN5IDE UTAH
We'll beat any advertised price.
MEGATRONICS, INC., 55 N. MAIN STREET, LOGAN, UTAH 04321
HETRCOnCO
Quality software from the authors of AmigaDos Metacomco’s newest additions to its line of quality software for the Amiga are available NOW.
Mctacomco TOOLKIT $ 49.95
The smartest TOOLKIT package available for the Amiga. MCC TOOLKIT contains seven useful tools and utilities for Amiga programmers and developers.
• LIBRARIAN • PIPE • PACK &. UNPACK • AUX CLI • BROWSE • ENLARGE • DISASM Metacomco SHELL $ 79.95
The versatile programming environment with full screen command line editing. Fully explore the power of
* ¦ AmigaDos with the many useful features of Metacomco
SHELL. Enhance your Amiga CLI with HISTORY, PATH, PUSH St POP directories, aliases and more.
also available
Macro Assembler - Professional quality development system .$ 99.95
Lattice ‘Cr - The well known Lattice 'C' compiler ....$ 149.95
Cambridge Lisp - The interpreter compiler for the 80’s......$ 199.95
MCC Pascal - Fast ISO ANSI standard compiler .... .$ 99.95
Metacomco provides experienced technical support and keeps its customers informed of new products and upgrade releases.
Contact your local dealer or call: _
Tel: (US) 800-AKA-META (CA) 8O0 GETMETA
BIX; mhill CompuServe: 732*17.522 I B
Add 6, :% tax if CA resident
METACOMCO
535 3 E Scotts Valley Dr. • Scons Valley, CA 95066
Registered trademarks: Lattice Lattice, Inc; Amiga Commodore Amiga.
Circle 16 on Reaaer Service card.
THE LAST SPORTS GAMES YOU’LL EVER NEED!
“1 you're looking for the most realistic simulation around, 3 IN 1 FOOTBALL should be your first draft choice. ”
The Chicago Tribune " BASKETBALL is] another real winner from Lance Haffner ...a must addition to your library”
The Guide To Computer Living
Didn't like the way last season went for your favorite team? Here's your chance to do better as the coach. Or imagine the possibilities of dream matchups like the 72 Miami Dolphins vs. the '85 Chicago Bears or UCLA with Alcindor going against Patrick Ewing and Georgetown. How about the ’86 Celtics against anybody? Now YOU can know the the outcome of some of the greatest sports matchups that never were!
3 IN 1 FOOTBALL
• with Stats Compiler for each player and team • you choose from 14 offensive plays and 6 defensive formations
• includes 176 college teams, the 28 NFL teams and 14 USFL teams from the ’85 season PLUS 174 great college and 189 great pro teams of the past
FINAL FOUR COLLEGE BASKETBALL & BASKETBALL: THE PRO GAME
• Includes Stats Compiler • you determine starting lineup, substitutions, shot selection, passing, offensive and defensive styles of play and more • the College game includes 292 teams from the ’85-’86 season plus 70 all-time greats • the Pro game features the 23 NBA teams from ‘85-’86 and more than 100 great teams of the past OTHER PAST SEASONS' TEAMS DISKS AVAILABLE AND 1986 FOOTBALL TEAMS READY PRIOR TO PLAYOFFS AND BOWL GAMES.
Available at your local dea er or send check or money order for $ 39 99 each. Visa and MasterCard accepted or. Phone orders only. Please add $ 2.00 for postage and handling.
COMMODORE APPLE AMIGA IBM and compatibles
LANCE HAFFNER GAMES
P. O. Box 100594 • Nashville. TN • 37210 • 615 242-2617 3 in 1 Football also available for Atari 520ST. Macintosh, and Atari 900 800XL 130XE
NOW AVAILABLE FOR THE APPLE -FULL COUNT BASEBALL!
Listing continued from page 54
* ? If i? ? ? ? * $ if £ * * * if if* if if if if £ if if if if £ .*;: if if:;c if if if * if sjs j
extern struct Menu * My Menu;
j if if if if if if if * if * if if if if * * if * * * * if if * * if if if if * if. *if s*t * * if if if t-if *
¥
* This is the structure that must be submitted to
* the OS to open a screen. These are ihe defaults,
v
V- if * * if * * * =:= if if if * ? If if if * if * if if if if sf if .* if * if if * if if if if if if j
struct NevScreen NewScreen =
(
0, 0, 640, 200, * LeftEdge, TopEdge, Width, Height * 2, * Depth
0, 1, * DetailPen, 131ockPen *
*
*
*
Change the ’’HIRES" line to "HIRES | INTERLACE," to set interlaced display. Be sure to change the Height field above to 400, or not enough screen ram will be initialized.
HIRES,
HIRES | INTERLACE, *
CUST0MSCREEN, * Type
NULL, * Font - use default font. *
"Menu Test Screen" * DefaultTitle for titlebar. *
»U .U «•* «U »V «•'. «•-. J. .1 « • .r. «*» ,1, .1. .I»,r,,v ,!• «I. J, «!• «*•«¦» . • .E» .1. >t> .1, .1. .1. « . J. J.
'•* 'I* 't% 'I' *ri' 'I' •'«* *(* •'»*¦ '1' 'l’* '»¦* "(• *l* V V 'I' '1* 'a* •»* 'I* '«* *|- 'i* V *1* v V 'I* *1* V * * "1” V ri' V '>¦* '1' V V V v
V
* This is the default structure to open a window in
the Intuition system.
• a*
V
* *» «i» »*» *1* »*» *1* *’» •' «• »U »•» »'» «•» .1, »• »•» »• »•» %•» %• *1* »•*» J* il* J* J* J* it Jj
v -r -«* ••• -r 1* *•* n* 'r r v •»* *v 'r ¦*»* *r *.• '¦* 'i- 'r •r '•* v *>* '•* *•* •** v
struct N e w Windo w N ew W indo w =
(
20, 20, 300, 100, * LeftEdge, TopEdge, Width, Height * 0, 1, * Width, Height
*
These are the Intuition Direct Communication Port Flags. See the Intuition Reference Manual p. 167 for description. In short, these flags indicate to Intuition the t ype of IDCMP messages this program wishes to use.
CLOSE WIN DOW | MEN U PICK,
These are the window parameter flags. See the Intuition Reference Manual p.66 for description.
WINDOWCLOSE | S M A RT_R EF R ESH WIN DO WSIZIN G | WINDOWDRAG NOCAREREFRESH,
AC TIVATE WINDOW 1) KPT 11
NULL, * First Gadget *
NULL, default CheckMark *
"Menu Test Window ", * Title ¦¦’
NULL, ¦¦' Screen - standard screen *
NULL, Bit Map
100, 25, * MinWidth, Minlleight »
640, 200, * Max Width, Max Height '"}
CUST0MSCREEN * Screen Type
• »* .b «I* »'• . « Or •«¥ •'» •'» «V*V •. Of >V «V •*> •»* vV 'b j. .y *
v v -i" 'f v v **»• *»* v v t v *r 'i- v *r *r *r ¥ ¥ ¥ v ¥ ¥ ¥ v ¥ v *i* ¥ ¥ ¥ ¥ ¥ *i» ¥ ¥ ¥ ¥ v ¥ v ¥ i
•r
This is the main entry point of this test driver.
All structure initialization has been done.
J.
¥
Jj; * jy sy ;;; sjs ij; if if if if if if * if * £ £ if * if if if ;|j tf ;f ;|t ;f * ;f ;f?f%ififif
m ain()
(
unsigned char str[30]; * struct to store window messages
unsigned int i; * general purpose loop counter *
struct Screen Screen; * pointer for OpenScreen ret value* struct Window * Window; * pointer for Open Window ret value51*' struct IntuiMessage * message; * expected message pointer *
COMPTERS
*
Open each of the Libraries and check for a NULL return. NULL indicates that the library is unavailable, and this program exits.
*
Intuition Base = (struct IntuitionBase *)
0penLibrary("in tuition,library", 0);
if (IntuitionBase == NULL) exit (FALSE);
Gfx Base = (struct GfxBase *)
0 penLibraryCgraphics.library", 0);
if (GfxBase == NULL) exit (FALSE);

*f
Open the screen with previously initialized default values. NULL indicates error of some sort, and an exit is taken.
If ((Screen = (struct Screen *)0penScreen(&NewScreen)) == NULL) exit(FALSE);
WE’VE
SLASHED
PRICES . A r ON THE AMIGA
The West Coast’s Largest Inventory of Commodore And Amiga Software And Hardware Products
*
OUTSIDE CA.
(818) 366-5305 • (800) 443-9959
CALL
*
This initializes the only value in the window structure that we did not know at program initialization time. Place the returned pointer into the structure, and open a window'.
New Window.Screen = Screen;
10815 Zelzah Avenue Granada Hills, CA 91344
Circle 118 on Reader Service card.
If ((Window = (struct Window *) 0penWindow(& New Window)) == NULL) exit(FALSE);
L
i
*
*
I
*
I
I
*
(Other quantities at similar savings...) CALL: 800-533-4188 215-363-2400 in PA
*
DATA SERVICES, INC.
Marsh Creek Corp Center Lionville, Pennsylvania 19353
g
f
A
Set MenuStrip(Window, M v Menu);
Move(Window->R Port, 20, 20); * Move text pointer in window * Text( Window->R Port, "Hello”, 5); * Set Hello in the window *
for (;;) * loop here until a CloseGadget message is received *

This part of the program will wait for the message port to become not empty, and extract the message.
WaitPort( Windo w'-> User Port);
message = (struct IntuiMessage *)GetMsg( Windo w-> User Port);
if ((message-> Class) == MENU PICK) * is the msg a menu
msg? *
(
The message received was for a menu selection. Clear the string to be sent to the window, and check for valid pick, or just a non-selection.
For (i = 0; i 30; str[i++] = * ’); if ((message->Code) != MENU NULL)
sprintf(str, "Menu %x Item %x Sitem %x ",
M E N U N U M ( m essage-> Code),
ITE M N U M( message->Code),
S U B N U M( m essage->C ode));
else
Listing continued on page 104
This line submits your menustrip declaration to Intuition.
SUPERB AMIGA COPY PROTECTION NOW AVAILABLE!
( WHOLESALE DISKS )
MAXELL - 3M - NASHUA - DYSAN
p 500 Amiga disks for only $ 1.71 each!
!
Commodore has selected us for our quality, speed, and super prices, as have scores of other Amiga software publishers. They didn't trust their great
AMIGA DUPLICATION Nobody Does it Faster!
Amiga software to anyone else... WHY SHOULD YOU?
$ 99
Inventory Control
Accounts Payable $ 99
Helps manage and track cash liabilities by collecting vendor invoice and intormation and reporting the business cash commitments and payment history
Accounts Receivable $ 99
Know current customer status, which accounts are past due. Forecast how much money to expect to receive for cash flow planning, and keep on top of your customers' credit positions
Computerware®
Box 668 • Encinitas. CA • 92024
(619) 436-3512
General Ledger S99
A comprehensive double-entry accounting system wirh complete audit trails closing procedures, and lull reporting
Check Ledger $ 99
A sngle-entry bookkeeping system with a usei-dehned chart of income and expense accounts, year-to-date totals, and complete checking account history
Payroll S99
A comprehensive system allowing pay rates for standard hours, overtime, and salary. Hourly, salary, and commissioned employees may be paid weekly, biweekly, semimonthly. And monthly Year-to-date, quarterly. Monthly, and current totals are maintained Federal reporting and state computations are included
Call or write lor brochures.
Dealer inquiries welcome.
COMPUTERIZE YOUR BUSINESS
with «»> COMPUTERWARE® Affordable Business Software
M ove( W indow->R Port, 5, 20);
Text(Window->R Port, str, 2A);
Reply Msg( message);
i
} * End If-then clause * else
break; * Not Menu selection, must be closegadget. * ) * End For(;;) *
Reply Msg( message); * Reply to messsage received. *
ClearMenuStrip(Window); * Remove menustrip previously declared. *
Close Windo w( Windo w);
CloseScreen(Screen);
exit(TRUE); * Indicate good' exit. *
) * End Main() *
Move to the point at which this string is to be placed. Place the string there, and reply to the message.
Sprintf(str, "No Item Selected,
Listing 2.
*

if if if if if * ifif * * if if if if if if if if if * if * if if if * * if if if if if if if * if if if * * if if if if if if * * if if if if if if if if if if if if *
MenuStrip Structure Initialization
Circle 114 on Reader Service card.
»*. J. .v % . ...•.v.w.uw .u ••• .1* .•«. .•» .i. «i. «•» ««• «i* «i.«ju J. a. .i, o,
• ¥• 'r v 'c v V v *»% *»* •»* v r % v *1* v n* *»¦* v v *»% '»** v v *»* v v 'c v v *.* v v v v v v V *»* v '»¦
Read Write MS-DOS Disks on your Amiga
D0S-2-D0S Transfers MS-DOS Files To and From AmigaDOS!
• Supports single and double sided 5 25" as well as 3 5" 720KB diskettes
- Converts ASCII file line-ending characters ana provices Wordstar
comparability
• Supports full directory path names, with wild cards in file names.
• Allows selection of MS-DOS and AmigaDOS subdireclory and displays sorted directory listing
• Formats 3.5” and 5 25" MS-DOS diskettes
• Provides duplicate file name detection with query replace options
• Provides TYPE ano DELETE commands
• Permits renaming of files where file name restrictions occur.
• Remains resident to permit AmigaDOS disk swapping.
Requires standard Amiga with either an external 5 25" or 3 5" disk drive This product is available lor immediate shipmenl. Only S55 00 plus S3 00 shipping and handling CA residents add sales tax Telephone orders welcome Dealer inquiries invited
fttotfwCoKl
a M
VISA
Central Coast Software"
268 Bowie Drive, Los Osos, CA 93402 • 805 528-4906
IfMCfnjrxs Amiga AmigaDOS transformer. CommodOfc-Arn.gj In: PC DOS IBM MS-DOS Microsoft DOS ? DOS Central Coast So'tware
include "exec types.h" include "intuition intuition.h"

Intuitext Initializations. See text for reason for organization of this file.
*
struct IntuiText Itext[] =
(
O, 1, J A M1, CHECK WIDTH, O, NULL, "Morning 5tar "
[ 0, 1, JAM1, CHECK WIDTH, O, NULL, "Long Sword " )
0, 1, .J AMI, CHECK WIDTH, O, NULL, "Dagger " ),
( 0, 1, JAM1, CHECK W1D T H, 0, NULL, "None " ],
( 0, 1, .JA M1, 0, 0, NULL, "Possessions " ),
( 0, 1, J AMI, 0, 0, NULL, "Pockets " ),
[ 0, 1, J A M1, 0, 0, NULL, "Backpack " ),
( 0, 1, JAM1, 0, 0, NULL, "Personal " ),
( 0, 1, JAM1, 0, 0, NULL, "Health " ],
( 0, 1, JAM 1, 0, 0, NULL, "Hits " ),
( 0, 1, JAM1, 0, 0, NULL, "Heal " },
( 0, 1, JAM1, 0, 0, NULL, "Light " )
*
*
Here are the Menultem irvitializations.
Struct Menultem Menultem[] =
(
( * Menultem[0] : Morning Star & M enulte m( 1 ], 0, 0, (120 + CHECK WIDTH + COMM WIDTH), 9, (CHECKIT | CHECKED | ITF.MTEXT COMMSEQ ITEM ENABLED I HIGH COMP),
W4 January February 1987
Circle 143 on Reader Service card.
0x0 A ,
(APTR) 8IText[0],
NULL,
'S'
},
( * Menultem[l] : Long Sword *
& Menulte m[2],
0, 9, (120 + CHECK WIDTH + COMM WIDTH), 9, (CHECKIT | ITEMTEXT | COM MSEQ | ITEMENABLED | HIGHCOMP),
0x09,
(APTR) &IText[l],
NULL,
'L'
TIRXJE SUE VIE fl©ss llteim I® s® c od nn dl s 2 Over 4®®,®®® BO-LOOPS per §©c©imdlS
- ----- Need tv b say more7 ------
I' o r I h
forAMIGA
( * Menultem[2] : Dagger *
& Menultera[3l,
0, 18, (120 + CHECK WIDT U + COMM WIDTH), 9, (CHECKIT | ITEMTEXT | COM MSEQ | ITEMENABLED | HIGHCOMP),
0x08,
(APTR) 8IText[2],
NULL, f Df
( - Meiuiltem[3] : None *
NULL,
0, 27, (120 + CHECK WIDTH + COMM WIDTH), 9, (CHECKIT | ITEMTEXT | COM MSEQ | ITEMENABLED | HIGHCOMP),
OxOF,
(APTR) 8IText[3],
NULL,
* 11 *
* TOTALLY INTERACTIVE programming environment!
* OPTIMIZING COMPILER ... all words compile to 68000 assembly code ... brutally FAST!
* OPTIMIZING TURNKEY UTILITY...compiles only whats needed...PLUS...no fees or hscensing required!
* OBJECT-ORIENTED dialect included!
* ELEGANT INTERFACE to all AMIGA libraries!
* FREE Jforth newsletter ... updates available for shipping, handling & media cost!_
Jforth is directly threaded, Only $ 99.95
'JSR' code...the fastest kind! Shipping & handling inch
(CA residents please add 7%)
. send check or money order to .....
A 4054 Ujilkie Lday
Delta Research Pal° Rlto- Cfi 9‘,30B
[ (415)-856-3669
(inquiries or orders only, please)
( * M enulte m[4] : Possessions 5V 8 M enulte mf 7],
0, 0, 120, 9,
(ITEMTEXT | ITEMENABLED | HIGHCOMP), NULL,
(APTR) &IText[4],
NULL,
NULL,
& Menulte m[5]
),
( * Menultem[5] : subitem : Pockets *
8 M enulte m[6],
110, 4, 90, 9,
(ITEMTEXT | ITEMENABLED | HIGHCOMP), NULL,
(APTR) &IText[5]
( * Menultem[6] : subitem : Backpack *
NULL,
110, 13, 90, 9,
(ITEMTEXT | ITEMENABLED | HIGHCOMP), NULL,
(APTR) &IText[6]
( * MenuTtem|7] : Personal *
NULL,
0, 9, 120, 9,
(ITEMTEXT | ITEMENABLED | HIGHCOMP),
NULL,
(APTR) &IText[7],
NULL,
NULL,
8 Menultem[8]
Listing continued on page 106
r
Ujhen "Hoy to C ujos first introduced. AMIGA microcomputer programmers responded enthusiastically. Now, there's o new, extensively enhanced, even better version! The 'C functions are similar to BASIC. The object library's good, clean working code includes windows, screens, menus, graphics, requestors, and alerts. For even greater productivity, we include our own system utilities.
UNLOCK TH€ MVST€ftV WITH TH6 KCV TO 'C
• Source & (Executable Code • Foster & Cosier
• Full Documentation • Deliveries Begin Sept. 1
$ 34.95
DATA A€S€ARCH PROC€SSING, INC.
5121 Audrey Dr. Huntington Beach, CA 92649 Phone: (714) 840-7186
* Air*9a ft o registered trodemor* of Commodore-Amiga Irx
GOOD STUFF!
HIGHCOMP),
HIGHCOMP),
1;
*
*
AMO Variety Disk 10 full programs S10.00ppd
AMI JO Buitder 12 programs to test your skitt ..S"IU95ppd
AM2 Young Folks I 8 programs lor youngsters ..S11.95ppd
AM4 Strategy I 8 Challenging puzzles ...S1l"95ppd
AM6 Finance I over 20 financial functions, loans S11.95ppd
AM7 Education IJ Spelling, Math, Reading & more ......S11.95ppd
AMB Slrategy II 8 more puzzles to solve .S11.95ppd
AM9 Adventure I 4 full text adventures S11.95ppd
AM13 Real Estate I Printing Amortizations, Interest Rate
Comparisons, Loan Balance. 25 in all .....S14.95ppd
COMMSPEC 3001200 Baud Hayes compatible modem with 1 year warranty, even the color matches! Includes correct cable and complete communications software. Plus
access to our Amiga bulletin board with lots ol tree software?!! S129.95ppd
256K MEMORY 1 year warranty, highest quality, metal shielding, plus a credit for 3
free disks of your choice from our farg selection! .. S109.95ppd
AMPD We now have Iwo libraries ol Amiga Public domain sottware, each with over50 disks in it! Season Special each disk only S7.95ppd or 54 ea. Ppd when you get the complete library, over 1000 programs in all!!!
AMNL Subscribe to our newsletter with tips, techniques, public domain listings and example programs. A real aid only 515 tor 12 issues!
DbMan dbase III “ lor the Amiga by Versasoft. 96% syntax compatible with the Ashton Tate's dbase III *“. Up to 10 open databases at one time. Over 110 commands and 90 functions. 300 pages of documentation. We developed a complete accounting system with this package. Ashton-Tate charges S695 for theirs ours is only . S129.95ppd
• Great Prices on Commercial Products Also! •
Call our FREE Bulletin Board at (517) 628*2943 6 pm-8 am EST 300 1200 baud 8, N, 1 protocol
COMPUTER SOLUTIONS
. . P.O. BOX 354
• Free Shipping 888 S. EIFERT • Money-back guarantee
• Free Order Line MASON. MICHIGAN 48854 • Low-Low discount prices
• Newsletter (8Q0) 874-9375 ORDERS ONLY • Quick service
(517) 628-2943 MICHIGAN & INFO
( '¦’ Menultem[9] : subitem : Hits *
NULL,
110, 13, 70, 9,
(ITEMTEXT | ITEM EN A BLED | HIGHCOMP), NULL,
(APTR) &IText[9)
).
( * Menultem[8] : subitem : Health *
& M enulte m[9],
110, 4, 70, 9,
(ITEM TEXT | ITEM ENABLED | HIGHCOMP),
NU Lt,
(AFTR) &ITexL[8]
( * Menultem[ 10] : Heal *
& M enulte ra[ 11 ],
O, O, 80, 9,
(ITEMTEXT | ITEM ENA BLED NULL,
(APTR) &IText[ 10]
h
¦¦' M enulte m [1 1 ] : Light * NULL,
0, 9, 80, 9,
(ITEMTEXT | ITEM ENA BLED NULL,
(APTR) &ITextfl 1]
1
These are the Menu Initializations.
Circle 80 on Reader Service card.
A
From the authors of Microft BASIC for Macintosh, comes AC BASIC for the Amiga, Companion compiler to the Amiga BASIC interpreter: has more features and includes a Debugger, includes BLOCK IF, CASE statement, and STATIC keyword extensions and executes up to 50x Lister. AC BASIC is the new BASIC reference for MC68000 based personal computers. Not copy protected. $ 205.
Telephone orders welcome
Mainframe quality, full feature ANSI FORTRAN 77
compiler includes: Debugger, Linker, Library Manager, Runtime Library, IEEE math, and C interface. Supports Complex numbers, Virtual arrays, Overlays and Dynamic Linking. Not copy protected. $ 295.
Version with support for CSA 68020 68881 hoard also available.
Scientific Engineering Software
4268 N. Woodward, Royal Oak, Ml 48072 (313) 549-7111
Amiga trademark of Commodore Amiga Microsoft trademark of Microsoft Corp. 187AW
AC FORTRAN
AC BASIC
ft
struct Menu Menu[] =

* MenufO] : Weapons :;c & M enu[ 1 ],
0, 0, 80, 0,
MENUENABLED,
!lr t»
a capons ,
& M enulte m(0]
K
* Menu[l] : Inventory * Si M enu[2],
100, 0, 100, 0,
MENUENA BLED, "Inventory ”,
Si M enulte m[4]
),
( * Menu[2] : Magicks * NULL,
220, 0, 80, 0,
MENU ENABLED, "Magicks ",
& M enulte m[! 0]
This definition is included only to make this file compatible with the driver. This section may be removed after testing of the menustrip is complete.
Struct Menu * My Menu = &Menu[G];
};
*
*
)
• MONITORS *
AMDEK
Color 600 Hi-Res (640x240) ...S39S 00
Color 722 Hi-Res Dual Mode ......8529 00
MAGNAVOX
515 RGB Composite ...S299.00
NEC
JC 1401 Mullisync RGB ....In Stock
ZENITH
ZVM 1220 1230 ......,....(ea.) S99.99
ZVM 1330 16 color RGB .S459 00
AMIGA
1080 Hi-Res Color .....S279.00
• MODEMS •
ANCHOR
Volksmodem 300 1200 8139.00
Signalman Express 1200 EXT .....8199.00
Lightning 2400 Baud EXT ..$ 319.00
HAYES
Smartmodem 300 ......8139.00
Smartmodem 1200 ...... 8389.00
Smartmodem 2400 . 8599.00
COMMODORE
THIRD PARTY SOFTWARE
Amiga 1680 1200 BPS S229.00
PRACTICAL PERIPHERALS
1200 BPS Externa! .$ 169.00
• ACCESSORIES •
KENSINGTON MICROWARE
Master Piece ...... 899.99
Printer Stand ....$ 19.99
CURTIS
Diamond SP-1 .S32 99
Emerald SP-2 .....839 99
Sapphire SPF-1 ..852 99
Ruby SPF-2 S59 99
Safe Strip S19 99
Universal Printer Stand .814.99
DATA SHIELD
300 Watt Backup .
......8379.00
500 Watt Backup ....
..8589 00
Turbo 350 Watt Backup ..
......8449.00
P125 Power Director ...
......899.99
P150 Power Director w Modem......
......S119 00
S85 Surge Protector ...
.869 99
CABLES
Parallel Pr nter Cable ....
819. 99
AMIGA™ SYSTEM PACKAGE
Amiga 1000, 512K, Mouse.
Amiga 1080 RGB Monitor. Amiga DOS, Basic, Tutorial. Kaleidoscope and Voice Synthesis Library
$ 1199°°
• DISK DRIVES •
Amiga 1010 3VV" .$ 219.00
Amiga 1020 5V ..$ 189.00
• DISKETTES •
MAXELL
3V2” SS DD ..S18 99
3Vs" DS DD .. 829.99
5V4” MD-2 DS DD .S15.99
SONY
3V2-’ SS DD Disks (10) ..$ 17.99
3V2” DS DD Disks (10) .$ 29.99
5V* " DS DD Disks (10) ..812.99
AMARAY
30 Disk Tub 3V2" 89.99
KALMAR DESIGNS
3V2” Disk Cabinet - Teak ....814.99
GENERIC
3V2" DS DD (10) 819.99
3V2" DS DD Bulk 50 Pack ...889.99
ACTIVISION
Borrowed Time ..,...$ 32.99
Hacker ..$ 32.99
Mind Shadow .....$ 32.99
AEGIS DEVELOPMENT
Animation ......CALL
BATTERIES INCLUDED
Isgur Portfolio System ....S169.00
COMMODORE
Textcraft w Graphic Craft .....$ 59.99
Musicraft ......$ 79,99
TLC Logo ......$ 79.99
Amiga Pascal .....$ 79.99
Lattice “C" .. $ 119.00
Assembler $ 79.99
Lisp .....$ 156.00
ELECTRONIC ARTS
Deluxe Paint S59.99
Archon ..S31.99
One on One .S31.99
Sky Fox S31.99
Financial Cookbook., ....S37.99
Seven Cities of Gold .....S31.99
Arctic Fox ....$ 31.99
Deluxe Print .$ 74.99
Instant Music .. $ 34.99
Deluxe Video ...... $ 69.99
• PRINTERS •
EPSON
LX-86 120 Cps 8239.00
FX-85. FX-286 ..Call
EX-800. EX-1000 ....Call
LQ-800. LQ-1000. LG-2500 .....Call
Free book & printer stand w purchase
JUKI
5510C Color Dot Matrix ....Call
6000 12 cps Daisywheel ...Call
6100 18 cps Daisywheel ...Call
6200 30 cps Wide Carriage .....Call
6300 40 cps Wide Carriage ,.... Call
OKIDATA
Okimate 20 Color Printer .. S129.00
ML-182 120 cps Dot Matrix S219.00
ML-192 160 cps Dot Matrix 8339.00
ML-193 + . Ml-292 , ML-293 + Call
STAR MICRON1CS
NL-10 Font Compatible .....Call
NX-10 120 cps Dot Matrix..-. .....S239 00
TOSHIBA
...8479 00 ..,.8589.00 S1049.00
P321 24 Wire 80 column ..
P341 24 Wire 136 column
P351 24 Wire 136 column......
• PLOTTERS
CALL
.. $ 359.00
HEWLETT PACKARD ......
EPSON - HI80 4 Pen ...
DISCOVERY SOFTWARE
Marauder Back-up .832.99
INFOCOM
Wishbrmger ...... 531.99
Hitchhiker’s Guide ... .531.99
Spellbreaker .S31.99
Planetfall ......S31.99
Witness .S31.99
MEGASOFT LTD
A-Copier S34.99
A-Report ......S44.99
MICRO ILLUSIONS
Dynarmc-Cad . 8319.00
MINDSCAPE
Hailey Project ..... $ 31.99
Deja Vu $ 34.99
Keyboard Cadet .. 829.99
MICRO SYSTEMS
Analyze .859.99
Scribble 859,99
On-Lme Comm ...849.99
Organize Data Base .....$ 59.99
V. LP.
V. I.P. Professional ......8139.00
Please call for pricing and availability of any new releases.
COMPUTER MAIL ORDER
Call toll-free: 1-800-233-8950
Outside the U.S.A. 717-327-9575 Telex 5106017898 Educational Institutions call toll-free 1-800-221-4283
CMO. 477 East Third Street. Dept. B901, Williamsport. PA 17701
All major credit cards accepted.
POLICY: Add 3Bu (minimum S7 00) shipping and handling Larger shipmenis may require additional charges Personal and company checks require 3 weeks to clear For faster de ivery use your credil card or send cashier s chec-. Or Bank money order Pennsylvania residents add 6% sales lax All prices are subect lo change and al ilen-.s are subject to availability Defective software will be replaced with the same item enly Hardware will be repaired or replaced al our discretion within the terms and limits of me manufacturer s warranty We cannot guarantee compatibility AH sales are final and relumed shipments are subject to a restocking lee
Index to 1985-86 Amiga World Articles
ARTICLE
AUTHOR ISSUE
PAGE
Business
- j "8
If l1'
''TJijS,: ;,fer
Wright
Nov Dec ’85
36
Guzelimian
Nov Dec *85
37
Wratt
Nov Dec ’85
18
Wright
Nov Dec ’85
12
Zigmond
May June '86
42
Leeds
May June '86
38
Wright
May June '86
32
The Bottom Line: An Introduction to Spreadsheets The Right Stuff: The Amiga in the Marketplace White-Collar Amiga
Artificial Intelligence: Expert Systems in the Business World Business Graphics Computerizing a Small Business
warn
fit
List of Amiga Regional Representatives Amiga Software Market
The Great AmigaWorld Holiday Software Buyer's Guide
Staff
Mitchell
Laughner, Jacob
Jan Feb '86 Mar Apr ’86 Nov Dec ’86
44 40
45
Telecommunicating in the Small-Busi ness World Getting It On Line
Jan Feb '86 Nov Dec ’86
56
16
The Amiga as a Teaching Tool Amiga in the Schools: A Realistic Look
Wright
Lashway
Premiere '85 81
May June '86 90
Stimulating Simulations: Electronic Arts Gets Involved with the Amiga
Forbes
Premiere ’85
56
What If...
Wright
Premiere ’85
36
Metacomco: Developers of AmigaDOS
Staff
Nov Dec '85
70
Adventurous Journey
Liddil
Jan Feb '86
66
Challenging the Mind: Mindscape’s Commitment to the Amiga
Laflamme
Jan Feb '86
84
The Wizard of W'ishbringer
Moriarty
Jan Feb '86
70
Enabling Amiga
Labriola, Meyer
Mar Apr '86
81
Optical Revolution
Leeds
Mar Apr '86
34
Miami Vice Co-Stars Amigas?
Laughner
Sept Oct ’86
32
Textcraft Tricks
Brown
Sept Oct ’86
92
The Amiga Shows Up
Ryan
Sept Oct ’86
70
Editors’ Choice Awards
Staff
Nov Dec ’86
74
Graphics Art Video
Wright
Premiere ’85
44
Leeds
Nov Dec ’85
42
Wright, Suokko
Jan Feb ’86
16
Reifsnyder
Jan Feb '86
28
Laughner
Jan Feb "86
24
Wright
Jan Feb ‘86
36
Oakes
May June '86
74
Shapiro
May June '86
66
Hagen
Sept Oct '86
26
Evans
Sept Oct '86
12
Ingalls
Sept Oct '86
22
. V Li~£- *' .
Wright
Premiere '85
72
Reifsnvder
Nov Dec '85
58
Amazing Graphics Digital Imagery
Andy Warhol: An Artist and His Amiga Artists and the Amiga Computer Art: Is It Really Art?
The Personal Art of a Personal Computer Computer Graphics: New Tools and Techniques for Artists Creating Fill Patterns with DeluxePaint Astronomical Art and the Amiga
The Illusion of Life: Traditional Character Animation on the Amiga Oh No! It’s Mr. Bill!
Ossa
Sound
Sounds Like
Cherry Lane Technologies: Maestros of Innovative Music Software
If the space program as fast as the compute
mighi
view ir
tions professionals, including MIS executives and professionals, communications managers, executives at reseller organizations, micro experts, and industry executives and marketers.
And space stations, Martian colonies, and interstellar probes might already be commonplace. Does that sound outlandish? Then bear these facts in mind:
In 1946 ENI AC was the scientific marvel of the day. This computer weighed 30 tons, stood two stories high, covered 15,000 square feet, and cost $ 486,840.22 in 1946 dollars. Today a $ 2,000 portable can add and subtract more than 20 times faster. And, by 1990, the average digital watch will have as much computing power as ENIAC.
The collective brainpower of computers sold in the next two years will equal that of all computers sold from the beginning to now. Four years from now it will have doubled again.
It’s hard to remember that this is science fact, not fiction.
How do people keep pace with change like this? That’s where we come in. We’re CW Communications Inc. the world’s largest publisher of computer-related newspapers and magazines.
Every month more than 12,000,000 people read one or more of our publications.
Nobody reaches as many computer-involved people around the world as we do. And nobody covers more markets.
In the United States, we have twelve publications: Computerworld, Info World, Micro MarketWorld, Network
CW COMMUNICATE
An International Data Group Company 375 Cochituate Rd.. Box 9171, Framingham, MA 01701-9171, (617) 879-0700
Ivnr sJDiodlnJ Afowc cptvp rnmnntpr *anH rnmmiinira-
We also have six publications which concentrate on specific personal computers and their compatibles. PC World (IBM), MacWorld (Macintosh), inCider (Apple II), 80 Micro (TRS-80), RUN (Commodore C-128 C-64) and AmigaWorld (Commodore Amiga). And we have a new publication dedicated to the emerging field of desktop publishing: Publish!
And we have similar publications in every major computer market in the world. Our network publishes over 70 computer publications in more than 25 countries Argentina, Australia, Austria, Brazil, Chile, Denmark, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, The Netherlands, Norway, People’s Republic of China, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Swit7,»rinnri United Kingdom, United States, Venezuela, and West Germany.
The sooner we hear from you, the sooner you’ll hear from our readers
Simply put, we make it easy audience and for them to information. You’ll find the number
ARTICLE
AUTHOR
ISSUE
PAGE
Music by MIDI: The Marriage of Talent and Technology
Herrington
Nov Dec ’85
52
Amiga Music Studio
Herrington
Mar Apr ’86
64
Designing Amiga’s Sound
Herrington
July Aug ’86
24
Digital Sound Synthesis
Foust
July Aug ’86
34
Music Synthesis and the Amiga
Herrington
July Aug ’86
14
Professional Musicians and the Amiga
Herrington
July Aug ’86
38
Using Your Intuition
Fisher
Mar Apr '86
68
IFF: A New Standard
Leeds
May June ’86
68
Using the Amiga Editor
Baker
May June ’86
28
Window on AmigaDOS: Using the Command Line Interpreter
Wallace
May June ’86
18
Programming
¦MBS
Programming in C: Speaking the Amiga's Language
Leemon
Nov Dec ’85
62
Programming on the Amiga: Cambridge Lisp 68000
Zigmond
Jan Feb ’86
74
TLC-Logo for the Amiga
Herrington
Jan Feb '86
81
Basic Graphics
Dodgen
Mar Apr '86
54
Programming on the Amiga: MCC Pascal
Zigmond
Mar Apr '86
56
Amiga Basic: An Overview
Ryan
May june '86
48
Basic and Before
Laughner
May June '86
62
The Apple Connection
Hollander
July Aug '86
52
Fundamentals of C: C Basics
Van Name. Catchings
july Aug ’86
46
Making Music with Amiga Basic
Wallace
july Aug '86
42
Amiga Basic Graphics Primer: Part 1
Knight
Sept Oct ’86
37
Fundamentals of C: C Concepts
Catchings, Van Name
Sept Oct '86
56
Using Libraries from Amiga Basic
Wallace
Sept Oct '86
50
Amiga Basic Graphics Primer: Part 2
Knight
Nov Dec *86
76
C Compilers: Lattice versus Manx
Van Name, Catchings
Nov Dec *86
36
Fundamentals of C: C Structures
Van Name, Catchings
Nov Dec '86
92
Reviews
Textcraft
Wright
Nov Dec *85
92
DeluxePaint
Reifsnyder
Mar Apr ’86
72
MaxiComm
Ryan
Mar Apr ’86
77
Video RoomMate Powered Speaker System
Laughner
Mar Apr '86
75
Borrowed Time
Stall
May June ’86
82
Mindshadow
Staff
May June ’86
83
Monkey Business
Staff
May June ’86
84
The Okimate 20
Staff
May June ‘86
79
One-on-One
Staff
May June ’86
80
OnLine! Courier 2400 Modem
Staff
May June ’86
78
The Seven Cities of Gold
StafF
May June '86
81
Brataccas
Staff
July Aug ’86
96
CD20 Amiga Hard Disk System
Staff
July Aug ’86
92
Rags to Riches
Roberts, Lopes
July Aug ’86
90
Time & Task Planner
Staff
July Aug '86
92
A Mind Forever Voyaging
Staff
Sept Oct '86
104
Amiga Transformer
Van Name, Catchings
Sept Oct '86
97
An Behind Glass: Aegis Images and Aegis Animator
Laughner
Sept Oct '86
64
Financial Cookbook
Bobo
Sept Oct '86
99
Flow
Bobo
Sept Oct '86
96
The Hailey Project
Staff
Sept Oct ’86
98
103 102 112 118 108
104 114 100 103
Sept Oct ’86 Sept Oct '86 Nov Dec '86 Nov Dec ’86 Nov Dec ’86 Nov Dec ’86 Nov Dec ’86 Nov Dec ’86 Nov Dec ’86
Staff
Staff
Salamone
Bobo
Ryan
Herrington
Ludwick
Ryan
Salamone
Rogue and Temple of Apshai Trilogy
The Talking Coloring Book
Analyze! And Unicalc
Financial Plus
MiAmiga File
The Music Studio
Penmouse +
True BASIC VIP Professional
Software
A First Look at the Amiga
Morabito
Premiere ’85
14
A Peek at the 68000
Epstein
Premiere ’85
76
Cynicism and Seduction, Speed and Software
Pandaris
Premiere '85
26
In Stark Contrast: Comparing the Amiga with the Macintosh and IBM-PC
Morabito
Nov Dec ’85
24
The Trump Card: Amiga's IBM-PC Software Emulator
Graham
Nov Dec ’85
34
CD-ROM: The Future of Memory?
Rotello
Mar Apr ’86
60
Success Story: A-Squared Systems and the Amiga Digitizer
Leeds
Mar Apr ’86
26
VIVA from Knowledgeware
Wright
Mar Apr ’86
22
Interactive Videodisc Technolog)’
Leeds
Mar Apr ’86
18
Amiga Sidecar Preview
Ryan
Sept Oct ’86
46
DeluxeVideo Construction Set Preview
Ryan
Sept Oct ’86
76
MaxiPlan Spreadsheet Preview: Unmistakably Amiga
Ryan
Sept Oct ’86
74
Color Printers
Kalisher
Nov Dec ’86
30
?SPECIAL*
Amiga Computer, Monitor, 256K Expansion Module and 3.5 External Drive
STOP HERE
For Your Best Buys in Hardware and Software.
Amiga Computer
AMIGA products at your fingertips
Specials of the Month
SOFTWARE
Mleroeyslems SW
Analyze ....I 67 46
BBS PC ....J 69 00
Online ....S 47 21
Organize S 6900
Scribble ...* 69 00
The Crimson Crown.....* 29 96
The Coveted Mirror ..... J 26.21
Graphical .....Call
Micro League
General Managers .....call
Owner Disk ..* 26.96
Micro League Baseball . ... I 47 96
Electronic Arts
Adv Construction Kit.....S 28 50
Archon .$ 20 50
Artie Foi ...* 28 50
Deluxe Music Call
Meiaierib* ..S 68 00
Metalools I . $ 55 96
Metalooli II .j 55 96
Meiascribe ..I 68 00
Oeluee Paint .. 5 63 00
Deluxe Prlnl .....J 63 00
Financial Cookbook......S 36 63
Golden Oldies .J 24 94
Marble Madness * 35 00
Mixicomm ..j 3563
Masideak ...X 49 Bfi
Modem
Special
• 300 1200 Baud
• OnLme software
• Cable
$ 199
93 75 7500 5525
JUKI 5510 with Color Kit
$ 399
28 QO 28 00 16 00
15 00
Epson
Juki
Xefcx
Modems Cedes Hard Drives
Monitors
* Calor Printers* Special
Activision
1 Oiffl Builtri * 29 96
2 Mun 16 ..S 29 96
3 Borrowid Time ...... * 3034
4 Mimcshjdo* S 3034
5 Mutic Studio S 3S.25
6 Hacker ...S 35 96
Aegis
Aegis Anirrator lmages . . . . S 89 00
Aegis Draw .. 1124 00
Aegis Images .* 54 00
Aegis Impact ..... 12900
Aegis Draw Pro $ 799 99
Aegis Aripak ...Call
Aegis Doug Clapps Word Tool . . . Call
Commidore Amiga Sollwate
Amiga Assembler......J 75 25
Amiga Litp ..SI57 94
Lattice Imk ..SI43.00
Lattice Ue ....Call
Maclibrary . ..Call
dbc III Library..... Call
Mindscape Amiga Tutor
Brataccus ...S 337!
0«l* VU ....S 33 71
Hatley Praject . 5 30.34
Keyboard Cadel I 26 96
Ractor .. . | 30 34
CALL FOR PRICES ON ITEMS NOT LISTED
Maxiplan ... 1106 63
0 J A L Bird One on One . . . S 28 50
Seven Cilres ..S 2850
Skytor I 2850
Uyllima ....S 48 50
Return to Atlantis .Call
Instant Music ......Call
Deluxe Paint Art ..Call
Deluxe Paint An & Utilities .... Call
Deluxe Printing ..Call
Inlocom
Ballyhoo ...S 26 96
Cutthroat ...* 26 96
Deadline ...J 33 71
Hitchhikers Guide......* 26 96
Inchanter ...* 26 96
Intidel ....* 33 71
inwiti Clues
A Mind Forever Voyage .... * 3034
Planetlall ...* 26 96
Sea Stalker ..* 26 96
Sorcerer ...* 30 34
DISKS
3 5 Maul OS OD
3 5 3M ......
5% Waiel MO 2 5% Elephant
PRINTERS
Spellbreaktr .* 33 7!
Siarcross ..I 33 71
Sutpeci ....* 33 71
Suspended . . ......S 27 9!
Wishbringer ..S 26 96
Witness ....* 26 96
Zork I .....t 28.95
Zork II ....I 30 34
Zork III ....S 30 34
VIP Technology
VIP Professional *13125
VIP Analysis...... Call
VIP Consultant ...Call
VIP Forethought ..Call
VIP freelance ...Call
Lattice
Make Utility.....
Screen fdilor , , , , Text Utilities . . . ,
JHM
Talking Coloring Book
ACCESSORIES
Memory Dis* Holders More1 Mate! Mare! Mate1
* 21 25
1-800-423-7347
AMIGA Is a trademark of Commodore-Amiga Inc. Prices subject to change
STAR FLITE*
P. 0. Box 685 Nitro. WV 25143
Telemarketing
AmigaWorld is a member of CW Communications Inc. group, the world’s largest publisher of computer-related information. The group publishes over 70 computer publications in more than 28 major countries. 12 million people read one or more of the group's publications each month. Members of CWCI group contribute to the CW International News Sen ice, offering the latest on domestic and international computer news. Members of the group include: ARGENTINA'S Computenvorld Argentina, PC Mundo; ASIA'S Asian Computerworld, Communications World: AUSTRALIA’S Computer-world Australia, Communications World, Australian PC World, Australian Maaeorld: AUSTRIA’S Computerwelt Oes- terreich; BRAZIL’S DataNews. PC Mundo; CHILE'S Information, Computacion Personal: DENMARK’S Corn- put erwor Id Danmark. PC World Danmark, RUN: FINLAND'S Tietoviikko, Mikro: FRANCE’S Le Monde Informatique, Distributique, Golden, InfoPC. Theoreme: GREECE’S Micro & Computer Age: HUNGARY’S SZT Computerworld, Mikrovilag: INDIA'S Dataquest; ISRAEL’S People Cf Computers Monthly, People Computers Weekly; ITALY’S Computerworld Italia, PC World Magaz i ne, J APA N ’ S Computerworld Japan: MEXICO’S Computerworld Mexico: THE NETHERLANDS' Com- puteruiorld Netherlands, PC World Netherlands: NEW ZEALAND'S Computerworld New Zealand: NORWAY’S PC Mikrodata, Computerworld Norge; PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA’S China Computerworld: SAUDI ARABIA’S Arabian Computer News: SOUTH KOREA'S The Electronic Times: SPAIN'S Computenuorld Espana, Commodore World, PC World Espana; SWEDEN’S Computer Sweden, Mikro- datorn, Svenska PC World: SWITZERLAND’S Computerworld Schweiz: UNITED KINGDOM’S Computer News, DEC Today, ICL Today, PC Business World: UNITED STATES’ Amiga World, Boston Computer News, Computerworld. Digital News, SO Micro, FOCUS Publications, inCider, Info World, MacWor d, Micro Mar- ketworld. Network World, PC World, Publish!, RUN: VENEZUELA’S Computerworld Venezuela: WEST GERMANY'S Computerwoche, PC Welt, Computer Business, Run, InfoWelt
Manuscripts: Contributions in the form of manuscripts with drawings and or photographs are welcome and will be considered for possible publication. AmigaWorld assumes no responsibility for loss or damage to any material. Please enclose a self-addressed, stamped envelope with each submission. Payment for the use of any unsolicited material will be made upon acceptance. All contributions and editorial correspondence (typed and double-spaced, please) should be directed to AmigaWorld Editorial Offices, 80 Elm Street, Peterborough, NH 03458; telephone: 603-924-9471. Advertising Inquiries should be directed to Advertising Offices, CW Communications Peterborough, Inc., 80 Elm Street, Peterborough, NH 03458; telephone: 800-441*4403. Subscription problems or address changes: Call 1-800-227-5782 or write to AmigaWorld, Subscription Department. PO Box 868, Farmingdale, NY 11737. Problems with advertisers: Send a description of the problem and your current address to: AmigaWorld, 80 Elm Street. Peterborough, NH 03458, ATTN.: Barbara Harris, Customer Service Manager, or call 1*800*441-4403.
List of Advertisers
Reader
Sendee
Number
175 AbSoft, 106 54 Access Associates, 81 128 Amiga Public Domain Connection, 88 AmigaWorld Subscription, 64, 65 Christmas Ad, 80 RUN Speical Issue, 111 205 Applegren Computer Systems, Inc., 97
29 Applied Visions, 59
197 Baudviile, 18
58 Best Computer Supplies, 45 57 Bethesda Softworks, 57
42 Byte By Byte, CIV
59 C Ltd., 49
170 Cardinal Software, 88
143 Central Coast Software, 104
110 Compumed, 11
53 CompuServe, 6, 7
207 Computer Best, 94
41 Computer Mail Order, 107
80 Computer Solutions, 106 116 Computer World, 111
114 Computerware, 104
79 Comspec Communications, 77
60 Creative Solutions, 84
172 Data Research Processing, Inc., 105 202 Delta Research, 105
28 Digital Creations, 83
28 Digital Creations, 85
46 Digital Solutions, Inc., Cll, 1
89 Discovery Software, 55 153 Echo Data Services, 103 2 Electronic Arts, 2, 3
51 Finally Software, 63
91 Finally Software, 63
111 Finally Software, 63
135 FutureSoft Applications, Inc., 61 26 Go AMIGA, 34, 35
150 Gold Disk, 79
50 Infocom, 50, 51
88 Interactive Analytic Node, 99
188 Jumpdisk, 82
118 KJ Computers. 103
93 Lance Hafner Games, 102 23 Lattice. 27
68 Lionheart, 82
48 M.W. Ruth Company, 84 31 Manx, 55
180 Megatromcs, Inc., 101 56 Meridian Software, 89 16 Metacomco Software, 102 98 Metadigm, Inc., 60
Reader
Sendee
Number
37
Micro Illusions, Clll
71
Micro Illusions, 93
198
Microorose Software, 87
95
Micro-Systems Software, Inc., 43
103
MicroBotics, Inc., 67
195
Microsmiths, Inc., 92
112
Miles Computing, 9
38
New Horizons Software, 13
102
Newtek, 22, 23
40
PAR Software, 91
159
Progress. Periph. & Soft., 33
159
Progress. Periph. & Soft,, 31
161
Progress. Periph. & Soft., 59
78
RS Data Systems, 47
70
Rastaware, 18
67
Sedona Software, 96
132
Side-Effects Inc., 100
105
Specialist In, 90
63
Spectrum Holobyte, 99
120
TDI Software Inc, 95
126
The Other Guys, 86
62
Transtime Technologies Corp., 75
66
True Basic, 69
97
USA Flex, 58
* This advertiser prefers to be contacted direcdv
This index is provided as an additional service. The publisher does not assume liability for errors or omissions.
Coming Attractions
New things from Commodore.. .taking off from the Amiga 1000 launching pad? You won't believe what has been cooking in the Commodore hardware R & D labs! You are going to hear rumors and read speculations, but AmigaWorld is going to give you the complete story from specs to pics, infos to photos. An exclusive preview of the next wave (so exclusive that we can’t tell you much more than that right now). You’ll just have to wait and wonder....
TO RECEIVE MORE INFORMATION
TEAR
LOOK FOR
your subscription in 10 to 12 weeks.
ORDER
a one year subscription to AmigaWorld by circling 500 on the card,
MAIL
CIRCLE
the numbers on the card that correspond to the reader service numbers on the advertisements that interest you.
Out the perforated card. Please print or type your name and address where
indicated.
The card with your check, money order or U.S. currency to: AmigaWorld Reader Service Dept.
P. O. Box 363 Dalton, MA 01227 Or, you may request billing.
REMEMBER
to put the proper postage on the card.
READER SERVICE
JANUARY FEBRUARY 1987
This card valid until March 31, 1997.
? Mr.
? Mrs.
? Ms. Name
Title _
Address
¦ you w&Ad fee a one year *X*cr xo- so AmgaWortd (i cftaae crew 500 on ne card Each eubaenpcon a S‘«97 (Canada & Masco. 117 97, Fpregn Suri*c* 534 97 one year only US BANK FUNDS ONLY ) P1e®» nfcw 10-12 weeks for drtvary
1
8
11
IB
21
201
206
211
216
221
401
* 08
* 11
418
421
2
7
12
17
22
202
207
212
217
222
402
407
* 12
417
422
3
8
13
18
23
203
2C8
213
218
223
403
40$
* 13
418
423
*
9
1*
19
24
204
209
214
219
224
* 04
* 09
* 14
419
424
5
10
15
20
25
208
210
215
220
225
* 06
* 10
415
420
425
26
31
36
41
*8
228
231
238
241
248
* 26
* 31
4X
441
* 48
27
32
37
42
*7
227
232
237
242
2*7
427
* 32
437
442
447
28
33
38
*3
48
228
233
238
243
2*8
428
* 33
438
443
448
29
3*
39
44
9
226
234
239
244
2*0
429
434
439
44*
* 49
30
35
*0
45
50
230
238
240
245
250
4X
* 35
* 40
* 48
* 50
51
56
61
68
71
251
258
261
286
271
451
458
481
* 88
471
52
57
62
87
72
252
257
262
287
272
452
457
* 82
* 87
472
53
58
83
88
73
263
258
283
288
273
453
458
483
* 68
473
5*
59
84
89
74
25*
259
28*
289
274
454
459
484
* 49
474
55
80
85
70
75
286
280
288
270
275
458
* 80
485
470
475
78
81
88
91
96
278
281
238
291
290
* 76
* 81

491
488
77
82
87
92
97
777
282
287
292
297
477
* 82
487
492
497
78
83
88
93
98
278
283
2S8
293
298
478
483
488
* 93
498
79
8*
69
94
99
276
284
289
294
299
479
48*
489
494
* 99
80
as
90
95
100
260
285
290
295
3C0
* 80
* 85
* 90
495
500
101
108
111
116
121
XI
308
311
318
321
501
508
511
518
521
102
107
112
117
122
302
X7
312
317
32?
502
XT
512
SIT
522
103
108
113
1 IB
123
303
308
313
318
323
503
508
513
5i6
523
104
109
114
119
124
30*
309
31*
319
324
50*
509
514
5i9
524
108
110
118
120
125
305
310
315
320
325
506
610
515
520
528
128
131
138
141
146
326
331
338
141
346
528
531
536
5*1
5*8
127
132
137
1*2
1*7
327
332
337
342
347
527
532
537
5*2
547
128
133
138
1*3
1*8
328
333
338
3*3
348
528
533
538
5*3
548
129
134
139
14*
149
329
331
339
344
3*9
529
53*
539
5*4
549
130
135
140
145
150
330
335
340
345
350
530
535
540
545
560
151
158
161
168
171
351
356
XI
388
371
SSI
558
Hi
568
571
152
157
1B2
167
172
352
357
382
367
372
582
587
562
587
572
153
158
163
166
173
353
358
383
386
373
553
558
583
588
573
154
159
184
169
17*
354
359
384
389
374
55*
559
58*
589
574
155
180
185
170
175
155
360
365
370
375
558
580
585
570
575
178
181
188
191
196
376
XI
388
XI
396
578
XT
586
591
598
177
182
187
192
197
377
382
387
392
1ST
577
582
587
592
597
17B
183
188
193
138
378
383
388
393
398
578
583
568
593
598
179
IB*
189
16*
196
379
38*
389
394
399
579
56*
589
594
580
180
1BS
190
165
200
380
365
390
395
400
580
565
590
596
800
READER SERVICE ' R E A D E R S E R V I C E
City State Zip Telephone_
a AmgeYitorttf? I
OS- IV 06 Po«
? 7 Vary Poor
? Fi ’trrcM
A Ho* «oJC you ru ft*
? V GREAT!
? 2 Vrey Good
? 3 Prrtly Good C * Good
? 11 Dgui C*f>va»
? 12 A tdas
? 13 Cow*
ftaadre Serve* Card Everytfwrg
? 14
0 15
F When c* Si* tofcMmg catogerw* do you wm lo Purchase *c T*w» from 41 lie rad 12 months’?
? 1. Ertartanrrert ? 9
? 2 Wxd ProcaBKiQ ? 10
? 3 GsmTuooncn* Oil
? 4 Spreacmeea ? 12
? 5 Hama Praductvty 0 13
0 8 Programming 0 14
? 7 Seftwsre Devetopmen G 15
C B .KoO-iya Create- C 18
a Whrt w* be you* nw mepr peripheral purmaae?
? 1 Mooter ? 6 5 3acre
C 2 Pnrtre 0 7 Gen Ux* or Frre-ia G aDore
? J Modem ? 8 Muse (Mtf. Keyboard tfc)
O * Merrory E*par»on G 9 Ghre
05 a» Ova hard cr toppy)
DrtrteM Management
Francal Managemert
Greenes
EducsPon
Muac
Hardware Dmbcnrl SounQSoaecfi 0reeto(yi*r4 CCC*W
7* amc csmpteto tm wrtvxm Mart c4
C Oeo ai a re enongi
AmgtWoftj 4 ..."
c' J -* n T!
? 2 Too SmtJe
? 3. Too Comptox
? 4. FtoB 0 5 UeaM
? 8
? 7
? 8 C 9
G Hm you aw purchased a product eflar recerying fw rtgrm«on you ve reguertad from an AmfleWo kJ read** eervca cartf7 ? 1. Yre 0 2 No
H 1W* do you buy your compare produca? (Please pek ere)
&MM
TvrturtW)
C 4 OtecouxOeparcmert Sere C 5 Other_
? 1 Compute* Deere
0 2 Mai Ora
? 3
& Amge-
w~jt ICOC4 *4utd yai I'm io m cowad n lmi Ode tree )
C 1 C language Amfls Bald
ai
0 11 How offer* uk Te A nge O 12. B.jw« QuOm
t Do ydu Own an Amiga7
0 V'm
J W« ® you uae your Amga7 O 1 Home
02 Work
03 School
G 4. A! Home tot
0 13 ? 1*
? 15.
A io
? 17
? 18 a is
020
Comoarttvw Smwi
Muec
Qrechc*
Progrren LUCng*
New Products Opnore
Hardware Protaca Offer
02 Ho
? 5 Both K from* and work D 6 BoJi at from* and Kfrxl
? 7. I don'! U*o an Amge
Buareaa Apfjorcn* IBM Comp«W*y Home Aprtcrtor* Education
Vdeo
Scene* And Engneanng
O 10
K to tm you* copy d AmrgeWond7 ? 1 Yee
? 2 HO ore* *99
Vwel ere yojr a.--rti, ;-.ng* ttxxl AmgaWorkT (Plaaae pek al fet
• 0&t)
C 1 Zecge* (=dor » Page!
O I Repanaa (Lacre*)
? 3 irtwvwwe C4 H«K»y (Quarter*)
? 3 Veurm
L> |«i n nd t ajfieenbet.
0 6
? 7.
08 C 9 Raw**
? 10
Hor* tfoourras
JANUARY FEBRUARY 1987
This card valid until March 31, 1987.
? Mr.
? Mrs.
? Ms. Name
Title
Address
City State Zip Telephone_
? * Dacoux'Depamerl Star*
? 5. Ofher_
L fr yw are not a eubeenbre. Cieaie crele 4H
M » you would h* a ona year eubaenpum n AmigaWorld (an aouM]. Ptaaaa cresa 500 on Te card Eacn ajCacrcxon a 114 97 Canada & Mateo, 117 97. Fcragn Solace S3* 97 ore yere crty-Lj S BANK FUNDS ONLY) Prtaae akw 13-12 wean* tor drtuary
1
e
11
16
21
20>
205
211
216
221
401
408
411
416
421
2
7
12
IT
22
202
207
212
217
2X2
402
407
412
417
422
3
a
13
16
23
203
208
213
218
223
* 03
406
413
41B
423
4
9
14
19
24
204
209
214
219
22*
* 0*
409
414
419
424
5
10
15
20
X
2Q5
210
215
220
225
* 06
410
415
4X
425
X
31
X
41
46
228
231
2X
241
248
426
* 31

441
448
27
32
37
42
47
227
232
ZS7
242
247
427
* 32
437
4*2
447
X
33
X
43
48
223
233
236
243
2*8
* 28
* 33
*X
4*3
4*8
29
34
39
44
*9
229
23*
239
244
249
* 29
* 3*
* 39
4*4
4*9
X
35
40
45
SO
2X
235
2*0
245
250
4X
* 35
4*0
44S
450
51
58
81
M
71
251
258
XI
286
271
451
458
481
486
471
52
57
82
67
72
252
X7
282
X7
27 2
482
457
482
487
472
53
58
83
68
73
253
258
283
268
273
* 53
* 58
483
488
473
54
SO
84
ee
74
25*
259
28*
289
274
454
450
484
489
474
55
X
85
70
75
2W
XO
285
270
275
* 56
480
455
470
475
78
51
H
91
96
278
XI
296
XI
236
478
451
486
491
* 96
77
52
87
32
97
277
232
26 7
292
297
477
452
487
432
497
78
53
58
93
X
27B
283
288
293
236
478
483
438
* 33
498
79
B*
89
9*
99
279
26*
289
29*
299
479
434
488
494
498
60
85
X
95
IX
260
285
290
295
300
400
455
490
* 96
500
101
108
111
118
121
XI
308
311
316
XI
XI
608
5ii
510
521
102
107
112
117
122
302
XT
312
317
322
502
507
512
517
522
103
108
113
118
IX
3(0
308
313
316
323
503
508
513
518
523
10*
109
114
ne
124
30*
309
314
319
324
604
609
514
519
524
106
110
115

IX
305
310
315
320
325
506
510
515
520
5X
IX
131
IX
141
148
326
Xi
336
3*1
348
528
53!
538
541
5*8
127
132
137
142
147
327
332
337
342
XT
527
532
537
542
547
IX
IX
IX
143
140
328
333
338
343
343
526
533
538
5*3
540
IX
134
IX
144
149
329
33*
339
344
349
629
S3*
530
544
549
IX
IX
140
145
150
3X
335
340
345
350
SX
535
540
545
550
161
’56
161
186
171
X!
366
X!
368
371
HI
558
HI
588
571
152
157
182
187
172
352
367
382
367
372
552
H7
582
587
572
153
156
183
188
173
353
368
383
368
373
553
558
583
588
573
15*
iS9
16*
169
174
35*
359
38*
389
374
55*
559
58*
589
574
155
180
166
170
175
355
380
385
370
375
565
580
586
570
575
176
181
186
191
196
376
XI
388
XI
396
576
561
586
581
586
177
182
167
192
197
377
382
X7
332
397
677
562
587
582
597
178
183
188
193
196
37B
383
388
393
398
578
583
588
583
598
17®
164
189
19*
199
379
36*
389
394
399
679
584
589
£04
599
100
165
190
196
200
380
386
390
395
400
580
586
590
S86
600
ol AmgaWonrf’ (pek ones 0 5. V ? 6 Poe*
O 7. Vary Poor 0 5 Ta
? 11 D girt Canva*
? 12 AdCW*
? 13 Cow*
F Wnch c* Se tolowng from r> re ree is ”ot 1
? I. Ewinrwi
? 2. V«r3 Proceasng
? 3 Co*T«Tv«n atore 0 4 Sprerertneea
? 5. Home PrCKKdrvty 0 8. Programming
? 7. Software Developmre*
? 8 VdeoAjracftca Craaoon
A How woJd you rale 9*
G V GREAT!
? 2. Very Good
? 3 Pr«y Good C * Good
6 Atort >4 oe you* n*>3 rr p perprerai pa :r me’’
? 14
n 15
RMOor Serve* Card Evreyffwig
do yw cian to wrefeaa reftwar*
? 9 Dacrt se Managarrieri
D 10 Fnancat Managar-eH
? 11. GrsclX*
? 12 Education
? 13 Mmc
? 14 Hardware Ovdopmrei
? 15 SoundGpeoch Davotopmar* O 16 CAD CAM
... you *v*r pocneaad a creojet afire lacrevrg me rtymreon yOu'v* epjortod from an Av»grwcrt3 raadre tarvca ctuP
? 1 m 02 Ho
H Wtera oo you ouy yoa comcxfler products'’ (Please pe* on*)
C 1. Itner C 6
G 2. Ffrnar ? 7.
C 3 Modem ? 8
G *- Memory £»pen*on O 9
C 5 D«A Dffr* (hard or Vwfr)
Sdecar
Gan Lock or Frame Grabber Mu»c (M t. Keyboard, ec) Ow
C Ore*, al d !* enjngi ru* beat complete me tananc* ¦ Moa oI AmgeWorVJ «
C 1. Ju Rt n
O 2 Too Srrc*
C 3 Too Corrcw*
C* FV C5. U»U
D Vib* lopes *oJd you ha to WortdT (ffraoas pick three)
D 1. C Language ? 2. Amiga Baac
3 ai
4 TeleccrriTtjncJtoni
5 Buanwa Appfrcjtana
6 IBM Compretolry
7 Hqma Acc*aeona
8 EltoaBOn
9 VoeO
O G Ul
? 7.
? B BM
O 9 kowuaoa
wa covered n future
G 1. Compuer Dealer C 2. Mai Oder ? 3 Manufacturer
I Do you own an Amps7
? 1 Yee
J Where OD you use yOJ Amiga7
? 1. Home
? 2 Work 03 Screa
O * Ai noma to* buenaat
K la r* you copy of AmegaWorkT
O 1- Yea
oi A-r*g*
Oil. How other* uae the Anga
? 12. Buyre ¦ Gudoe
? 13 CompreaLva Hewwt C 1* Muac
O 15 Graprtc*
C 16 Ptoyam Latngi C 17 H*w PrtxUA Clfi Ognone C 19 HarWw* PnjjiCti C 20 Other
?
O O
c c
D O
O 10 Sooxe and Engneenng
? 2 . Ho
O 5 Bon at O 6 Bon ¦
? 7 t donl i
and ork and icftsa an Amiga
0 2 Ho
E Whet are >or tavorta Ihng* about ArogaWoncJT (Pieaa* D * * Set
* PW)
? 1 ? 2 ? 3 O* G 5
Zatges! (Edtr * Page) Reoartae (Lrtar*} trtarww*
Harp Kay (Quarecn.)
0 6 Tieonaia ? 7, Hor* if. G B C 9 Rewwe
C 10
(h.notpe!
TO RECEIVE MORE INFORMATION
TEAR
ORDER
a one year subscription to AmigaWorld by circling 500 on the card.
CIRCLE
the numbers on the card that correspond to the reader service numbers on the advertisements that interest you.
LOOK FOR
your subscription in 10 to 12 weeks.
Out thB perforated card. Please print or type your name and address where indicated.
REMEMBER
to put the proper postage on the card.
READER SERVICE
the card with your check, money order or U.S. currency to: AmigaWorld Reader Service Dept.
P. O. Box 363 Dalton, MA 01227 Or, you may request billing.
MAIL
AmigaWorld
PLACE
STAMP
HERE
ATTN: Reader Service Dept.
P. O. Box 363 Dalton, MA 01227
PLACE
STAMP
HERE
AmigaWorld
ATTN: Reader Service Dept.
P. O. Box 363 Dalton, MA 01227
Circle 37 on Reader Service card.
Engineers, architects and designers are deserting their drafting tables for the precision and ease of
THE PROVEN
The highly advanced and powerful DynamicCad Drafting System by Micro- illusions has recently emerged from years of successful applications as a professional CAD system in the aerospace and piping industries. Combined with the Commodore Amiga, the most dynamic and versatile microcomputer on the market today, DynamicCad is revolutionizing the work methods of countless engineers and architects. DynamicCad’s time and money-saving applications for these highpowered professionals is truly astounding. Here is an advanced, 2-D drafting system with isometric capabilities that can be combined with many models of plotters, printers, and digitizers.
The DynamicCad software was developed with three overridding principals in mind. First, it had to be 'easy to learn,’ which resulted in DynamicCad’s simple commands and abundant help tools. Next, it had to be ’easy to use,’ which was assured by DynamicCad’s powerful tools,
CAD SYSTEM FOR THE AMIGA
achieved by its efficiency in producing every type of mechanical and architectural drawing, including printed circuit boards, integrated circuit designs, pert charts, piping diagrams, and electrical diagrams with their associated net lists. With the addition of extra memory DynamicCad will provide you with what may be the fastest PC type CAD system available.
Microillusions has an excellent upgrade policy and any changes to the system software will also be made available to existing DynamicCad users. Upcoming features for DynamicCad include a hierarchical data base which will allow for increased flexibility for underlying relevant information on library parts. New libraries will be added, and additional plotter and printer drivers. Currently Microillusions is writing a template for use on most digitizers. As the capabilities of DynamicCad expand our newsletter will help you keep pace with the technology and grow along with it.
Simple commands, and mouse menu functions, which combine to make the revising and capturing of drawings quick and efficient. Finally, DynamicCad had to provide great flexibility. This has been
DYNAMIC* CAD IS A PRODUCT OF
P. O. BOX 3475, GRANADA HILLS, CA 91344
OYNAMIC.CAQ SYSTEM FEATURES:
DC Automatically configures itself to support additional memory Supports most printers and plotters Supports hard disk systems DC is not copy protected DC supplies online help Screen resolutions of 640 x 400 and 640 x 200 modes
Both keyboard and mouse functions
Extensive symbol library Alphanumerics: left, right, center, horizontal, vertical, varied angle Multiple line possibilities with varied arcs and degrees Horizontal & verticle doglegs Automatic line dimensioning in U.S. standard, metric or neither Gives X Y coordinates Create own pseudo symbols
• Arcs and circles
• Editing commands to move, delete and search
• Enter, rotate, change size or delete pseudos
• Group functions to manipulate, delete, step and repeat, move, etc.
• Fill and cross hatcn capabilities
• Zoom and move elements around, resizing and repositioning
Creates automatic schematics Creates net lists from electronic drawing or schematic Parameter settings include window size, percent of viewing area, alphanumeric ratios, 8,192 level selections, adjustable grid sizes, third line showinp, grid set and overlay, line snap, alpha size, off screen display Can capture pictures in IFF format
AMIGA IS A TRADEMARK OF COMMODORE BUSINESS MACHINES. LTD
» ' ' •* 4 * * • * '* 1 " _ ! § . JF , | . RijA*
UNLEASH THE AWESOME POWER OF THE AMIGA!.
WITH PAL SYSTEMS
• Supports Three Half Height Devices
* Hard Disks
• Tape Backup
• CD ROM
,1
• Five DMA Expansion Slots
• Battery Backed Clock Calendar
• Whisper Fan
• Auto-Configure
• 200 Watt Power Supply
• DMA Hard Disk Controller (ST506 412)
* Optional additional SCSI
• 100% Zorro Compatible
• 1 to 9.5 Megabytes of Fast RAM
__
WITH PAL Jr
• One Megabyte of Fast RAM
• DMA Hard Disk Controller
• 20 Megabyte Hard Disk
• Auto-Configure
4
• DMA SCSI Pass-through for further expansion
Suggested retail price only S1495.
CiTTIft cpip fSHl CT?
, *
Mr ' Vk K !
Will '
the nfombon ilcsmfc: (of. The Arr a
WITH INFOMINDER
The Information Manager. Hierarchial Database that allows you to organize and display text and graphical files, e.g. Real Estate Listings, Personnel Files, Digitized , X-Rays, Geographical Maps, etc. Fully supports multi-tasking. Fast access by menu or outline. INFOMINDER will revolutionize the way you store and access both textual and graphical information.
Get INFOMINDER today at the special introductory price of only $ 89,95.
WITH TIC
The TIC provides your Amiga with a tiny battery backed clock calendar that conveniently plugs into the second joystick port. The TIC’s 3-year battery will rTratrr* tain time even if temporarily removed from the Amiga. Change the Amiga’s internal time simply by moving the displayed clock’s hands with the mouse. Set your Amiga's time once and for all. It’s about time for TIC. Suggested retail price only $ 59.95.
e
Arboretum Plaza II
9442 Capita! Of Texas Highway
Suite 150
Austin, TX 78759
(512) 343-4357
BYTE bu
mr riHtmiuiios
AMIGA is a trademark of Commodore-Amiga, Inc.
1
Defender of The
Crown ..S 37
S D I S 37
The King of Chicago
(Available 12 1) S 37 Smbad (Available 1 S7) $ 37 OLAMIC
2
Datamat A-100, 200, 300 . Call
TRUE BASIC, INC.
True Basic $ 109
9 Libraries (each) $ 39
Runtime ..$ 109
TYCHON TECH Utilities ...$ 39
3
1334
4
fully Zorro bus compatible
* auto-Con!;g standarc
’ Purned-in Eefore shipping
* 6-menth warranty

Click image to download PDF

Amiga World Vol 03 01 1987 Jan Feb

Merci pour votre aide à l'agrandissement d'Amigaland.com !


Thanks for you help to extend Amigaland.com !
frdanlenfideelhuitjanoplptroruessvtr

Connexion

Pub+

53% 
11.4% 
4.6% 
3.7% 
3% 
2.2% 
2.1% 
1.6% 
1% 
0.9% 

Today: 80
Yesterday: 74
This Week: 80
Last Week: 665
This Month: 2522
Last Month: 2920
Total: 72132

Information cookies

Cookies are short reports that are sent and stored on the hard drive of the user's computer through your browser when it connects to a web. Cookies can be used to collect and store user data while connected to provide you the requested services and sometimes tend not to keep. Cookies can be themselves or others.

There are several types of cookies:

  • Technical cookies that facilitate user navigation and use of the various options or services offered by the web as identify the session, allow access to certain areas, facilitate orders, purchases, filling out forms, registration, security, facilitating functionalities (videos, social networks, etc..).
  • Customization cookies that allow users to access services according to their preferences (language, browser, configuration, etc..).
  • Analytical cookies which allow anonymous analysis of the behavior of web users and allow to measure user activity and develop navigation profiles in order to improve the websites.

So when you access our website, in compliance with Article 22 of Law 34/2002 of the Information Society Services, in the analytical cookies treatment, we have requested your consent to their use. All of this is to improve our services. We use Google Analytics to collect anonymous statistical information such as the number of visitors to our site. Cookies added by Google Analytics are governed by the privacy policies of Google Analytics. If you want you can disable cookies from Google Analytics.

However, please note that you can enable or disable cookies by following the instructions of your browser.

Visitors

Visite depuis
03-10-2004
Visite depuis
23-02-2014