Sponsors

FacebookTwitterGoogle Bookmarks

you will find that Commodore had “private showings” of these peripherals without “officially announcing” anything.) As far as I know, by the time you read this, the new Amiga will have been “officially announced” and on its way to market. So what makes the 2000 so special? Sure it’s nice to have the extra memory, the slots, the flexibility, etc., but what is so different about that? The thing that makes the 2000 truly unique is the fact that it is a "multi” machine. Multi-processor, multi-DOS and multitasking. The 2000 provides a bridge between systems, processors and operating environments. Most people don’t care whether they are running their software or hardw'are under MS-DOS, AmigaDOS, Unix or gribbleflix, just as long as it works. The 2000 will provide a system, an "uber-system” if you will, that will make the software, hardw'are, etc. nearly invisible to the end user. No matter what kind of end use or application you need or want, the 2000 should let you buy the peripherals, processors, software, drives or whatever else is needed. With the 2000’s multitasking abilities, giving you parallel coprocessing and parallel DOS, you have a machine that is almost unlimited in its configurations and potential. It will be a while before all the possibilities are grasped and implemented. Since the 2000 can act like almost any machine on the market, it is unlike any other machine on the market. The article pretty much describes the machine, its inner workings, etc., but what wre didn’t talk about was the impact it’s going to have. What does the new machine mean to the future of Commodore? What will it mean to software and hardware developers? What will it mean to everyone who already owns an Amiga 1000 and doesn’t have enough money to go out and buy a whole new* system? What will it mean to Amiga World? As for the future of Commodore, I think the 2000 is a signal that Commodore is eager to make as great an impact in the U. S. business market as it has in Europe, but they know that they will have to offer more than just PC compatibility. Other computers offer that at a much lower price. Commodore wanted the 1000 to be a business machine, hut the business world has been trained to look for certain things in a personal computer (whether they are right or not), and the Amiga didn’t quite fit the description. The 2000 deals with most of the objections that the business w orld had about the 1000 as a business machine, since ii unleashes the Amiga’s full potential. The fact that Commodore is bringing out a new* Amiga rather than a newr C-64 or 128 proves that they are committed to the Amiga, not just as a single machine, hut as an entire line. That is good for all Amiga owners. The 2000 should have good sales in the next few* years, and the Amiga line will continue to grow.

Click image to download PDF

Amiga World Vol 03 02 1987 Mar Apr

Document sans nom ¦¦¦ -
Digital Solution* Inc. brings yog the light with easy lo use software
specifically cMgned to use
the power of your Commodore Amiga
Announcing:
LRD’W Writer LPD* Planner LPD* Filer loch ol these programs give you all ftie functions you would c-jTpfrct liam pirqduclMtv sett- ware plus the following unique features:
UPD tf Writer, LPD'" Planner and LfD'* Filer can run individually or together When running together information can be transferred fiom one application 1a anoihor manually, or automaticalty using "links'', a transfer procedure unique to LPD Software.
The software allows you to see all projects-and applications through windowing. Each application con then be doomed" up to Full screen size. Vdu coin execute a command by using the mouse, function keys or short cut" com mond sequences A "suspend" feature allows you 1a pul away all applications you are cur rently working on and a "resume” command will restore the application* to Ihe presuspended stale. Also featured is on lino memory resident help ¦In addition. LPD* Writer,
LPK> V Planner and tPD Fiier each have their own very special CharacteMstics
Powerful software lhairs simple to use.
Digital Solutions Inc.
30 Wgffti mCwii Nfj ? Richnwna Nil, Onrkvio Carincja L40 16v
teept-iono 1414] 731-0775
!»'' WHIfefi Ward tWiiluir1
- ii.iii |.ii+i aaaurpenls can t4 *d ten cn Iho samofeM ¦¥i£h o Ihu-i an* w-rdcw can to* ope ned c-pi a document on scioen rflpro onimon al documents os- Ihcywfl t» pnnted Imcludmg line spacing. -supc 5ciip and sUdtcnpbl cm screen haodurs and kraler? Underlining bo Ml hod and rhnfc-c cnnancerronl “• +« *1
UO ' PLANNER BptMCbhffl1
Word Processor
mufHpta spiocdsnne'iscan few msnpj- Mleda! On* nnra morn-1 Iran one- wndaw can :.ip*ni :i an an> scr-ood j?iwi HMCfelmlllE* V bcnLrnnhfcjir ft T.. 536 r:.:w>. jriHwvi pf nlny
stffo rtn dUpteWd undiwlrtttd h-nl:Hi>-+t :?rcl C4* chai%. Br*-:jiu|:hi. Fi£i- £i :3phl and hlfadtfaJ Mi- $ i-3phli aridlaCte vuiiublu nMlhcoljmn5 ha'IzonMI srtcaland'smcFr
i ucahz Jdllcr-
Upn PILE V thu I'j Lh!xk Li1
h. jii piiH dalabaua ccn bo- used ol
lM’iO liTifi
more Iha one wr-dcw can &e- oc?n«j mem w
ort a vpccil-: database muili p-agc rcco'd i at oris t-XhOldlVCC-5 nurrypnc. Chprw*?!. I-«-il
dalf lime- nortf USCr-SC'irrik-lF- nii fli IhjI-:!! HtiI-ihi -::rd dnlni.i I lurk! -TnU«fc
:!i,rrnj iW¥y
rviv I m visiWd ufi ¦'iiiiII iIh
tii'lit-. -ini;11:i=iIF
- :.iI iplJh.t IiM* IO- MSI OCCOtt
i h1.1u11 qtii-tfioiisn including hcador i Mtyois and pooard by rccixd
- COJCuJiBtonS
¦ h-jjb! Nanjat ei «c
Publisher
Stephen Twombly
Editor-In-Chief
Guy Wright
Managing Editor Shawn Lafiamme
Senior Editor Vmoy Laughner
Technical Editor Robert M. Ryan
Review Editor Linda J. Barrett
Contributing Editors Peggy Herrington,
David T. McClellan,
Lou Wallace
Art Director
Rosslyn A. Frick
Designers Anne Dillon Roger Goode
Production Advertising Supervisor Howard G. Happ
Advertising Safes Manager
Stephen Robbins Sales Representative Kenneth Blakeman
Advertising Coordinator Heather Paquette 1-800-441-4403
West Coast Sales Giorgio Saluti, manager 1-415-328-3470
3350 IW. Bayshore Road, Suite 201 Palo Alto, CA 94303 Executive Secretary Cynde Garrett
Secretary Laura Livingston
Marketing Manager
Wendie Haines
Business Manager
Barbara Harris
President CEO
James S. Povec
Vice-President Finance
Roger Murphy Director of Operations
Matt Smith
Executive Creative Director
Christine Destrempes
New Projects Director
Jeff DeTray
Fulfillment & Special Projects Manager
Craig Pierce
Director of Corporate Production
Dennis Christensen
Typesetting Manager Linda P. Canale
Typographer Doreen Means
Manufacturing Manager
Susan Gross
Director of Circulation
Frank S. Smith
Direct Marketing Manager Bonnie Welsh
Single Copy Sales Manager Linda Ruth
Direct Sales Liz Kehn 800-343-0728
Circulation Business Manager Brenner Fuller
Director of Credit Sales & Collections
William M. Boyer
FEATURES
The Amiga 2000
By Bob Ryan
Take an Amiga 1000. Add about 750K, for a total of one megabyte of internal RAM.
Add a bunch of internal slots for memory expansion, Amiga and IBM PC. Cards, maybe another CPU. Put room in for two more disk drives, hard or floppy. Put contents into a metal box and fasten securly. Add an enlarged keyboard. Fasten Seat Belt.
M Between Two Worlds: The A2088 Board
By Bob Ryan
PC in a Window, or How Commodore bridged the gap between AmigaDOS and MS DOS by making an IBM PC-on-a-board that you can plug into the new Amiga 2000.
MARCH APRIL 1987
CONTENTS
VOLUME 3. NUMBER 2
ARTICLES
DEPARTMENTS
Easy Palettes
By Christoph C. Borel-Donokue
An Amiga Basic program that will let you create, customize and store color palettes for use in your Basic programs.
Graphic Hardcopy and the Amiga
By Morion A. Kevelson
More on capturing the Amiga’s flashy graphics on paper. Good advice and information about products, procedures and techniques for making high-quality printouts.
IS Absoft’s AC FORTRAN
By William B. Catchings and Mark L. Van Name
A review of Absoft’s FORTRAN compiler for the Amiga; a serious implementation of FORTRAN 77.
Fundamentals of C;
Playing with Intuition
By William B. Catchings and Mark L, Van Name
Now that you’ve learned some C, here's a tutorial on programming Intuition with this powerful language.
Repartee
Culled from the avalanche of fan mail.
Hors d’oeuvres
Treasures from the microwaves of your insight.
COLUMNS
HI Digital Canvas
Zeitgeist
What difference could the Amiga 2000 make...for you and Amiga World?
S3 info.phile
By William B. Catchings and MarkL. Van Name
More That’s New in 1.2! A look at version
1. 2 Workbench improvements, including Preferences additions, icon and gadget handling and the new and improved Notepad.
Artistic stretches of the imagination.
Reviews
Defender of the Crowm MAS-Drive20 Hard Disk Logistix
Money Mentor; PAR Home I;
PHASAR; and 2 + 2 Gridiron!
Goldspell
Computer Baseball Marble Madness Revurw update: Scribble! 2.0
What’s New?
New products and more new products.
FH Help Key
It never hurts to ask.
AmigaWorUi (ISSN 0883*2390) is an independent journal not connected with Commodore Business Machines, Inc. AmigaW'ojld is published bimonthly by CW Communications Peterborough. Inc.. 80 Elm St.. Peterborough, Nil 03458. U.S. subscription rate is S19.97. one year. Canada and Mexico $ 22.97. one year. U.S. funds drawn on U.S. bank only. Foreign Surface $ 39.97. Foreign Air Mail $ 74.97. U.S. runds drawn on U.S. bank. Second class postage pending at Peterborough, NH. And at additional mailing offices. Phone: 603-924-9471. Entire contents copvright I9H7 by CW Communications Peterborough. Enc. No part of this publication may Ik- printed or otherwise reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Postmaster: Send address changes to Subscription Services. PO Box 954,
hirmingdale. NY 11735. Nationally distributed by International Circulation Distributors. Amiga World makes every el fort to assure the accuracy of articles, listings and circuits published in the m.iga inr. AmigaWmU assumes no responsibility lor damages due to errors or omissions.
Zeitgeist
What Does the New Amiga Mean?
This column is probably not the first thing that you read in every issue. (It’s the first thing that I read, but then again, I write it.) I imagine that most of you have already turned to the article on the new Amiga.
Atniga World may not be as fast as television (or even the pony express) when it comes to getting out news flashes, but when you read about it in AmigaWorld, the information carries more weight and reality.
Finally! Another Amiga! GREAT! Since before the beginning, we have heard that there was going to be an entire line of Amigas. Rangers, B-52s and anything else people can dream of are still being talked about all the time. I had my own visions of the next Amiga, and I have to admit that I was only about 40 percent right. Now that I have seen the 2000, I am more impressed with Commodore’s ability to engineer new computers than I am with the power of my own imagination. The 2000 is more than just a souped-up 1000, and yet it is not a drastic jump into a different operating system or disk file structure. It is still compatible with 1000 software, and it is possible for developers to adjust hardware configurations to allow peripheral compatibility as
well. There are so many ele-
*
ments to the 2000 that we are going to be spending a lot of time in the future talking about its special features. If you don’t see it in this issue, don’t worry, we have a lot of time to peel back the 2000 petal by petal. This is just the start.
The article and photographs were all done in New York City with heavily armed Commodore
By Guy Wright
guards breathing over our shoulders, making sure that we weren't slipping chips into our pockets. You wouldn’t believe the rigmarole we had to go through to get a preview of the machine. Commodore has gotten very nervous about officially announcing things before they can ship them. (Note; the operative word here is “officially” We have all heard about products like the Sidecar, Genlock, etc. that took months to ship, but if
vou check the records, I think
-
you will find that Commodore had “private showings” of these peripherals without “officially announcing” anything.) As far as I know, by the time you read this, the new Amiga will have been “officially announced” and on its way to market.
So what makes the 2000 so special? Sure it’s nice to have the extra memory, the slots, the flexibility, etc., but what is so different about that? The thing that makes the 2000 truly unique is the fact that it is a "multi” machine. Multi-processor, multi-DOS and multitasking. The 2000 provides a bridge between systems, processors and operating environments. Most people don’t care whether they are running their software or hardw'are under MS-DOS, AmigaDOS, Unix or gribbleflix, just as long as it works. The 2000 will provide a system, an "uber-system” if you will, that will make the software, hardw'are, etc. nearly invisible to the end user. No matter what kind of end use or application you need or want, the 2000 should let you buy the peripherals, processors, software, drives or whatever else is needed. With the 2000’s multitasking abilities, giving you parallel coprocessing and parallel DOS, you have a machine that is almost unlimited in its configurations and potential. It will be a while before all the possibilities are grasped and implemented.
Since the 2000 can act like almost any machine on the market, it is unlike any other machine on the market.
The article pretty much describes the machine, its inner workings, etc., but what wre didn’t talk about was the impact it’s going to have. What does the new machine mean to the future of Commodore? What will it mean to software and hardware developers? What will it mean to everyone who already owns an Amiga 1000 and doesn’t have enough money to go out and buy a whole new* system? What will it mean to Amiga World?
As for the future of Commodore, I think the 2000 is a signal that Commodore is eager to make as great an impact in the
U. S. business market as it has in Europe, but they know that they will have to offer more than just PC compatibility. Other computers offer that at a much lower price. Commodore wanted the 1000 to be a business machine, hut the business world has been trained to look for certain things in a personal computer (whether they are right or not), and the Amiga didn’t quite fit the description. The 2000 deals with most of the objections that the business w orld had about the 1000 as a business machine, since ii unleashes the Amiga’s full potential. The fact that Commodore is bringing out a new* Amiga rather than a newr C-64 or 128 proves that they are committed to the Amiga, not just as a single machine, hut as an entire line. That is good for all Amiga owners. The 2000 should have good sales in the next few* years, and the Amiga line will continue to grow. Yes, the 2000 will attract the business market, but >-
1 -I -I -I
A -f ri -1
• 1 ¦ I L T V*" Lw
rtainer Dec. 1986
Computer
Cinemaware interactive movies are a revolutionary new genre that pulls you emotionally into the story and characters It’s more like being in a movie than playing a computer game.
Popcorn not Included.
ACTUAL SCREEN SHOTS!
NOW PLAYING AT A SOFTWARE DEALER NEAR YOU
DISTRIBUTED EXCLUSIVELY BY MINDSCAPE YblHgf
3444 Dundee Road Northbrook, IL 6TOa
Call Toll Free in Continental U.S* (except IL): 1-800-443-7982 minduaPE Illinois 1-312-480-7667
Available lor Amiga, Atari ST, Macintosh, Apple ||., , IBM PC ond Commodore 64, which are trademarks respectively of Commodore-Amicjg, Atari Inc.,
Apple Computer, Inc., International Business Machines and Commodore Electronics, Ltd. Nat all products are available for all formats. Gnemaware is a trademark of Master Desjgner Software, Inc
. . .offers you an intelligent alternative to the Amiga CLI com raining features familiar to users of UNIX. W ritten by the authors of AmigaDOS, Metacomco SHELL integrates with the entire AmigaDOS environment.
• HISTORY with COMMAND LINE EDITING
• ALIASES * PUSH &. POP DIRECTORIES
* RESIDENT COMMANDS * PATH • VARIABLES and much more for S69.95- . .
THE METACOMCO
also available
Macro Assembler • Professional quality development system S 99.95
Lattice ‘C’ - The well known Lattice ‘C compiler S225.00
Cambridge Lisp • The interpreter compiler for the SC’s ...,. $ 199.95
MCC Pascal » Fast ISO ANSI standard compiler .S 99.95
Metacomco MAKE - NEW! UNIX-like MAKE utility ......S 69.95
Metacomco TOOLKIT * Smartest tools available for the Amiga $ 49.95
Metacomco provides experienced technical support and keeps its customers informed of new products and upgrade releases. _
Ccr.racr o:r local dealer or call:
Tel: (US) SCW-AKA-META (CA) (408) 4 33-7201 BIX: mhitl CompuServe; 73247,522 Shipping 52,00 Add 6' ;% tax if CA resident
METACOMCO
5353 'E Scotts Valley Dr.
Scorts Valley, CA 95066
Registered trademarks; Lattice • Lattice, Inc, UNIX - Bell Labs; Amiga • Commodore Amiga.
TOT
Circle 16 on Reader Service card.
SrThe
Commodore Show -
¦ Fri., Feb. 20, 10:00-6:00 ¦ Sat., Feb. 21, 10:00-6:00 "Sun., Feb. 22, Noon-5:00
v° Brooks Hall, Civic Center San Francisco
EXHIBITS, EVENTS AND DOOR PRIZES
The Commodore Show is the only West Coast exhibition and conference focusing exclusively on the AMIGA, Commodore 128 PC and C-64 marketplace.
REGISTRATION FEES: One Day Only $ 10 Three Day Pass $ 15
NATIONAL COMMODORE SPEAKERS
SHOW SPECIALS AND DISCOUNTS
SEE THE LATEST INNO VATIONS IN HARDWARE SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY
For More Information Or To Reserve Exhibit Space Contact
COMPUTER SWAP, INC.
PO Box 18906. San Jose. CA 95158
(408) 978-SWAP • 800-722-SWAP • IN CA 800-252-SWAP
I think it will appeal to the vertical markets first, such as desktop publishing and video, interactive training and business presentations. The expandability and flexibility (with custom and specialized boards) is going to sell die 2000 to people and businesses that need highly specialized features and don't care whose name is on the case.
What will the 2000 mean to developers? T he software developers will either continue to develop for the 1000 and won’t bother to make changes for the 2000, develop for both machines, or switch over to developing only for the 2000. Some developers will produce exclusively 2000 software as a way to break into a tight field (imagine a company with a new paint program trying to compete with Aegis and Electronic Arts), but most developers will continue to work on products that will run on both machines. Software products will add a depth of new features that fully utilize the 2000; the same software will run on a 1000, but these new features will require internal and external add-ons. There will be opportunities for new Amiga developers wanting to break into existing markets and new markets (e.g., software that makes use of both MS-DOS and AmigaDOS or unique ways to merge programs).
Hardware developers are the ones who will be most effected by the new 2000. All the add* ons developed for the 1000 will have to be redesigned, but, since everything for the 2000 is internal, the manufacturing costs will go down (manufacturers won’t have to put their boards inside cases). The 2000 will give hardware people new opportunities to develop things like controller boards for PC hardware, but it will open up the competition for things like hard disks. Whatever happens, it should be interesting.
For all of you Amiga 1000 owners who don’t have the extra S$ S to rush out and buy the new 2000, you will also be able to benefit from all of the new features of the 2000. With memory expansion cards available and external hardware options, a 1000 can do anything that a 2000 can do. Software will run on both machines, so developers won’t be limiting their audience by working on 2000 software exclusively.
My best guess is that if you want the high-end specialty addons that are going to be developed for the 2000, then you will probably end up buying either a 2000 or the memory and slot peripherals for the 1000. However, offsetting that trend, there will probably be more inexpensive add-ons developed for the 1000 market. If you need a 50mb hard disk or super-clean composite video output and don’t care about cost, then the 2000 will probably be your machine, but if you only need a 5-, 10- or 20mb hard disk at prices that are bound to come down, then stick with your 1000. If all you crave is PC compatibility, then the Sidecar should suffice.
Lastly, what will the Amiga 2000 mean to AmigaWorld? It will mean that we will have a lot more to cover, more advertisers, more machines out there, more readers and (I hope) more reasons to go monthly. It also means more work, more headaches, more confusion and more excitement, but I prefer it that way. I suppose that we will have to start giving more coverage to MS DOS when hybrid software begins to overlap the two operating systems, but we aren’t going to turn into another PC-focused magazine. Nor are we going to become a business magazine. There are many, many areas of common interest to all Amiga owners, whether they own 1000s, 2000s or whatever else comes along. Additionally, AmigaWorld will integrate coverage of the new vertical markets. We will adapt to the situation, getting bigger or more frequent or both. Whatever we do, you can bet we will remain the bcst.R
The Mirror Copier Can Now Bac
A Disk Almost As Fast As Maraud
Duplication Speed 83 Sec.
1 Minute 48 Sec.
Upgradable With Strategy Files
Mouse Driven User Interface
Exit Without Restarting Amiga
Runs From Workbench or CLI
Makes Multiple Simultaneous Copies From One Original
Copies Itself
Copies The Mirror
Price
YES
NO
YES
NO
YES
NO
¥
Marauder II is the most powerful copier ever produced for Amiga. It will automatically copy ALL software released to date , and it requires no hardware modification of any kind.
It produces completely unprotected copies of most Amiga software faster and better than any other copier.
No other copier can copy as much software as Marauder II.
YES
• J.
W'
YES
NO
1
1
YES
NO


YES
NO


$ 3945
S49£5 L
f
Marauder II also has the most advanced user interface your money can buy. If you have an Amiga you already know how to use Marauder U. You never have to reboot your machine to use Marauder II, it is completely compatible with
the Amiga’s multitasking operating system.
Marauder II has been designed with your future needs In mind. As protection schemes change you can update the program yourself with our unique “Strategy Files."
The Strategy Files are developed as new software Is released so that you can get them quickly and easily when you need them.
Compare the features of Marauder II to our competition and you’ll see that Marauder II is quite simply the best copier you can get, at any price! And for only
139. 95 you can rest assured that your software investment is safely protected against damage, loss or theft.
Don’t wait, order now!
And It Only Costs About 25% V
Marauder II Mirror
NOW YOU CAN SAVE ANY SCREEN, FROM ANY PROGRAM, ANYTIME WITH GRABBIT.
This amazing keyboard macro processor is just what you need to give your fingers a rest. The Genie is always at work to save you time and keystrokes. Complicated or repitious keyboard sequences are easily assigned to a key you choose through the Genie’s Pop-Up Macro Definition Window. You can also load and save your
With GRABBIT you can capture exactly what you see on your screen in an instant, regardless of what programs you're running. GRABBIT works with all video modes, including “Hold and Modify."
& Ini la
What's more, GRABBIT runs completely in the background, transparent to your other software. GRABBIT is always ready for you to use, even when you’re in the middle of another program. As if that is not enough, GRABBIT requires only about 10K RAM to operate, and it supports dozens of printers.
TO
GRABBIT is truly a productivity power tool for your AMIGA!
With Key Genie One Key Launches 1000 Strokes!
Favorite macro sequences on disk. Once saved, the macros can be automatically installed at startup to save time. In addition to the Genie's powers. Discovery Software has added a bonus program “Turbo-Shell'’. The Shell is an AmigaDOS performance enhancer that you shouldn't be without] The Shell gives you the capability to recall previous CLI
commands with the arrow keys so that mistyped commands can be quickly corrected, and frequently used commands can be easily repeated. Fast AmigaDOS command replacements give you UNIX-style performance from your Amiga.
What other software does so much for you at such a low price. Only $ 49.95 + S5 shipping and handling.
GRABBIT is far superior to other screen-printing “programs" because of its small size and quick performance. No complicated setup is required, just install and go! Also, GRABBIT doesn’t require the screen to remain visible during printing or saving, and stopping the print operation is as easy as starting it.
GRABBIT supports all standard Amiga printer drivers. GRABBIT also supports full color printing.
In addition to GRABBIT’s printing capabilities, the package also includes a powerful utility program “ANYTIMEThe ANYTIME bonus
program is a “Preferences" style palette requester that allows you to change any colors of any screen, anytime! With ANYTIME, you are NOW capable of customizing all colors to match your printer’s hardcopy to the screen’s colors.
Once you start using GRABBIT and the bonus program ANYTIME you will want it on every disk. You get all the power of this sizzling new software for an unbelievably low S29.9S + $ 5 shipping and handling.
11 -1-86
903 E. Willow Grove Ave., Wyndmoor, JR4 19118 (215) 242-4666
Circle 89 on Reader Service card.
AMIGA TM is a registered trademark of Commodore- Amiga Inc UNIX is a registered trademark of Bell Laboratories
Repartee
From the Livingroom...
Our fatuity just loves the Amiga.
We recently completed a project using the Amiga, two VCRs, a slide projector, TV camera, audio cassette player, color monitor, microphone, Aegis Images and Digi-View software. The result was a unique travel log. We digitized several slides and added humorous commentaries with the text capability of Images. Dynamic, colorful script was used to introduce each country. An overall background soundtrack was dubbed over the video. Once this was completed, verbal commentary explained the details of the trip. The hookup was rather complicated, so my Dad handled that problem.
We really enjoyed the creative capability of the Amiga. This project eifen sparked my Mom's interest in the computer.
Noelle C. Adams (age 14) Chesterland, OH
., .to the Laboratory
As a professor of architecture writing a technical book, my Amiga has been my constant companion for many months. It has done everything I have asked of it word processing, spreadsheets, data management, matrix algebra and other calculations, and all the drawings that will appear in my book, as well as the color lecture slides that will accompany it.
'The Amiga, the furthest thing I can think of from a door stop, is a real tiger. All the other computers in our university computer labs (all of the best ones are there) seem like old gray mares after using the Amiga. I see that some Amiga owners with little appreciation of the graphic and plastic arts have been put off perhaps intimidated, by your coverage of the Amiga's prowess in the visual arts that are so much a part of my personal and professional life. But take heart, there is a tremendous ground-swell of those such as I who are exploring and exploiting the Amiga for the many things it can do for us.
Eugene E. Crommett, Ph.D.
University of Puerto Rico San Juan, PR
Whither Tecmar?
I see one notable omission in your Hardware Buyer's Guide [Jan. Feb. ’57] a full line of expansion units from Tecmar. What happened at Tec- mar? As I believe, they were among the first to offer hardware for the Amiga. Their line included the T- card expansion unit, T-disk hard disk and the T-modem, which offered features not available elsewhere, such as tone-decode and audio-circuit access.
Has Tecmar discontinued their line of Amiga products?
Mark Barnes Los Angeles, C4
Tecmar is no longer manufacturing products for the Amiga market. Also out of the picture is The Micro Forge and their line of Amiga hardware.
Editors
Wanted: Professional Software
I feel very fortunate that I do not need to use my Amiga for any serious business applications. Since I have purchased my machine, only a fen) quality business packages have been introduced. I have yet to find a word processor that supports mail merge and macro functions, finding hardware at a reasonable price seems to be a problem, too. Did Commodore lack the confidence or the ability to develop a line of peripheral hardware such as a hard drive,
a color printer or an expansion chassis?
Developers must start to exploit this machine's power for GAD, business and desktop publishing. Realtime I O control and monitoring are also possible applications for the Amiga.
Richard A. Ireland
Charleston, WV
Up until now, there wasn't a system under $ 2,000 that could meet the needs of small businesses without requiring the user to also he a programmar. The Amiga, with the right software, could solve a lot of the problems encountered by small businesses.
Question: Isn't the Amiga multitasking? Why doesn't the software act like it?
IBM Pcs, Apples and the rest, including the Amiga, make you do the same re-entry into a dozen separate, non-integrated software packages.
It's easier and cheaper to use a Dome Ledger ($ 3.95) than an IBM PC ($ 3,950). Unless Amiga software can be created to solve problems for attorneys, students, printers, artists, store owners, salesmen and writers, then the Amiga is doomed to anonymity,
R. Skip Uldriks
Holmes Beach, FL
As editors of Amiga World, you are probably in touch with software developers all the time. Let them know that we Amiga owners need high-quality output for our graphics (business graphics and slides), such as output to a 2,000- to 4,000-line film recorder. Also, we need a quality desktop-publishing package with output to a black-and-white laser printer, such as an Imogen $ 203 XP or another high-quality laser
printer capable of printing a full page at 300 DPI or better. Without this kind of output, the Amiga cannot compete with the Macintosh or IBM PC AT, both of which already have this professional software.
Ron Dube Ossining, NY
Scribble! Rebuttal
I have just read the review of Scribble! [jan . Feb. '$ 7, p. 78] and have to give my views about it. Although the review was not of version
2. 0, which I am using, I believe my comments are still applicable.
Mr, Watt and I disagree on one major aspect of the program. He complains that the program forces you to use embedded commands to change the text format in the middle of a document. If I am that picky about the layout of text at the time of entering it, I might just as well use ED or Notepad. With all this computing power available, why should I have to do all the work of formatting text? I would even like to see a few more dot commands. The feature I miss most from my old word processor (Scripsit, on a TRS- 80 M4) is vertical centering, which made letter formatting easy. Scripsit also had an automatic paragraph indent and blank line ability.
When I'm writing something, I just want to write. The layout can come later, when the text is finished.
Dennis Lee Bieber Sunnyvale, C
See Douglas Watt's review of Scribble! 2.0 in this issue, p. 94.
Editors
Send your letters to: Repartee. Amiga World editorial, 80 Elm St., Peterborough, NH 03458. Letters may he edited for space and clarity.®
EpAiftf Igriitie-.- Airy W>v1f11 s ytvUi u
Computer Leg *14Atc InsurJinc*
Kite
• t txperiSk
¦I Sales Cl Expens H Taxes E3 Prof 1t
12m* i»me
* s; Prgf ti MM Twts HMM j
tllitits 3tkHH
Kilt! Til 21111
F. lni.U IM»»
tel
i ----
I
it s making every other spreadsheet old fashioned!
Rhe original MaxiPlan™ was named he Best Amiga™ Spreadsheet of 1986 by F.A.U.G., the worlds argest and most active Amiga iser group. Now in 1987. Oxxi is jroud to introduce MaxiPlan 5lus™ -the most advanced Amiga spreadsheet ever. With even more ime-saving innovations than the iward-winning MaxiPlan, the new tfaxiPlan Plus includes Microsoft Excel ™-like Macros and Utilities.
Vith MaxiPlan Plus and your Imiga you can:
• Open multiple spreadsheets ind graphs
"Link” data from any number of preadsheets
Create a self-running demo or nteractive multiple choice quiz, ncorporating files from word rocessors and paint programs
Automatically create reports uch as invoices and purchase
• rdefs
MaxiPlan Plus™
$ 19900
at your local Amiga software dealer.
OXXllmc
1835-A Dawns Way Fullerton, CA 92631
(714) 999-6710
ftf, MIGA KM GROIP NWAlil)
• rtwrn
UAXIHUM
uumn
MaxiPlan
Named the best Amiga spreadsheet of 1986 for its outstanding mouse interfaces, unique pull-down menus and advanced speech capabilities.
Excel is a trade marie ol Mk rosoft Corp
Circle 75 on Reader Servce card
Hors d’oeuvres
Clearing Keyboard Buffer In BASIC
The ability to type ahead on the Amiga is usually a good thing to have, but it can sure mess up the INKEYS statement in a BASIC program. The following subroutine will make sure no old, garbage keypresses are mistaken for a response.
SUB CLEARKEYS STATIC
FOR X = I TO 10
r$ = IN KEYS
NEXT X
ENDSUB
To use. Call ii immediately before the INKEYS statement. Example:
CALL CLEARKEYS WHILE INKEYS = WEND
Margaret Hettinger Lebanon Junction, KY
Faster Downloads
For those of you who have ever tried to download a large file from a BBS or one of the major networks, you may have noticed that the transfer really slows down waiting
for the disk drive to finish writing after each block. This is especially noticeable when using Xmodem, since it uses 128-byte blocks. The solution is to send the file to RAM:. From the CLI you can open another
CLI with NEWCLI. Then load your termi*

nal program from the first CLI. After you finish the download, simply move the front window up out of the way and click in the second CLI window. Then type:
COPY RAM: file name TO drive number
DELETE RAM: file name
With a 512K machine using Micro-Systems Software’s Online!, you can get about 199K in the RAM disk before total machine lockup (I found that out the hard way!). The longer the file, the greater the time savings realized. This technique is especially useful when calling long distance to get that pub- lic-domain program that you just can’t live without.
Ken Baynard
K. I. Sawyer AFB, MI
C Compiler Printouts
1 was having difficulty compiling a program in C when ! Thought how nice it
would be to have a hard copy of the compiler errors to discuss with other programmers. The command format for Manx’s Aztcc C compiler is:
There are two kinds of people in the world: those who own Amiga World T-shirts and those who don’t. To join the prestigious, growing ranks of the former, you need good taste, a little imagination and an idea worth sharing. If this sounds like you, send your recipe to Amiga World Hors d’oeuvres, 80 Elm St., Peterborough, NH 03458. If it’s good enough to be included in our next platter of palate pleasers, you’ll soon be wearing your reward (just remember to send us your T-shirt size).
We hope you enjoy these latest offerings. Be sure to use backups of your original disks for experimenting, and if you find anything here that seems half-baked, let us know.
Cc -option > filename
Thinking this chore would be easy, 1 tried to redirect the console output to the printer by typing:
cc filename > prt:
However, the compiler treated > prt: as a parameter, since options can appear either before or after the name of the C source file that resulted in an error. Due to a quirk of the system, prt: should precede compiler invocation so that:
cc > prt: -option > filename
will properly compile filename and redirect output to the printer and return output to the console after compilation is executed,
Sam Spear Fort Worth, TX
Break Key
Every time I try to download something from a BBS using Micro-Systems’ BBS-PC, I get a message saying “use break to cancel.” Try as I might, I could never find a break key on the keyboard. Well, I'll he damned! Break on the Amiga keyboard is a combination of the ALT and C keys. Many mainframes and network systems use break to stop transmissions or to kill a running program, so it is a good thing to be aware of.
Mike Smithwick Los Altos Hills, CA
Saving Custom Icons
When I discovered how to use the Icon Editor on the Workbench disk. I made useful icons for my Amiga Basic programs.
WARNING: Independent test results have determined that this game is habit forming
Fourth and goal on the two. Ten seconds left and you’re down by five. The roar of the crowd is
deafening as you scan the defense. Something’s not right. You call an audible...that special play you’ve
been saving for a moment like this. You fake a hand off to the fullback up the middle and drop back to pass, but nobody’s open. You roll left, pursued by a 270 pound defensive lineman. Finally, the fullback breaks clear in the end zone. You squeeze a bullet between two defenders as your fullback cuts back to make the catch. The scoreboard lights up as the crowd goes wild...TOUCHDOWN!!
This is GRIDIRON!™, the most realistic football simulation ever developed for a micro- I
computer. GRIDIRON! Is TACKLE football played in real-time. Call a play from the Playbook, I
or design your own using our Play Creation Utility. You control the action with five levels of play, |HpPjM|P I
real time graphics, digitized stereo sound and an unprecedented level of game interaction. U I
Experience the game that’s winning rave reviews from players and critics alike. I
GRIDIRON!, the ultimate football simulator designed to unleash the power of your Amiga. |i4r I
Nothing else comes close.
I low to order: Visit your retailer, or call for direct VISA or Mastercard orders 1-800-992-4009
9208 Burning Tree Road, Bethesda, Maryland 20817 (301) 469-7061
Requires 512K. For one or two players. Soon to be available for the Atari ST
Amiga is a trademark of Commodore-Amiga, Inc. ej 1986 Bethesda Softworks Circle 57 on
- - -
TpnT
I. R.S.
No Sweat... With Money Mentor !
"Keep track of your pennies, and your dollars will take care of themselves." Old. Hut sensible advice, even in today's complex financial environment. Money Mentor*is a breakthrough in personal financial management. It harnesses the awesome power of the .Amiga™ to compute and graph clear reports of your financial situation.
A unique system called "Smart Scrolls" handles a diversity of tedious data entry functions and can save 70% of the typing typically required for entry.
T HI
Money Mentor features:
• 200 budget categories.
• 30 integrated accounts: checking, cash, saving and credit cards.
• Elaborate search routine allows editing of transactions according to your specific guidelines.
• Automatic check printing.
• Automatic Account Balancing.
• Colorful graphic reports illustrating actual versus budgeted amounts.
• (h er 50 reports from which to choose.
This year... get organized with
Money Mentor -
However, when I made an adjustment in the program and re-saved it, my custom icon was replaced with the standard flowchart icon that is created for every Amiga Basic program when it is initially saved.
There are two solutions to this problem. One is to keep an icon library and use the Icon Editor to replace the standard icon with your custom icon.
The other solution is implemented without leaving Amiga Basic, and leaves you with an old (unmodified) copy of the program.
First, get into the intermediate mode and type SAVE OLD. Now you have a new copy of the program with a standard icon and an old copy of the program with your custom icon. All you have to do now is switch the programs.
In die intermediate mode, type:
NAME OLD AS TEMPORARY
NAME your program’s name AS OLD
NAME TEMPORARY AS your programs name
Now you have the new program with the custom icon and the old program with the standard icon, so you can move the old copy somewhere else or into the trash until you know your modifications work correctly.
Derek Buckley
Spokane, WA
Quick CLI
I have an answer to the quick CLI problem. It’s so simple it’s almost not worth mentioning.
I moved my CLI from the System Drawer to the Workbench window itself; now when I open my Workbench, there’s the CLI, This also saves the trouble of typing LOADWB or trying to press CTRL-D at just the right time.
Larry H. Larson Austin, TX
Icon System Solution
Here is a solution to Mr. Raidma’s problem [Help Key, Nov. Dec. ’86, p. 127] which will allow him to keep Amiga Basic in his drawer labeled “BasicWork.”
With Workbench loaded, first click once on the icon for the Basic program. Next, select Info from the Workbench menu by highlighting it and releasing the mouse button. When the Info window comes onto the screen, change the default tool from :AMI-
GABASIC to :B ASIC WORK AM IG ABAS IC. This will direct the icon system to load Amiga Basic from the BasicWork drawer. I tried it and it works for me.
Dr. Michael J. Doyle Bel Air, MD
SAY from BASIC
If you want to use the Say (voice) function, the best method is to store the spoken text in a sequential data fde created with the built-in ED function or any word processor that allows an ASCII save. After the file is created, add the following lines to your Amiga Basic program:
OPEN file name FOR INPUT AS 1 REM file name CREATED USING ED
WHILE NOT EOF(l)
LINE INPUT 1,A$
SAY TRANSLATE$ (A$ )
WEND
CLOSE 1
You can listen to the spoken text before placing it in your program by opening a CLI window and typing SAY -X file name.
Karl Dittman
Salem, MO
Copy of Another Type
Another way to copy a file is by using the Type command under the CLI.
The Type command will display the contents of a file in either ASCII or hex, depending upon the option used and, of course, the file being accessed.
Normally, the return is to the screen or prt:. However, I have discovered that it can also be to a disk or file, and if a file is not specified, one is created.
The format is as follows:
TYPE DF?: file name TO file name
For example, let’s say you have a file on a disk in drive 1 called Amiga World and you want a copy on the disk in drive 0 to he called Mags. In the CLI, you would type the following command string:
TYPE DFLAMIGAWORLD DFOiMAGS
Note that the use of TO is optional.
When you now do a directory search, you should find a new file called MAGS on DF1:.
David Morgan
Robina, Queensland, Australia ¦
Circle 67 on Reader Service card.
Now Look At Word Processing In A Whole New Light.
IvrjcH.iJmj, tateshisrit-??
- *• :£oiw=f*»i *•¦»' ' '-~c
! 1*1 ,.T,«S* I:. .
• • •' P°t if'!:-"-' •** :•« -
‘ : • i ¦ ¦ i I . • .r
I'l r’ n*vtl If "I l.« twl 3. > f j»l it>-l 7V«I
rl ir-lr«. T(ryn.-li-,i d-iI -I ***) «>f *•» '
"¦'! *t-* 1 -i 1h- - **«» ,-u -J-l- >*¦* •’
¦¦*•« >.l iuvlulwiMilifh .-«•« « !»**, •«• •»•* - • •*'•
• »» t. . Ti,> ,,t j W.’
- *‘f« *t-,, Irrat:’ itCm-
A. tirKA
'twm'
ProWrite. All Others Pale By Comparison.
You chose Amigf because you wanted something more. Now you choose your software for the same reason. Which makes choosing Pro- Write word processing a very bright idea.
The Full Spectrum of Capabilities.
ProWrite lets you select more than just a typeface: You get proportionally7 spaced character fonts. Brilliant color. Unsurpassed graphics capabilities. And no surprises, Ifecause what
you see on the screen with ProWrite is a letter-
4
perfect picture of what you’ll see printed on the page from header to footer, right down to the last pixel.
Creative Control: .A Brilliant Stroke. With six pulldown menus, just a click of the mouse or a few ke strokes is all
4
you need to create, delete, copy, alter, move and otherwise manipulate text. Multiple selections create a limitless choice of character fonts, colors, sizes and stvles.
4
Customize everything from a daily diary to an annual report, including color graphics. And with headers and footers always clearly displayed, ProWrite makes even ;idvanced formatting as easy as dragging a mouse.
Ease of Use: Another Bright Idea.
ProWrite delivers more of what you bought Amiga for: Professional output Multi-tasking power.
A "creative edge." You can open up to eight windows at once and perform a variety of editing tasks between them. With
ri ...
ProWrite, vou'll al-
»
wavs know exactlv what vou're
4 4 4
doing, because you see it done in living color right before vour eves.
4 4
See for yourself what you get with ProWrite. Then, just for fun, take a look at the others and watch them pale by comparison.
New Horizons
First In Personal Productivity And Creativity.
New Horizons Software. Inc. PO Box *13167, Austin. TX 787-15 (512) 329-6215 ProWrite is a trademark of New Horizons Software. Inc. Amiga is a registered trademark of Commodore-Amiga. Inc. Circle 38 on Reader Service card
BRINGING THE WORLD OF AMIGA" PRODUCTS TO YOU... FAST!
AMIGA 1000 COMPUTER AMIGA 1080 COLOR MONITOR
AMIGA 1010 3.5" DISK DRIVE
(Call For Current Price)
AMIGA MODEM 1200 RS
(Call For Current Price)
(Cali For Current Price)
AMIGA 5.25" DISK DRIVE WITH TRANSFORMER SOFTWARE Available Now! CALL FOR PRICE AND AVAILABILITY OF SIDECAR AND GENLOCK
ipanders
• Autoconfiguring y • Optional Pass Thru Bus
with 2 megabytes RAM * Expandable to 4 MB
installed and tested • Recoverable RAM Disk
We have memory expansion boards from Microbotics, C Ltd., ASDG, Byte by Byte, Access Assoc., and more.
Free Software From GA and Electronic Arts
Birds
-« ’Sew (*
Buy any two Electronic Arts products (except Data Disks) and get your choice of Adventure Construction Kit, Archon, Archon II: Adept, Financial Cookbook, Seven Cities of Gold, and One-on-One FREEH Call for details. Offer expires March 31. 1987.
¦¦¦¦¦¦¦I
IS
_
OKI MATE 20
with
Interface
Modem Special
300 1200 Baud On-Line Software Cable
$ 199
SONY DS DD Disks
Box of 10 Disks $ 28
256K RAM Expansion
Free Blue Label Shipping
* On all software orders over $ 100 to destinations east of the Rocky Mountains. This is two-day delivery from shipping date.
SOFTWARE
ABSOFT
AC Basic .S239
AC Fortran $ 239
Fortran 77 $ 239
ACCESS SOFTWARE
Leader Board S 31
Tournament Disk , . $ 17
Tenth Frame $ 31
ACCOLADE
Mean 18 ..S 32
ACM
Grade Manager... $ 69 ACTIVISION Borrowed Time ... $ 29 Champ Basketball $ 29
Gamemaker $ 48
Gamestar Titles ... Call
Hacker ...$ 29
Hacker II .$ 29
Little Comp People Call
Mmdshadow $ 29
Music Studio $ 43
Shanghai .S 29
ToneTown . . S 29
ADEPT CompuCuisine.. , . S 29 AEGIS Animator Images . . S 89
Art Disk . $ 42
Draw .....Call
Draw Plus .Call
Images .... . Call
Impact . $ 125
Sonic .....Call
ALIEN
Hyperbase .Call
AMIGA
Lisp .... $ 149
Assembler $ 79
MmdWalker .....$ 44
1. 2 Update $ 14
ANAKIN
Easyl .....Call
BATTERIES INCLUDED ISGUR Portfolio ... $ 129 Paperclip Elite .... $ 89
BIS .... $ 49
DEGAS Elite $ 56
BAUDVILLE Video Vegas 28
BEST SOFTWARE Best Financial .... $ 309 BETHESDA
Gridiron! ..$ 69
BROWN WAGH Zuma Fonts
1,2.or3 ..$ 26
BYTE BY BYTE Financial Plus .... S250
InfoMinder $ 69
CAPILANO
Logic Works $ 159
CENTRAL COAST
DOS 2 DOS $ 45
CHANG LABS Accts Payable .... $ 109 Accts Receivable .. $ 109
AR AP GL $ 219
General Ledger ... $ 109
Payroll ...$ 109
Sales Analysis .... $ 109 COMPUMED
Hacker Package . .
$ 39
Mirror ....
$ 39
COMPUSERVE
Starter Kit .
$ 29
COMPUTER CLUB
Nancy ...
$ 45
COSMI
Super Huey......
S 32
CREATIVE SOLUTIONS
MultiForth .
Call
DARK HORSE
Chess Mate......
S 25
DELTA RESEARCH
Forth ....
Call
DELUXE HELP
Deluxe Help
For Dpaint
$ 20
DIGITAL CREATIONS
Dbuddy .
$ 58
Digital Link
$ 49
Gizmos
$ 39
DIGITAL SOLUTIONS
LPD Series
Call
DISCOVERY
Grabbit ...
$ 25
Exactly! ..
$ 19
Key Genie
$ 39
Marauder II......
$ 39
ELECTRONIC ARTS
Adv. Constr. Kit ‘ .
$ 29
Archon ‘ .
$ 29
Archon 11 *
. Call
Arctic Fox .
$ 29
Auto Duel .
$ 39
Bard’s Tale . . .
$ 39
ChessMasler 2000
S 35
Deluxe Music.....
$ 75
Deluxe Paint......
$ 69
Deluxe Print......
S 69
Deluxe Video
S 69
Dpaint Data Disk
$ 25
Dprint Data Disk . .
S 25
Financial Cookbk ’
S 35
Instant Music.....
S 35
Instant Music Data
S 25
King's Quest .....
. Call
Maxicomm
$ 38
Maxidesk .
$ 52
Maxiplan .
$ 109
Marble Madness . .
S 37
New lech Col. Book $ 17
Ogre.....
S 38
One on One ’
S 29
7 Cities of Geld ' . .
S 29
Sky fox ...
$ 29
Starfleet I .
S 44
Ultima III......
$ 49
Winnie the Pooh . .
S 26
• Gel one of these FREE with th purchase of any other t wo F A products, exceo' Data Disks)
EPYX
Roque ...$ 31
Temples of Apshai $ 31
FIREBIRD
Pawn ....$ 32
FIRST BYTE
First Shapes S 34
Kid Talk ..$ 39
Math Talk .S 39
Speller Bee $ 39
FINALLY SOFTWARE
Dr. Xes ...$ 39
Talker ....S 54
GIMPEL
Lint ......S 85
GO AMIGA
Printer Drivers.....Call
GOLD DISK
Page Setter......$ 109
GRAFOX OF ENGLAND
Logistix ..$ 174
HARVSOFT
Infobase ..S 36
INFOCOM All Titles Available . . Call INOVATRONICS Power Windows ... $ 65
M. Call
INTERACTIVE ANALYTIC Expert System Kit $ 56
Explorer ..$ 39
JAG WARE
Alien Fires .Call
JDK IMAGES
Pro Video CGI____ Call
JENDAY Conv. W Comp . . S 24
JHM
Talking Color Book S 24 KENT ENGINEERING MacroModem ... $ 55
LATTICE
C Compiler ......$ 129
dbC III Library S119
Dos X Compiler ... S199
Make Utility S 99
Panel ....$ 149
Screen Editor $ 89
Text Utilities $ 62
MARK OF THE UNICORN
Hex .... $ 31
MARKSMAN
PHASAR .S 69
MANX Aztec C Comm . . $ 389 Aztec C Devel. . . $ 239
Aztec C Prof......Call
MEGASOFT
A-Copier ..... . . S 29
A-Disk ...S 24
A-Filer ...$ 34
A-Report .$ 34
A-Term ...S 34
MER1DIEN SOFTWARE
Zing ......Call
METACOMCO
Pascal ...S 80
Shell ......Call
Toolkit .....Call
METADIGM
MetaScope ......$ 79
MetaScribe ......$ 73
MetaTools I $ 61
MICRO ILLUSIONS CAD System Call
Discovery Math .. S 31 Discovery Spell . . S 31 MICROPROSE
Silent Service S 31
MICROSMITHS TxEd .....$ 32
MICROSYSTEMS SW
Analyze 2 0.....
. Call
BBS-PC .
S 65
Online ..
. S 47
Scribble .
S 65
Organize
. S 65
MILES
Quintette's ..
Call
MIMETICS
Soundscape ....
. $ 130
NEW HORIZONS
Flow ....
$ 85
ProWnte .
.. Call
NEWTEK
Digi-Pamt
$ 49
DigiView Software
$ 185
NORTHEAST SOFTWARE
Order
. . Call
Publisher
. . Call
MINDSCAPE
Balance oi Power.
. $ 37
Bratacus .
. $ 35
Deja Vu .
$ 37
Hailey Project
$ 37
Keyboard Kadet. .
. $ 30
Mastertype .
$ 30
Racter ..
$ 35
SAT Preparation .
$ 61
Def. Of the Crown
$ 37
S. D.I ....
$ 37
The King of
Chicago......
. S 37
Sinbad ..
S 37
PAR SOFTWARE
Par Home ......
$ 53
Par Real .
S 99
PECAN
Pascal Powersys. .
S 89
PRECISION SOFTWARE
SuperBase......
S114
QUEUE
Educational ....
. Call
S ANTHONY STUDIO
Laser Up!
S 69
Laser Utilities . . .
$ 30
Laser Fonts.....
S 30
SEDONA
Money Mentor . . .
S 78
SOFTW. INSIGHT TECH
GO 64 .
. Call
SOFTWOOD
Mi Amiga File.. . .
S 72
Mi Amiga Ledger.
S 72
SOFTWORKS
Softworks Basic . .
. Call
SPECTRUM HOLOBYTE
Gato ...
Call
SUBLOGIC
Flight Simulator . .
. Call
Jet .....
. Call
TAURUS
Acquisition......
. Call
TDI
Modula II Comm.
Call
Modula II Devel.
$ 115
Modula II Reg .
$ 70
THE OTHER GUYS
AMT ....
S 31
Great States.....
S 31
Keep-Trak ......
S 99
Omega File
S 61
TIGRESS
Diskwik .
$ 39
TRANSTIME Datamat
A-100. 200. 300 Call
TRUE BASIC. INC.
True Basic $ 109
9 Libraries (each). . $ 39 Runtime ..$ 109
UNISON WORLD
Art Gallery I, II
Call
Printmaster Plus. , .
$ 49
VERSASOFT
dBMAN .
$ 99
VIP TECHNOLOGY
Professional......
Call
WORDPERFECT INC.
WordPerfect......
. Call
BOOKS
ADDISON WESLEY
Intuition Manual ., .
$ 24
Hardware.....
S 24
Rom: Libraries
S 34
Rom: Exec
S 34
SYBEX
Progr.’s Guide.....
S 24
HARDWARE
ACCESS ASSOCIATES
Alegra 512K......
S335
AKRON
A-Time .....
$ 59
AMIGA
A1000 CPU ......
. Call
External 35".....
. Call
Monitor ..
. Call
Transformer......
. Cali
Genlock ..
. Call
Modem ..
. Call
ANCHOR AUTOMATION
Omega 80
$ 165
APPLIED VISIONS
Futuresound .....
. Call
ASDG
Mini-Rack .
Call
Memory Banks . . .
Call
BYTE BY BYTE
Pal Jr .....
. Call
Tick .....
. Call
EPSON
JX-80 Ribbons
$ 17
GO AMIGA
Printer Cables
$ 25
Modem Cables .
$ 25
Disk Head Cleaner
S 15
30-Disk Case.....
S 10
Mousepad
S 10
Sony Monitor Cable $ 35
GOLDEN HAWK TECH.
MIDI Gold ..
S 69
JUKI
5510 Color Printer .
S499
MICROBOTICS
Starboard 2MB . . .
$ 599
MAS-Drive 20 ....
Call
MIMETICS
Audio Digitizer ....
S 89
MIDI Interface
S 45
OKIDATA
Okimate 20 Ribbons
; $ 7
SUN-RIZE
Perfect Sound ....
. Call
TECMAR
All Products......
Call
800-BE-AMIGA
Orders
In California: 800-843-2842
Customer Service: 415-322-0686 55
VISA
Delivery subject to product availability.
Prices subject to charge. Circle 26 on Reader Service card.
Send Mail Orders to:
GO AMIGA
508 Waverley Street. Palo Alto. CA 94301
(Money Order, Cashier's Check, or Qualified P.O. only)
SHIPPING INFO: We ship UPS ground On orders less than 5100. Shipping is S3 per item (limit S6) For software orders over S100. FREE UPS 2nd Day Air shipping. Call for hardware shipping costs. RETURN & REFUND POLICY: All returns must have an RMA- . Call Customer Service and request a RMA- . Defective merchandise under warranty will be repaired or replaced. We do not offer refunds for defective products or for products that do not perform satisfactorily. We make no guarantees for product performance Any money back guarantees must be handled directly with the manufacturer
Amiga is a trademark of Commodore-Amiga
Captain’s
"Captain's Log, October 1.1944.0250 Hours. Fleel submarine USS Hammerhead proceeding Southwest at cruising speed. Our mission: intercept enemy convoy off the coast of Borneo. Disperse and destroy."
Atari 520ST screens shown
irnur •*
"0500 Hours. Sound General Quarters!
Battle stations manned. Preparing tor torpedo run. Gauge Panel OK. Periscope OK. Charts and Attack Plot Board OK. All mechanical systems OK."
"0400 Hours. Lookouts on the bridge.
Target identification party reports one tanker, 6,000 tons, troopship of 10,250 tons, with two Kaibokan-type escorts. Moving into attack position."
"0525 Hours. Torpedo rooms report full tubes forward and aft. Battery at full charge for silent running. We hope water temperature will provide thermal barrier to confuse enemy sonar."
"0600 Hours. We are at final attack position. Convoy moving at 10 knots. Target distance decreasing rapidly... Crash Dive! Escorts have spotted us and are turning to attack! Rig to run silent." « "0700 Hours. Depth charged for one hour. Some minor damage, but repair parties at work. Destroyer propeller noises receding. We'll come to periscope deplh for our return
punch."
"0715 Hours Torpedo tubes 1.2.3 fired.
Two destroyers hit and sinking. One of the enemy's last tankers coming into 'scope view an ideal target position. On my mark... Fire Tube 4! Fire 5!" “Superb” raves Scott May in On Line, “strategic intensity and heart- pounding action have rarely been merged this successfully.” Analog calls it flatly “the best submarine simulation so far.” Compute comments "Silent Service's detail is astonishing.” Join the more than
50,000 computer skippers who have volunteered for Silent Setvice, the naval action tactics simulation from MicroProse.
Silent Service is available lor Commodore 64 ’ 128”''. Amiga'”. Apple II family Atari XL XE, Atari ST. IBM PC PCJr, and Tandy 1000, at a suggested retail price o( S34.95 (Atari ST and Amiga, 539.95).
Commodore. Amiga, Apple. Atari. IBM. And Tandy are registered trademarks of Commodore Electronics. Ltd.. Commodore-Amiga Inc., Apple Computer, Inc.. International Business Machines Corp.. and Tandy Corp., respectively
Available from your local retailer. II out-of-stock, contact MicroProse directly for further information on our full range ol simulation software, and to place Mastercard Visa orders.
MICRO PROSE
SIMULATION * SOFTWARE
120 Lakefrcmt Drive * Hunt Valley, MD 21030 • (3011 667-1151
Circle 198 on Reader Service card.
BACK IN FRONT..
The Amiga 2000 features a megabyte of memory,
m m
m m m m
¦ m
internal slots,
up to three
internal disk drives,
and the ability
-
to run coprocessor tasks in Amiga windows.
¦1
*
1
a
S
1
I S 1 i
* *
%
1
%
3 3 3 1 IJ
111111111! Ii mum
0 to
RtGHT LffT
SEFEELL POFTT
Amiga 2000 doesn’t make the A1000 obsolete the graphics modes, for instance, are identical but it is a much more versatile, expandable, compatible, and. Ultimately, more powerful machine.
System Description
The Amiga 2000 uses the MC68000 processor. It comes with one megabyte (million bytes) of RAM, one halfheight, internal 3 -inch floppy drive that can store 880K of programs and data, a detachable, 94-key keyboard and a two-button mouse. It also has five Amiga and four IBM PC AT slots for internal expansion. The Amiga 2000 system box is a metal case 6 -inches high. 17 inches wide and 15 %-inches deep. Its footprint the area it occupies on a desk is about the same as the A1000. Unlike the A1000, however, the A2000 keyboard can’t be stored beneath the system unit when not in use.
Like the 1000, the Amiga 2000 has many built-in ports. On the front are the two mouse joystick ports.
On the back are a Centronics- and IBM-compatible parallel port, an IBM-compatible serial port, an RGB video port, stereo sound output and a connector for an external disk drive. Missing are the composite and RF connectors found on the A1000. Composite and RF output are optional on the A2000. The keyboard on the A2000 connects to the front of the machine; the power cord to the back.
Conspicuous by its absence on the Amiga 2000 is the 86-pin edge connector that gave Amiga 1000 owners direct access to the AlOOO's address and data busses. The A2000 has internal expansion slots, so no external bus is provided. Devices that connect to the expansion bus on the A1000 can’t connect to the Amiga 2000. The Amiga 2000, therefore, is not hardware compatible with the A1000. According to Commodore, however, third- party hardware developers will provide expansion boxes for the A1000 that will give A1000 owners access to all peripherals developed for the A2000.
Photo 4. Numeric Keypad. Inscribed on the front of some keys is the function they assume In IBM mode.
You can use standard interface cables with the Amiga 2000 serial and parallel ports; Commodore has changed the pin-outs of these ports to comform to industry standards (See Figure 1 for the pin-outs of the parallel and serial ports).
Drive Configuration
In addition to the one standard disk drive, the Amiga 2000 can mount two more disk drives in the front of the machine. You can put another half-height 3 -inch floppy, or a half-height 3 -inch hard drive next to the standard drive. Below these two, you can mount one 5 -inch half-height drive either hard or floppy or, with a 3 inch mounting bracket, mount another 3 - inch half-height hard or floppy drive. The A2000 has controllers to support two internal 3 -inch floppies.
The A2088 Board the board that provides IBM compatibility has a controller for four 5 -inch floppies.
You will have to supply a controller for any haicl-disk drive mounted in the front of the machine.
In addition to the front-mounted drives and any drives connected to the disk drive port on the back, you can attach other disk drives to the Amiga or IBM side of the system by supplying the appropriate controller board.
The Keyboard
The Amiga 2000 keyboard (Photo 1) has 94 keys (96 on the international version), five more than the AlOOO’s keyboard. The five new keys are on the numeric keypad. In Amiga mode, these keys are left and right parenthesis, slash, asterisk and plus. When working with the A2088 Board, these keys take on the IBM-specific functions inscribed on the front of the keys (Photo
4) . These include Num Lock, Prt Sc, Scroll Lock and other IBM keys. The numeric keypad emulates the functions found on the IBM numeric keypad.
The keyboard is larger than the A1000 keyboard and the keys themselves are shallower. The keys feel springier than on the A1000 they “come back at you” faster than they do with the A1000 keyboard.
Inside the Case
Considering the number of boards and drives you can stick inside the Amiga 2000, you’d expect the machine to have a large power supply: It does. The biggest thing on the motherboard, the power supply (see Photo 2) supplies 200 watts to whatever you load into your machine. It could take a while before you overload this power supply.
Unlike the Amiga 1000, the Amiga 2000 has Kickstart in ROM, specifically Kickstart 1.2, This will save you time when you boot the system. Because the ROM chips are socketed, and because Kickstart 1.2 contains hooks to RAM-resident software patches, Amiga 2000 owners will be able to take advantage of operating system upgrades.
The Amiga 2000 comes with 1 megabyte of RAM standard. Half of that RAM is Amiga chip memory memory accessible by both the 68000 and the Amiga custom chips. Graphics and sound data must be ?
Amiga custom chips
serial port
audio out
RGB port
PC AT slots
Internal
drive
connector
external
drive
port
parallel
port
- n n >
U)
PS 5
H- 2 CD
* -* CD Cl U)
m n
cn o
o 2
serial
chips
Amiga expansion slots
MC68000
chip RAM
power
supply
connector
mouse
connectors
ROM (on daughterboard)
keyboard
connector
CPU slot
Photo 5. Amiga 2000 motherboard. The mount for the power supply and Internal drives normally covers the right half of the board.
Iii chip memory before it can be used by the system. The other 512K is fast memory; so called because the custom chips can’t access this memory. The 68000 can access fast memory at full speed. AmigaDOS automatically loads programs directly into fast RAM (if there is any available) and reserves chip memory for graphics and sound. This increases the efficiency of the svstem.
t
The 512K of chip memory is built into the Amiga 2000 motherboard. The fast memory is contained on an autoconfig memory board that plugs into a 100-pin expansion slot.
The A2000 system has a built-in clock calendar.
Unlike the clock in the A1000, however, this clock has a battery backup. You will no longer have to set the time and date on powerup. One thing missing on the A2000 that is standard on the A1000 is composite video-out. Commodore has removed composite video-out from the motherboard entirely. Instead, Commodore provides a video slot that you can fill with either an NTSC coder for North America or a PAL coder for Europe. Both coder boards will be available from Commodore and will include RF signals for use with Tvs and VCRs. Hopefully, the composite signal from these boards (or from third-party hardware boards) will be superior to that supplied by the A1000, which hasn’t won the hearts of video professionals.
Expansion Architecture
The biggest difference between the A1000 and the A2000, and the raison d'etre of the A2000, is the presence of slots on the A2000 motherboard (Photo 5). Commodore has made the Amiga system expandable internally, and provided as well a unique and ingenious method for running MS-DOS software on the Amiga.
Perhaps the most interesting slot on the motherboard is the CPU slot. This 86-pin slot has the same unbuffered access to the Amiga data and address busses as the MC 68000. You could use this slot to let another processor take over the Amiga or work in parallel with the 68000. This is the natural place to put a 68020 68881 board to upgrade the Amiga to a 32-bit processor.
The inclusion of the CPU slot reflects Commodore’s intention to make the A2000 a multitasking, multiprocessor. Multi-DOS machine. In addition to the CPU and the video slots mentioned earlier, the A2000 has live Zorro-like expansion slots on the Amiga motherboard. These slots are 100-pin, they support autoconfig, and they do have buffered access to the 68000 data and address busses; but. They arc not totally compatible with the Zorro 100-pin autoconfig standard published earlier by Commodore. They conform to the revised Zorro specifications announced at the Monterey developers conference last fall. There are two differences: First, the form factor the physical size and shape of the boards is different; Zorro boards arc square, A2000 boards rectangular. More importantly, some of the lines have been relocated in the slots (Figure 2). In addition to resizing, this means that some Zorro boards will have to be rewired to work in the A2000.
PC slots
The A2000 also has a four-slot IBM PC AT bus system on the motherboard.. .sort of. Two of the slots are 1 libit AT slots; the other two are eight-bit XT slots. If you look closely at these XT slots, however, you'll see that all the lines are in place to convert these slots into AT slots (see Photo 5). All you (or your dealer or Commodore) have to do is solder the AT-specific part of the
Iwo-Hay
Buffer

- XT AI Slots
.One-May
Buffer
Aniga Slots
Expansion Bus
CPU
Slot
Pin
Function
Pin
Function
1
STROBE*
14
+5y pullup
2
Data 8
15
NC
3
Data 1
16
RESET*
4
Data 2
17
GND
5
Data 3
18
GND
6
Data 4
19
GND
7
Data 5
28
GND
8
Data 6
21
GND
9
Data?
22
GHD
18
ACK
23
GND
11
BUSY
24
GND
12
POUI
25
GND
13
SEL
PARALLEL PORI D-25 Fenale
sfmmmt
Pin
Function
Pin Function
I1
GND
14

2
IxD
15
3
RxD
16
4
RTS
17

5
CIS
18
ADI
6
DSR
19
- --
7
28
DTR
8
DCD
21

9
+12v
22
RI
18
- 12*
23
11
AUDO
24
12

25
13
-
SERIAL PORI D-25 nale iiimmmn
vBSBXSBF
Figure 1.
Simplified block diagram of the Amiga 2000 system.
Pinouts of the Amiga 2000 parallel and serial ports.
Connector in place to convert the XT slots into full- fledged AT slots.
As mentioned earlier, the A2088 Board available for the Amiga 2000 provides IBM PC XT compatibility on a board. Why, then, did Commodore provide a PC AT bus system, two PC AT slots, and the ability to expand the other slots to AT slots? Commodore has indicated that they plan to provide an AT-compatible board at some future date.
If this is so, then why didn’t Commodore make all four slots AT compatible at once, and save themselves and users the trouble of upgrading to AT slots in the future? The problem is that, although XT cards work in AT slots, they don’t always fit into AT slots. Many XT cards overhang so much that they don't clear the AT slot extension. To make certain that all current XT cards work in the A2000, Commodore left the extension off two of the AT slots. It’s a neat solution to the problem of fitting enough Amiga, XT and AT slots into a machine that can fit easily on a desktop.
Bridging the Gap
Surprisingly, the five Amiga slots and four IBM slots don’t add up to nine usable slots; they add up to seven. This is due to the way the slots are laid out on the motherboard (Figure 3). Looking from the front, the four IBM slots are in the back-left of the machine. The Amiga slots are towards the front and the right. Note well, however, that the two rightmost IBM slots are aligned with the two leftmost Amiga slots. This alignment lets specially-constructed cards sit in an Amiga slot and a PC slot at the same time, providing a bridge
between the two systems. The A2088 Board is an exam-
.
Pie of such a bridge card. It plugs into both an Amiga and a PC slot, thus providing a connection between the Amiga bus system and the PC AT bus system. The connection is not achieved through physical juncture of the two busses, but rather through the sharing of memory accessible to both bus systems.
The fact that two slots of each type arc aligned means increased flexibility in how you configure your Amiga 2000 system. With the A2088 Board in the leftmost Amiga slot (and the aligned IBM slot), you still have four unused Amiga slots and two unused IBM slots. If you put the A2088 Board into the next Amiga slot to the right, with the board’s IBM connector in the rightmost IBM slot, you will have three unused Amiga slots and three unused IBM slots. Overlapping two slots allowed Commodore to give you great flexibility in configuring your system. Of course, if you don’t install an A2088 Board, you have five unused Amiga slots at your disposal.
Amiga 2000 Peripheral Boards
The A2088 Board (covered in detail in the next story) and the composite video boards mentioned earlier are not the only significant peripherals available for the A2000. Commodore has two memory-expansion boards for the A2000 and a DMA hard-disk controller that supports both ST506 and SCSI (Small Computer System Interface) devices. Commodore is also offering a new high-persistence monitor for both the A1000 and the A2000. This monitor is designed to eliminate the flicker associated with using the Amiga in interlaced mode.
The two memory boards available for the Amiga 2000 use two different kinds of chips: the A2050 Two- ?
Pin
k
Pin
A2888 Board Can Go Here..
t
Odd
tt'edl
pins
1
t
Even
ll'ed
pins
4
BFD0B8
DFF8B0
Pin
Pin
Frnrr -
Amiga system memory map.
Figure 2. Pinout of the Amiga 2000 100*pln expansion slots.
512K Chip Hewwy
Reserved
8 Megabyte Henory Space For Auto-Configuration Expansion Devices
Reserved
Auto-Configuration Expansion Decoding
Reserved
Reserved
I O For 8528's CPU RAH
ROM
Pin Function
Fin Function
Fin Function Fin Function Pin Function
1
GKD
21
A5
41
A14
61
GND
81
BD3
2
GKD
22
EM6
42
EDITS
62
B6ACK
82
BD7
3
GKD
23
A6
43
A15
63
ED15
83
BD4
4
GKD
24
M
44
EMM
64
BGx
84
BD6
5
+5V
25
GND
45
A16
65
BD14
85
GND
6
+5V
26
A3
46
BERR
66
DfACK
86
ED5
7

27
A2
47
A17
67
BD13
87
GND
8
- 5V
28
A7
48
m
68
READ
SB
GND
9
SLAVEx
29
Al
49
GND
69
BD12
89
GND
18
+12V
38
AS
58
E
78
BLDS
98
GND
11

31
BFCB
51
m
71
Bdil
91
GND
12
UU1
no*
32
A9
52
A18
72
BUDS
THE
13
GND
33
BFC1
53
FES
GND
93
DOE
14
C3B
34
A18
54
A19
74
m
94
RESB
15
CDACB
35
BFC2
55
m
75
BD8
95
8 BGIN
16
C1B
36
All
56
m
76
BD18
96
EMI
17
m
37
GND
57
A22
77
BD1
97
RESERVB
18
XRDY
38
A12
58
A21
78
BD9
98
RESERV9
19
IM2
39
A13
59
A23
79
BD2
99
GND
28
I -12V
48
EMI7
68
BR*
88
BD8
188
as
: updated by Amga
FIGURES DRAWN BY ROGER GOODE
Amiga 2000 Specifications
Price (preliminary)
Under Si,500
Basic System
A2000 CPU box with 200-watt power supply, keyboard, clock calendar with battery backup and an optomechanical, two-button mouse are standard. AmigaDOS Workbench disk and Extras disk with Amiga Basic are standard software.
CPU
MC68000 running at 7.14 Mhz. Three custom chips handle video display (graphics and animation), sound and DMA.
Standard Memory
One megabyte RAM divided into 512K chip (graphics and sound) memory and 512K fast memory. Expandable to 8.5 megabytes.
256K ROM contains operating system kernal Kickstart VI.2.
1 .1
jKi
Amiga 2000 system box (front). Note the spaces reserved for the internal drives. The ports along the bottom are, from left to right, the keyboard connector, mouse port 1 and mouse port 2.
Amiga 2000 system box (rear). At far left is the cut out for the video sloL Across the top, left to right, are the power switch, power plug and fan. Across the bottom are the RGB port, parallel port, dlsk-drive port, stereo-audio connectors and serial port On the far right are cut outs for connectors to boards In the seven expansion slots. Above the serial port are two more cut outs for boards that have multiple connectors.
Keyboard
Detached, 94 keys (96 on international versions). Includes 10 function keys, full cursor control and IBM-tvpe numeric keypad. Operating system vU2 supports different language key maps.
Disk Drives
One 3-J£* half-height floppy, built-in; 880K formatted capacity. One additional Amiga floppy drive can be controlled internally. Mounting for a third internal drive. Additional internal drives or hard disks require additional controllers.
Ports
Centronics IBM parallel, RS-232 serial, RGB port analog and digital), external disk drive port for two additional Amiga floppies, two audio ports and two mouse controller ports.
Slots
86-pin CPU slot, video slot, five Amiga 100-pin expansion slots and four IBM PC AT (16-bit) slots.
Video Display
Text:
60 or 80 columns x 25 lines; text is graphics-generated. Graphics:
320 x 200 pixels: up to 32 out of 4,096 colors 640 x 200: up to 16 out of 4,096 colors 320 x 400: interlaced, up to 32 out of 4,096 colors 640 x 400: interlaced, up to 16 out of 4,096 colors
In each mode, the palette can he switched on the scanline (hold and modify) so all 4,096 colors can appear on screen at once.
Sound
Four independent sound channels output as two stereo channels. Each sound channel consists of an eight-bit digital analog converter and a low-pass filter.
Optio?ial from Commodore:
• A2002 Color Monitor, RGB analog, RGB digital, composite. Price not available.
+ A2080 Color Monitor (under $ 500). High-persistance version of A2002.
+ A1Q10 External Floppy Drive. 3-J(, inch. Price not available.
* A1020 External Floppy Drive. 5-% inch. Price not available.
+ A1680 Amiga Modem. 1200 baud, Hayes compatible. Price not available.
+ A2088 Board (under $ 500). IBM PC XT compatibility on a board, with 512K RAM.
• A2094 Hard Disk SCSI Controller. Controls two ST506 drives and seven SCSI devices. Price not available.
+ A2050 Two-Megabyte RAM expansion. Also available; 512K. Version, Price not available.
A2058 Eight-Megabyte RAM expansion. Also available; 4M version. Price not available,
• A2060 Video RF Modulator Board (under SI 00). Provides NTSC composite and RF out.
+ A2Q61 Video RF Modulator Board (under $ 100) Provides PAL composite and RF out, ?
Brings the world into your Amiga!
ith Digi-View and a video camera.
Your Amiga can see! Faces, logos, artwork ... anything you can imagine!
Simply point your camera and click the mouse. In seconds, whatever the camera sees is painlessly transformed into a computer image that can be printed, stored on disk, or transferred to other programs. Imagine how quickly and easily you can generate stunning video art and animation when you start with high quality digitized photographs or artwork.
Sophisticated software included with Digi-View makes it easy to produce dazzling, hroadcast-quality color images. Intuitive, on-screen controls are as easy to use as the knobs on your T.V. set. Digi-View can capture images in several modes, including 320x200 pixels with up to 4096 colors on screen ("hold- and-modify' mode), and the incredibly detailed 640x400 high resolution mode.
• IFF disk format works with Digi-Paint™. PcIuxePaint™. DeluxeVideo™. DeluxePrint. Aegis Images™, Aegis Animator, and more!
• Saves time! No more hours of freehand drawing and redrawing.
• Send photos over the telephone with your modem and terminal software.
• Capture images for scientific image processing or pattern recognition.
$ 199.95
• Spice up business graphics slide show program included.
Only
Incorporate photos in posters and greeting cards, ____
it T' • i I HBS includes video digitizer module.
Use Digi-View pictures in your BASIC programs. I fcjgg color separation filter; software and manual
• Catalog images with IFF database programs. I I : 1 Orders Only 1-800-843-8934
• Make red blue .3D photos. iifffMI Customer Service (913) 354-9332
• A powerful tool for commercial graphic artists!
NewTek
Panasonic IVV-1410 video camera w lens .....
CS-1L Copy stand w lights ...
S280
S 75
INCORPORATED
701 Jackson • Suite B3 • Topeka, KS • 66603
Amiga is a trademark ot Commodure-Amiga. Inc. Digi-View and Digi-Paint are trademarks of NewTek. Inc. Deluxe Paint, DeluxeVkieo. And DeluxePrint are trademarks irt Electronic Arts. Inc. Aegis Images and Aegis Animator are trademark* of Aegis Development. Inc.
‘ Digi-View software version 2 0 (or newer) required to use color camera. For maximum resolution use monochrome camera with 2.1 interlace. Iligh-res color modes require 1 Meg expansion RAM.
• £ 1986 NewTek. Inc.
Circle 102 on Reader Service card.
Megabyte Board uses 256K*bii RAM chips; the A2058 Eight-Megabyte Board uses the newer (and more expensive) 1 Mega-bit RAM chips. Both boards are autocon- fig, both have zero-wait state memory, and both are available in smaller memory sizes. If you buy a board that isn’t filled to capacity, you can buy chips and populate the board yourself when you need the extra memory.
Hard Disk and Scuzzy
The A2094 Hard Disk SCSI Controller Board (Photo 3) is designed to give the Amiga high-speed access to external hard disks and SCSI (commonly called “Scuzzy”) devices. The board uses a custom VLSI DMA (Direct Memory Access) controller the 8727 to move information quickly between the board and the Amiga’s memory. The board uses a Z-80 microprocessor to control a pair of ST506 hard disks. The SCSI interface is provided by the Western Digital WD33C93. This chip can be controlled by either the Z-80 or the Amiga 68000, with the default being the 68000.
The 8727 DMA controller is a Commodore custom chip that features a 64-byte FIFO (First In, First Out) real-time buffer. This buffer allows real-time data transfer between the controllers on the board and the Amiga's memory without having the DMA chip hold the system bus for an entire sector (512 bytes) transfer. Wait states caused by DMA transfer are therefore kept to a minimum.
The DMA controller uses 3 address counters accessible by the Amiga CPU to determine where to initiate data transfer (either to or from memory)- Once DMA begins, these counters are incremented automatically. DMA is initiated with a 12-byte command block sent to the DMA controller by the Amiga system.
Using the DMA controller, the ST506 hard disk interface can transfer data to the Amiga at 1.6 microseconds byte (687K-bytcs second). Data transfer from the SCSI controller is even faster 800 nanoseconds byte
(1. 25Mbytes second). Translating these values into Mbits second, the most common unit for expressing data-transfer rates, you find that transfer from the ST506 controller can reach 5 Mbits second; transfer from the SCSI interface can hit 10 Mbits second.
The SCSI interface is an ANSI X3T9.2-compatible interface that can control seven SCSI devices numbered 0 through 6. Device number 7 is the SCSI interface itself. The interface supports two connectors; an industry standard 50-pin connector and a Macintosh Plus- compatible D-25 connector. The Amiga SCSI port is thus hardware compatible with the Mac Plus SCSI port.
The ST506 controller handles one or two hard drives with up to eight recording surfaces per drive and up to 2,048 cylinders (tracks) per head. The ST506 controller doesn’t support 16-head drives. The Z-80 chip that is the brains of the ST506 controller has available 2K bytes RAM to buffer commands from the Amiga. The intelligence of the controller is contained in 8K PROM (Programmable Read-Only Memory) that stores the routines that drive the Z-80, and IK RAM for the storage of variables needed by the controlling routines.
In addition to the A2088 Board, memory boards and Hard Disk SCSI Controller Board, Commodore and third parties are developing other peripherals for the slots in the Amiga 2000. At the nondisclosure preview provided by Commodore, they showed a Computer System Associates 68020 68881 board running in the Amiga 2000. CSA has resized their board to match the A2000 form factor; they are also making the necessary- electronic changes to conform to the alterations in the Zorro electronics. Since the changes to the board weren’t completed at the time of the press demonstration (early December 1986), the CSA board needed three jumpers into the CPU slot to work. With that slight modification, the board seemed to work perfectly. It computed and displayed a Mandelbrot image on the Amiga in a couple of minutes. (Note: The CSA 68020 board demonstrated goes into an expansion slot, not the CPU slot: The 68020, with a 14-MHz clock, takes control of the system simply by answering bus requests faster than the 68000 can.) Other companies are making adjustments in their Zorro boards and expansion boxes to conform to the A2000 revised-Zorro slots.
Conclusion
With the A2000, Commodore has extended the Amiga architecture to include internal slots and, optionally. IBM compatiblity, while maintaining software compatibility with the Amiga 1000. On the negative side, Commodore has failed to address the interlace flicker problem directly (although the high-persistence monitor is a big help) and has revised the Zorro expansion specification. This is bound to confuse buyers and to confound third-party hardware makers who have invested lots of time and money in supporting the Zorro standard. It is too early to tell how many manufacturers will support the A2000 expansion standard or how many may drop out of the Amiga market altogether. The third-party hardware situation will take time to sort itself out.
On the positive side, the Amiga 2000 is far superior to the A1000. In many respects, especially concerning standard memory and internal expansion, it is the machine the A1000 should have been. While maintaining software compatibility, Commodore has stretched the horizons of the Amiga architecture while giving Amiga 2000 owners a window literally to other processors and operating systems. With a price for the base unit of under $ 1,500, the Amiga 2000 is an excellent buy. Fully configured, it is perhaps the most powerful and versatile personal computer you can buy.H
Editor's note: This article and the piece on the Janus system that follows is based upon a six-hour meeting with Commodore marketing and engineering personnel, numerous follow-up plume calls and meetings, and about three days of hands-on, unsupervised experience with the A2000 and various peripherals, Due to deadline constraints, some of the information supplied by Commodore could not be verified independently. We will follow this description of the Amiga 2000 and the Janus hardware and software with further details, clarifications and corrections as needed.
From the creators of Digi-View comes Digi-Paint. The first paint program to take full advantage of the Amiga’s exclusive "hold-and-modify" mode. No longer are you limited to 32 colors. With Digi-Paint, you can use all 4096 colors on screen simultaneously. Features include brushes, smooth shading, magnify, cut & paste, output to printer, and full IFF load and save. Digi-Paint was programmed completely in assembly language for the fastest possible response. Give your Amiga the graphics power of systems costing thousands of dollars more. See your Amiga dealer today or call toll-free for Digi-Paint, the 4096 color paint program.
Only $ 59.95
Orders Only 1-800-843-8934 Customer Service (913) 354-9332
N=wT=k
INCORPORATED
701 Jackson • Suite B3 • Topeka, KS • 66603
Amiga is a trademark or Cummndore-Amiga, Inc. Digi-Paint and Digi-View art trademarks of NcwTck. Inc. Deluxe Pamt is a trademark of Electronic Arts. Inc.
Between Two Worlds: The A2088 Board
Commodore’s plug-in bridge between the world of Amiga and the world of the IBM PC.
By Bob Ryan
n the Roman pantheon, Janus was a two-faced god who guarded gates and doorways his unique anatomical arrangement let him see in two directions at once. The Janus system incorporated into the A2088 Board (and the Amiga Sidecar) is also the guardian of a gateway: The gateway between the Amiga and the IBM PC.
The A2088 Board is a peripheral board that sits in one of the special “bridge” slots on the Amiga 2000 motherboard. The A2088 Board has two edge connectors one connects the board to the Amiga bus system via an Amiga expansion slot; the other connects the board to the IBM PC AT slot system. Thus, the A2088 Board contains the physical and logical link between the Amiga and the IBM world.
A2088 Hardware
More than a simple connector, the A2088 Board is a full-fledged computer system. It is an IBM PC XT computer on a card. It has an Intel 8088 microprocessor running at 4.77 Mhz, an IBM-compatible ROM BIOS (Basic Input Output System), a floppy-disk controller for four IBM-type 5J 4" disk drives, up to 512K RAM (256K standard) for MS-DOS software and a socket for an optional 8087 math coprocessor. In addition, the A2088 Board has a custom PC Multifunction chip that emulates many of the hardware aspects of the IBM PC XT. These include interrupt control, DMA and the generation of PC-specific timing signals. The ROM BIOS is a product of Phoenix Technologies, the leading maker of PC-compatible BIOS, and Commodore. Commodore customized the PC BIOS slightly to incorporate handshaking between the PC and the Amiga.
The A2088 Board also contains an area that is controlled by the Amiga. Two large custom chips on the board contain the Janus interface and the Amiga controller for the actual physical connections between the Amiga and the XT-on-a-board. This physical connection takes place in an area of memory common to both the
PC and the Amiga; an area called the dual-port RAM. Common Access
The A2088 Board has 128K of dual-port RAM, so called because its address and data busses are connected to both the Amiga side and the IBM side of the board (with access by one system or the other controlled by flip-flops). It is through dual-port RAM that information passes between the two systems. This is how the Amiga controls the IBM PC XT in the A2088 Board: To the Amiga, the entire IBM PC XT system is just another AmigaDOS application running in a wfindow on the Amiga screen.
The 128K dual-port RAM is divided into three major sections. The largest is a 64K buffer used by the Amiga to transfer data between the two systems. Using this buffer, AmigaDOS can use a hard disk connected to the IBM bus system. The PC, however, can’t use hard disks on the Amiga side of the system. The PC doesn’t have the built-in intelligence to control the Janus interface.
The second major chunk of the dual-port RAM is critical to running IBM-PC programs in an Amiga window. In this area are the I O registers, the monochrome video RAM, the color video RAM and the CRT registers of the PC. Also here is an eight-bit interrupt-type register that tells the Amiga what type of interrupt has occurred on the IBM side. To an application running on the IBM side, everything seems normal: The PC thinks it is writing to its screen memory and thinks it is reading its keyboard register. In fact, the PC side is writing to memory in dual-port RAM and reading a pseudo keyboard register in dual-port RAM. Once the information is in dual-port RAM, it can be accessed and massaged by the Amiga to produce output on the Amiga screen and input from the Amiga keyboard. This “massaging” function is performed by a library of routines called the janus.library. The link library for C is called jlib.lib.
Three copies of the PC registers and display memory exist in dual-port RAM; the original, as accessed by the PC side, and two “shadows” of the same information that is automatically created by the Janus controller located on the A2088 Board.
These areas of shadow RAM exist because the Amiga accesses information from the IBM system in three different ways, depending upon what the information is. Sometimes, the Amiga is looking for information in byte form; sometimes in word form (the 8088 and the 68000 have a different order of bytes in their words); and sometimes as graphics information. The Janus system automatically makes three copies of the information from the PC side and then directs access of the Janus routines to the appropriate shadow RAM. (For an example of how shadowing makes life easier for the Amiga, see the sidebar entitled “How the Amiga 2000 Creates an IBM Medium-R.es Display”)
The Amiga addresses the different shadow areas by applying an offset to a base address. Byte access has an offset of zero; the Amiga reads byte-sized information from the same physical locations where the PC writes it. The address of the word-access memory is offset $ 20000 from the byte area; graphics access is $ 40000 above the byte-access area. The Amiga-accessible I O registers are offset $ 60000 above byte-access memory. Although very little of the possible memory between these offsets is actually used, the A2088 Board does take a big chunk of contiguous memory out of the Amiga memory map. In fact, the A2088 Board reserves two megabytes of memory for itself during the autoconfiguration process. With an A2088 Board installed, your Amiga is “limited” to 6.5 megabytes of RAM, of which only 6 megabytes can be autoconfig expansion RAM.
The third major area of dual-port RAM is called
MB
JANUS
interface
controller
AMIGA bus connector
The A2088 Board is an IBM PC XT- compatible computer on a card.
Parameter RAM. This area acts as the software interface control for the Janus system. It has some special registers that control runtime handshaking between the two systems. This handshaking is important both at pow- erup (see the sidebar “Two-Fisted Powerup”) and while a PC application is running to keep both systems from accessing the dual-port RAM at the same time. Parameter RAM contains definitions to all the PC software interrupts that the Janus system recognizes. It also has pointers to the different data structures in other areas of the dual-port RAM.
A2088 Software
All the intelligence to control the flow of information between the PC XT and the Amiga is on the Amiga side of the interface, either built into the A2088 Board or in the Janus library. To run PC software, the Amiga runs a task called the PCWindow task.
PC Window is like any other Amiga program. It uses Intuition to create a resizable screen and pull down ?
MODULA-2
the successor to Pascal
FULL inlerface to ROM Kernel. Intuition. Workbench and AnngaDos Smart linker lor greatly reduced code size
Supports real numbers and transcendental functions ie sin. Cos. Tan, arctan, exp, In. Log, power, sqrt 3d graphics and multi-tasking demos
CODE statement for assembly code Error lister will locate anc identify all errors in source code Smg e character PO supported No royalties or copy protection Phone and network customer Support provided 350-page manual
True native code implementation (Not UCSD p-Code or M-code) Sophisticated multi-pass compiler allows forward relerences and code
optimization
ReallnOul. LonglnOut. InOut. Strings Storage Terminal Streams MathLibO and all standard modules
Works with single floppy.'512K RAM
Pascal and Modula-2 source code are nearly identical Modula-2 should be thoughl ol as an enhanced superset of Pascal Prolessor Niklaus Wirtn (the creator ot Pascal) designed Modula-2 to replace Pascal
Added features ol Modula-
2 not found in Pascal
Dynamic strings that may be any size
Multi-iaskmg is supported Procedure variables Module version control Programmer delmable scope ol objects
Open array parameters (VAR r ARRAY OF REALS.)
Began! Type transfer functions
CASE nas an ELSE and may contain subranges
Programs may be broken up into Modules for separate compilation
Machine level interface Bit-wise operators Direct port and Memory access Absolute addressing Interrupt structure
Ramdisk Benchmarks (secs)
Compile
Link
Execute
Optomized
Size
Sieve of Eratosihenes
61
49
42
1257 bytes
Float
6 7
72
86
3944 bytes
Calc
5 7
48
36
1736 bytes
Null program
48
4 7

1100 bytes
MODULE Sieve;
MODULE Float.
CONST Size = 8190,
FROM MathLibO IMPORT sin. In. E*p.
TYPE FlagRange = [O.Size],
sqrt, arctan.
FlagSet - SET OF FlagRange.
VAR x.y REAL, i CARDINAL.
VAR Flags; FlagSet,
BEGIN rST-.SA-.SS-*)
i FlagRange.
X ; = 1.0.
Prime, k, Count, Iter CARDINAL,
FOR i:= 1 TO 1000 DO
BEGIN fSS-.SR-.SA- ')
y:= sin (x). Yr- In (x). Y = exp (x);
FOR Iter- 1 TO 10 DO
y - sqrt (x) y - arctan (x).
Caunt:= 0.
X - x - 0.01.
Flags - FiagSetO. (’ empty set ')
END.
FOR i = 0 TO Size DO
END float
IF (i IN Flags) THEN
Prime = (i * 2) • 3. K i • Prime
WHILE k Size DO
MODULE calc;
INCL (Flags, k).
VAR a.b.C. REAL. N. i CARDINAL.
K: - k - Pnme.
BEGIN (-ST-.SA-SS--)
END.
N:= 5000.
Ccunt Count - 1
a - 2 71828; b - 3 14159; c * 10
END
FOR i:= 1 TO n DO
END.
C - c'a, c c’b. C c a. C c b
END.
END
END Sieve
END calc
Product History
The Tdl Modula-2 compiler has been running on the Pinnacle supermicro (Aug
84) . Atari ST (Aug. 85) and will soon appear on the Macintosh and UNIX in the 4th Qtr. 86
Regular Version $ 89.95 Developer's Version S149.95 Commercia! Version $ 299.95
The regular version contains all the features listed above The developer s version contains additional Amiga modules, macros and demonstration programs - a symbol file decoder - link and load lile disassemblers * a source tile cross relerencer
- the kcrmit file transfer utility - a Modula-2 CLI - modules for IFF and ILBM The commercial version contains all of the Amiga module source files.
Other Modula-2 Products
Kermit - Contains lull source plus $ 15 connect time to CompuServe $ 29 95
Examples - Many of the C programs from ROM Kernel and Intuition
translated into Modula-2. $ 24 95
GRID - Sophisticated multi-key Me access method with over
30 procedures to access variable length records. $ 49 95
Tdl
SOFTWARE, INC.
10410 Markison Road ¦ Dallas, Texas 75236 ¦ (214) 340-4942 Telex: 888442 CompuServe Number 75026.1331
menus, and it only goes into action when its polling procedure detects an action that requires its attention.
Like other Amiga tasks, this action could be the user clicking the mouse. Unlike common Amiga tasks, however, PCWindow must also respond to what is happening on the PC side of the A2088 Board and take action when needed (specifically, when the PC changes its display screen or reads its keyboard). Optionally, you can have the PC control the Amiga parallel port.
When an IBM-PC program changes the information it is displaying on the screen, it writes the new information to a specific area of memory. In a PC, a video processor scans this memory and uses the data there to update the screen. When a PC program running on the A2088 Board writes to screen memory (located in dualport RAM), it triggers a level 2 interrupt on the Amiga side. The PCWindow task then checks the interrupt- type register in dual-port RAM to see what caused the interrupt. (The PC will interrupt the Amiga when one of eight conditions occurs: The PC reads the keyboard, writes to monochrome video RAM, writes to color video RAM, accesses the monochrome CRT registers, accesses the color CRT registers, accesses LPT1, accesses CQM1, or experiences a software interrupt.)
If the interrupt is something the Amiga must handle, it does; otherwise, it ignores the interrupt.
In the above example, where the interrupt is triggered by the PC writing to its screen memory, the PCWindow task can’t ignore the interrupt since it needs to keep its window current with what's happening inside the PC. The PCWindow task checks the PC display memory in dual-port RAM against a copy of this memory that it keeps in Amiga memory. If a change has occurred, Pcwindow updates its output window to reflect the change on the IBM side. It also updates its copy of the IBM screen memory. Going the other way, when the PC is looking for keyboard input, it sends an interrupt to the Amiga. PCWindow handles the interrupt and passes a character along to the PC side (in PC-keyboard-specific serial form) after reading the Amiga keyboard. Then, via an interrupt to the PC side, PCWindows tells the PC that it has completed transferring the character. Then, both computers go on their merry ways until the PC application again changes its screen memory or asks for keyboard entry.
PC Operations
The Amiga software that comes with the A2088 Board contains the Janus library and allows you to run MS- DOS programs in either monochrome or color-graphics mode. MS-DOS programs come up in an Amiga window that you can resize like any window. You can also eliminate the border around the window and change the default colors.
PC programs in text mode update the Amiga window a little slower than they would a PC screen. Many times, the Amiga will scroll two or three lines at a time to keep up with the PC program. Graphics applications on the A2088 Board are not appreciably slowed by having the display routed through an Amiga window.
The A2088 Board comes with both Amiga and PC *
I lUiiil M LH.iBn
muiLKia ? ?C3Q
AMIGA
GILjCULJ
aCJL-lLJ
Precision
Software
ESEH0
00H10E]
RETAIL PRICE
$ 14995
Progressive Peripherals and Software Inc.,
464, Kalamath Street, Denver CO 80204 USA Telephone (303) 825-4144 Telex 888837 PPSDVR
Precision
Software
First in a new generation of database systems, Superbase Personal benefits from the latest ideas in ease ot use - pull down menus, multiple windows, poinl-to-click selections - as well as the full power of relational database management.
Easy to set up
Type in your field names, add details like length or date style. With the easy-to-understand menu selections and control panels, you can create a database in minutes. What’s more, you can alter your formats at any time without disturbing the data already held on file.
Manage your data
Superbase displays your data in easy-to-read lables or page by page in Form view. There's practically no limit to the number of fields in a record, but you have full control over what you choose to show. Select fields, select index, then use VCR style controls to view your data - fast forward, rewind, pause or stop - it’s as easy as playing a tape. A unique Fitter system lets you select ano work with any category of records from your file.
Working power
Oefine reports and related queries across multiple files, with multiple sort levels if you need them. Import data from other databases or applications. Export data to your word processor or join several files to form a new database. The advanced B+ tree file structure and disk buffering ensure high performance - Superbase reads a typical name and address record in iess than three hundredths of a second.
The Picture Database
Use Superbase’s special picture reference facility and powerful data handling to create a unique picture data library application. You can even run an automatic slide show.
Utilities. On the Amiga side, it comes with software that allows you to let the A2088 Board take exclusive control of the Amiga parallel port. In addition, you get a Preferences program that lets you determine which areas of the PC ROM space you want to include in dual-port RAM. Some PC graphics boards, such as the Hercules color board, use the same ROM space as the IBM CGA that is emulated by the Janus system. The Hercules board, however, supports a horizontal resolution (720 pixels) that can’t be duplicated by the Amiga, which is limited to 640 pixels. If you plug a Hercules card into the AT bus system on the Amiga, you’ll have to use the PC Preferences program to turn off the emulation of PC ROM area $ B800Q in the dual-port RAM. This area is the one used by both the IBM CGA and the Hercules board. You will then have to hook up a separate monitor to the Hercules board to see the Hercules display.
The A2088 Board comes with MS DOS 3.2. On the disk, you get a utility called Adisk that lets you format a partition on an MS-DOS disk under AmigaDOS. Then, using the Djmount command from AmigaDOS, you can get AmigaDOS to recognize and use the partition on the MS-DOS disk, even when MS DOS isn’t booted. In
effect, if you have a hard disk on the IBM side of the Janus interface, you can use part of it under AmigaDOS.
At the time I saw the A2088 Board, Commodore hadn't finalized a file-transfer technique for moving information between MS DOS and AmigaDOS. Two techniques are under consideration. One is to pass an MS-DOS pathname to the A2088 Board under AmigaDOS and to then intercept the result of the action that MS-DOS takes. This will only work if there are no concurrent requests for MS DOS by the PC system. The second technique under consideration is to emulate the MS-DOS filing system in an AmigaDOS task. This would make the file-transfer program rather large, but it could let you transfer data without having MS DOS active. Commodore promises some type of file-transfer system with the release of the A2088 Board, in addition to a cut-and-paste function between Amiga and PC windows.
Beyond MS DOS
The important thing to remember about the A2088 Board is that it isn’t necessary to run MS DOS on the board to make use of the 8088 processor. At the pre-
Two-Fisted Powerup
When power is supplied to an Amiga 2000 system that contains an A2088 Board, the sequence of events is carefully choreographed by the Amiga to ensure that the PC is brought under the Amiga’s control. Understanding the powerup procedure is important in understanding how the Amiga interacts with the PC and how AmigaDOS can access a partition on the IBM side of the system.
At powerup, the A2088 Board is reset by the Amiga and it stays that way until the Amiga has executed Binddrivers, loaded janus.library, and loaded Workbench. The Amiga then releases the PC from reset and waits. When reset is released, the PC starts its powerup procedure. The Amiga knows that PC powerup is complete when it detects memory refresh on the PC side.
At this point, the PC BIOS begins to poll a special location in dual-port RAM for permission to precede. This polling procedure is one of the modifications that Commodore made to the Phoenix PC BIOS ROM.
Having detected memory refresh on the PC side, and knowing that die PC is in a wait state, the Amiga then downloads the file PC.Boot into the $ E0000 page of PC memory in dual-port RAM. The PC.Boot file contains the PC side of an AmigaDOS hard disk driver. Once the Amiga has installed its driver in the PC ROM, it sends a signal to the PC to proceed with its boot process. The Amiga then waits for confirmation that booting is complete.
When the PC receives the signal from the Amiga, it continues with its boot procedure by initiating its ROM search. In a PC, the programs that drive peripheral
boards are contained in ROM on the board. During ROM search, the PC incorporates these ROM routines into its memory map, starting with the lowest ROM address and proceeding to the highest. In an IBM system, hard disk controllers normally reside at location SC8000 in memory. When the PC ROM search reaches this location, it triggers the execution of an initialization routine. This routine modifies the vector for interrupt $ 13, which is triggered by a disk access. Normally, this vector points to the BIOS services for floppy-disk drives. The hard-disk initialization routine at $ C8000 modifies the vector so that it points to the hard-disk controller located just above the initialization routine.
As the PC ROM search continues, it encounters the code at $ E00G0 that was placed there by the Amiga while the PC was in a wait state. This code modifies the vector for interrupt $ 13 once again, so that it points to a place above SE0000. Thus, since the Amiga code above SE00O0 is the first invoked by a request for disk services on the PC side, the Amiga can redirect the results of disk access from the PC to the 64K buffer in dual-port RAM. The Amiga can even initiate disk services by sending an interrupt $ 13 to the PC side. This is how AmigaDOS controls disk hardware on the PC side of the A2088 Board.
Once the initialization routine at $ EOOO() is finished, it sends a signal to the Amiga confirming that the PC ROM search is done. The PC is now ready to run MS DOS, and the Amiga is ready to access the PC through an Amiga window. The two systems are ready to get to work.D
• LOGiSTiX
Spreadsheei»Tlme ManagemenfDatabase•
LOGiSTiX is a powerful spreadsheet. Its 2048 row by 1024 column worksheet is large enough to handle serious business applications. LOGiSTiX takes advantage of the Amiga’s unique multi-tasking ability and can even use the Amiga's interlace mode to display 44 rows of your worksheet in 640 * 400 resolution mode. That's powerful!
LOGiSTiX is a powerful database that lets you store, sort, find and edit data like a stand-alone database does. The true power of the LOGiSTiX database is its ability to integrate with the spreadsheet, graphics, and time and project management functions. LOGiSTiX can also read dBase, ASCII, CSV and many other file formats (such as Lotus and Supercalc), so data compatibility won't be a problem. LOGiSTiX is fully integrated software!
LOGiSTiX is a powerful time and project manager. You don't have to be a "PERT master” to learn LOGiSTiX. Simply decide on your time frame, break down your job into tasks, decide which ones need to be completed first and which tasks get done next. Then LOGiSTiX can take into account job dependencies, calculate Critical Path, and display float. You have complete control over your planning. You can plan your schedule in time units from half hours to years, while completely tied into your worksheet.
It's easy to construct Gantt charts and print them out to most popular printers and plotters with sideways print abilities). The LOGiSTiX timesheet can be fully integrated with cash flow projections, income statements, etc., all in the same worksheet area so you can see the effect of time and schedule changes on your bottom line. No other project planning program offers you so much flexibility, letting you plan your time, resources and money so easily.
LOGiSTiX is powerful color graphics. It’s easy to translate complex facts and figures into understandable presentation quality graphs. Your on-screen graphs take full advantage of the Amiga’s amazing graphics capabilities, and can also be output to the Polaroid Palette system for super high-res text and or graph slides and transparencies.
LOGISTIX
WHEN QUALITY COUNTS!
Th» !nfcgrgf d Soffwora 5yricm ihet
- dda The Tau-lh Dimension of TIME
ST A IN BUSINESS 50 SINCE THE S?R£ ADSHEF. ’
A Program b,v C. RAFO.v
PRO(jR€XriV€
P€RIPH€RRLr
6 OFTUJORC
LOGiSTiX and many other innovative products are now available at your favorite dealer, or directly from Progressive Peripherals and Software, Inc. LOGISTIX is also available for IBM PC and compatibles, Atari 1040 ST and the HP-150.
464 XALAMATH STREET DENVER. COLORADO 80204 303-825-4144 TELEX: 888B37
LOGiSTiX, Amiga. Atari 1040 ST, dBase, Lotus, IBM. HP-150, and SuperCalc are registered trademarks of Graloxol England.Commodore Amiga Inc Atari Inc.. Ashton-Tate Corp., Lotus Development Corp., International Business Machines, Hewlett Packard Corp., and Sorcim IUS Inc., respectively
Circle 160 on Reader Service card.
How the Amiga Creates An IBM Medium-Res Display
The screen memory of an IBM medium-res display stores four pixels per byte. Each pixel is defined by two bits and can therefore have one of four different values. These four values correspond to the four colors a pixel can have in an IBM medium-res color display.
When an IBM program running on the A2088 Board writes to screen memory in dual-port RAM, the information is immediately shadowed to the graphics-access area in dual-port RAM. The shadowing procedure is not a straight copy, however; There’s some hard wired processing going on that makes it easy for the Amiga to transform PC pixel-packed graphics information into Amiga hit planes.
The shadowing process takes information from two hvtes of PC screen memory and sends alternate bits to two different Amiga bytes. The odd-numbered bits from the PC bytes go to one Amiga byte and the even- numbered bits go to the other. This automatic process doesn’t require the 68000 or the 8088. When the Amiga creates an IBM graphics display, it shifts the odd-numbered byte (containing the odd-numbered bits) into one bit plane and the even-numbered byte (with the even- numbered bits) into the second bit plane. The shadowing process unpacks the IBM graphics information; the only work the 68000 has to do is shift the unpacked information into the bit planes. ?
S
view, a Commodore engineer described a system whereby the PC system is used as a real-time data aquis- ition system and preprocessor for the Amiga. Using the public routines of the Janus library, it won’t be too difficult to develop custom applications that use the combined power of the 8088 and the 68000. The A2088 Board is not merely "MS DOS in a window.” The Amiga 2000 with the A2088 Board gives you flexibility not seen before in a microcomputer coprocessor system. El
VIZiSWRITE
PERSONAL WORD PROCESSOR
I o'I
*
rK£ v.'om£vni
1C
II I
in
I Ci-tit |
¦f crl-
0 f«ril!fl ® tarn!
Sr
lit* Hit
HZC2
r
A
rrv
CALL
TODAY
viza
SOFTWARE
;!LJ Tl
u2"?is is a sstH ix; JT ocn VijalUrite
« nanj ownfoort « + a-T** it
Announcing the first desktop publishing word processor for the exciting Commodore Amiga. VizaWrite Amiga is a brand new developement of a product that has been a best seller for many years. Developed entirety in machine code. Vizawrite has the speed, compactness and style that makes the most of the Amiga.
¦ VizaWrite brings desktop publishing to the AMIGA!! Combine pictures from your favorite "Paint" program into a document, reduce or enlarge pictures at any time and then print it!! For high quality presentation o both text and graphics.
¦ VizaWrite supports all AMIGA proportional and fixed-width fonts. True proportional layout gives instant pixel accuracy to margins, tabulations and justification. Switch fonts at any time - underline, italic, bold, and superscript subscript all show on-screen as they will print.
¦ VizaWrite is extremely easy to use. We’ve made sure that our software is presented in a logical and natural way. Using pull-down menus, requester boxes, and mouse selection of activities combine to make document preparation more effective and enjoyable.
¦ VizaWrite is well behaved, allowing you to use the mutti-tasking capabilities end run se eral programs simultaneously.
¦ VizaWrite is broad minded, allowing you to include text from Textcraft, pictures from Graphicraft. Deluxe Paint ® and most other products.
¦ VizaWrite comes ready to run, no installation of the software is required and will run in 256K of RAM on one or more drives. Comes supplied with Workbench 1.2 and requires Kickstart 1.2 or greater.
¦ Because VizaWrite is well behaved, it supports all peripherals, such as hard disk subsystems, as long as they are similarly well-behaved.
M Automatically sets text into pages while editing. Text is always shown as "What you see is what you get."
¦ Headers and footers show at the top and bottom of each page, they can beoneormore lines and have their own font style and margins.
¦ Ruler lines control page layout. Margins, tabulations, justification and line spacing are all adjustable using the icons on the ruler line. Rulers can be introduced anywhere in the document. Rulers can be hidden from view, if required.
¦ Move between pages instantly, no waiting for disk accessing - select any page to work on.
¦ Copy, cut and paste by highlighting text with the mouse.
¦ Move around the text by pointing with the mouse or by using the cursor keys. Scroll through the document - forwards or backwards.
¦ Edit and save any standard ASCII file. All character codes above the space character can be used in a document. Supports all international characters.
¦ VizaWrite documents retain pertinent information when saved - such as author, creation date, notes, alteration count etc.
¦ Open as many documents onto the screen as will fit into memory. VizaWrite uses memory extremely efficiently, and works with the AMIGA operatiny system in the standard way.
¦ Mail merge from a standard ASCII file with configurable item delimiters. Alternatively, mail merge from a VizaWrite document, where each name and address is held in its own page.
¦ Optional configuration file permits the varying of many operation defaults, such as standard document size, screen colors, margins, tab stops, etc.
¦ Document history window, used to log author's name, creation date, amended date etc. Shows document statistics, such as word and sentence counts.
¦ Glossary system permits single keystrokes recall of frequently used phrases. This is inserted directly into the document at the current typing position, instantly.
¦ Supports fixed width font printing on any preferences selected printer. Supports proportional printing on certain printer types only (this is a limitation of the printers). Recommended dot-matrix printer is NEC P1NWRITER P6 P7, recommended daisywheel is JUKI 6100 or any DIABLO compatible. HP LaserJet is the recommended laser printer using the “F” font cartridge. The AMIGA proportional screen fonts are printed in high quality on supported dot-matrix printers. Daisywheel users can use proportional print-wheels to print out documents laid out using the proportional screen fonts.
VizaWrite AMIGA now forms the nucleus of a complete desktop publishing system that Viza is developing for the Commodore AMIGA. Intuitive, simple,m fast and powerful software - just what your AMIGA deserves.
Distributed by Progressive Peripherals & Software, Inc.
$ 14995
frialrr Me*:
Cin-ieam Mflllll
?
MTJZIII
W
Tuhll 131
...
Tli** ntn
III** rr-is
2® I? Ii ¦
Jihi (Ml
?
- filch
0 t« Oil 0 IS ff: rs
ONLY!
Evsitcp VizdJHte Prra'ea Cborenl
iiiflr re t>€ umaxH?
VinHriti frrtm; 1.1
n. . 1
'J>FT ft T>t limSDCH?
A
~ir~
Circle 137 on Reader Service card.
¦hr
Pi t »« !¦• ¦ a*k«i*ijj|
prr;
¦VtTtl
iiix,rH,:*i*!,::t>
• ;3x
1T--V A
Graphic Hardcopy And the Amiga
By Morton A. Kevelson
o matter how impressive an original Amiga screen display is, I have yet to see one that can be slipped into my portfolio or folded into a letter-size envelope. For these applications, and many others, a quality graphic printout is indispensable. The developers of the Amiga’s operating system anticipated this need by including a generic printer device (ERT:). On most computers, it is up to the applications programmer to create primer drivers for each package; the Amiga includes these drivers as part of its operating system. The applications programmer need only follow the Amiga's rules on printer control while the end user simply selects the appropriate printer driver with Preferences.
The Amiga’s printer drivers are not just simple text routines. Full graphics capabilities have been included for the dot-matrix printers, which have the ability to print bit map graphics. Even color graphic printers are supported. As a result, an Amiga fresh out of the box has so much graphic printing potential that it takes many hours to discover just what is available. Version
1. 2 of the operating system (which is starting to ship as of this writing) even includes a graphic screen-dump utility l ight on the distribution disk.
This article is intended to shorten the process of discovering the Amiga’s graphic priming capabilities. It presents die results of many hours of experimentation with several printers, some popular graphics packages and some stand-alone screen-dump programs.
INSET:
A screen dump made using Grabbit and a Canon PJ1080A.
LEFT:
77te same image printed from Aegis Images at 640 wide X 800 high on the Canon PJI080A.
Preferences
With very few exceptions, the graphic screen printer- dump parameters will be controlled entirely with the Amiga’s Preferences took Two of the three Preferences screens arc devoted entirely to printer settings. The second screen, accessed by clicking on the Change Printer box, deals primarily with the hardware aspects of the printer. However, the margin and page-length settings on this screen may be used to to control the size of the graphics dump.
The width of the printed image is set by the difference between the right and left margins. Note that this is a relative setting, since the graphic dump always starts at the left edge of the paper. The width of the dump automatically determines its height. The aspect ratio (width divided by height) of the graphic printout
is Fixed by the characteristics of the printer and its printer driver. It is also possible to set the dump size by adjusting the page-length parameter. However, the fixed aspect ratio will still prevail. Thus, the smaller of the two settings, and the aspect ratio, will determine the size of the printout.
The real fun to be had with graphic dumps is found on the third Preferences screen. This may be reached by clicking on the Graphic Select box in screen two.
On this screen take note of the three types of graphic dumps that are available under the Shade category. The Black-and-white option generates a high-contrast dump with screen colors printed as either [jure black or pure white. This mode works in conjunction with the Threshold scale at the top of this screen. An understanding of how the Amiga generates its display colors will he helpful in applying the Threshold setting.
The Amiga Color Display
Each of the Amiga’s 4,096 colors is composed of a mixture of red, blue and green primary colors, which correspond to the color phosphors of the video display. Each of the primary colors can he set at one of 16 intensity levels (hence the 4,096 possible combinations). Note that an intensity of zero is equivalent to black, or turning off that color entirely. Internally, the Amiga stores a color value in a 12-bit register with four hits devoted to each primary color. The Amiga’s custom graphics chip has 32 of these registers, which define the maximum number of different colors on the lo-res screen under normal circumstances.
The relationship between the color values and the threshold scale should now he obvious. For a given setting, eight for example, all colors with a combined intensity that is less than this value print as black. All lighter shades print as white. This relationship holds firm for shades of gray where the red, blue and green are set lo the same level. It seems to also hold fairly well for the average value when the primary-colors settings are not all the same. However, I have noticed some anomalies: Using a threshold setting of eight, on a color consisting of 15 red, 0 green and 0 blue prints as black, while 0 red, 15 green and 0 blue prints as white. This corresponds to the maximum sensitivity of the eye to the green portion of the spectrum. ?
Lie Gray Scale option is exactly as the name implies. The display colors are translated into shades of gray by printing various patterns of black dots. The total number of possible patterns is of course limited by the printer’s dot size and the number of pixels composing the screen image. For example, a four-by-four printer pattern may be made to correspond to a single screen pixel. Although this allows for 65,536 possible dot patterns, on the average only 16 unique shades of gray are actually possible. Some additional shading may he obtained by the arrangement of the dots in the matrix. The remaining patterns are merely different arrangements of dots whose differences may he discerned at the pattern boundaries. For example, color 15 red, 7 green and 0 blue (an intense orange) generates the same gray pattern as 0 red, 15 green and 0 blue (pure green) on my Canon PJ1080A and Okidata ML92 printers.
Both the Black-and White and Gray Scale options may be used with color as well as black-ribbon printers. Note that color printers should use only their black ribbon or ink pack with these modes. If you have an Oki- mate 20, you will have to make sure that the black- ribbon cartridge is in place.
If you have a color printer, the Color setting will let you produce color-graphic dumps. With very few exceptions, do not expect to see the same results on paper as you see on the screen. Printer technology is just not up to the wide range of colors available on the video display tube. Pleasing and useful results are still attainable; however, “serious” applications will demand some experimentation on your part. One approach is to set up test patterns of calibrated colors. Of course, trying out all possible 4,096 colors is quite a project. At 32 colors per screen you will need 128 dumps for a complete selection. Nevertheless, useful results can be obtained from far fewer trials.
Of the remaining settings, one lets you choose between a horizontal or vertical printout. The latter setting will let you make a larger dump than the former. Note that the aspect ratio of the horizontal dump may differ from that of the vertical dump. The last setting applies only to black-and-white or gray-scale graphics dumps. This setting lets you invert the printed relationship between light and dark screen colors. Just click on the Positive box for a dump that corresponds to the screen display. Clicking on the Negative box will generate a photographic inverse of the screen on the printer.
Of course, the Preferences settings may he changed as often as you like. And make sure, when you first customize Preferences to your most used mode and printer, you select the Save option upon exiting if you want to store the settings on the Workbench disk. Clicking on the Use box on the first screen is adequate to make temporary changes.
RIGHT:
,4 Canon PJ1080A
printout from DeluxcPaint at 320
wide x 800 high.
INSET:
The same image printed on the Canon PJ1080A at 1,024 wide x 200 high using the Preferences Vertical setting.
Setting the Palette
Every paint program has some means for changing colors. In the course of preparing this report, I examined the three most popular Amiga paint programs and noted some differences in their color-setting procedures.
Aegis Images has a color-palette control that is well suited to the type of experimentation described above. Three sliders with numerical settings from 1-15 are displayed, which may be set to control either red, green and blue or hue, luminance and shade. The red, green and blue slider combination is preferred for calibrating the color palette. The numerical settings make it very easy to set up and repeat calibrated colors for experimentation.
DeluxePaint’s palette control is also easy to work with. Six sliders for red, green, blue, hue, saturation ancl value are simultaneously displayed. The three color sliders have tick marks for all sixteen color steps with numerical markings every four steps. Changes in the red, green or blue sliders are immediately reflected in the settings of the hue, saturation and value sliders and
vice versa. The arrangement is well suited for setting up calibrated colors.
Commodore’s Graphicraft also uses red, green and blue sliders for setting the colors. However, these controls lack any visible calibration. To make matters worse, dragging the sliders results in more than 16 possible positions for each slider. I did find that clicking in the space next to the slider changed the setting in 15 discrete intervals. To repeat a setting it is necessary to count the mouse clicks as the slider is stepped along.
Graphic Dumps from Paint Programs
All of the graphic packages mentioned above include built-in graphic dumps that can be controlled by Preferences. Aegis Images 1.2 includes a useful refinement to the margin settings with its graphic screen dump. Images lets you specify the width and height of the printed image in pixels, instead of using the margin settings in Preferences. T his feature lets you exercise precise control of the dimensions and aspect ratio of the graphic printer dump.
The range of Aegis Images’ printer control is 320- 1200 pixels horizontally x 200-800 pixels vertically. These values apply to the screen orientation of the image and not the Horizontal or Vertical printout selection in Preferences. For example, a dump 640 pixels wide X 200 high in Images will print as a horizontal or vertical strip depending on the setting in Preferences.
The actual usable range of Aegis Images’ printer controls will depend on the number of dots per line the printer can generate. For example, the Okimate 20 will work with up to 920 pixels across the page while the Canon PJ1080A is limited to 640. The length of a vertical printout is essentially unlimited. A vertical aspect in Preferences will permit the entire 1200-pixel width to be used with any printer. With Images, if you try a dump with more than the possible number of pixels, it simply refuses to print. No indication is given when this happens; this is a bit frustrating, since it ?
OPPOSITE PAGE:
An Okimate 2(1 printout from Deluxeflaint at 610 wide x 602 high.
ABOVE:
The same image printed in gray scale on an Ohimatv 20 at 957 wide x 800 high.
RIGHT:
The same image printed in gray scale on an Okimate ML92 printer at a threshold of S.
ILLUSTRATED BY ROGER GOODE
normally takes several seconds for a color dump to get started.
Commercial Graphics Utilities
In addition to the screen dumps that are built into the graphic packages, stand-alone screen-dump utilities are available both commercially and in the public domain. One of the most versatile of these programs that I have come across is Grabbit from Discovery Software. Once activated, this program stashes itself in some out of the way place in RAM. Its presence is not felt until invoked by the proper “HotKey” sequence. Grabbit can he used to generate a graphic printer dump of any screen image that is displayed by any program. The only requirement is that the program whose screen is to he dumped should follow the protocols that are set forth in the Amiga’s ROM Kernel Reference Manual.
Included on the Grabbit disk is a very useful palette- adjustment utility called AnyTime. When activated, AnyTime displays a color palette that is very similar to the ones generated by the dedicated drawing programs. This is a very handy way to fiddle with the shading of a black-and-white or color graphic dump prior to printing.
From Electronic Arts, the DeluxePaint Art 8c Utility Disk Volume 1 contains a number of useful items. Among these is the PrintUtility written by Perry Kivo- lowitz. This program opens its own minimum height Workbench window to allow for Amiga protocol menus. When activated, PrintUtility will let you cycle through the available screens and pick one for printing. All the Preferences printer controls are available with the exception of the vertical aspect option.
When a screen is selected for printing, PrintUtility looks for enough empty RAM to put it in. If RAM is available, the screen will he copied to it and printed in the background. Otherwise, you are informed of the lack of space and asked to pick direct printing. Print- Utility will also let you print images and text files straight from disk. For images, the barest minimum of memory is used, since only a single line of graphics is read in at a time. This is the reason for the restriction to horizontal aspect dumps. Also on the Utility Disk is a comprehensive slide show program and the public domain SeelLBM utility. The latter lets you conveniently view individual IFF images without loading up a complete graphics package. The SeelLBM program, used in conjunction with PrintUtility or Grabbit, is a very convenient way to view and print a series of graphic images.
Public Domain Graphic Utilities
Commercial software is not the only source of graphic utilities. Many useful programs may also be found as shareware or in the public domain. A good source of public-domain software is Fred Fish (345 Scottsdale Road, Pleasant Hill, CA 94523). Mr. Fish has single- handedly undertaken the task of compiling a massive public-domain program library for the Amiga. As of ibis writing, the count is up to disk 35.
I have already come across two graphic screen-dump programs in the non-commercial sector. Scrimper, for SCReen Image PrintER, is the predecessor to the Electronic Arts PrintUtility. Scrimper will not print an image from disk; nevertheless, it is well worth the price. Scrimper may he found on Fish disk number IS.
ScreenDump is a shareware offering from Ned Konz (210 Oleeta Street, Ormand Beach, FL 32074). If you find that ScreenDump satisfies your needs, then Mr. Konz requests a minimum donation of $ 10 to further his efforts.
Conclusion and Comment
The proliferation of graphic and print utilities, so early in the Amiga’s life cycle, is a fitting tribute to its capabilities. All indications are that the selection will continue to grow for the forseeable future.
While I hate to conclude on a sour note, I feel that this may be an occasion where it may do some good. Although the Amiga’s printer routines produce satisfying results, their speed leaves something to be desired. Anyone who has actually done a graphic screen dump
will recall the anxiety associated with their first

attempt. The Amiga seems to go off to some inner limbo for an extraordinary long delay before printing starts. Color graphic dumps are always accompanied by pregnant pauses that punctuate each pass of the printhead.
The fault seems to lie entirely in the Amiga’s printer routines and not with the application software. Rumor has it that Commodore is well aware of the problem, but has declined to fix it as, to date, no one has complained. Well, for the record, here is my official complaint! Slow printing, on a machine with the Amiga’s capabilities, is a shame and a disgrace. So, go to it Commodore, fix those printer routines! ¦
Address all author correspondence to Morton Kevelson, 2471 Bragg St., Brooklyn, ATY 11235.
He combination of FOR TRAN and the Amiga, the old and the new, may seem an unlikely one. But, for many Amiga users, Absoft1 s AC FORTRAN version 2.2 could become one of their most valued tools.
Absoft’s AC FORTRAN
A review of Absoft Corporation’s FOR TRAJAT compiler for the Amiga.
By William B. Catchings and Mark L. Van Name
The Amiga FORTRAN compiler is based on a core system that is already available on other microcomputers, including the Macintosh (as Microsoft FORTRAN), the Atari ST and the Hewlett-Packard Integral PC. Absoft also offers FORTRAN 020, a version of the compiler tailored specifically to take advantage of the CSA 68020 68881 Turbo Amiga Board.
Many large scientific laboratories do much of their programming in FORTRAN. They are laced with problems that the Amiga can help to solve, such as graphical
ILLUSTRATION BY ROGER GOODE
TV*TEXT-
Circle 163 on Reader Service card.
A Text Presentation Program for the Amiga
? Uses 4096 colors
? Adjustable light and depth
? Italics, bold and underline
? Use with IFF programs or GENLOCK
? 2 level strobe and drop shadow
? Justify-center, left and right
SAVE $ 50,000! TV*TEXT brings capabilities of the most expensive character-generators to you and your Amiga. Pocket all that money while you create professional quality lettering for presentation graphics or live video production with Genlock. TV* TEXT uses the mouse, high or medium screen resolution, the full Amiga palette of 4096 colors and IFF format.
You can use any Amiga fonts, such as Zuma Fonts, workbench fonts, etc. Spacing can be adjusted and characters can be stretched, squeezed or even rotated! Text can be positioned with left right justification or centering.
Make titles exciting with rendering attributes such as italics, bold, underline, outline, edge, extrude (3D), cast drop shadows and strobes. Create attractive backgrounds using wallpaper or tile patterns. Then captivate your audience with special effects made by applying those attributes to fines, boxes, circles and ellipses.
If you want to make your text look special, try TV* TEXT!
? Wallpaper background pattern
? Rendered ellipse with outline
? Stretched character spacing
? Extruded (3-D) with drop shadow
? Horizontal lines with outline & shadow
? Different font styles and sizes
TV*TEXT. Only $ 99»
Other products by Zuma Group: Zuma Fonts Volume 1, 2, 3 $ 34.95 each
See your local dealer or call:
Brown-Waeh Publishing
1-800-451-0900
1-408-395-3838 (in California)
16795 Lark Ave., Suite 210, Los Gatos, CA 95030
data presentation. Imagine, for example, a large central computer doing a great deal of number processing, with the results being turned into graphic images and displayed on Amigas. The powerful computational and graphics capabilities of the Amiga can remove the image-gcncralion work from the central machine, freeing it to concentrate on the computational chores.
To do this, the Amiga needs to process a dialect of FORI RAN very close to that in use on the larger machine, while offering reasonable performance. The Absoft compiler, while by no means perfect, fulfills both of these needs.
FORTRAN 77
FORTRAN, short for FORmula TRANslation, is a programming language that first appeared in the 1950s. It was designed to solve highly mathematical problems. Despite its age, FORTRAN is still extensively used.
In 1966, the ANSI FORTRAN standard was ratified; it is commonly known as FORTRAN IV or FOR FRAN 66. Because its structure and basic capabilities fell behind those of newer high-level languages, it was revised about a decade later as FOR'I RAN 77.
AC FORTRAN is an almost complete version of FORTRAN 77. Our testing revealed no areas of incompatibility beyond those mentioned in Appendix 1 of the manual. Of the six restrictions cited there, we feel that only three might interfere with normal work:
1. While you can declare eight- and 16-bit integer (INTEGER* 1 and INTEGER*2) variables, you cannot have constants in these sizes. It is not even possible to pass a one- or two-byte integer constant to a procedure.
2. The Absoft system restricts the size of records in direct access, formatted sequential and unformatted sequential files to a maximum of 1,024 bytes. This can be a severe limitation, as many files can have considerably larger records.
3. This FORTRAN’S runtime system handles differently I O that is to be treated a block at a lime, such as many data files, and character by-character I O, such as to the screen. It uses a set of internal buffers to manipulate the block files, while it essentially reads and writes character files one at a time. If a program terminates abnormally, the runtime system might not have flushed its block file buffers, causing data to be lost.
While these restrictions may cause problems, AC FORTRAN, overall, offers a useful implementation of FORTRAN 77.
New Additions
Like FORTRAN 77 compilers for larger machines, AC FORTRAN’S design takes into account that the new, upcoming FORTRAN standard will eventually be accepted. Its language extensions, along with some similar to those incorporated by popular laboratory machines such as the VAX from Digital Equipment and minicomputers from Hewlett-Packard, help make this version more useful to programmers. Among the most useful of these additions are the following:
• Additional looping structures: DO WHILE, WHILE,
END DO, REPEAT CYCLE and EXIT statements.
• A statement (SELECT CASE) that gives structure to multi-decision blocks of code.
• Names up to 31 characters long.
• Recursion.
• Intrinsic Shift, Date and Time functions,
• One and two-byte INTEGER and LOGICAL variables.
• Three functions, byteQ, word() and longQ, that allow the direct manipulation of specific bytes of variables.
• A function, loc(), which can get the address of any variable.
Working with the Amiga
Other extensions include a means to communicate with the Amiga’s libraries. To do this, you pass the name of an Amiga support routine, followed by the arguments for that routine, to a single routine, amiga.suh, that is called. You also must include in your programs the include files for the proper Amiga library. For example, if you want to free some memory that you have previously allocated, you include in your program the file “exec.inc” and then have the following statements:
integer*4! Size integer*4 block
call amiga( FrecMcm, block, size )
The amiga routine also can be treated as a function, for those Amiga support functions that return values.
The system does not include direct support for all of the Amiga’s many operating system and ROM Kernel functions. However, it docs come with the assembler source for the amiga.suh subroutine, so you can extend it yourself to work with additional routines.
In addition, the manual explains how to hook your FORTRAN programs to those written in C or assembler. The major trick here is using the compiler’s option that causes it to produce assembly code and then stop. While the care needed to assure correct parameter passing will be somewhat daunting to the beginner, such connections are possible.
A Complete System
AC FORTRAN is more than just a compiler. It comes with a linker, a librarian, a set of runtime libraries and a debugger. T he linker will allow you to hook up separately compiled subroutines or access routines in libraries built by the librarian. The debugger provides source-level capabilities, including single-stepping, breakpoints and the ability to examine and change the values of variables.
The system is self-contained. The linker and compiler produce executables that are reentrant and position independent, but they are not in the standard Amiga form. Further, the linker relies heavily on dynamic linking. All undefined procedure references are treated as
Integrated Spreadsheet Graphics for the Amiga
n Reader Service card.
Micro-Systems Software
ANALYZE!
Sort using primary secondary keys use bold, italics and underline to improve appearance
SALES PER QUARTER
? High-res 3-D bar graph
? Legend; grid; automatic scaling
? Adjust view with pitch, yaw
ANALYZE! 2.0 is an enhanced version of our powerful electronic spreadsheet.
Up to 6 times faster than version 1.0, ANALYZE! 2.0 now contains features you’ve asked for business graphs, macros, sorting, access to Lotus 1-2-3™ files and much more.
Four graphs can be displayed at the same time. Formats include line, bar, stacked bar, pie, area, X-Y, 3-D pie (cake) and 3-D bar. All graphs can be printed or saved in IFF format so that other programs can use them.
We’ve added features to improve your productivity. Macros let you execute simple or a complex series of keystrokes automatically, saving you time and reducing errors. Spreadsheets created with Lotus 1-2-3™ can now be used by ANALYZE! 2.0 and vice versa.
ANALYZE! 2.0 is one of the outstanding productivity products developed by Micro-Systems Software. This integrated product family includes Scribble! Word processing, Organize! Data base management, Online! Telecommunications and BBS-PC! Bulletin board system. If you haven’t tried our products before, please try us now. If you are already one of our
20,000 customers, try this updated version of ANALYZE!. You’ll be pleasantly surprised!
Area graph with titles
graphs change automatically when
spreadsheet changes
? High-res 3-D pie chart
? Up to 8 colors
? Automatically calculates percentages
ANALYZE! 2.0
Only $ 149”
Updates from ANALYZE 1.0 $ 49-95 (plus S & H)
See your local dealer or call:
Brown-Waeh Publishing
1-800-451-0900 1-408-395-3838 (in California)
16795 Lark Ave., Suite 210, Los Gatos, CA 95030
external ones that are to be resolved at runtime. Partly because of this, the object files produced by this compiler are incredibly small. However, the runtime system must be present in order to run a program.
Except for the amiga.sub subroutine, AC FORTRAN does not appear to be integrated with the Amiga. You can access it only from the CLI. It has pre determined, and currently unchangeable, search rules. Amiga integration is one area in which die product definitely could use some work.
Some Bad News
AC FORTRAN’s manual is useful only to someone who already has some knowledge of FORTRAN, linkers, librarians, debuggers and the Amiga's support routines. If you are not conversant in any of these areas, this manual will do little to alleviate your confusion. Also, while there are code snippets in the manual, it contains no complete examples. The release diskette contained several example programs, but all were rather poorly documented and not for the novice. For the programmer experienced with both FORTRAN and the Amiga, however, they are useful.
The system claims to work on a 256K Amiga with a single disk drive. The release diskette is indeed onlv about half full, so that claim is believable. However, despite the fact that we conducted our tests on a 512K Amiga, we received an "Out of Memory” error message for each of their three sample programs that we tried to compile.
The manual warns you once to increase your stack size, but if you forget to do so (as we did), the resulting guru meditation is both frustrating and of little use. Vvc
Table 1. Benchmark
' ' ' - ::..... • . .:------::: .
Results.
Execution
File size
Compilation
Program
Time (mimsec)
(bytes)
Time (mimsec)
fibonacci.for
0:41
1120
0:41
Lattice
0:27
16416
4:25
Manx
0:23
6476
2:39
floaLfor
0:09
928
0:38
Lattice
0:29
16584
4:35
Manx
0:03
6512
2:37
pointer.for
0:53
760
0:32
Lattice
0:17
16232
4:32
Manx
0:20
6332
2:48
sieve.for
0:01
988
0:42
Lattice
0:06
24580
5:27
Manx
0:06
14684
2:53
found no problems with our test programs once we did STACK 40000 in the CLI before starting the compiler.
Another problem stopped us from ever actually testing the interface to the Amiga’s support routines. We believe that it works; we ran their sample programs and they did what the code suggested they should. However, as noted above, we could not get any of the samples to compile. When we tried to write our own smaller tests, we were unable to get include files to work. Without include files, we could not access the needed Amiga support files. While it is certainly possible that we missed something, several hours of playing and two complete readings of the manual still left us unable to get the include files to work.
Benchmarks
One of AC FORTRAN’s claims was a quick compiler that produced small, fast code. Some of the small code size was due to the dynamic linking scheme it uses. Nevertheless, as Table 1 shows, the compiler is indeed very fast and does produce very small objects.
In order to make the benchmarks as meaningful as possible, we used the same tests that we ran on Lattice C (version 3.03) and Manx Aztec C68K (version 3.20a commercial) in our comparison of these two C compilers [Nov. Dec. '86, p. 36]. For comparison purposes, we reproduced those results in the table as well. Briefly, the following are the four benchmark programs and their purposes:
fihnnacci.for computes a Fibonacci series recursively. We use it to test the performance of function calls.
Float.for repeatedly performs a simple, double-precision floating-point calculation. Because the Amiga handles floating-point operations in software, and because of the scientific orientation of FOR TRAN, this test seems particularly important.
Pointer for was originally designed as a test for C. It cycles through an array. In the standard FORTRAN manner, it was done here with subscripts.
Sievefor is the Sieve of Eratosthenes. It computes the number of primes between 1 and 8190, and is considered by many to be a “classic” general benchmark.
We ran all of the tests on a 512K Amiga with two disk drives, using version 1.1 oi the Amiga system software.
To be fair to all concerned, we must note that these comparisons simply could not be done identically. For the C systems, we used niakc-stylc command files, while the AC FORTRAN compiler is invoked by executing a single program, which then manages all three of its own passes. Also, we could not get include files to work, so the self-timing code was directly entered into the programs, whereas the C compilers had to pay the extra cost of opening and retrieving the code. Finally, we followed the spirit of FORTRAN in some cases rather than attempting to translate exactly each C statement. This came into play primarily for loops; we used standard DO loops in almost all cases. ?
PUBLISHER
Desktop Publishing for the Amiga
NEWSLETTERS
The
HEADLINE NEWS
- rvi «**» mu i...p
? Any size shape of columns
? Text overflows into next column
? Multiple columns; multiple pages
REPORTS
SALES REVIEW
? Justified text
? Read IFF graphics
? Move, resize or crop graphics
PUBLISHER 1000 Only $ 199w
Developed by N.E. Software Group
Hot off the press in less than one hour! Now, you can create all kinds of printed output quickly without complication or expense. With PUBLISHER 1000 you can publish your own newsletters, signs, reports, presentations just about anything you can imagine.
SIGNS
Club Meeting
This Tuesday
Meeting Agenda:
Coming Events:
It is amazingly easy to use. Just draw a “guide” box on the screen any size or shape and type in it. Then move the box (with the text) where you want it on the printed page, and that’s all.
What's new in software
You can improve its appearance by selecting from PUBLISHER 1000 fonts, Zuma Fonts, workbench fonts, etc. If you want graphics, just start drawing lines, borders or solids again, any size or shape anywhere on the page. It’s really as simple as that!
Merge text or pictures from other products, such as Scribble! Or Deluxe Paint. Then you can enhance the text or resize and crop the pictures. You will see full- page views of your work in order to review before you print.
PUBLISHER 1000 supports medium and high screen resolutions, and all printers in Preferences. Soon we will include a POSTSCRIPT laser printer driver. You will be able to combine text, line art, even digitized photographs on one page for printers such as the Apple LaserWriter,
QMS-PS, Linotype Unotronic, etc. All customers will be updated free of charge with the POSTSCRIPT driver.
For business, pleasure or school, make those hot presses a lot hotter with PUBLISHER 1000.
Draw directly on page different font styles and sizes custom line shade patterns
PRESENTATIONS
? Lines, borders and shading
? Text centered in boxes
? Underline, italics and bold
See your local dealer or call:
Brown-Waeh Publishing
1-800-451-0900 1-408-395-3838California)
16795 Lark Ave., Suite 210, Los Gatos,CA 95030
Voted the Best
of 1986
MB,
by Commodore Editors...
5x the Power of a VAX 11 780 40x the Power of an IBM AT
Now fully compatible with all AMIGA Computers.
M BEST Of HAMWBE
processor running »
RAM.
1986. Commodore Editors
Reprinted iromNw'-0ec"
and here's why
• • •
The power of the 68020,32 bit processor and the 68881 co-processor with the
Commodore Amiga combine to provide a 14 Mhz, low cost, color graphics
workstation. The Absoft Corporation’s Fortran 020 and Manx C compiler are fully
compatible with the 68020 68881. Running the Turbo-Amiga with the 68020
processor alone gives a 120% Amigados performance increase.
The Turbo-Amiga appears to be capable of meeting Carnegie-Mellon’s MMM
specification for color graphics workstations of one million instructions per second
processing power, one megabyte of memory and one million pixels of color graphics display.
The Turbo-Amiga is available from CSA stock today!
Put a Turbo on the Porsche of Personal Computers
Starting from $ 3675 (options available)
on
COMPUTER SYSTEM ASSOCIATES
7564 Trade St., San Diego, CA 92121 • (619) 566-3911
All of these warnings aside, the benchmarks reveal some interesting facts. First, the compiler is definitely fast, several times faster than either of the C compilers. It -also produces smaller objects, even taking into account its dynamic linking scheme.
The execution times are not as one-sided, although the results are understandable. Perhaps the most amazing is the sieve test, on which the FORTRAN program outperforms the C equivalents by many times. AC FORTRAN is obviously very good at integer arithmetic. On the other hand, it falls between Manx and Lattice on the floating-point benchmark, usually a FORTRAN bastion of strength. This is probably because the Manx library works with floating-point numbers in 68000 form, while AC FORTRAN stores and manipulates them in IEEE standard form.
AC FORTRAN does not fare at all well on the Fibonacci or pointer tests. In the case of the pointer test, this is understandable: the C programs had only to increment to go through the array, while the FORTRAN program had to increment the subscript and then compute the offset from the base. Still, this occurrence is common enough so that the AC FORTRAN compiler probably should optimize it much better than it currently does. The poor showing on the fibonacci test reflects a higher cost of subroutine calls. This may perhaps be tied into the overhead of the dynamic linking scheme, although that is not clear. Regardless, the system clearly could use work here.
For the Professional
Although not without flaws, AC FORTRAN is a very reasonable and nearly complete implementation of FORTRAN 77. It also offers some interesting and useful extensions. It does need improvement, particularly in order to integrate better with the Amiga’s standard interface and support routines and to speed its floatingpoint and subroutine call performance. The documentation also needs improvement.
It is clearly oriented toward the professional FORTRAN programmer, and could well scare off the novice or those who do not know FORTRAN already. For those in its audience, and particularly for those programmers who want to connect Amigas to larger systems where FORTRAN 77 is also the dominant language, AC FORTRAN presents new possibilities for the Amiga and its users.¦
William B. (latchings is a freelance writer and software developer. Mark L. Van Name is vice president and cofounder of Foresight Computer Corp. and a freelance writer. Write to them at 10024 Sycamore Road, Durham, NC 27703.
Absoft Corporation
4268 N. Woodward
Royal Oak, MI 48072
313 549-7111
AC FORTRAN (version 2.2) ...... $ 295
FORTRAN 020 (for the CSA board) .....$ 495
Hard Disk
Any car enthusiast can tell you that a performance auto is made up of many parts. Each individual piece must be high-performance for the complete car to be high-performance. For example, a car that can do well in excess of 150mph would be very limited by tires that were only rated for 80mph. The same is true with your Amiga™ Computer. The Amiga is a very high-performance computer, but can be severely limited by the speed of its floppy disk drives. Much of the time, your computer sits there idling while loading data from the disk. This also makes you idle and greatly decreases your productivity.
Now you can turbo-charge your Amiga with a SupraDrive HardDisk and bring it up to its true performance. SupraDrive will speed up disk transfers by up to 800% and also eliminate the tedious task of constantly swapping diskettes in and out ot your floppy drive. The performance of your Amiga will be enhanced in many ways; directories, icons, and graphics will appear much faster, programs will load quicker, and the general user interface will seem much better.
A SupraDrive, much like a European sports car, includes many subtle features that greatly enhance its value. The built-in real-time clock will remember the current time and date, even when you turn your computer off - eliminating the need to set the system's clock every time you use your computer. Expanding your RAM memory is much cheaper and easier with the 512K to 4MB SupraRam modules that can be quickly installed in the SupraDrive interface. Other expansion is also easy with the Amiga Buss pass-through on the SupraDrive and the built-in SCSI port (for adding another hard disk or tape back-up).
¦ 20. 30. And BOMB Hard Disks
¦ Real-time Clock with Battery Back-up
¦ SCSI Expansion Fort and Amiga Buss pass-through
¦ 512K to 4MB RAM expansion capability
¦ Only $ 995.00 for 20MB version
Increase the performance of your Amiga. Add a SupraDrive.
Supra Corporation
1133 Commercial Way, Albany, OR 97321
Phone: (503) 967-9075 Telex:5106005236(Supra Corp)
™ Amiga is a trademark ot Commodore-Amiga, Inc.
T SupraDrive is a Irademark of Supra Corp.
Circle 208 on Reader Service Card

•9
i
%
info.phile
•>
More That’s New in 1.2
¦

»

(
Version 1.2 offers great improvements in handling icons and gadgets, new additions to Preferences including more printer options, and a greatly improved Notepad. And that ’s not all, folks.
By William B. Catchings and Mark L. Van Name
Last issue in info.phile (Jan. Feb., p. 56), we began examining the newest release of the Amiga system software, version 1.2. We reviewed changes that allow you to add more memory and new devices to vour Amiga more easily than before. We also discussed some new and changed CLI commands. This time we will look at changes to some of the visible system software.
Workbench Improvements
As we noted last time, under 1.2 the Workbench has become visibly faster. A number of bugs also have been fixed and several other significant changes have been made. Some of these changes are small but improve the system's appearance. Window title bars now use two thick blue lines rather than several as in version 1.1. The CLI has a new, more descriptive icon. The Workbench disk's window is in a slightly different place on the screen and displavs its contents in a cleaner arrangement.
Other improvements make working with icons simpler and more consistent. When you drag an icon, rather than seeing the drag pointer of old, you now move a copv of the icon itself. You also can drag several icons at once, using the extended-selcction mechanism (by selecting multiple icons while holding down the Shift key; when you drag one, all the selected icons will move). Disk icons no longer remain on-screen when a disk is removed (unless it has open drawers). In previous releases, if you selected the icon for a disk that was not in the drive, you would often be rewarded with a system crash; this has been fixed.
String Gadget Enhancement
We have found one seemingly minor improvement to be a great boon to frequent Workbench users. In the past, when vou were asked to enter a string, such as in renaming a disk or changing a directory, vou had to click in the box. Or string gadget, that contained the question before you could start typing. This seemed awkward and unnecessary. Version 1.2 offers automatic selection for string gadgets to address this problem. If a program uses this feature for a string gadget, you can start typing in it as soon as it appears. Nearly all Workbench and Notepad string gadgets have adopted this convention.
String gadgets have improved in other ways. When you select one, the text cursor goes to where you were pointing when you made the selection. This makes editing such strings quicker. For those used to working on other systems, Control ! I is now equivalent to Backspace, Finally, you can skip the mouse in working with such gadgets by using two new keyboard shortcuts: To retry, you use Left-Amiga-14; to cancel, you use Lcft-Amiga-V. Little changes such as these
make the Workbench a more stable, polished and productive tool.
Cleaning up Preferences
Workbench 1.2 lias a new Preference utility with a number of improvements. It is now much more reliable. The Amiga developers have Fixed many hugs (including one particularly annoying one that caused you to lose 1(5.128 bytes of main memory every time you opened Preferences). The clock within Preferences is now updated once a minute. The date is displayed in the more standard day month year format. All Preferences windows, except for Edit Pointer, have front and back gadgets as well as drag bars. (The Edit Pointer screen has a drag bar. But not front or back gadgets.)
Interlaced Mode
A new Workbench Interlace gadget allows you to choose from Preferences to run the Workbench in the denser 640 x 400 graphics mode. If you change this setting, you must reset the Amiga before the new setting will he used. Workbench normally operates at (540 x 200 pixels; interlacing gives you twice as many lines of resolution on your screen (400 for the typical NTSC screens, 512 if you use the European RAT standard). Interlaced mode is best if you have a high- persistence monitor, otherwise the flicker may be unbearable. And using interlacing
(No I.D. required for half-elves.)
When the Going Gets Tough, the Bard Goes Drinking*
are magic, the Bard is ready to boogie. All he needs is a band of loyal followers: a light-fingered rogue to find secret doors, a couple of fighters to bash heads, a conjurer to create weird allies, a magician for magic armor.
Then it's oft to combat, as soon as the Bard finishes one more verse. Now what’s a word that rhymes with "dead ogre?”
nd the going is tough in Skara Brae town. The evil wizard Mangar has cast an eternal winter spell. Monsters control the streets and dungeons beneath. Good citizens fear for their lives. What's worse, there's only one tavern left that serves wine.
But the Bard knows no fear. With his trusty harp and a few rowdy minstrel songs he claims
4 classes of magic user, including wizard and sorceror. 85 new magic spells in all.
128 color monsters, many animated. All challenging.
Fulhcolor scrolling dungeons. 16 levels, each better than the one before. 3-D city, too.
The Bard’s Tale
TM
from
ELECTRONIC ARTS ‘
The Bard's Tale is available tor the Amiga for $ 49.95, the Apple 11 family for $ 44.95 and thcC64 iw Cl 28 tor $ 19.95. How to order: Visit your retailer or von van order direct with a Visa or M C hv calling 800-
245. 4525 (In California call 800-562-1112). To order hv mail send check, money order or Visa or M C info to: Electronic Arts, P.O. Box 75 10, San Mateo CA 94401. Please include $ 1 for shipping and handling per order. There is a 21 day money-hack guarantee on direct orders. Fora complete full-color catalog, send $ 1 tin Electronic Arts, l820Gateway Drive, San Mateo CA 94404- Free catalog with direct purchase. The Bard’s Tale and Electronic Arts are trademarks of Electronic Arts.
Circle 2 on Reacer Service card.
Does have a price: it consumes 32K of main memory for NTSC and 38K for PAL,
Serial Port Selections
In version 1.1. tile onlv control von could exercise over the serial port was to set its baud rate. Now you have access through Preferences to an entire screen of options. Select the Change Serial gadget and it appears. Once in this window, you can set all of the major attributes of your serial port. The most common of these is the baud rate the rate, in bits-per-second, at which data is transferred. Preferences' default is 9,600 baud, although for most modems you should use the 1,200-baud setting.
You can send or receive characters that are either 7- or 8-hits long. The read bits and write bits attributes let you control which size to use. You can also set the number of stop hits hits between characters if necessary. The parity setting allows you to specify what parity (even, odd or none) to use.
Preferences offers you two other controls over the serial port. The buffer size attribute determines the amount of memory that is set aside to temporarily hold the data being transferred. You sometimes can improve overall data-transfer speed by using a larger buffer size, but this does consume memory. You also can specify the type of handshaking. Or simple data transfer protocol, that you want. There are currently three choices: XON NOFF, RTS CTS and None. If you are in doubt about any of these new settings, consult the user manual for your communications program or modem.
Printer Support Upgrade
Preferences now makes it easier to use more printers with the Amiga. The list of supported printers is in the Select Printer window. We will review the additional ones that come with version 1.2, You can add others by putting their printer drivers in the Devs Printers directory of your Workbench disk. The set of such drivers on the disk determines the printers shown in this window. The default printer type is now Generic, a simple driver that should work, though with a minimum of features, with most printers.
Preferences now supports the Apple ImageWritcr II, with or without a color ribbon. It also handles three Okidata Microline printers: models 92, 192 and 292. If you plan to use either the Microline 92 or 192, he aware that they each come in two
versions, one "standard" and one compatible with IBM dot-matrix primers. If you have one of the standard ones, choose it bv name from the list of printers. If you have one of the IBM-compatible ones, choose CBM_MPS1000 from the list of printers.
The Microline 292 can pose a similar problem, as there are two different, optional “personality cards” available for it. One makes it IBM-compatible. To use this type, again choose CBM_MPS 1000 from the printer list. If you have the other card, plus a color ribbon, you can print color by choosing the Epson JX-80 setting.
Printing graphics is a different process from printing text. If you plan to prim graphics on a dot-matrix printer, you must enter the Change Primer window. You then select the Custom gadget that is under the words “Paper Size." Preferences currently supports many dot-matrix printers, including the Epson FX-80, RX-SO and JX-80. The CBM MPS1000, the Apple ImagcWriter II and the Okidata Okimate 20 and Microlinc 92, 192 and 292 models.
The Notepad Steps Forward
Preferences has always been a valuable and useful part of the Workbench. For some of
Simply the BEST Database & Mail Merge for the AMIGA
Use Omega File for:
Invoicing • Check register * Mailing labels Recipes * Check writing • Forms - Tables Letters • Any type of mail merge application
per record, 5000 characters per record and up to 32000
indexed records per data base, multiple searches, plus many more
Thousands already in use S79
99
Itate Location and Shape
State Capitals, Bird, Tree and Flower State Abbreviation and State Nickname Spelling of All Above.
• 4 Part Harmony Music
• Animation
• Single or 2 Player Modes
IMOW SHIPPING S 39"
D 55 North Main Street ¦ ¦ Surte 3QTD PO Box H
Logon Utah B4321 Ask far a free catalog
See your dealer or Call
(801) 753-7620 1800] 942-9405
I ~. 4
Professional Software Series
KEEP-Trak General Ledger
S129.99 S 79.99*
S 79.99*
S 79.99*
* Available soon
Accounts Receivable Accounts Payable Payroll
AMT - Amortization Cost Forecasting S39.99
ENTERTAINMENT EDUCATIONAL:
Activision
Borrowed Time ..... $ 29.00
Hacker II ..$ 35.00
Little Computer People . $ 35.00
Shanghai $ 29.00
Tass Times .$ 29.00
Bethesda Softworks
Gridiron ..$ 54.00
Electronic Arts
Archon .. $ 29.00
Archon II: The Adept...... $ 29.00
Arctic Fox . $ 29.00
Auto Duel .$ 35.00
Bard's Tale $ 35.00
Chessmaster 2000 . $ 35.00
Marble Madness ... $ 35.00
Ogre $ 29.00
One-on-One ......$ 29.00
Seven Cities of Gold ..$ 29.00
SkyFox ...$ 29.00
StarFleet I .$ 44.00
Ultima III: Exodus ....$ 44.00
Infocom
All Title Avail ...S26.00-S36.00
Mind scape
Balance of Power ....$ 35.00
Defender of the Crown . $ 35.00
Deja Vu . $ 35.00
The Hailey Project ......$ 35.00
King of Cnicago .....$ 35.00
S. D.I .$ 35.00
Sublogic
Flight Sim. II $ 35.00
GRAPHICS VIDEO APPLICATIONS:
Aegis Development
Animator Images .. . $ 89.00
Images $ 31.00
Art Pak U] .$ 24.00
Art Pak 2 .$ 24.00
Electronic Arts
Deluxe Paint II ......$ 89.00
Deluxe Print $ 69.00
Deluxe Video ..... $ 69.00
D. Paint Data Disk ...$ 24.00
D. Print Art Disk 2 ...$ 24.00
New Tech
Digi View .$ 149.00
Digi Paint .. $ 45.00
MUSIC APPLICATIONS:
Activision
Music Studio $ 43.00
Aegis Development
Sonix ... $ 60.00
Electronic Arts
Deluxe Music Constr. .$ 69.00
Instant Music .....?..... . $ 35.00
It's Only Rock & Roll ...$ 24.00
Mimetics
Soundscape Midi Studio $ 125.00
Audio Digitizer .....$ 85.00
BUSINESS GRAPHICS:
Aegis Development
Impact! ..$ 125.00
Draw! ...$ 95.00
Draw Plus $ 199.00
Gold Disk
Pagesetter $ 125.00
Micro-Illusions
Dynamic-CAD ......CALL
BUSINESS FINANCIAL:
Byte by Byte
InfoMinder .$ 69.00
Financial Plus ......$ 240.00
Chang Labs
Rags-to-Riches (AR, AP, GL)......$ 199.00
Electronic Arts
MaxiComm $ 36.00
MaxiDesk ......S50.00
MaxiPlan...... $ 107.00
Financial Cookbook ...$ 35.00
Prea’sion Software
Logistix ..$ 149.00
Superbase Personal ..$ 119.00
Sedona Software
Money Mentor $ 69.00
SoftWood Co.
MiAmiga File II .....$ 70.00
MiAmiga Ledger ....$ 70.00
Versasoft
dBMAN ..$ 99.00
livAcrv no 5U ,
CwoW Orders OnW
coW° ° ice
PRODUCTIVITY UTILITIES:
Compumed
The Mirror ....$ 36.00
Digital Creations
D’ Buddy ..$ 60.00
Gizmoz (v 2.0) . ..... $ 52.00
Discovery Software
Grabbit! ..$ 24.00
Marauder II ... $ 29.00
Meridian
Zing . . $ 60.00
Metacomco
Make ...$ 54.00
Shell $ 54.00
Toolkit ...$ 39.00
New Horizons
Flow $ 85.00
PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES:
Absoft
AC Fortran $ 235.00
Manx
Aztec C Commercial ..$ 375.00
Aztec C Developers ..S230.00
Metacomco
Cambridge Lisp ....$ 149.00
ISO Pascal .$ 79.00
Prices may vary. Cell for liardv are prices. Delivery subject to product availability.
[ee uR
us, however, the Notepad occupied a different position: It seemed watered-down, a toy rather than a tool. With version 1,2. The Notepad takes a giant step toward becoming a text-entry and editing tool that many of us will use regularly. One important change is that, as we noted last time, you can run it on note files from the CLI. For users of the
CLI. This means that you can edit notes created from the Workbench without having to leave your CLI session.
The Notepad looks and works better than before. There are up and down scroll gadgets that let you move your text a line at a time simply and quickly. The number of the current page appears in the previous page gadget* so you can easily see where you are in your text. These simple changes give it a more professional appearance.
Many new features have been added to the Notepad, Several of these are available by mouse selection from the new Notepad Edit menu. An option that is currently on appears with a check mark to the left of it in the menu. Clicking a second time on an option turns it off.
One new option is Word Wrap, which is now the default. If on* it causes text lines to break at word boundaries as you type your note. Other Edit menu features let you manipulate blocks of text in your note. To work on a block of text von must First mark
i
it. One way to do this is to position the text cursor at the start of the block and then choose Mark Flare from the Edit menu.
Then move the text cursor to the end of the block and again choose Mark Place.
A quicker way to mark blocks is to double click the select button at the start and end of a block. Once you have identified a block of text, it will be highlighted. You then may do one of several things with it: You may remove it from your note and put it on the Clipboard by choosing Cut from the Edit menu; you can keep it in your note and put a copy of it in the Clipboard by choosing Copy from that menu; or you can change its style by choosing a combination of plain, italic, bold or underline from the Notepad Style menu. By choosing Cancel, the text will no longer be highlighted.
You insert text from the Clipboard into your document by moving the cursor to where you want the text to be inserted, and then selecting Paste from the Edit menu.
The Edit menu also lets you find and optionally replace text in a note. To do so, choose Find; then select the gadget Find: and enter the text that you wish to find. II you also want to replace that text once you
Table 1.
Version 1.2 Notepad keyboard
shortcuts.
Right-Amiga Calls the Notepad
Key Plus:
Function:
O
Open
S
Save
Q
Cancel
X
Cut
8c
Paste
C
Copy
M
Mark place
F
Find
+
Find next
-
Find previous
R
Replace
P
Plain text
I
Italic text
B
Bold text
U
Underlined text
find it, select the Hr pi: gadget and enter the replacement text. When you are done with these steps, press Return and then choose either the Next or Last (previous in the note) gadgets to tell the Notepad the direction of the search. Of course, you can always abort by selecting the Cancel gadget.
After you have entered the text, you can continue to search or replace more quickly. To do so, select Find Next or Find Last or Replace, as appropriate, from the Edit menu. All of these Edit menu options, as well as options from some other Notepad menus, have new keyboard shortcuts (see Table 1).
The Notepad also supports several other new key functions. The Tab key adds spaces to the left of the text cursor until the text cursor reaches the next pre defined, eight- character wide tab stop. You can move around quickly within a page using the Shift key and one of the four arrow keys at the same time. Shift -f Up-arrow takes you to the top of the page, while Shift + Down-arrow moves you to the page's bottom.
Shift + Left-arrow and Shift + Right-arrow move you to the beginning or end, respectively, of the current line.
The Notepad also has a number of new options that let you control how it uses fonts. To get at most of these, you select the Notepad icon and choose Info from the Workbench menu. Then select the Add gadget to the right of the words “ Tool Types” and type text into the string area between these two. The text you type exercises these new options. When you arc done with the text, hit Return and then select the Save gadget in the requester.
To start the Notepad without loading fonts from the disk, type FLAGS = NOFONTS. If you later decide you want the fonts, choose Read Fonts from the Notepad Project menu.
You can change the default font for an individual note or for the entire Notepad. To do so, pick the note’s icon or the Notepad icon and then type text as above. This time you enter FONT = NAME.SIZE, where NAME is one of the fonts in the Notepad Font menu and SIZE, is one of the si .es shown there for that font.
To change fonts while in a note, you must be sure that the Global Font option in the Notepad Format menu is off. If it is on, select it again to turn it off. Once it is off. You change fonts by selecting a new font and size from the Notepad Font menu. By default, the Global Font option is on. You can force it to be off or on by using the text method shown above and typing instead FLAGS = NOGLOBAL or FLAGS =
C i IO BA Ires pec t i vel y.
When you save a note, the last font active when the Global Font option was on becomes the default font the next time you open the note. Also, if the Global Font option is on when you save a note, none of the font changes in it arc saved with the note. Finally, you can remove all font or
* j
style changes from a note. To do so, choose Remove Fonts or Remove Styles. Respectively, from the Notepad Format menu.
And Still More. . .
Even though we have devoted two columns to version 1.2, we have only touched the surface. New features to support Amiga software developers have been added (such as a circle-graphics primitive), as well as still more new Notepad options, bug Fixes that help all of us, and new information that will allow hardware developers to make Amiga add-ons more easily than before. Included on the Workbench disk are a screen dump utility and a text to speech utility.
And we haven't even touched on the new EXTRAS disk! We think you'll agree that version 1.2 of the Amiga system software is an important step forward for the Amiga.H
Bill Catchings is a freelance writer and a software developer. Mark Van Name is vice president and co founder of Foresight Computer Corp. and a freelance writer. Write to them at 10024 Sycamore Road, Durham, NC 27703.
Rated ttl by Amiga® Users
THE MIRROR
THE MIRROR
HACKER PACKAGE
FOR DISK ANALYSIS
$ 49.95
DISK COPIER
$ 49.95
The Mirror Disk Copier is the Amiga's most powerful and effective disk copier. It was the first copier to produce unprotected copies of most software on the Amiga and it is still the leader in this field. No other copier can copy as much software as the Mirror. Other copiers only claim they can copy most schemes. ONLY THE MIRROR DOES IT ALL!
The Mirror Disk Copier is specially designed to back up heavily protected disks. To date it’s 100% successful! Ft’s completely automatic, no knowledge of Amiga DOS is required. It requires no drive modification.
The Mirror Disk Copier is Technically Superior. It employs its own operating system. It uses no routines from Kickstart or Workbench. It is the fastest copier available for the Amiga.
Our liberal update policy lets you make backup copies even when protection schemes change. It works on single or dual drive systems with 256K or 512K.
The Mirror Disk Copier consists of four highly advanced functions: Deep Copy - copies all protected disks; Fast Copy - an ultrafast dual drive copier; Write Check - checks drive speed; Alignment Check - checks drive alignment.
The Mirror Hacker Package is a flexible disk utility designed for serious disk analysis. It is a tool that can be used for a variety of
uses, from disk repair to disk 'breaking.’
It allows the user to access his disk drive on 4 exceedingly higher levels.
1ST LEVEL: This is the lowest level, allowing the user to read and write MFM or GCR in any format, indexed tracks and tracks of various lengths. You can view and edit any type of protected track. Complete flexibility is achieved.
2ND LEVEL: At this level is the system formatted track. You can look at a track and edit in ascii, hex, or with a direct memory assembler of your choice.
3RD LEVEL: At this level system formatted tracks are arranged so you can look at them as file system blocks. This module allows you to change system checksums, copy blocks to different disks, and trace file origins. This tool will easily allow you to patch a corrupted diskette.
4TH LEVEL: This is the highest level of disk structure, the Amiga binary file. You can study and edit data arranged as hunks, outputs from compilers, assemblers and linkers.
At any level you are able to fully edit and change your diskette to your liking. A powerful direct memory editor is included or you can use any other memory editor or disassembler of your choosing.
As a bonus this package contains a few extra ‘hacker’ type tools.
COPYKICK; A tool that will customize any Kick- start disk allowing the user to save memory after a reset and be placed in any external memory or expanded memory section. It may then be viewed by a disassembler or memory editor.
DISKSEARCH: A tool that will locate any pattern of Ascii or Hex on a diskette.
ERRORCHECK: This routine will check your disk for any errors or strange formats and report them back to you. It will also tell you the gap length of every system formatted track on the diskette. (A common protection scheme is to write a track with an extra long gap).
DUMBCOPY: A disk copier that will copy a disk without stopping on a track that it doesn’t recognize.
AVAILABLE NOW!
Compumed
MasterCard, Visa, M.O. or check + $ 3 shipping and handling.
(408) 758-2436
P. O. Box 6939 Salinas, CA 93912
C. O.D. or foreign orders add $ 3. California orders add 6% sales tax. Phone orders accepted 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Mon.-Fri.
AMIGA is a registered trademark of Commodore-Amiga, Inc
Circle 110 on Reader Service card.
OfC
Playing with Intuition
The final installment of our four-part tutorial on programming in C. With the basics behind us, we have come to the payoff
By William B. Catchings and Mark L. Van Name
jr
You have now learned enough C to have some fun playing with your Amiga’s capabilities. Obviously, we cannot cover all of the functions of the Intuition operating system in one article. However, without being complete or even totally methodical, we will give you a basic understanding of how it works. This should serve as a basis for further exploration. [For a close look at programming Intuition menus, see “Creating Mentis with Intuition” in our Jan. Feb. ’87 issue, p. 48, Editors]
Unfortunately, most of the existing Amiga programming books focus on either C or Intuition, and merely touch on the other. If you want to write programs that use Intuition, there is one book that you must own; the Amiga Intuition Manual. It does not give many examples, but it describes most of the functions you will need. What you learn from that manual, coupled with this tutorial, should be enough to get you started on Intuition programming.
Playing with Our Sample
Our sample program is a simple one called play.c. It is a toy and nothing more, a somewhat mild-mannered shoot-’em-up game that might give you a fewT minutes of simple entertainment. More to the point, it is short, and yet it uses quite a few different Intuition functions. Play.c displays a window on your screen. The window contains two boxes. The smaller box is your target. The larger box contains cross hairs; this is your viewfinder. Your goal is to move the viewfinder on top of the target and click the left mouse button. The faster you do so, the more points you score. Your score is actually three numbers: the total score, the score of your last hit and the total number of hits. When you are finished playing, exit the program by clicking on the window’s close gadget.
We wrote and tested play.c on a standard, single-drive, 512K Amiga system. Due to space limitations, we did not worry about handling all possible errors. While we cannot guarantee that it will work on your system, we believe that it will.
You may want to save some of the routines from play.c to start an Amiga C library' of your own. One common goal with C programming is to build up such
a library so that each successive program you write requires less new code.
Intuition Overview
The Amiga’s system software is composed of several different parts. The lowest-level part, or kernel, is actually several system modules. Some of these are stored in the protected kickstart memory, while others are loaded as needed from your system disk.
Built on this part is another major one, the Intuition system. It is used by Workbench and many of the utilities. It is composed of functions. These functions were designed to be accessed by C programs (even though much of the initial operating system was written in the language BCPL).
We will discuss several functions in each of a few important areas. We use play.c as an example throughout.
Libraries
Intuition’s functions are stored in libraries on your system disk. These libraries are only loaded into memory when an executing program asks for them.
You load a library' when you need it by using the OpenLibraryQ Intuition function call. The function requires two arguments: an ASCII string that is the name of the library and the version number of the library. In play.c we open the Intuition and the graphics libraries. By convention, the name of the library is followed by ".library” as in intuition.library. The version number indicates what version of that library you require. If the available library is greater than or equal to that number, then it is at least upwardly compatible with the one you want, and so the call succeeds. If you specify zero for the version number, this check is ignored. We used the constant LIBRARYVERSION to specify the current library at compile time.
OpenLibraryO returns a pointer to the base address at which the library is loaded. If this pointer is null, then either the library was not found or there was not enough memory free to load it.
When you are done with a library, you should dose it so that you do not waste main memory. You close it by
Reviews of Aztec C68k am v 3.2 were great.
Aztec C6Hk goes into overdrive for benchmark speed...
Byte November, 1986
Aztec C is more than just a C compiler... compiles programs significantly faster than Lattice.. . Options that for many applications, will improve program execution performance dramatically... code generated hy Aztec C was dramatically smaller than that produced by Lattice.
Amiga World November, 1986
Now, the New Aztec C68k version 3.4 is even faster, more flexible, and dramatically less expensive.
We did it! We moved all of the great development utilities from Aztec C68k am-c, our S499 system, to Aztec C68k anvd, our $ 299 system.
We packaged the same compiler, assembler, linker, libraries, and librarian that are in the $ 499 system into Aztec C68k am-p, The Professional System, and priced it at $ 199. Is that all we did? Not by a long shot!
We also added new features, speeded up the already impressive performance, and we listened. We listened to what users were saying on the technical support lines, on the East Coast Bulletin Board, the West Coast Bulletin Board, and on BIX. Then we responded by correcting, adding and augmenting to satisfy every’ one of the major requests. The result is three carefully packaged and reasonably priced high performance development systems that will do everything you could possibly want with the Commodore Amiga.
To back up this claim, we offer a 30-day money back satisfaction guarantee. The system must be purchased by an end user directly from Manx to qualify for the 30-day return, but that's it. Less than one per cent of the systems we sell to end users are ever returned, and over 60% of the systems we sell are repeat sales or by recommendation of an existing user. That says a lot.
Manx Software Systems One Industrial Way Eatontown, NJ 07724
Manx has a reputation as the expensive system to use for high demand professional applications, but the new prices and reconfigurations make our high powered systems attractive to everyone. In addition,
Manx has aggressive site licensing, multiple purchase discounts, OEM, educational, and other special purpose discounts. Call us today for more details. Join the over 50,000 satisfied end users who understand the Manx difference.
New Keatures: shorter development times •smaller faster code • support for 1.1 and 1.2 Amiga DOS • direct link of Amiga object modules and libraries standard driver support • C and assembler support for 68020 and 68881 • scatter loading and support of overlays by segmentation • 1.2 Amiga library* function support • debug utilities • enumerated data types
• stack depth checking code • Amiga assembly directives support *four floating point formats: Motorola fast float, Amiga IEEE double, Manx IEEE double, 68881 • dynamic memory allocation and window sizing for the Z editor • “touch" command • improved console window RAW and CON switching • stdio I O is buffered to console *68010, 68020 debug support • “exec” function supports Amiga PATH command •VT100 emulator (source) • lots of examples
New Configurations and Pricing
Aztec C68k am-p (The Professional)
$ 199
$ 299
$ 499
Optimized C, Assembler, Linker, Librarian. Libraries. Examples
Aztec C68k am-d (The Developer)
Optimized C, Assembler, Linker, Librarian, Libraries, Debugger,
Make, Diff, Grep, Support Utilities, Examples
Aztec C68k am-c (The Commercial System)
Library Source, One Year Of Updates, Z (vi) editor, Optimized C. Assembler, Linker, Librarian, Libraries, Debugger, Make, Diff,
Grep, Support Utilities, Examples
All systems are upgradable by paying the difference in price i $ 10, C.O.l),, VISA, MasterCard, American Express, wire (domestic or international), and terms are available. One and Two Day delivery available for all domestic and most international destinations.
To order, or, for information call today.
1-800-221-0440 ™,
In NJ or outside the USA call (201) 542-2121.
Amiga is a registered TM ot Commodore Intl. Lattice TM Lattice. Inc
Circle 31 on Reader Service card
passing this pointer to the CloseLibraryQ function. Windows
Once we have opened the required libraries, we are ready to display something on the monitor. You can use Intuition to display data within two primary vehicles: screens and windows.
You use screens when your program must have complete control of the display and you do not care about working with other programs. Most systems do not offer multitasking capabilities. On such systems, this is typically the way you would manipulate the display. Also, working with the screen in this fashion is often the fastest possible way. This is how most of the current Amiga games have been written.
However, the Amiga can allow more than one program to run simultaneously. All such programs that use the display then must share it. You share the display by using windows. For example, when you have two different versions of the CLI running at once, each is in its own window.
Since play.c is only a simple game, we decided to make it display through a window. You will often want to set up and open windows in Amiga C programs.
With this in mind, we put the window initialization and opening code in an independent routine that you may want to save for other programs as part of your growing C function library.
To build a window you must fill in the Window data structure. To do so you must initialize many fields.
Most of these are either self-explanatory or used only in complicated programs. A few deserve special explanation. You set the two edge fields to determine the starting upper-left coordinates of your window. You use the width and height fields to specify the starting window size and, if the user is allowed to resize the window, the maximum and minimum sizes for it.
The Flags field can be more confusing. You use it to tell what gadgets you want for your window, how your window’s updating should be handled, and to specify other parameters. In our window-initialization code, we turn on all the window gadgets, including dragging, resizing, depth arranging and closing. The ACTIVATE flag indicates that our new window should become the active window when it is opened. We require that the window image be updated any time it is first covered, by another window or requestor, and then uncovered. Because we do not want to worry about updating the window in play.c, we used the option SMARTREFRESH to let the system do it for us.
IDCMP
The field IDCMPFlags of the New Window structure leads us to our next topic: Intuition's Direct Communications Message Port (IDCMP).
IDCMP allows your program to communicate with Intuition. Whenever some form of outside input is given to the Amiga, usually from the mouse or keyboard. An InputEvent is built. It describes what happened. Intuition also uses events to indicate disk
Setting Up Your Program Development Disks
In the first installment of this series (July August ’86), we gave instructions on how to set up two disks for program development, C-CLI and C-DEVEL. We assumed that you owned Lattice (or Amiga) C, and we referred to Appendix D of its revised 1.1 manual. Many readers have written to us with the news that there is no such appendix. But we do have one. As it turns out, the appendix came with our development system from Commodore.
It is not something that Lattice distributes. So, to clear up any confusion, here is a summary of the relevant portions of that appendix.
Create the C-CLI disk as follows. Diskcopv your original Workbench disk and name the copy C-CLI. Then reboot with C-CLI and change it in the following ways. Use Preferences to activate the CLI and go to 80-column mode. Make any other changes your system may require while you are here, and then save your changes.
Start up the CLI and close all other active windows. Then insert into DPI: the disk (from Lattice) named C* DEVEL. In the CLI window, type:
EXECUTE Dfl:s make_c_cli.
You will get a number of messages that tell you about the excess files that are being cleared from various directories. When you get the message “Done,” this disk is ready.
To make your C-DEVEL disk, first make a diskcopy of the C-DEVEL disk from Lattice. Name it C-DEVEL. Reboot with the C-CLI disk you just made. You will be left in the CLI. Put the new C-DEVEL copy in DEL. Copy the commands from the C-DEVEL disk to the C- CLI disk by typing:
COPY DFLc c:
Then remove them from the C-DEVEL disk by entering:
DELETE DFLc ?
Your two disks are ready to go. We suggest that you
COPY DfhexampIes make ? DF0:s
so that the makesimple command is available to you at all times. Also, we suggest you make one or more directories for your programs on the C-DEVEL disk.
We apologize for any difficulties or confusion that our earlier error might have caused.?
Circle 150 on Reader Service card.
Gold Disk reveals
Desk Top Publishing for the Amiga.
Welcome to the exciting world of Desk Top Publishing with PageSetter, the page composition and layout program foryour Amiga. With PageSetteryou can mix graphics and text in a variety of styles and fonts to create professional quality reports, forms, newsletters, flyers and more.
Here are some of PageSetter’s features:
An ‘intuitive’ user interface combines ease of operation with complete flexibility of page design. At all times ‘WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET’. Use magnification to zoom in for detailed work or pull back for the full page. Enhance text and graphics with a variety of different borders, shading and shadows.
Articles may be created using the built-in word processor or imported from other programs like TextCraft or Scribble! Similarly use the built-in graphics editor to create graphics or import them from programs such as Deluxe Paint or Aegis Images.
Other features include:
• Point size capabilities to 800 pt.
• Type may be centered, flush left or right and justified.
• Multi page documents with variable page sizes and formats.
• Rules, grids, column and margin indicators.
• Measurements in inches or picas.
• Prints on any printer in Amiga preferences.
Suggested retail price $ 149.95 US.
Requires Amiga with minimum 512 KB and one drive.
Now Available.. .POSTSCRIPT support for laser printers.
Contact your local dealer or Gold Disk Inc.
The
COLD
DI6K
Manufactured and distributed by: Fabrique et Distribue par: GOLD DISK INC., RO. BOX 789, Streetsville, Ontario L5M 2C2
PageSetter is a registered trademark of Gold Disk Inc. AMIGA is a registered trademark of Commodore Amiga Inc. Scribble! Is a registered trademark of Micro-Systems Software Inc. Deluxe Paint is a registered trademark ol Electronic Arts. Textcraft is a registered trademark of Commodore Amiga Inc. Aegis Images is a registered trademark of Aegis Development.
Insertion or removal, the passage of time, and the fact that new preferences have been chosen. Each new event is placed at the back of a queue of other such events.
You receive events in your program via messages.
The function GetMsgQ returns a pointer to the First message in the queue, or NULL if there are none. You must specify a UserPort through which to receive your messages. When you open a window, Intuition supplies you with a UserPort. You use the IDCMPFlags field of the New Window structure to state which of the possible IDCMP message classes you want to be placed in your event queue. In this way, you can limit the number of messages your program must handle. In our window opening routine, to be fairly general, we asked to be given only WINDOWCLOSE messages.
You are not stuck forever with this set of message classes. You can modify the set while your program is running; your window’s UserPort will receive all messages of the new set of classes. You do this with the ModifylDCMPQ function. In playx, we indicated that we wanted to receive window-resizing, window-closing and mouse-button event messages.
Once you receive a message, yon should reply to it as quickly as possible. Before you reply, you must save the message fields in which you are interested, so that later events do not affect this list. You then reply with the ReplyMsgO function. After you have replied, you perform whatever processing the messages require and then check for more messages in your queue. Each event is marked with a time. This time is the seconds and microseconds that have elapsed since the Amiga was booted. For our game, we want to translate this into an approximate number of milliseconds. To do so, we divide the microseconds by 1,024 (right-shift 10 bits), multiply the seconds by 1,024 left-shift 10), and then add the two numbers together.
The simplest thing to do would be to loop back and try to get another message with GetMsgQ. However, there may be other processes running on the Amiga that could use the CPU cycles that such a busy loop would waste. Therefore, when there are no more messages in our queue, we WaitQ until another event message arrives at our UserPort. To wait in this fashion, you must use the following rather obscure notation:
Wait I my_window - > UserPort - > mp_ SigBit);
This statement simply left-shifts the signal bit number to the position assigned at run time to your UserPort. WaitQ returns when there is an event message.
When we receive a CLOSEWINDOW message, we clean up any mess the program has left and then exitQ.
We also must deal with the problem that resizing the window could obscure the target. Because of this, when we receive a NEWSIZE message, we give the player a new target.
Most of the actual code in play.c is executed when a MOUSEBUTTON event occurs. Because we did not specify otherwise, we only receive a mouse-button event when the selection (left) button is pressed or released.
If the event is a SELECTDOWN code, we ignore it. We
only want to act when the “click” is completed by- releasing the button, which we receive as a SELECTUP code.
When a SELECTUP occurs, we first check the mouse’s position. We retrieved this position from the event message before we replied. We must decide whether the mouse was “close" to the box. We decide in the hit routine by checking if the difference in the two sets of coordinates is less than the accuracy delta defined by ACCURACY. We give the player only three seconds to hit each target. Therefore, if the mouse was close enough, we subtract from 3,000 the number of elapsed milliseconds between when the box was drawn and when the mouse button was released. This gives us the score.
We get the SELECTUP’s time from the IntuiMessage structure.
Once wc have the score (total, for this hit and number of hits), we must display it. We pass the score to the routine ivritescorei) for display. Then we draw a new box with our function putboxQ. PutboxQ also gets the time after it has drawn the box by calling CurrentTimeQ and translating the result into milliseconds as before.
Alternate Pointer
So far we have not discussed how to move the viewfinder with the mouse. Yet, if you run the program you will see that it does indeed move with the mouse. We could have moved it by creating a sprite, asking for MOUSEMOVE events and then moving the sprite appropriately. But we didn’t. We cheated.
We took advantage of the fact that the mouse pointer is actually sprite zero of the eight sprites available on the Amiga. We used the SetPointerQ function to change the shape of the mouse pointer from its normal arrow form to our viewfinder. SetPointerQ causes this change to occur only when the specified window is active. If you activate another window, the pointer will return to its familiar arrow shape.
Sprites are low-resolution graphics objects that are maintained on the screen separately from the rest of the display by the Amiga’s hardware. Since they are handled separately by the hardware, you do not need to erase them when you move them. They can be up to sixteen dots wide and any height. They exist in two hit planes, which gives you four colors with which to work. One of these colors, color zero, is special. It is “see- through." This lets you build “holes” and non-rectangu- lar sprites.
You give a sprite its shape with an array of word pairs. The sixteen bits in each word correspond to the width of the sprite. The bits of each word in the pair specify whether that bit’s color should be 0, 1, 2 or 3. A pair of zero words start and begin the array. Our sprite data array, ptr_thta, defines a square with cross hairs. Getting exactly the image you want from such an array can require some time. The best way is to start with a sprite that is close to what you want and then change it as needed.
The SetPointerQ function requires several arguments: the window in which you will use the alternate pointer, the sprite data array, the height, the width and the x- ?
Introducing a spreadsheet with the speed of a mouse and the memory of an elephant.
Without memorizing critical locations.
Unicalc also gives you new flexibility in window management. The window environment includes sizing and repositioning; vertical and horizontal scroll bars: page up, page down, page left and page right designators; close window designators; and pull down menus.
Because of its sparse matrix technology, Lattice's Unicalc has a jumbo-size memory-at least twice as large as other Amiga spreadsheets. And the memory is used dynAMIGAlly:
d J J
the greater the memory, the larger the spreadsheet.
A wide range of database functions is provided to fill ranges, perform queries on a database, and build tables based on various input data. What’s more, this software package allows
you to escape
Lattice
Lattice, Incorporated Post Office Box 3072 Glen Ellvn, Illinois 60138
(312) 858-7950 TWX 910-291 -2190
IXTERXATIOSM. SALES OFFICES lienelux I no Daucom 32>2T20-51-6l Japan Lifeboat. Inc 03)293-Cl 1 England Raumlhill 06’2) 546*5 France Sfl11) ¦Mj-66-1 1 33 Gcrman PfKcnluur I iWft-H SOSH Hong Kong Prtma 8S2SH-H2S >3 A | Soft Korea, Inc 021'8363A!
Lattice is a registered trademark of Lattice. IncAnicalc isa registered trademark of Lattice, Inc Amiga is a registered trademark rifOtmmodore Amiga. Inc
Orcfe 23 on Reader Service card
to CLI to perform AmigaDos functions.
Other outstanding features include: DIF, a file format which permits you to import and export your save files from other spreadsheets; Foreign Language versions; plus HIDE cell capability which allows you to hide a single cell, column of cells or a row of cells from the screen display.
To simplify operation, comprehensive context- sensitive HELP screens are alwavs
J
available, no matter where you are in the spreadsheet.
Despite all its features, Unicalc is the lowest cost spreadsheet for your Amiga PC-only $ 79.95. And a complete template pack is available for just $ 39.95. So, you can get the whole package for only SI 19-90. With that kind of performance and price, you'll agree that Lattice has just built a better mousetrap for your mouse driven Amiga PC.
And y-ccnter offset. These last two values define the place on the pointer that actually determines its location, or its activation point. The standard arrow pointer has an x and y offset of 0, 0. This means that its activation point is in the upper-left corner, the point of the arrow. We are trying to build a pointer that looks like a viewfinder. Therefore, we want the activation point to be at the meeting of the cross hairs. We specified an x and y offset of -8, -6. This tells Intuition to shift the pointer position - 8 dots horizontally (minus indicates left) and - 6 dots vertically (minus indicates up). When we gel the coordinates of the mouse pointer in a SELECTUP event, it will be the coordinates of the center of our pointer.
It is important to note that any graphics object that is manipulated by the Amiga’s display hardware, such as a sprite, must be in chip memory (the first 512K). If you only have 512K of memory or less, then this is not a
j
problem. If you have additional memory, you should use the ATOM tool on the executable file that contains the sprite’s definition array. The loader then will automatically force that part of your program to be in chip memory. You can find more information about the ATOM tool and the loader in the Amiga DOS User's Manual.
Simple Graphics
We do only a little bit of Amiga graphics in play.c. However, it serves as a good introductory example. In order to draw a graphics item, such as a line or some shape, you use a rastport. A rastport handles such tasks as keeping your graphics objects within your window, keeping track of your drawing pens and other miscellaneous functions that you probably do not want to do yourself.
When you open a window, Intuition provides you
with a default rastport (RPort). We use this for all of our drawing. When drawing, you use one or more pens. A pen has associated with it a color register. To draw lines and simple graphics, you need just one pen the foreground pen. You set this pen to one of the Amiga’s 32 available pens with the SetAPenQ function. There is also another pen that is used in some drawings the background pen. You can set it with the function Set- BpenQ. By default, the background pen is pen zero.
We draw the target box by using the PolyDrawQ function. This function works by drawing successive lines from the current position to the first position in the coordinates structure and from the first coordinate to the second, for as many points as you specify. The array comers contains the four points of a square. We first call MoveQ to position the pen and then call Poly- DraioQ to draw lines that connect the four points of the square.
In our example, we use the Set A Pen Q function to set the foreground pen alternately to pen 0 and then to pen 1. We use pen 0 to draw in the background’s color. This erases the previous box. The previous box's coordinates are still in the corners array because it is a static array.
We then SeLAPnU) back to pen 1 to draw the next box.
The target is supposed to be drawn in random positions. We use the Lattice C library random-number functions rand() and srandQ to generate the box’s coordinates each time we must move it. We give srandQ an initial seed value based on the time. This helps to avoid having the same box positions every time you run the program. Rand() returns a number between 0 and the largest integer. We scale that value by AND mg it down to 1,024 for the x location and 512 for the y. If the scaled-down number is larger than our window, we try again until it is correct. We then use this x and y to
Continued on p. 102.
Improving the Sample Program
The programs that we have provided as samples are by no means perfect. However, they can serve as starting places for other, more useful ones.
In order to get either the wordcount program or the text analysis program to process an input file, you have to redirect the standard input. Both would be more useful if they instead took an input file name as a command line argument. You could even make them able to process all of the files that matched an AmigaDOS- style wildcard.
There is one program that you can change from wrong to right! On page 60 of the September October ’86 issue, in our sample function cpystr, there is an error. The if statement shown there should break out of the for loop when *dest = = " 0 not when *dest != ’ 0’. Our thanks to Henry L. Warner of Lynn Haven, FL, for catching this error.
You could do many different things to spruce up play.c, our sample program this time. One easy improve
ment would be to utilize better the Amiga’s colors. In the sample, we never try to specify the colors directly. Instead, we use whatever colors are already present in the color registers. You could use the SetRGB4() function to set the color of the pens you used.
Our viewfinder is a simple, boring box. You could change its shape, perhaps into something a bit more like a gunsight. Add some motion. Try moving the target box a few pixels in a random direction every couple of INTUITICKS events (about ten occur every second).
You also could change the program so that it handles ACTIVE WINDOW and IN ACTIVE WIN DOW events. The player should be able to have a new target if he goes to another window and then returns.
One caution: save a recent, working copy! When you program relatively close to the machine, as in this program. You can easily ruin your source file, or even your disk.D
“Open the pod bay doors, HAL...”
Programmers cast their vote!
Right now, leading software developers are hard at work on the next generation of Amiga® products. To add the spectacular sound effects we've all come to expect from Amiga software, they am overwhelmingly choosing one sound recording package...
FutureSound. As one developer put it, "FutureSound should be standard equipment for the Amiga."
FutureSound the clear winner,..
Why has FutureSound become the clear choice for digital sound sampling on the Amiga? The reason is obvious: a hardware design that has left nothing out. FutureSound includes two input sources, each with its own amplifier, one for a microphone and one for direct recording; input volume control; high speed 8-bit parallel interface, complete with an additional printer port; extra filters that take care of everything from
H VJ51GM
background hiss to interference from
the monitor, and of course, a microphone so that you can begin recording immediately.
What about software?
FutureSound transforms your Amiga into a powerful, multi-track recording studio. Of course, this innovative software package provides you with all the basic recording features you expect. But with FutureSound, this is just the beginning. A forty-page manual will guide you through such features as variable sampling rates, visual editing, mixing, special effects generation, and more. A major software publisher is soon to release a simulation with an engine roar that will rattle your teeth. This incredible reverberation effect was designed with FutureSound’s software.
Question: What can a 300 pound space creature do with these sounds? Answer: Anything he wants.
Since FutureSound is IFF compatible (actually three separate formats are supported) your sounds can be used by most Amiga sound applications. With FutureSound and Deluxe Video Construction Set from Electronic Arts, your video creations can use the voice of Mr. Spock, your mother-in-law, ora disturbed super computer.
Programming support is also provided. Whether you're a "C" programming wiz or a Sunday afternoon BASIC hacker, all the routines you need are on the non-copy protected diskette.
Your Amiga dealer should have FutureSound in stock. If not, just give us a call and for $ 175 (VISA, MasterCard or COD) we'll send one right out to you. Ahead warp factor one!
Applied Visions, Inc., Suite 2200, One Kendail Square Cambridge, MA 02139 (617)494-5417
Amiga is a registered trademark ot Commodore-Amiga, Inc.
Deluxe Video Construction Set is a trademark ol Electronic Arts, Inc.
AmigaWorld
Sophisticated, Stimulating, and System-specific
When you use the most sophisticated and exciting computer on the market today, you deserve an equally sophisticated and exciting companion magazine.
Introducing AmigaWorld, published by CW Communications Peterborough, the leader in quality computer publications. It's the only magazine for Amiga users.
Amiga World's clearly-written features help new users take full advantage of the newest Commodore. Plus, lively and fully-illustrated articles offer inspiration to everyone who wants to be creative while learning.
You'll get outstanding color reproduction on high- quality, oversized pages. Instead of a reasonable facsimile, you'll see true-to-life examples of the Amiga's colorful graphics!
+s llMIGA
Magazine
Making the Amiga Work For You
With unrivaled graphics and sound capabilities, the Amiga is already in a class by itself. AmigaWorld not only tells you why, it shows you how every incredible feature can work for you.
In each issue, AmigaWorld authors will guide you through a new frontier of computing!
Subscribe to AmigaWorld today and:
• Explore the speed and versatility of the Amiga for home and business applications.
• Learn about the latest and very best new hardware software on the market.
• Receive in-depth, easy-to-understand analyses of Amiga’s astounding features.
• Discover a regular buyer’s guide, timely reviews, and user hints and tips.
Become A Charter Subscriber And Save 25%
The cost of an AmigaWorld subscription couldn't be better! By becoming a charter subscriber, you’ll save 25% off the basic subscription rate, and nearly 37% off the cover price!
As the world’s largest publisher of computer-related information, CW Communications unconditionally guarantees your AmigaWorld subscription.
If you’re not completely satisfied, tell us. We’ll refund the full price of your subscription no questions asked!
To order, please return the coupon or attached card. For faster service, call 1-800-258-5473. In NH, call 1-924-
9471.
YES.
I want to save 25% off the basic rate! Enter my one year subscription (6 issues) to AmigaWorld for the low charter subscription price of S14.97. If I’m not satisfied at any time, I will receive a full refund no questions asked.
? Payment Enclosed ? Bill Me 373B2
Name
Address
City State Zip
Please make check payable to AmigaWorld. Canada and Mexico SI7.97,
1 year only, US funds drawn on US bank. Foreign Surface S34.97, I year only, US funds drawn on US bank. Foreign Airmail please inquire. Please allow 6-8 weeks for delivery.
DIGITAL canvas
I This month’s exhibit features the work of Armond Deueno, a “mostly self taught” artist who lives and works on his Amiga in Springfield, Massachusetts.
Though he has had some graphic arts training,
Armond Deveno is primarily interested in painting.
Armond’s interest in and enthusiasm for computer art are evident in his work; sometimes, he says, the newness of this artform makes him feel . .like a medieval monk must have felt in front of an illuminated manuscript.”
Armond was introduced to computer art while looking for a good game computer; he was first captivated by Microillustrator on an Apple II. As he related to AmigaWorld, his first exposure with computer art reminded him of his childhood experiences with The Winki Dee Show, a kids’ show that had a segment when you could attach a special drawing board to the TV screen and trace drawings. Armond maintained a fascination with the idea of artistic interaction with the cathode ray tube.
Armond waited for “minicomputer technology to come down to micros” He bought a Mindset computer, and then, after reading about the chips Jay Miner was working on, became convinced he had to have an Amiga. He likes the ability to rapidly change colors, the instant feedback and the ability to combine and manipulate digitized art with computer paintings. He also enjoys not having to clean up. ¦
Anyone submitting artwork to be considered for exhibit in Digital Canvas should send the artwork on a disk and properly packaged to:
Amiga World
80 Elm St.
Peterborough, H 03458
Attn: Art Director
Please include brief biographical information, relevant details about access to the pictures and any information regarding special products or procedures used in creating the artwork. Please do not submit disks with less than eight finished pictures.
G
D
N
Now Amigrft forld puts
a powerful new research tod
right at your fingertips.
If you need instant access to news and information about your competition, your profession, technology, finance, law, or just about any other subject, AmigaWorld s SearchLink will give it to you.
AmigaWorlcTs new SearchLink service gives you easy access to more than 800 databases in just minutes!
And SearchLink gets you answers to all sorts of questions from these databases like details about new products and services, or market facts, or emerging technologies. You can get information on computers, medicine, investments, law, chemistry, engineering and much more. Everything from accounting to trademarks to history or geography.
SearchLink is easy to use and inexpensive.
All you need is a credit card and a computer with modem.
No subscriptions. No passwords. No difficult manuals to learn. Just call 800-843-7337 with your computer and log on. You pay only $ 7.99 per search (a few databases carry surcharges) plus 25 cents per minute for telecommunications and $ 2 for each abstract you want to see. (You can also get hard copies). You can charge everything to MasterCard, VISA, or American Express.
SearchLink provides 24-hour on-line assistance.
SearchLink even gives you free on-line tips from trained SearchLink search specialists if you have problems or questions about your searching. Just type “SOS” when you’re on-line!
SearchLink gets you to the information you want.
If you’ve ever wanted to access databases offered by ADP Network Services; BRS; Data-Star; Datasolve; DataTimes; Dialog; G-Cam Serveur; NewsNet; Pergamon InfoLine; SDC; Questel; or
VU TEXT, SearchLink will access databases from all of them without a special subscription or knowledge of special search languages.
We can't list all of SearchLink's more than 800 databases, but just to give you an idea, here are some of the databases available under the topic “COMPUTER."*
Business Software Database COMPENDEX* Computer Database COMPUTERPAT INSPEC
Menu The International Software Database Microcomputer Index Online Microcomputer Software SUPERTECH
And here are just a few of the other popular databases you
can access with SearchLink.
Abi INFORM
ERIC
Chemical Abstracts
PTS PROMT
Disclosure
TRINET
(Selected databases)
Trademarkscan
Donnelley Demographics
Standard and Poor’s
Dun & Bradstreet
Corporate Descriptions
(Selected databases)
Call 800-843-7337 now!
Put the power of knowledge to work for you light now. Call 800-843-7337 (THE-SEER) on your computer and get the answers you need to stay ahead.
* A complete list of the databases is available on SearchLink.
From AmigaWorld
Your link to the world of information.
An International Data Group Service
Soarchl.ink is sponsored by the National Federation of Abstracting .mi) Information Services.
NFAIS is a professional association of database producers.
_ TK
Cirde 184 on Reader Service card
Circle 161 cn Reader Service card.
MeaaBoard 2
Memory Expansion for the Amiga
by Progressive Peripherals & Software. Inc.
NEW for the AMIGA! NOW ONLY!
Features: SHOO 98
• 2 Megabytes of fast RAM
• Fully Populated
• Auto Configure with 1.2 Version Operating System
• Small 4" x IOV2" Footprint
• Made in the U.S.A.
• Fully Amiga Compatible
• Plugs into expansion bus on the side of the Amiga... Ready to go in just minutes!
• Allows better use of memory oriented software,ie.: Dynamic-CAD. Aegis Animator, Delux Video and RAM disk for fast copying and handling.
• Clean, Professional Unit
Progressive Peripherals & Software, Inc. 464 Kalamath Street Denver, Colorado 80204
(303) 825-4144
For The
AMIGA USER !
With
Computer
Discount Spring Catalog
Yours Free!
200
w
Lattice
¦ ¦
ELECTRONIC ARTS’
TM
rH=l First Byte
His
New Horlions
'W Hinder*
% A Rot*
7"m Pr'-‘-
c tfom
N**niP titer );
ount
* 3995
NEW CLImate
Never use CLI again!!
Believe It
• EASY BATCH PROCESSING •
• FAST COPIES (WILDCARDS TOO!!) •
• FULL MOUSE SUPPORT •
• AND MUCH, MUCH MORE. •
CLImate is a tremendously powerful utility which lets you completely bypass the CLI and Workbench, eliminating a major source of frustration and confusion for Amiga users. With a simple click of the mouse, it allows you to rename files, delete files, make Directories, and create multiple file copies (even to the RAM disk), its print display options let you adjust page length, margins, numbers. CLImate can do all this and much more! From Progressive Peripherals & Software, Inc.
NOW ONLY!
Home & Business Productivity Producl
J
Computer Discount
• Hardware Accessories
• Games
• Music Aetlf
• Educational
±)
Precision
Software
T t es
OtVt tOPMl n ?
ACTIVISION!
MacroWare
Oer
Progressive Peripherals & Software, Inc. 464 Kalamath Street Denver, Colorado 80204
(303) 825-4144
HOURS-
Mon-Fri. 10am to 6pm MST Sat. 10am to 5pm MST Gosed SundavK
CALL TODAY!
CALL TODAY
CALL TOD A Y 998 West 5th Avenue
Denver. Colorado 80204
(303) 825-2943
Easy Palettes
An Amiga Basic program that allows you to create custom color palettes.
By Christoph C. Borel-Donohue
Here’s an interactive way to create your own palette of colors for your Amiga Basic programs. Along the way, you will learn how to use some of the advanced features of Amiga Basic, such as opening windows, asking the mouse’s position, and using pull-down menus.
The Easy Palette program lets you create, modify and store Amiga Basic palettes, Here’s how it works.
First, the program defines a screen (in this example, a low-resolution screen with 320 x 200 pixels) using the Screen command. Then a window is defined that is just large enough to hold the palette, three mixing bars and a big area that shows the currently selected color.
A subroutine called INITPALETTE then assigns the gray tones to the different colors and calls the subroutine named ALLCOLOR, which draws the mixing bars. The pull-down menu is initialized by INITMENU.
Main Loop
The main program loop consists of three lines. In the first statement, the program checks to see if the pulldown menu has been activated by the right-mouse button. If that has happened, the program jumps to the CHECKMENU routine to determine which menu item
Listing 1. Easy Palettes
’EASY PALETTES : A interactive color mixing program
’COPYRIGHT BY CHRISTOPH C.BOREL-DONOHUE ’WRITTEN IN AMIGA-BASIC MAY.1986
t
DEFINT A-Z
DIM P(3,31),RGBS!(3),RGB(3),RGBN(3)
SCREEN 2,320,200,5, I
WINDOW 2,"PALETTE",(10,10)-(300,100) , 2.2 WINDOW OUTPUT (2)
COSUB INITPALETTE GOSUB INITMENU
LOOP: ’check if mouse has been activated
ON MENU GOSUB CHECKMENU : MENU ON IE M0USE( 0)00 THEN GOSUB CHECKMOUSE : MOUSE ON GOTO LOOP
CHECKMOUSE: 'get mouse position and adjust gauges
X=MQUSE(1)
Y=M0US E(2)
IF X >16 5 THEN X =16 5
IF X 1 0 THEN X- 1 0 Listing continued, on p. 74.
(Store, Specials or Actions) has been selected.
The second line of the main loop tests whether the left-mouse button is activated. If so, the subroutine CHECKMOUSE is entered. The vertical position of the mouse determines whether a new color on the palette is selected or if one of the color sliders has to be moved. The horizontal position determines which color is being edited. This, the current color, also appears in a big rectangle on the left of the screen. By adjusting the color sliders, any of the Amiga's 4,096 colors can be produced. As mentioned earlier, only 16 colors are available at one time for the mixing process, but if you select the menu item Upper Lower Palette, you can toggle between the values of the upper or lower palette. This keeps the display from changing colors as it would if all 32 colors were on-screen together.
To make the color-mixing process more user friendly, a number of extra features have been added. It is possible to swap two colors, to copy a color to another color and to mix two colors together. You might want to generate a range of colors (e.g., from dark blue to light green). By selecting Spread Color, the RGB (red, green, blue) values are linearily interpolated. Finally, it is possible to change the brightness of the selected color by pressing two different keys to lighten or darken it.
Storing the Palette
Storing the palette as a data file can be done with the Store menu by selecting Save Color Table. The RGB values of each color are written on a data file and can be used in any program you design.
It is possible to load any color palette data file for modifications. T he Easy Palettes program listing shows you how to convert die RGB values back into colors (subroutine LOADCOLOR).
If a color palette is never changed in an application program. Save Subroutine should be selected from the menu. The program then writes a subroutine (LOADCOLOR2) on a user-selectable data file that can be merged to your own programs.
Finally, to get out of the main program loop, select Exit Program. I
Address all author correspondence to Christoph C. Borel-Donohue, 34 Dickinson St., Amherst, MA 01002.
The Financial Manager
Professional Home Accounting System And Register
PHASAR™ is the most powerful, versatile, and easy to use Financial Management software package available for your 512k Amiga™ Computer. It's loaded with features. Here are just a few:
• Interacting Accounts (checking, savings, charge cards, charge accounts, etc.)
• Ability to define up to ten different tax calculations.
• Ability to define up to twenty tax worksheets and forms of your choosing.
• Extensive help messages available at the touch of a key.
• Many printer reports including: account summaries, selected transactions, category summaries, net worth statement, tax calculations.
• Loan and savings account analyses presented four-at-a-time on the screen for easy comparisons.
• Excellent colorful presentation of reports and plots on screen.
Call Finally Software collect to learn more about PHASAR.
Or, order risk free; your satisfaction is guaranteed. (714) 854-4434
• v, ,
* y ' ;V - .7
PHASAR and Amiga are trademarks of Marksman Technology, inc. and Commodore-Amiga, Inc.
respectively.
V. V Finally Software
4000 MacArthur Blvd., Suite 3000 0QQ OR
SOFT WARE Newport Beach, California 92660 Available flOW for Only
Circle 51 on Reader Service card.
We Teach Your Computer Spanish. It Teaches You.
A detailed psychotherapeutic game on a disk, Dr Xes takes the form of a Gestalt therapy session. Learn more about artifical intelligence, psychotherapy, and yourself Dr Xes even talks. More fun than a padded room, great for parties. S49.95.
Shrink In A Box
Dr-Xes
*
Call collect to learn more about Dr Xes. Or, order risk free, your satisfaction is guaranteed.
FnilY
S 0 f T W A R [
4000 MacArthur Blvd Suite* 3000 Newport Beach, California 92663 Circle 111 on Reader Service card.
(714) 854-4434
Senor Tutor leads a beginning Spanish student through self-paced, changing lessons. You learn greetings and phrases, household terms, and much more.
Sophisticated speech synthesis actually lets your computer speak Spanish.
Turn your computer into your Spanish teacher with Senor Tutor.
; H Lspanol es facil!
Call collect to learn more about Senor Tutor. Or. Order
Circle 91 on
risk free, your satisfaction is guaranteed.
(714) 854-4434
Ftfcur
sat r w a r f
4000 MacArthur Blvd Suite 3000 Newport Beach, California 92663
Reader Service card.
10 19.95 25 S42.25 25 S37.50 100 $ 8.95
511. 95 25 S13.25 25 S15.00
511. 95
T2T795
S7.99
1000 S 17.95 1000 S17.99 500 S7.95 500 S8.95 1000 S5.95
S4H-S2.50 US S&H-S4.50 CN US S's only
Visa
Master
Join the largest users' group dedicated to the Amiga. Receive our official newsletter. Evaluations on software and hardware, Advanced updatings, technical information. Problem-solving, program exchange (over 50 disks in our PD library), Buying discount service, etc. Send $ 18.00 US for Membership to:
Disks (DS.DD) -PLAIN LABEL® 10 S 17 . 9S
33}" Disks (SS,DD) -PLAIN LABEL® 10 S 16.50
3Jj" DISK LABELS - T F-F F (bulk I000 $ 40.00) 3* ' Disk filp top file - Holds 40+ disks 5V," Disks (SS,DD)-PLAIN LABEL® 10 S6.40
5H" Disks (DD.DD)-PLAIN LABEL® 10 S7.50
5k" Disk flip top file - Holds 60 disks
CLASSIC IMAGE, INC.- PRESENTS DIABLO - Graphic mind challenge garre S29.95
DISK LIBRARY-Fi1e,Cat.,Update,Search,X-Ref.,etc$ 49.95 DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED
M. W. RUTH CO., AMW37 510 Rhode Island Ave. Cherry Hill, NJ 08002
(609) 667-2526 We stock what we sell, for fast delivery.
Number and deduct 10% off of all purchases.
ATTENTION PROGRAMMERS - Let us take over the headaches of publishing your software. We are looking for al 1 itens
Paper T F-F F White, 93$ x 11, 201b. Paper T F-F F Jj" Greenbar,9>$ x 11 Index Cards - T F-F F, 3x5 Rolodex Cards - T F-F F, 21 6x4 Labels - T F-F F, Address_
Send for FREE CATALOG * All available AMIGA items AUG of SJ (6800) - Members - Just give us your membership
AUG
AMIGA USERS' GROUP of SJ (68000)
AMIGA OUTLET
3>i" Disks (DS.DD) -SPECTRUM by Memory Media
Amiga« System Covers - W nouse LOGO Amiga® Disk Cover - 1010 or 1020 with LOGO
AXIGA® II A registered tradenarfc. 0f Corredore-Anigi. Inc
elated to the "AMIGA®
AUG
Box 3761 - Attn: Jay Forman Cherry Hill. NJ 08034
(609) 667-2526 * Visa Master - Add $ 1.00
Circle 48 on Reader Service card.
X M =(X- 15) 10 IF Y 20 THEN COL=XM+16
IF COLOCOLOLD THEN GOSUB ALLCOLOR
C. 0 L 0 L D = C 0 L ELSE
C=(Y-25) 10
IF C MOD 2=0 THEN RETURN C=(C+1) 2
IF (C 1) OR (03) THEN RETURN ON C GOSUB RED,GREEN,BLUE P(C ,C.OL)=XN GOSUB MIX END IF RETURN
DATAFILE: ’save load color tables
LOCATE 3,2 : INPUT "FILENAME";FILES ON MENU ITEM GOSUB SAVECOLOR,LOADCOLOR , SAVESUB GOSUB ALLCOLOR
LOCATE 3,2 : PRINT STRINC$ (26," ");
RETURN
CHECKMENU: ’branch to subroutines
MENUID=MENU(0)
MENUITEM=MENU(1)
ON MENUID GOSUB DATAFILE,SPECIAL,EXITPALETTE RETURN
SAVECOLOR: ’save color table
OPEN ”0" , 1 , FILF.$
IF SWITCH*1 THEN GOSUB SWITCH FOR 1=0 TO 31
WRITE 1 ,P(1 , I) , P(2,1), P ( 3 ,1) NEXT I CLOSE 1 RETURN
LOADCOLOR: 'load color table
OPEN ,FILES
FOR 1=0 TO 31
INPUT 1,P(1,I),P(2,I),P(3,1)
IF I>15 THEN PALETTE I , P(1 , T) 15! , P(2 ,1) 15! ,P(3 ,1) 15 NEXT I CLOSE 1 CLS
RETURN

ll$ =CHRS (34)
PRINT 1 PRINT 1 PRINT i PRINT 1 PRINT 1 PR I NT 1 PRINT 1 PRINT 1 P RIN T 1 PRINT 1 CLOSE 1 RETURN
II
TI
II

II
IT
II
CD _
Listing continued on p. >
Professional, full featured and built On convenience and ease of use. File size limited only by disk capacity, (14,000 records" on standard micro floppy or 32,000 records on a hard disk.) Field length is variable, with up to 40 fields per record. Alpha or numeric sort on multiple keys 10 with up to 5 fields each). Report Writer calculates fields with subtotals and averages, performs fast addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, (over 10 math functions can handle complicated equations). Allows selective printing (cased on 20 different selection criteria). Minimal mouse commands to speed data entry and manipulation. 51 2K
* 59.95' 800-762-5645
Amiga Schematics still $ 24.95! Curdinul Software Info: (703) 491-6494 14 840 H uiId America Dr.
Database Management At Its Best
Wood bridge, V A 22191
- s & n
v
SPECIAL: ’special color feature
ON MENU ITEM GOSUB SWITCH,SWAPCOL,SPREAD,COPYCOL,MIXC0L,CHBRIGHT
GOSUB ALLCOLOR
RETURN
REDS*11; 11 $ ; REDS ;H$
GREENS*";H$ ;GREEN $ ;H$
BLUE$ = fl;H$ ; BLUES ; H$
FOR 1=] TO 32"
R=ASC(MID$ (RED$ tI,l))-65"
G=ASC(MID$ (GREENS,I,1))-65"
B = ASC(MID$ ( BLUES, I , 1 ) )-65,f PALETTE 1-1,R 15. ! ,G 15. ! , B 15 . !" NEXT I"
RETURN"
S AV E S U B: ’save color subroutine
REDS*"" : GREEN$ ="" : BLUES*"" FOR 1=0 TO 31
RED$ =RED$ +CHR$ (65+P(1,1)) GREEN$ = GREEN$ +CHR$ (65+P(2,1) ) BLUE$ =BLUE$ +CHR$ (6 5+P(3,1)) NEXT I
OPEN "0"t l,FILES PRINT 1 , " 1.0ADCOLOR2 : "
SWITCH: ’switch between upper lower palettes
ti
II
74 March April 1987
AVAILABLE NOW!
StaiBoani2
If you’ve owned your Amiga® for a while now, you know you definitely need more than 512k of memory. You probably need at least double that amount...but you might need as much as an additional two megabytes. We want to urge you to use StarBoard2 as the solution to your memory expansion problem -and to some of your other Amiga-expansion needs as well!
It's small, but it’s BIG-
Since most of you want to expand your Amiga's memory without having to also expand your computer table, we designed StarBoard2 and its two optional "daughterboards" to fit into a sleek, unobtrusive Amiga-styled case that snugly fastens to your computer with two precision- machined jackscrews.
The sculpted steel case of StarBoard2 measures only 1.6" wide by 4.3"high by
10. 2"long. You can access the inside of the case by removing just two small screws on the bottom and pulling it apart. We make StarBoard2 easy to get into so that you or your dealer can expand it by installing up to one megabyte of RAM on the standard StarBoard2 or up to two megabytes by adding in an Upper Deck.
Thiscard hasdecks!
The basic StarBoard2 starts out as a one megabyte memory space with Ok, 512k, or one megabyte installed. If you add in an optional Upper Deck (which plugs onto the Main Board inside the case) you bring StarBoard2 up to its full two megabyte potential. You can buy your StarBoard2 with the Upper Deck (populated or unpopulated) or buy the Upper Deck later as your need for memory grows.
And you can add other functions to StarBoard2 by plugging in its second optional deck -the Multifunction Module!
StarBoard2:1unctionsfive!
If we count Fast Memory as one function, the addition of the MultiFunction Module brings the total up to five!
THE CLOCK FUNCTION:
Whenever you boot your Amiga you have to tell it what time it is! Add a MultiFunction Module to your StarBoard2 and you can hand that tedious task to the battery-backed,
M icroBotics, I nc. AMIGA is a registered trademark of Commodore-Amiga
811 Alpha Drive, Suile 335, Richardson, Texas 75081 (214) 437-5330
Auto-Configuring Fast RAM Zero Wait States User Expandable from 512k to 2 Megabytes Bus Pass- Through MultiFunction Option: battery clock, FPU, parity, Sticky-Disk
real-time clock calendar. A small piece of MicroBotics software in your WorkBench Startup-Sequence reads the clock and automatically sets the time and date in your Amiga. And the battery is included (we designed it to use an inexpensive, standard AAA battery which will last at least two years before needing replacement).
THE FLOATING POINT FUNCTION:
If any one aspect most characterizes the Amiga it's fast graphics! Most graphic routines make heavy use of the Amiga Floating Point Library. Replacing this library with the one we give you with your MultiFunction Module and installing a separately purchased Motorola 68881 FPU chip in the socket provided by the Module will speed up these math operations from 5 to 40 limes! And if you write your own software, you can directly address this chip for increased speed in integer arithmetic operations in addition to floating point math.
THE PARITY CHECKING FUNCTION:
If you install an additional ninth RAM chip for every eight in your StarBoard2, then you can enable parity checking. Parity checking will alert you (with a bus-error message) in the event of any data corruption in StarBoard2's memory space. So what good is it to know that your data's messed up if the hardware can't Fix it for you? It will warn you against saving that data to disk and possibly destroying your database or your massive spreadsheet. The more memory you have in your system the more likely it is, statistically, that random errors will occur. Parity checking gives you some protection from this threat to your data residing in Fast RAM. Note that the Amiga's "chip" RAM cannot be parity checked.
THE IMMORTAL MEMORY DISK FUNCTION (STICKY-DISK):
When you've got a lot of RAM, you can make nice big RAM-Disks and speed up your Amiga's operations a lot! But there's one bad thing about RAM-Disks: they go away when you re-boot your machine. Sticky-Disk solves that problem for you. It turns all of the memory space inside a single StarBoard2 into a Memory Disk that will survive a warm-reboot! When your Amiga attempts to grab a StarBoard2 in Sticky-Disk mode, a hardware signal prevents the system from acquiring the StarBoard2 as FastRAM (and thereby erasing your Files) -instead it is re- recognized as a Memory Disk and its contents are preserved intact. If you want to work rapidly with large files of data that are being constantly updated (such as when developing software) you can appreciate the Sticky-Disk!
Fast RAM -no waiting!
StarBoard2 is a totally engineered product. It is a ZERO WAIT-STATE design, auto-conFiguring under AmigaDOS 1.2 as Fast RAM. Since AmigaDOS 1.1 doesn't support autoconFtguration, we also give you the software to conFigure memory in 1.1.
Any applications software which "looks1' for Fast RAM will 'Find" StarBoard2. And you'll Find that your applications run more efFiciently due to StarBoard2 on the bus.
A passing bus? Indeed!
What good is an Expansion Bus if it hits a dead end, as with some memory cards? Not much, we think -that’s why we carefully and compatibly passed through the bus so you could attach other devices onto your Amiga (including another StarBoard2, of course!).
The sum of the parts...
A really nice feature of the StarBoard2 system is that you can buy exactly what you need now without closing off your options for future exapansion. You can even buy a Ok StarBoard2 (with a one megabyte capacity) and populate it with your own RAM (commonly available 256k by 1 by 150ns memory chips). When you add StarBoard2 to your Amiga you have a powerful hardware combination, superior to any single-user micro on the market. See your Authorized Amiga Dealer today and ask for StarBoard2
SUGGESTED RETAIL PRICING:
Star8oard2, 0k (1 meg space):
$ 349 $ 395 $ 495 $ 595 $ 879 $ 959 $ 99 $ 99
StarBoard2, 0k (2 meg space):
StarBoard2, 512k (1 meg space):
StarBoard2, 1 meg (1 meg space)
StarBoard2. 2 megs installed:
StarBoard2, 2 megs & MultiFunction:
Upper Deck, 0k (1 meg space):
MulliFunclion Module: also available:
Standard 256k memory card:
$ 129 $ 1495 $ 50
MAS-Drive20, 20 meg harddisk:
MouseTime, mouseport clock:
IFF CONVERSION ROUTINES
?Convert from any Resolution to any other Resolution ?Change Hold and Modify to LO-RES ?Change LO-RES to Hold and Modify ?Reduce or Expand Number of Bitplanes ?Bar Chart of Color Register Usage ?Manually or Automatically Reduce to
any Number of Colors in a Picture ?Quickly Merge Pixels of One Color into another Color ?Sort Colors by Number of Pixels or Color Intensity ?Generalized Palette Controls ?Map or Enhance Edges ?Filter Stray Pixels ?Great for Getting More Pictures on a Disk, Special Effects, or Eliminating Unnecessary Dithering In Digitized Pictures Requires 512K RAM
$ 27 + $ 2 shipping and handling (VA residents add sales tax)
EAGLE TREE SOFTWARE 500 Wythe St.
Hopewell, VA 23860
(804) 452-0623
Circle 193 on Reader Service card.
Presents The finest Studio Quality Sound Libraries for:
¦ Deluxe Music
• Soundscape
• Music Studio
Add professional quality and dimension to your Amiga. Our sounds are unsurpassed in versatility, integrity and variety. For composers,over 30 sounds per disk,Vols 1,2,3 • for each.
Other disks:
B3 organ; steel drums; real brass
Please specify program & choice SEND- $ 18.50 per disk to:
WAVETABLE TECH 1647 WILLOW PASS RD. SUITE 267 CONCORD, CA 94520
Soundscape,flua icStud io,DeluxeHus ic trademarks of MimetiC3,Retiaision and Eiectnonic Arts
FOR 1=0 TO 15 12=1+16
FOR J=] TO 3 : SWAP P(J , I),P(J,12) : NEXT J PALETTE I2,P(1,I2) 15!,P(2,I2) 15!,P(3,T2) 15! NEXT I
S WIT C H = - S VIT C H
IF SWITCIU-1 THEN MENU 2,1,1,"LOWER PALETTE"
IF SWITCH =1 THEN MENU 2,1,1,"UPPER PALETTE" RETURN
SWAPCOL: 'exchange two colors
LOCATE 3,2 : PRINT "SELECT COLOR TO BE SWAPPED" GOSUB SELECT
FOR .1=1 TO 3 : SWAP P(J , COL ) , P J , 12 ) : NEXT J PALETTE COL,P(1fCOLJ l5!,P(2,C0L) 15!,P(3,COL) 15! PALETTE I2,P(1,I2) 15!,P(2,I2) 15!,P(3,I2) 15! LOCATE 3,2 : PRINT STRINGS(26," ");
RETURN
SPREAD: LOG AT GOSUB ISTEP R! =12 FOR J FOR I FOR PAL NEXT LOG AT RET UR
nterpolate between two colors
1 i
E 3 SE = 1
- CO = 1 = C0 J = ETT I
E 3 N
,2 : PRINT "SELECT COLOR FOR SPREADING"
LECT
: IF I2CC0L THEN ISTEP=-1 L : IF R!=0 THEN RETURN
TO 3 : RGBS!(J)=(P(J,12)-P(J,COL)) R1 : NEXT J L+TSTEP TO I2-ISTEP STEP ISTEP
1 TO 3 : P(J,I)-P(J,COL)+RGBS!(J)*(I-COL) : NEXT J E I,P(1,I) 15!,P(2,I) 15!,P(3,I) 15!
,2 : PRINT STRINGS(26," ");
COPYCOL: 'copy one color to another
LOCATE 3,2 PRINT "SELECT COLOR FOR COPYING"
GOSUB SELECT
FOR J=l TO 3 : P(J,12)=P(J,COL). : NEXT J PALETTE I 2 , P(1,12) 15!,P(2,12) 15! ,P(3,I2) 15!
LOCATE 3,2 : PRINT STRINGS ( 26 ,11 " ) ;
RETURN
MIX C O L: 'mix two colors
LOCATE 3,2 : PRINT "SELECT OTHER COLOR"
GOSUB SELECT
FOR J=1 TO 3 : P(J ,COL) = (P(J,COL)+P(J,12)) 2 : NEXT J PALETTE COL,P(1,COL) 15!,P(2,COL) 15!,P(3,COL) 15!
LOCATE 3,2 : PRINT STR1NGS(26," ");
RETURN
CHBRIGHT: 'change the brightness of a color
LOCATE 3,2 : PRINT "PRESS ANY TWO KEYS TO CHANGE"
M A X = 100 FOR 1=1 TO 3
RGB(I) = P (I ,COL)
IF RGB(T)>MAX THEN TMAX=I : MAX = RGB I)
NEXT T
IF M A X = 0 THEN GOTO CHEND
FOR 1=1 TO 3 : RGBS!(I)=RGB(I) MAX : NEXT I I0FF=0 : A$ ="" : BS=""
CHLOOP:
C S = IN K E Y S
IF C$ ="" THEN GOTO CHLOOP IF A $ = "" THEN A $ = C $
IF B$ = THEN B$ = C$
TF A$ = B$ THEN B$ = ""
IS T E P = 0
IF C $ = A $ THEN ISTEP = -1 IF C$ = B$ THEN ISTEP=1 IF ISTEP = 0 THEN GOTO CHEND 10 F F = 10 F F +1 S T E P FOR 1=1 TO 3
RGBN I)=RGB(I)+IOFF*RGBS!(I)
IF RGBN(I)>15 THEN RGBN(I)=15 IF RGBN(I) 0 THEN RGBN(T)=0 NEXT I
PALETTE COL , RGBN( 1 ) 1 5 ! , RGBN ( 2 ) 1 5 ! , RGBN ( 3) 1 5 ! Listing continued on p. 78.
$ 25,000
DATAMAT A PPLIGVTIONS CONTEST
(THE NO CODING NO PROGRAMMING RELATIONAL DATABASE)
oin us in our first ever contest to find the best application designed by you, the users of DATAMAT1'1 RELATIONAL DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM.
Prizes
One Grand Prize ...$ 10,000.00
One First Prize .....$ 5,000.00
Ten Second Prizes ..$ 1,000.00 each
Entries may win on any one of the following criteria: Creativity-
Utility of Application Completeness of Application or Clarity of Documentation
r
The Rules Are Simple:
1. All entries must be postmarked by May 4th 1987.
2. Each entry must be submitted separately with a completed entry form, application disk and documentation.
3. All entries must be made on Version 1.02 or later of DATAMAT™ AMIGA-DOS or MS-DOS. Free up-grades will be provided upon request to registered owners of earlier AMIGA™ Versions of DATAMAT™
4. No purchase necessarv entrant need not own or buy DATAMAT.™
5. No entry may be copyrighted.
6. All entries will be judged by outside independent reviewers. The winners will be announced by August 31, 1987.
7. Employees or family members of employees of TRANSTIME TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION are not eligible to enter.
8. ALL WINNING ENTRIES BECOME THE SOLE AND EXCLUSIVE PROPERLY OF TRANSTIME TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION TO USE IN ANY WAY TRANSTIME TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION SEES FIT.
9. Non-winning entries will not be returned to the submittor.
Contest winners will be notified by registered mail. A list of winners will be sent upon receipt of request and a self- addressed, stamped envelope.
Grand and First Prizes will be awarded at Fall 1987 Comdex. Transtime Technologies Corporation will pay the hotel and round trip transportation costs to Comdex for the Grand and First Prize winners or their representative.
Send the completed entry form, application disk and documentation to:
DATAMAT™ CONTEST Suite 217
3380 Sheridan Drive Amherst, New York 14226
F
DATAMA'I “ i' .i ii.nlrm.iiL nl li.uiMimr Ctirpur.iiion.
AMIGA is ,i irutU-murJt of Commodore Amiga ImciifKiraird MS DOS is .i ir.nU-m.iik of Microsoft Corpor.itiun.
Entry form
I have read and understood the contest rules and agree to them.
I am submitting my entry on DATAMAT™:
A-200 ____MX-200_Serial _
A-300_MX-300 __ . _Scrial _
I AGREE THAT SHOULD MY ENTRY WIN. MY ENTRY SHALL BECOME THE SOLE AND EXCLUSIVE PROPERTY OF TRANSTIME TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION.
I am the owner of the application and documentation that I am submitting. I acknowledge receipt of a copy of the contest rules. I understand TRANSTIME TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION will not return my entry to me,
I have not copyrighted this material.
My application is:_
Signature: _____
Name: __ ___
Street Address:_ ,
City, State. Zip:_
)_
Area Code, Phone(
DATAMAT™ is now available for AMIGA-DOS and MS-DOS.
For Your Nearest Authorized Dealer or to Order Direct Call (outside N.Y. State) 1-800-822-7701 (inside N.Y. State) 716-874-2010
TRANSTIME
TECHNOLOGIES
CORPORATION
810 Sheridan Drive Tonawanda, NY 14150
(716) 874-2010
A high performance programming environment designed specifically for the Amiga1*4
Multi - Forth™ for the Amiga
FOR J = 1 TO 3 : P(J, COL)=RGBN J) : NEXT J GOSUB ALLC0L0R FOR 1=1 TO 100 : NEXT 1 GOTO CHL00P CHEND:
LOCATE 3,2 : PRINT STRINGS(28 ," "); RETURN
SELECT: ’select second color
WHILE MOUSE(0)01 : WEND 12 = (MOUS E(1)-15) 10+16 RETURN
Multi-Forth is a new language which was designed to unleash the full power of the Amiga. Multi- Forth provides complete access to all Amiga libraries including Intuition. It compiles standalone applications in seconds (other languages t picalh lake several minutes). There are no royalties and no "levels." Csl pros ides the best support of any computer language vendor, including Csl technical hoi line, our own CompuServe net fC.O FORTIIj. And comprehensive documentation Programming the Amiga is interactive and fun with Multi-Forth. Contact us for a technical data sheet with the complete list of Multi-Forth's features.
e* f m AW
EXTTPALETTE: ’exit
MENU RESET WINDOW CLOSE 2 SCREEN CLOSE 2 END
INITPALETTE: ’initialize color palette PALETTE 6 , 1 ! , 1 ! , I !
PALETTE 7,1!,0!,0!
PALETTE 8,0!,1!,0!
PALETTE 9,0! ,0! , 1 !
C0L=16
FOR 1=0 TO 31
FOR J=1 TO 3 : P(J, T ) = I MOD 16 : NEXT J IF I>15 THEN PALETTE I,P( 1 ,1) 15! ,P(2,1) 15! ,P(3 ,1) 15 ! NEXT I
GOSUB ALLCOLOR RETURN
f rom program
INITMENU: MENU 1 MENU 1 MENU 1 MENU 1 MENU 2 MENU 2 S WIT C H =
4701 Randolph Road, Suite 12 1-S00-FORTHOK
Rockville, MD 20352 in MD (301) O«4-02b2
ArnlJj IS 41 tna.iJtTn.lTk of Conimi.li ift-Amiga. I'm.
Multl-portK is .1 Ituiltmjtk ¦•f 'ttalltc S illil jialls. Itlk
Circle 60 on Reader Service card.
MENU
MENU
MENU
MENU
MENU
MENU
MENU
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
NEXT I
Hors d’oeuvres
Unique applications, tips
and stuff
You may be using your Amiga at work, at home, or in the back seat of your car. But somehow you'll be using it in a unique way. You will discover things that will let you do something faster, easier or more elegantly.
AmgaWorld would like to share those shortcuts, ideas, things to avoid, things to try, etc., with everyone, and we’ll reward you with a colorful, appetizing, official AmigaWorld T-shirt. (Just remember to tell us your size.)
Send it in, no matter how outrageous, clever, humorous or bizarre. We will read anything, but we won't return it, so keep a copy for yourself. In cases of duplication, T-shirts are awarded on a first come, first serve basis.
So. Put on your thinking berets and rush those suggestions to:
Hors d’oeuvres AmigaWorld editorial 80 Elm Street Peterborough, NH 03458
MIX: ’display selected color
PALETTE COL,P(1,COL) 15! ,P(2 , COL) 15! ,P(3,COL) 15!
PALETTE 10,(15-P(1 , COL)) 15! ,(15-P(2,COL)) 15 ! , (15-P(3,COL )) 1 5!
LINE (180,30)-(240,80),C0L,BF
RETURN
RED: 'adjust red color gauge
LINE (10,30) (170,40),7,BF X=10*P(1,COL)+10 LINE (X , 30) ( 10 + X,40),6,BF RETURN
GREEN: 'adjust green color gauge
LINE (10,50)-(170,60),8,BF X=10*P(2,COL)+10 LINE (X , 50 )-(10+X,60),6,BF RETURN
BLUE: ’adjust blue color gauge
LINE (10,70)-(170,80),9»BF X=10*P(3,C0L)+10 LINE (X , 70 ) -( 10 + X,80),6,BF RETURN
ALLCOLOR: ’repaint palette
GOSUB RED : GOSUB GREEN : GOSUB BLUE : GOSUB MIX FOR 1=0 TO 15 : LINE (10+1*10,1)-(20+I*10,10),I+16,BF LINE (10+(COL-16)*10,1)-(20+(COL-16)*10,10),10,B RETURN
initialize menus 0, 1 ’STORE"
1 ,1 ’SAVE COLOR TABLE"
2. 1 'LOAD COLOR TABLE"
3. 1 'SAVE SUBROUTINE"
0,1 ’SPECIALS"
1. 1,"LOWER PALETTE"
-1
2, 1 'SWAP COLOR"
3. 1 'SPREAD COLOR"
4. 1, "COPY COLOR"
5, 1 ’MIX COLORS"
6. 1,"CHANGE BRIGHTNESS" 0, 1 ’ACTIONS"
1 , 1 ’EXIT PROGRAM"
RETURN
20-Meg
SCSI Hard Drive s999
95
Full AutoConfig
Full Pass-Through out of Amiga expansion port
Controller Supports 7 additional devices
Internal Power Supply
Faster than any comparably-priced drive
Circle 59 on Reader Service card
Create
your own
hard drive
system
Buy Components Separately
s 7QQ95
Hard Drive only I J J
299
95
Controller
JetSet
Hmeh
T inama,
Amiga Laser Printing Software s6995
Works with Hewlett Packard LaserJet or compatible laser printer
TM
Hundreds of Fonts available (starter typeface included)
Works with Textcraft™ & Scribble™
JetSet Fonts
s4995 to s9995
Complete Typeface in each package e.g. italic, bold italic, bold, demi-bold, regular in variety of sizes)
Selection Includes.. .Times ¦ Triumvirate ITC Souvenir ¦ Old English ¦ Unical Commercial Script ¦ Dom Casual ITC Benguiat Bold ¦ Broadway Globe Gothic Outline ¦ Borders Symbols ¦ ITC Dingbats ITC Souvenir Greek Math ITC Times Greek Math. And many, many more.
Full AutoConfig Compatibility
Works with all popular Amiga software
aMEGA
Board *549
95
Million Bytes of RAM
Pass-Through for future expansion 6-Month parts & labor warranty
Available NOW at Amiga Dealers!
C Ltd. 723 East Skinner Wichita, KS 67211 (316) 267-6321
Reviews
Defender of the Crown
Don your chainmail and prepare to ride. The kingdom’s safety is in your hands.
Looking for a little adventure in vour life? Try Defender of the Crown, a combination strategy, arcade, role-playing game that takes you back to the time of stouthearted knights and fair maidens. Defender of the Crown is the first in a series of “movie-like” games from Master Designer Software that combine traditional computer-game elements with plot ancl characters. As a story and a strategy game, Defender of the Crown succeeds wonderfully; it only falters in its arcade sequences.
The game begins with the death of King Richard I. The kingdom is divided between six knights three Saxons and three Normans. As one of those Saxon knights, your task is to unify the country by conquest and expel the Norman invaders.
You do have help: Robin of Lock- sley better known as Robin Hood -has pledged to come to your assistance three times in your quest. His aid will be invaluable as the game progresses.
Defending the Crown
England is divided into 18 territories. Six are the home territories of the original knights; the remainder arc ripe for conquest. Conquering a territory gives you the allegiance of the vassals who live there and a regular income that you can use to build your army. Conquering all 18 territories wins the game and brings peace to the land.
Each turn in Defender of the Crown represents one month. After the computer adds your current income to your treasury, you choose vour plan of action for that turn. You can hold a jousting tournament to win land or fame, raid an opposing castle for treasure, seek conquest, build your army or read the map. You can access the last two options as often as you wish. 'Hie first three, however, are exclusive options you can only choose one per turn. T hough you can use the conquest option to move your army between territories you already own without ending your turn, you can only conquer one territory per "month.” Conquering territories is the prime objective of Defender of the Crown, and in this aspect, the game plays a lot like Risk, the strategy board-game from Parker Brothers. 1 like this side of Defender of the Crown best for. Although the game mechanics are simple, you can employ some subtle strategies in acquiring land. My favorite is to sit back
and let the other players all controlled independently by the computer battle for a choice territory. After they've exhausted one another, my relatively fresh army has no problems taking over.
Jousts, Rescues and Raids
Although conquest is paramount, the outcome of Defender of the Crown is also dependent upon the arcade elements of the game. And. Although these sequences feature beautiful graphics and animation, they arc simplistic. For instance, if you elect to try to conquer an enemy castle, you will first have the opportunity to breach the castle walls with a catapult. After two or three attempts, you will be a catapult expert and bored by future breach attempts. A similar complaint holds for the rescue and raiding ?
N
'owhere has technology moved
so fast as in todays music studios.

Two years ago MIDI was just being established as an industry standard and the number of music software manufacturers could be counted on one hand. Over the same period music video has gone from experimental to an established art. Computers, video and music have joined to make musicians multi-media technology artists.
Now Mimetics and Commodore- Amiga move into the next generation technology by combining affordable computers, music and video into a single integrated system which stretches beyond music videos and creates a completely interactive real-time music
video environment which is totally

modular with expandability to
The Professional Software Source.
Ever)’ arena of the music performance arts.
Just imagine...one central machine that can score synthesizers, digital audio samples, drum machines, audio processors and mixing consoles for a complete soundtrack while it's also animating broad- castable color graphics mixed with live video, processed with special effects and edited into a final mu 11 i - med ia prod uct ion!
Mimetics1 SoundScape PRO MIDI Studio's unique modular design provides the power and flexibility necessary to connect and synchron - ize the various programs with internal and external music synthesis, SMPTE, video tape and processing systems. It, by itself, is the state- of-the-art music system. Com
bined with Amiga's video power, SoundScape gives you a completely new dimension in music and video prod uct io n en viron men ts.
See the next generation' possibilities for music and video, today, at your nearest Amiga music video dealer. Or contact Mimetics for more information.
See us at NAMM.
Nmncuci
CORPORATION
scenes, which require you to wield a sword. Once again, the controls available to you (moving the mouse and double-clicking the left button) don’t offer a wide-enough range of options to hold your interest.
Although the arcade controls are simplistic, they are important in developing the story line and on the outcome of the game. If you can manage to rescue a Saxon lady, she will (after a charming romantic interlude) become your wife and help you become a better leader. If you’re successful in raids and rescues, your men will look up to you and be better fighters. If you win a joust, you can win a territory outright. The interplay of the arcade and strategy elements in the game is excellent; I just wish that the arcade elements were more challenging.
King for the Day
While Defender of the Crown is not the First game I've played that has a movie-like plot (Karateka from Brodcrbund comes to mind), it is certainly the best game that successfully combines strategy, arcade and role- playing elements with a fun story line and beautiful graphics and sound. (The graphics, by the way, are the work of noted Amiga artist Jim Sachs.) Better yet, it is a game that doesn’t grow stale the first time vou win. It has its faults arcade aficiona-
J
dos should stay away but Defender of the Crown is a giant leap forward in computer game design. It is an intelligent piece of software that will appeal to people who like to think and have fun, all at the same time.
B. Ryan
Defender of the Crown Master Designer Software, Inc.
5743 Corsa Avenue Westlake Village, CA 91361 Distributed by Mindscape, Inc.
$ 49.95
512K required, 2nd disk drive optional
MAS-Drive20 20 Megabyte SCSI Hard Disk and Controller
Though it's cornered the hard drive market, the MAS-Drive20 isn’t strong enough to be the cornerstone.
Hard to believe, but it’s been over a year since the Amiga began shipping, and, at this writing, MicroBotics is the only company producing hard drives. True, you can still find some Tecmar drives floating around, and perhaps a few from The Micro Forge as well, but if you want to buy a hard drive from a company that is active in the Amiga market, you’ll either have to wait a little longer or you’ll have to buy a MAS-Drive20.
The MAS-Drive20 is a professional-looking unit. Twenty megabytes of storage are packed in an oblong box three inches high, seven inches wide, and nearly 15 inches
7 J
long. Unlike the Micro Forge Hard Disk (July August ’86, p. 92), the MAS-Drive20 is self contained; the SCSI (Small Computer System Interface) controller and power supply are inside the same unit that houses the drive. The MAS-Drive20 comes in a metal cabinet that is color coordinated with the Amiga. The front of the case sports the disk-access light. On the back there’s a power switch, a replaceable fuse, male and female D-25 parallel ports and a female D- 37 SCSI port. Only a power-indicator light is lacking.
Configuring the System
The MAS-Drive20 is easy to set up. Once you have it unpacked, attach it to the Amiga parallel port using the supplied cable, and attach your parallel printer to the MAS-Drive20. The software included with the drive configures your parallel port as a SCSI port. Normally, you can daisy-chain up to seven devices from a SCSI port. Although this feature has yet to be implemented with the MAS-Drive20, the necessary D-37 connector is present on the drive.
Getting your Amiga system software to recognize the MAS-Drive20 is more involved than setting up the hardware. The instructions provided, however, are very helpful. The important thing to remember is that the MAS-Drive20 will operate only under Version 1.2 of Kickstart and Workbench. Problems with the 1.1 port drivers make the drive unusable under the earlier operating system. Since it doesn’t use the expansion bus, the MAS-Drive20 is not an auto-config device: You have to run a program to mount the device on the system whenever you start up your Amiga.
After booting your Amiga with Workbench 1.2, execute die accompanying batch file to configure your system. The batch sequence replaces the standard Amiga parallel driver with one that allows the parallel port to double as a SCSI port, mounts the MAS-Drive on the system, and formats the drive. It also changes the startup-sequence of your Workbench disk so that the MAS- Drive will be mounted and recognized as the system disk whenever you boot up.
Although I had to replace the standard Amiga parallel driver with a custom driver,
I had no problems using my parallel printer, a Star Micronics NL-10, with the MAS-Drive20. Apparently, the custom parallel driver is a superset of the standard driver. The documentation does state, however, that you shouldn’t use the custom parallel driver without the MAS-Drive20, nor should you use the standard printer driver with the MAS-Drive20 attached. The former may result in gibberish for output; the latter may corrupt the hard disk.
I did have problems using Applied Visions’ FutureSound sound digitizer with the MAS-Drive20. FutureSound is a parallel device, so I daisy-chained it to the MAS- Drive20. Whenever I turned FutureSound on, however, the MAS-Drive stopped working. On the plus side, MAS-Drive20 worked perfectly with the auto-config memory devices that I tried (Alegra and aMEGA).
Slow But Steady
If I had one word to describe the performance of the MAS-Drive20, I would choose ?
?SPECIAL*
Amiga Computer, Monitor, 256K Expansion Module and 3.5 External Drive
STOP HERE
For Your Best Buys in Hardware and Software,
Amiga Computer
CALL FOR BEST PRICE
AMIGA products at your finger tips
SOFTWARE
Activision
Owner Disk ..
$ 26.96
1. Mean 18 ..
..,. $ 29.96
Micro League Baseball ....
$ 47.96
2. Borrowed Time
$ 30,34
Electronic Arts
3. Mimoshodow
... $ 30,34
Adv. Construction Kit .....
$ 28.50
4. Music Studio
.... $ 36.25
Archon .....
$ 28.50
5. Hacker .....
.... $ 35.96
Artie Fox ....
$ 28 50
Aegis
Deluxe Music
....Call
Aegis Animtor lmages
.... $ 89.00
Metascribe
.$ 68.00
Aegis Draw ....
.... S124.00
Metatools I ...
$ 55.96
Aegis Draw Plus .
.....$ 179,95
Metatools II ..
$ 55.96
Aegis Images .
... $ 54.00
Metascribe ..
..$ 68.00
Aegis Impact ...
.... S129.00
Deluxe Paint .
S 63.00
Aegis Artpak ...
.Call
Deluxe Print ..
.$ 63.00
Aegis Dough Clapps Word Tool......
.Call
Financial Cookbook ......
$ 35.63
Commodore Amiga Software
Golden Oldies ...
$ 24 94
Amiga Assembler ...
..., S 76.25
Marble Madness .
$ 35.00
Amiga Lisp ...
.... $ 157.94
Maxicomm ...
$ 35.63
Lattice LMK ...
.... $ 149.00
Max i desk ....
S 49.88
Lattrce Lse .....
.Call
Maxiplan ....
$ 106.63
Maclibrary .....
.Call
D. J. & L. Bird One on One
$ 28.50
dbe III Library ..
.Call
Seven Cities
$ 28 50
Mindscape
Skyfox ......
.$ 28.50
Amiga Tutor
Uyltima .....
$ 48.50
Brataccus .
$ 33 71
Instant Music .
....Call
Deja VU....
$ 33 71
Deluxe Paint II, ...
$ 119.95
Hailey Project ..
.... $ 30.34
Deluxe Paint Art & Utilities .
....Call
Keyboard Cadet
.... $ 26.96
Deluxe Printing ...
....Call
Ractor ..
... $ 30.34
Infocom
Defenders of The Crown ....
Microsystems SW
.... $ 39.95
Ballyhoo .....
Cutthroat ....
.$ 26.96
$ 26.96
Analyze
.... S 67.46
Deadline ....
$ 33.71
BBS-PC
S 69.00
Hitrhhikpm Guide
S 26 96
Online
. . $ 47.21
1 IIWNrfl II IipiwI «J UU'UU ..... i . .
Inchanter
$ 26 96
Organize ....
S 69.00
• 1 'V' W*I llvl • - . . -
Infidel .
. . - - - . , uv.vw
$ 33.71
Scribble
____S 69.00
Invisl Clues
The Crimson Crown .
. .. $ 29.96
A Mind Forever Voyage ...
$ 30.34
The Covated Mirror ..
.... S 26.21
Planetfall
S 26 96
Graphics! ......
.Call
Sea Stalker ..
$ 26.96
Micro League
Sourcerer ....
$ 30.34
General Managers ...
.Call
Spellbreaker
$ 33.71
JHM
Talking Coloring Book
CALL FOR PRICES ON ITEMS NOT LISTED
$ 33.71 $ 33.71 S 27.91 $ 26,96 S 26,96 S 26.96 $ 30.34 S 30.34
$ 131.25
$ 93,75 $ 75.00 S 56.25
$ 21.25
Starcross ...
Suspect____
Suspended
Wishbnnger
Witness____
Zork I......
Zork II.....
Zork III.....
ZIP Technology
VIP Professional .
Lattice
Make Utility.....
Screen Editor .,. Text Utilities.....
Specials of the Month
Modem
Special
• 300 1200 Baud
• OnLine software
• Cable
$ 199
JUKI 5510 with Color Kit
$ 439
PRINTERS
Epson
Juki
Xerox
DISKS
3. 5 Maxell DS DD .... 28 00
3. 5 3M 28,00
Maxall MD-2 ...16.00
5' , Elephant ..15.00
ACCESSORIES
Modems Cables Hard Drives Monitors
Memory Disk Holders Mcrel Morel Morel Morel
? Color Printers* Special
1 -800-423-7347
AMIGA is a trademark of Commodore-Amiga Inc. Prices subject to change
STAR FLITE *
P. 0. Box 685 Nitro, WV 25143
Telemarketing
“good,” In a normal configuration, the drive worked “first time, every time.”
The MAS-Drive20 is not blindingly fast. For instance, loading Preferences from the MAS-Drive20 was only slightly faster eight seconds versus nine than loading it from a floppy. In other comparisons, the hard drive did better. It took the MAS-Drive 20 seconds to copy a c directory (48 files and 435 blocks) to the RAM: disk: the same copy from a floppy took 50 seconds. Copying 1,225 blocks to RAM: took 126 seconds for the floppy; 53 for the hard drive. The MAS- Drive20 reads two- to two-and-a-half times faster than a floppy.
The MAS-Drive20 showed a greater advantage in writing to disk. Copying 438 blocks (49 files) from RAM: to the MAS- Drive20 took 30 seconds; it took 155 seconds to write the same material to a floppy. That’s a five-fold speed advantage for the MicroBotics’ entry not earth shattering, but respectable. The MAS- Drive20 isn't going to win any awards for speed, but it certainly outperforms floppies.
The Special Edition
The MAS*Drive20 I evaluated was a dealer developer model: It had the same hardware and basic software as the consumer model, but it lacked printed documentation and some utilities. Using the software and the limited documentation I did receive, I not only had the disk running in about an hour including 40 minutes of nothing but formatting but I was later able to easily partition the disk into three smaller, more manageable volumes. The ReadMe file documentation was clear and concise. With the commercial package, MicroBotics promises a backup utility, a park utility, a write-verify option and a surface-diagnostic utility.
Fifteen-hundred bucks is a lot to pay for a 20-megabyte hard disk, but, if you’ve got to have one, then you don’t have much choice. The MAS-Drive 20 is a solid, reliable system that uses a Seagate Technologies drive at its core. With the assumption that the utility software is as good as the rest of the system (an assumption I’ll test for the next issue), I think the MAS-Drive20 is a good, solid piece of work. I'd like it better if it were faster and or cheaper, and I don't particularly like having to keep disks with custom parallel drivers separate from regular disks. But, given that it exists, I'm not complaining too loudly.
B. Ryan
MAS-Drive20
20 Megabyte SCSI Hard Disk and
Controller
MicroBotics
PO Box 855115 Richardson, TX 78085 214 437-5330
SI,495.00
Requires Amiga Operating System Version 1.2
Logistix
This integrated package may offer something for everyone, but none of it is Amiga specific.
By Ted Salamone
Logistix, a high-end business product developed by Grafox of England and marketed by Progressive Peripherals 8c Software, integrates a spreadsheet, a database and graphics with a project planner time- sheet. This is unique considering the usual
• life lllKtn;* H*KS!4f tt4fr*l£
nature of such programs: spreadsheet, database, graphics and word processing or telecommunications. The timesheet makes Logistix more of a manager’s tool than its competition.
The program consists of two unprotected disks, a program master and an examples disk. Owners are advised to make copies. A dongle or key which plugs into the joystick port provides copy protection. Logistix runs only if it finds the key. Don't lose it, the manual warns, the key is irreplaceable.
Even though Grafox wants you to believe there’s no way around this one and only
key conundrum, there actually is. Dongles from other PP&S programs work fine.
First You Kick the Tires
Integrated programs are known for the limits placed on each module. Though somewhat true of Logistix, the program circumvents this by making heavy use of overlays in a 512K environment. With 1 MEG or more, overlays are eliminated and the processing speed picks up.
The spreadsheet runs 1,024 columns by 2,048 rows, sports average cursor movement capabilities and includes almost six dozen built-in functions. Advanced date, day, lookup and trig functions provide a glimpse of the power waiting to be unleashed.
The timesheet is a helpful resource planner. Users position manpower, materials, machinery and services over time to bring a job to completion within an allotted timeframe and budget. Rescheduling the components to reflect real life allows users more flexibility in planning and decision making. Knowing in advance the ramifications of missed deadlines and penalty charges, you can handle any team project effectively.
Grafox imbued Logistix with a cornucopia of graph types (two pie, two bar, line scatter GANTT and others), 10 fill patterns, 10 fonts, 10 line types, numerous color palette choices, 10 character sizes and 10 scat- tergram markers. You can open up to four graphs simultaneously, memory permitting.
The database routine allows vou to sort
J
on more than one key or column and to
r
extract, find and delete files. "Logistixi- callv” speaking, you can set up data tables and perform inquiries. If the need arises, you may import dBase (version not specified), 1-2*3, Supercalc, DIF, comma separated value (CSV) and text (ASCII) files.
Export is another story. While no procedure is available, it is possible to send saved formats (Logistix, CSV, DIF) via a hardwired configuration or modem.
Infinite Instructions
The user’s manual is impressive, both in its size and its thoroughness. A 50-page supplement explains the changes in version 1.1. The introduction briefly discusses each facet of the program and the user’s guide handles the rest, with the aid of appendices, an index and a glossary.
It is replete with working examples, references and crystal clear screen shots. Slash commands and operators are explained in detail.
However, once again the spec tor of MS- DOS intrudes. Logistix is a port from the
IBM PC. So, the manual actually refers to, and is identical to, the MS-DOS version. Therefore file paths are incorrect and non- Amiga keys arc continually referenced. This is confusing and counterproductive and needlessly prolongs the training period.
A mere three pages are devoted explicitly to the Amiga. One of them gives you the good news that Kickstart 1.1 crashes the system when low memory, approximately 25K or less, is encountered. Version 1.2 is supposed to correct this, even though the Beta 4 edition didn’t.
MctaScopC: The Debugger
Logistix also comes with a keyboard template, a simple affair with six of the F keys identified as to function. The others serve no purpose, though shifted F keys mimic their unshifted brethren. This is not documented.
The availability of on-line help is poorly documented, as well. FI calls for help. Nowhere does it say "Press HELP key.” Yet this works just fine, as does the “?” key.
Deeper Yet
The non-Amiga problem goes deeper than the manual. Betraying its humble origins, Logistix fails to support the mouse; nor does it know what a pull-down menu is. Lotus-like menus aren't even included; instead, slash commands, made famous by Visicalc, are the order of the day.
To get decent performance, eliminate overlays and reduce the chance of system crashes, Grafox recommends system memory of 1 MEG or more. This allows you to load one of the two other versions, providing higher resolution and more rows per screen in the process.
Logistix has the power to become the Amiga's 1-2-3 in sales. Unfortunately, it is buried beneath an MS-DOS facade and unrealistic memory demands.
The ability to create auto commands as well as the more traditional macros is overwhelming. Limited to 254 characters, Autos are automated command sequences tied to a particular key. Macros, as an Auto superset, are limited only by available memory. They reside in the worksheet and help tailor applications and operations.
While worksheets can be joined and graphs produced from database, spreadsheet or timesheet inputs, there is no hot- link facility to interactively update graphs as data changes are made.
Multitasking is supported, though it may only be a reality with 1 MEG or more. It is recommended that Logistix be loaded through CLI to spare some room for worksheets. As it now stands, the smallest ?
MetaScope gives you everything you've always wanted in an application program debugger:
• Memory Windows
Move through memory, display data or disassembled code live, freeze to preserve display and allow restoration.
• Other Windows
Status windows show register contents and program state with freeze and restore; symbol, hunk, and breakpoint windows list current definitions.
• Execution Control Breakpoints with repetition counts and conditional expressions; trace for all instructions or subroutine level, both single-step and continuous execution.
• Full Symbolic Capability
Read symbols from files, define new ones, use anywhere.
MetaSeribe:
The Editor
MetaSeribe has the features you need in a program editor:
• Full Mouse Support
Use for text selection, command menus, scrolling or use key equivalents when more convenient.
• Multiple Undo
Undo all text alterations, one at a time, to level limited only by available memory.
• Sophisticated Search Beplace Regular expressions, forward backward, full file or marked block.
• Multiple Windows
Work with different files or different portions of the same file at one time.
• Macro Programs
Lisp-like macro language lets you customize and extend the editor to meet your needs.
• Virtual Memory
Set the amount of data memory to be used, transparently edit files larger than memory.
• and Morel
Keystroke macros for repetitive text, copy between files, block copy paste delete, set tabs and margins, etc.
Metadigm products are designed to fully utilize the capabilities of the Amiga ™ in helping you develop your programs. If you're programming the Amiga, you can't afford to be without them.
• Powerful Expression Evaluation Use extended operator set including relationals, all assembler number formats.
• Direct to Memory Assembler Enter instruction statements for direct conversion to code in memory.
• and More!
Mouse support for value selection and command menus, log file for operations and displays, modify search fill memory, etc.
MctaTools I
A comprehensive set of tools to aid your programming (full C source included):
• Make
Program maintenance utility,
• Grep
Sophisticated pattern matcher.
• Diff
Source file compare.
• Filter
Text file filter.
• Comp
Simple file compare.
• Dump
File dump utility.
• Whereis
DosDisH
A program that lets you access PC-DOS MS-DOS™ diskettes on your Amiga, Use it to list file information and copy files between the PC-DOS MS-DOS diskettes and Amiga diskettes or devices. Patterns can be used for file names, and you can even operate on all files in a directory at one time. A copy option converts source file line-end sequences as the copy is performed.
Metadi§rp> Ipc.
19762 MacArthur Blvd. Suite 300 Irvine, CA 92715
(714) 955-2555
MetaScope
$ 95.00
MetaSeribe
$ 85.00
MetaTools
(California residents add 6% sales tax). Visa MasterCard accepted.
$ 69,95
DosDisk
$ 49.95
Dealer Inquiries Welcome
Amiga is a trademark of Commodore-Amiga Inc. MS-DOS is a trademark of Microsoft. Incorporated
version occupies 417K, leaving a mere 95K free.
All basic spreadsheet and database functions arc included. Logistix more than fills the bill where features are concerned, but this completeness actually causes problems.
Power With a Price
The spreadsheet operates in a straightforward. If antiquated, manner (Visicalc interface). The graphic capabilties are amazing for an integrated package of this complexity. Unfortunately, a lot of work is needed to harness their power.
Defining a chart is a near Neanderthal task, first you specify the chart type, then instead of setting ranges, you must reenter the chart type command on every data line. Labels, fonts, size and all other graph attributes are set through worksheet commands. Even if most of this can be automated through macros, the whole setup is a mindless exercise. A few clicks on icon choices followed by range designation could handle the entire task in much less time, regardless of macros.
It is hard to get excited about Logistix on a 512K machine. Even considering fewer disk accesses and other benefits of more RAM, Logistix falls short because it does not follow the unique Amiga interface. Software should take advantage of machine-specific functions.
On the other hand, the program is bulletproof. Its error trapping is exemplary; the error messages even make sense. Only the operating system is buggy. The developers managed to provide a surprisingly complete set of programs, not an easy task in such a heavy-duty integrated package.
Tweaking Is the Key
Overall, Logistix 1.1 is a good first step. An update addressing the MS-DOS problem among others would make Logistix one of the hottest selling Amiga programs on either side of the Atlantic.
As much as I felt I should like this program. There are too many performance penalties and too few Amiga incentives to make it really effective. But. As an IBM program it must reallv shine.
J
Logistix
Progressive Peripherals & Software
464 Kalamath
Denver. CO 80204
303 825-4144
$ 249.95
Requires 512K
Money Mentor PAR Home 1 PHASAR Financial Manager 2 + 2 Home Management
System
A comparison review of four personal financial management programs.
By Peggy Herrington
Personal financial management programs are based on business accounting procedures. Beyond the fact that you can get the same general findings from a spreadsheet program (provided you know how to set it up), personal financial programs should be easier to learn and use and their commands easier to remember because they are also for people unacquainted with business accounting. They are less elaborate, but more flexible than spreadsheets, because most of us don’t need to account for every penny that crosses our palms.
1 used the personal financial management programs covered in this comparative review to track my household finances from the start of 1986. Besides having the best documented "books’* west of Foi l Knox and finding that I’m further in debt than John Henry, here’s what I discovered in the process.
PHASAR
My hands-down favorite was PHASAR from Marksman Technology. It’s fast and easy to use and there are no account numbers to fool with. A full-screen editor means entries and changes are easy to accomplish and the program makes intelligent guesses based on previous entries, which you can easily defeat if necessary. It has an optional onscreen calculator and lets you combine various income and expense accounts to analyze standings in discrete areas (a part-time business, for example), even though all your transactions are entered in one program
module so you can determine vour overall

standing. It has a phone number listing and reminds you of special occasions on startup. Loan comparisons and savings account analysis arc available and it uses the mouse and pull-down menus to great advantage. It also incorporates a special tax module which, among other things, will project ?
At Last! An Electronic Magazine for the Amiga® Computer!
Introducing. . .
Software Digest
a New Dimension in Computer Magazines the Magazine on Floppy Disk Imagine . . . The convenience of having the highest-quality public domain programs delivered to you each month. Imagine . . . The power of running the best user supported software on your Amiga any time. And Imagine . . . The opportunity and fun of owning the most versatile software library for your Amiga.
*
A service that delivers all this convenience, productivity, opportunity, and fun is finally possible and is finally HERE! One floppy disk per month, full of the best public domain programs, will be delivered to your door. And best of all, the subscription fee is just about the cost of the blank disks! In addition to the select software, Software Digest also offers a wide range of valuable information and personal computing services. As an Amiga user, you owe yourself a look into the great advantage of this powerful new medium. Subscribe to Software Digest TODAY and discover how the power of the electronic magazine can expand the way you use your Amiga!
Dealer and newsstand inquiries welcomed. All advertising inquiries should be directed to Software Digest, Advertising Service, MIT Branch P.O. Box 315, Cambridge, MA 02139. Contributions of manuscripts, artwork, electronic images, public domain and user supported software are welcomed. Please direct all contributions to Software Digest Editorial Offices, MIT Branch P.O. Box 315, Cambridge, MA 02139.
Software Digest Subscription Form
YES, I would like to order. . .
? The most current issue of Software Digest
S8.95 plus SI.00 for postage and handling.
? A half-year subscription, 6 issues ($ 6.95 per issue)
S41.7Q plus S6.00 for postage and handling.
? A full-year subscription, 12 issues (14.95 per issue)
S59.40 plus S12.00 for postage and handling.
Please print.
Address
Please make check payable to Software Digest and mail it, along with this subscription form, to Software Digest, Subscription Service, MIT Branch P.O. Box 315, Cambridge, MA 02139. This special introductory charter offer is valid only until March 31, 1987. Subscription rates are subject to changes after this date. Please allow four to six weeks for delivery.
Software Digest for the Macintosh coming soon.
Amiga is a registered trademark of Commodore-Amiga, Inc. Macintosh is a trademark of Apple Computer Inc.
Circle 147 on Reader Service card.
Personal Financial Management Software Features
PHASAR
2 + 2
PAR Home
Money Mentor
Suggested retail price
$ 89.95
$ 99
$ 69
$ 95.95
Version reviewed
2. 10
2. 26
1st
1. 3
Uses special Amiga features
Yes
No
Some
Some
Automates repetitious entries
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Processes groups of entries
No
Yes
No
No
Tracks payroll taxes
Yes
No
No
No
Does profit and loss statements
Yes
No
No
Yes
Does net worth statements
Yes
No
No
No
Helps reconcile bank statements
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Prints checks
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Tracks non-cash expenses
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Printer output to disk files
Yes
Yes
No
No
Multitasks with other programs
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
APL. 68000
for the Amiga
APL. 68000 is a highly optimized 68000 Assembler based APL Interpreter which takes full advantage of the Amiga features including user'defined pull-down menus with Dialog and Alert boxes. All this, along with a complete interface to Amigagraphics,are the reasons that APL. 68000 on the Amiga sets the industry standard for performance and capabilities.
SPENCER OPGA,'jrorj'
P. O. Box 248 Westwood, N .J. 07675
(201) 666-601 1
your income taxes so you don’t get surprised on April 15th.
2 + 2 Home Management System
Olamic's 2 + 2 takes a more traditional approach. Because of this, and since it doesn’t employ pull-down menus or the mouse, it is harder to use than PHASAR. It does use account numbers and requires that you set up accounts in a separate area before you can enter expenses, but it's a good, solid program and is the only one that offers password security and will process repetitive groups of payments. The manual is very good with a reference section arranged in program menu order and cross-referenced to the tutorial. You can record things that don’t affect cash balances and print mailing labels or envelopes (and special checks, although 1 didn’t find it very practical; of the four, only PHASAR will not do this). It also has separate phone directory, daily appointment and calendar modules. If you have some knowledge of accounting and are pretty well organized, you’re more likely to like 2 + 2.
PAR Home 1
PAR Home 1 from PAR Software is relatively weak in its accounting section and in
that respect suffers by comparison with the other programs mentioned here. It has 19 fixed expense accounts (you can determine your own in the other programs), and although you can enter up to 12 checking accounts, expenses and budgets for each account are recorded and analyzed separately from the others. On the strong side, PAR Home 1 offers manv financial analysis
modules that the others don’t, and in that respect, is more comparable to though less extensive than Electronic Arts’ Financial Cookbook. Included are such things as loan amortization, asset appreciation, investment analysis (annuities, IRA versus CD, college investment and life insurance planners) and a Spendaholic’s Exam that will comment on your economic character, or lack thereof. Unfortunately, the program is rather sluggish in response because it was written in AbasiC.
Money Mentor
I was disappointed with Sedona Software’s Money Mentor. It is visually attractive and easy (if slow) to use, w'ith on-screen menus and audible prompts. One of it’s strongest features is a window that automates entries by letting you scroll through previously entered names, dates and accounts, type the first letter or two and then click the mouse pointer on the one you're after. These “smart scrolls” are nifty. But during a print operation, I adjusted my printer and found I couldn’t get to a requestor box behind the program window (although I’d been able to previously with Amiga-N and -M). I had no choice but to bomb out of the program, and doing that destroyed all my entries; they were wiped from the disk. Believe these people when they tell you to make backups of your data disks! Money Mentor is being reprogrammed in Modula 2 (from Amiga Basic) and upgrades will be available to registered owners for a small fee. I have hopes for the revision because I liked the program’s fundamental design. In fact, if it hadn't been for that data loss, I would recommend Money Mentor for new computer ?
ITS FINALLY hcKc! IN I KUUULINU Ihfc 1 01 | W
AmigaWorld
ISSUE
SPECIAL
Hurry! Limited Edition!
The technical and tutorial reference you've been asking for! Packed with graphics programming hints and tips system how-to's and more of everything you've come to depend on in AMIGAWORLD. Only $ 3.951
Whether you’re a novice or an experienced Amiga user, the more you know about today’s most advanced PC, the more creative you can be with it.
To realize the full promise of your Amiga, this clearly written Special Issue is a “must have.” You’ll use its helpful articles and tutorials to save time, be more productive, and do more with your machine. This is an issue to refer to again and again.
Hurry! The 1987 AmigaWorld Special Issue is sure to sell out in a matter of days, and will not be reprinted. Reserve copies now for yourself and your associates. Here’s what’s inside
• Amiga tips and techniques. Time-saving tips that help you get the most out of your hardware and software.
• Event programming in Amiga BASIC. How to get your Amiga BASIC programs to respond to mouse clicks, key presses, error conditions, collisions, and other events.
• Hardcopy Amiga images. How to capture, print, photograph, and videotape Amiga images.
• Advanced CLI. How to get the most out of CLI.
• Inside IFF. How pictures, music, and text are stored in AmigaDOS files and how you can access them from C or BASIC.
• Using the Icon editor. A step-by-step tutorial on creating custom icons for your Workbench.
• Programming the EXEC. How to program the Amiga multitasking executive.
• Beginner’s guide. The basics on how to backup disks, copy files, run programs, and more.
FREE with each Special Issue! This 16-page pull- out quick reference guide eliminates searching through manuals. Use it to look up AmigaDOS syntax. Printer control codes. Memory maps. Hardware locations. Pin-outs for parallel, serial and RGB ports and expansion bus. Includes ASCII chart. Block diagram. BASIC commands. Glossary. All in one handy, bound booklet to put on your reference shelf yours FREE with your AmigaWorld Special Issue!
Fit-
Special Issue, with my FREE pull-out Programming and Technical Refci Guide. 1 am enclosing S -95 for each copy that 1 order.
?
?
Check enclosed
VISA
Card
Exp. Dai
Signature
Name
Address
Citv
1
State
Canada it Mexico S-t.50. Foreign Surface S5.50. LS funds drawn on US ha Airmail $ 9.50. Orders will begin shipping in May 1987.
CW COMMUNICATIONS PETERBOROUGH 80 Elm St., Peterborough, NH 03458
Amiga is a registered trademark of Commodore Business Machines, Inc.
users with relatively straightforward financial situations.
Do’s And Don’ts
All these programs use single-entry (as opposed to double-entry) accounting methods and are interactive in that data entered in one module is automatically incorporated into others (except for the calendar and address phone listings and PAR Home’s analysis and net worth statement). All allow multiple checking and credit accounts and come in sturdy 3-ring plastic binders with good documentation, although again, I liked PHASAR’s best. None of the programs are copy-protected. Each will let you enter budgets, but not one of them even hints at cash flow analysis (so you can gauge if you’ll have sufficient funds to pay things on time), and I think there are enough people who don't get regular paychecks to warrant this feature. I used RS Data System’s 2- Megabyte Expansion RAM board to test whether these programs would multitask. See the chart for the results of those findings and some other comparisons.
Money Mentor Sedona Software
11844 Rancho Bernardo Road, Suite 20 San Diego, CA 92128-9901 619 451-0151 $ 95.95
No special requirements
PAR Home 1: Home Financial Management PAR Software Inc.
PO Box 1089 Vancouver, WA 98666 206 695-1368 S69
Requires 512K
PHASAR Financial Manager Marksman Technology Inc.
Route 5, Box 221A Santa Fe, NM 87501 505 455-2681 $ 89.95
Requires 512K
2+2 Home Management System Olamic Systems Corp.
141 West Jackson Blvd.
Chicago, IL 60604
312 786-1410
$ 99
Requires 512K
Gridiron!
So, you think you can call the plays better than the pros? Here’s your chance to prove it!
Take an Amiga computer, add a dash of Newton’s Laws of Motion, combine these with a generous helping of the NFL rule- book and the result is Gridiron!, an absorb ing, meaty simulation of NFL football. Unlike many other computer games, Gridiron! Has staying power; It doesn’t get stale after a couple of days.
Gridiron! Is a one- or two-player game. You battle the computer, or, in the two- player version, your opponent uses a second mouse or joystick. There are five levels of play: practice, beginner, intermediate, advanced and pro. The speed and “intelligence” of your computer opponents increase with each level.
Gridiron! Is a combination strategy and action game. Whether you’re on offense or defense, you can choose one of 20 plays to throw at your opponent. The plays detail the role of each player on the field. On offense, for instance, some players will have a blocking assignment while others will run specific pass routes. Defensive players can go after the ball carrier, pcrsue laterally, or cover a man or a zone.
If you don't like a particular play, or if you want to design an entirely new offense or defense, the play creation utility requires a minimum of fuss. You can also change the capabilities and physical attributes of individual players.
Hike
Once a play begins, you control one of your players with a mouse or joystick. On
offense, you’re always the ball carrier: You start out controlling the quarterback. If the quarterback passes or hands off, you control the player who receives the ball.
On defense, you control the free safety by default. You can change the default on any play, however, by clicking on the player you want to control before the ball is snapped. If, for instance, you think that the offense is going to run a play to the strong side, you could get closer to the action by clicking on the safety or linebacker on that side.
Not only do the players obey the laws of football: they also observe the Laws of Motion. Players can’t “stop on a dime” or change direction instantaneously. The computer simulates the effects of gravity and inertia when it moves the players on the Field. This makes Gridiron! A very convincing simulation of football. You also have the option of introducing random events into the game. Gridiron! Lets you specify if you want random penalties and fumbles.
Success with Gridiron! Takes a combination of good play calling and near-flawless execution. Before a play begins, you have to determine your best offensive or defensive play, based upon time remaining, score, down and yards-to-go and field position. Once the ball is snapped, you have to read the play as it develops and execute accordingly. For instance, if you see a reverse developing in your opponent’s backfield, you can get your defender into position to break it up. On offense, you can read how the defense is covering your receivers and throw away from the coverage, just as you would in an actual football game.
The graphics used with Gridiron! Are simple but not crude. Each player is represented by a colored circle; the Field is an overhead view of an NFL playing field. (Looks like artificial turf to me.) I’ve seen flashier games than Gridiron!, but the simplicity of the graphics doesn't detract from the game. The digitized sounds used in the game add to the sense of realism.
But Where’s John Madden?
Gridiron! Is an excellent physical simulation of an idealized NFL game. And, since it also features random events, it unfolds very much like a real football game. The only thing missing from Gridiron! Are teams of players that reflect the capabilities of actual NFL rosters. (I'm told this will be included in a future release.) Regardless, Gridiron! Is the best game I’ve played on my Amiga.
B. Ryan
Gridiron!
Bethesda Sofhvorks 9208 Burning Tree Rd. Bethesda, MD 20817 800 992-4009 $ 69.95
No special requirements.
Gold Spell Spelling Checker 8c Corrector
Do you write with one hand on the dictionary and the other on the keyboard? Do the words “spelling bee’' make you break out in a cold sweat? If so, read on. . .
Gold Spell is just what you would imagine, a spelling checker. It contains over
90,000 words, is compatible with Tcxtcraft, Scribble! Or any Amiga word processor that can save files in ASCII (texi only) format, and it lets you add words to your own dictionaries.
Gold Spell is very easy to use. Just load it up and tell it (he name of the file you want to check (including drive numbers, directories, which word processor was used, etc.) and it automatically starts checking the document. If it finds a word il does not recognize, il stops and highlights the word while displaying the complete sentence. You then may correct the word on the spot, accept (skip) the word, “accept &: remember” the word (useful for adding words to your own private dictionaries), ask Gold Spell to suggest the correct spelling, or scan the dictionary to try and find the right spelling yourself. When you find the right spelling, all you have to do is click on it and it will automatically be inserted into your document.
FASTFONTS
from the creators of Md.
? FASTTEXT routines speed up text display works with your existing programs!
? Replace the System TOPAZ Fonts with one of four fonts we supply or with one of your own.
? FunKeys hotkey program lets you move windows, program macros, or create a CLI at any time with a single keystroke.
? ScreenB lanker protects your display from damage.
? TxEd V 1.3 is still available foronly S39.95
Boulder Font: FIBCDEFGHI JKLIWQRSTlMliyZ
Gulch Foot: ABCDEFGH1JKLMN0PQRSTIMYZ
WESTERN FONT: ABCDEF6HIJKLIilHOPQESTUVMXYS
Siesta Font; ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUtlUXYZ
After you have finished checking the document, Gold Spell saves the corrected version back to your document disk using the original name, simultaneously saving the old, uncorrected version with the extension .BAR on the end. At that time you can update your persona] dictionary with words that you have "accepted and remembered.”
ff|
MICROSMITHS, INC
P. O. Box 561, Cambridge, MA 02140 (617) 354-1224
Checking the Checker
There are some nice features of Gold Spell that go beyond just checking spelling. You
BIXxheath CompuServe: 74216,2117
can also test a document for readability. Gold Spell will analyze a document and give you the Gunning Fog index (a number that roughly equates with grade-level reading abilities needed to comprehend your document; a Fog index of 8 means an eighth-grade reading level). You can create your own dictionaries either by adding “accept Sc remember” words after each session, or you can create or modify personal dictionaries with any word processor, as long as it saves files in ASCII. Personal dictionaries can be as large as your Amiga’s memory
will allow. The ability to scan the dictionary is a plus (other spelling checkers do not have this feature), and just clicking on the correct word to replace a misspelled word is very handy. Gold Spell is fast since the dictionary is loaded into RAM. You can also check individual word spellings without having to type them into a word processor first.
Gold Spell's few drawbacks are more like annoyances than problems. It would be convenient to be able to set the defaults once rather than having to reset them each time ?
FASTFONTS
$ 40.95
Mail orders, add S3 P & H. Mass. Residents add 5%.
You use the program. It would also be nice to modify the wav it saves files in cases
4 4
where you want the uncorrected document to have the original name and the corrected file given the extension .BAR. It would he helpful to have the program automatically load the personal dictionary instead of having to “manually” load it. (This is more of a sacrifice than a problem, because with Gold Spell's system you can create many different custom dictionaries and load them as needed for the type of document you wish to check.) It is also a bit annoying to have it freeze on every word in quotes or with an ’s or s’ (like Spell's). Finally, while figuring the Fog index number of a document. Gold Spel 1 Hashes a running word and sentence count as it works, but the total is only on the screen for an instant at the end. Why can’t we see the total word and sentence count at leisure in a box next to die Fog index number?
1 liked Gold Spell. In fact, I think ii is an excellent program at a very good price that does everything it claims and more (although it doesn’t recognize the word “misspelled”). II you have a word processor, you should have Gold Spell, too.
Gold Spell Spelling Checker 8c Corrector Gold Disk Inc.
PO Box 789 Strcetsville Mississauga. Ontario L5M 2C2 $ 45.95
Requires 512K
Computer Baseball
Now even a bleacher bum can manage the all-time greats.
The best simulations of baseball, both computerized and tabletop, are the ones that give you the responsibilities and options of a real manager. With Computer Baseball from Strategic Simulations Inc. (SSI), you can do everything a major league manager can do except argue with the umpire.
You have the opportunity to manage some of the greatest teams of all time. Twenty-six great pennant-winning teams, opponents in 13 of the most memorable World Series, are included on the disk; these teams are described in a booklet of Famous World Series Matchups if you're interested in replaying a series of the past.
Additional data disks with statistics for the 1980-85 major league teams are also available for SI5. A disk with all the major league clubs from the most recent season will be available by mail from SSI six months after the baseball season ends.
You can also enter, save and revise data for any team you choose, either real or imaginary. You could create an all-time all-star roster or enter data for your nephew’s Little League team. The manual gives instructions for entering player data, but it takes a fair amount of work.
To load the program, you need copies of Workbench and Amiga Basic. To simplify startup, you can install Amiga Basic on the Baseball game disk. You can play a game against the computer, a two-player game or manage both teams yourself. An imaginary manager named Casey will be your opponent when challenging the computer. After choosing the two teams, you select your starting pitcher and lineup from the team’s roster, which appears on-screen with statistics for each player. If you’re playing against Casey, you can select the starting lineup for his team or let him do it himself.
Play Ball
The screen display includes a scoreboard, current batter and pitcher data, a line for input and a playing field. The field shows you the positioning of the fielders and the base runners. As far as graphics go, the screen isn’t much to look at, but it doesn’t really need to be. The designer wisely placed his emphasis on providing statistical accuracy and plenty of options, not window dressing.
All input is done through the keyboard, with one- or two-keystroke commands. For quick reference, consult the players’ aid cards, which list all offensive and defensive commands.
As each batter comes to the plate, the manager on defense is prompted for a strategy. He can pitch to the batter, pitch around him or intentionally walk him.
Other defensive actions can be taken before pitching to the batter, including positioning infielders and outfielders and going to the bullpen. You can move your infield to double-play depth, guard the lines, bring them in at the corners or in all around. Outfielders can be kept at normal depth or moved to shallow positions. You can even visit the mound to find out how your pitcher is doing. Once the ball is pitched, the offense can choose to hit away, hit and run, bunt or steal. You can also bring a pinch hitter or pinch runner into the game.
As a play unfolds, the outcome is printed at the bottom of the screen. The play is also rather crudely animated on the field; it's just enough to give you a feel for what’s happening. The confrontation between hitter and pitcher is decided on one pitch, another wise design choice. Going to a full count on a batter, only to have him foul off the next five pitches, is too tedious for a computer or tabletop simulation; games using that format are slow and boring. Computer Baseball moves at a good pace; the average game lasts about half an hour to 45 minutes.
The outcome of each play is determined by a number of statistical parameters, including the hitting, running, fielding and pitching abilities of the players involved. You’ll find that the individual players in Computer Baseball perform remarkably close to the way they do (or did) in real life. How well they play as a team has a lot to do with how you manage them.
The handling of pitchers is where your managerial decisions will have the most influence on the outcome of the game. Starters tire as the game wears on, and relievers must be warmed up before they are brought in to pitch, just as in real baseball. You have to know your pitchers and think ahead.
If you’re competing against Casey, you'll find him to be an effective manager. He makes decisions quickly, based purely upon the statistics. One problem with him is that he also chooses a lineup strictly according to statistics, so he sometimes comes up with something that is very unorthodox for that particular team. You can get around this by choosing the lineup for him.
After each game, you can display the end- of-game statistics and line score on the screen or send it to your printer. You can also save a game in progress and finish it later.
There is still some room for improvement in Computer Baseball. The screen could be more attractive, sound effects could be added, and the animation could be better, but I wouldn’t want any of this at the expense of the game’s current features.
Computer Baseball gives you realism without sacrificing playability. The degree to which you, as a manager, are involved in the game, and the sheer number of factors involved in determining the outcome of each play make this the most realistic baseball simulation I've played.
S, Laflamme
FREE ? FREE
? Media-Mate 3 ?
Computer Baseball
Strategic Simulations Inc. 1046 N. Rengstorff Ave. Mountain View, CA 94043 415 964-1353 $ 39.95
No special requirements.
With purchase of any 100 diskettes
(Boxed in tens)
Boxed in tens minimum order 20 (FREE Media-Mate 3 with each 100)
31 2” SS DD ..... 1.15 Ea.
31 2” DS DD ..... 1.69 Ea.
Boxed in tens minimum order 20 (FREE Media-Mate 3 with each 100)
31 2" SS DD ..... 1.09 Ea.
31 2” DS DD ..... 1.49 Ea.
Nashua
Boxed in tens minimum order 20 (FREE Media-Mate 3 with each 100)
MAC PAC’s
Boxed in 50’s
3W' SS DD.. 3W DS DD..
3W' SS DD.. 3%,r DS DD..
31 2” SS DD..
MAC
PAC’s
Includes
Labels
Holds 30 3.5"
$ 8.95
With Lock
$ 10.95 ediaMate 3
Imagewriter Ribbons Black (2-5) 3.45 (6+) 2.95 Color Packs 20,70
1 800 351-BEST (2378)
1 800 451-BEST (in California)
Visa, Mastercard, C.O.D. or Prepaid. Corporations rated 3A2 or better, government agencies and schools may send in purchase orders on a net 30 basis. Minimum order $ 25.00. Shipping charges are $ 3.00 per 100 diskettes (minimum shipping order $ 3.00) (within the continental U.S.), APO, FPO, AK, HI, PR and Canada Orders add 10% to cover PAL and Insurance. All other countries add 20%. C.O.D. Orders Add $ 4.00.
No Sales Tax outside California.
Satisfaction guaranteed on all products.
Marble Madness
Get out the rubber nose,
Bozo wants to play marbles.
No quarters necessary for this madcap micro excellence.
When a micro edition of a flashy, popular video-parlor arcade game is released, you expect an abridged, pale, whittled-down version of the original something like your first game of whiffle ball. Electronic Arts’ Marble Madness, licensed from Atari and popularized on Atari arcade machines, will forever broaden your expectations it did mine. The power of the Amiga plus the
programming expertise of Will Harvey and Larry Reed (who did the Amiga version) have made Marble Madness a first-rate micro arcade game.
Losing Your Marbles
Marble Madness is an animated-action-strat- egy-coordination ball-and-mazes sit-on-the- edge-of-your-chair type game. It consists of numerous screens that contain tracks, ramps, jumps, moving floors and other indefinable animated obstacles, along which and through which you must direct a ball, which itself doesn’t always agree to obey the laws of physics. Various little “hoovers,” “marble munchers” and black “steclies” ?
Maxell
Mouse- Pad
$ 5.95
maxell
BASF
COMPUTER
SUPPLIES
Red - Blue - Gray- Brown
2148-A Bering Drive San Jose. CA 95131
(408) 435-3866
ORDER NOW
31 2” SS DD.... 1.15 Ea, 31 2” DS DD.... 1.69 Ea,
1. 14 ea 1.09 ea 1.04 ea
1. 49 ea 1.44 ea 1.39 ea
1. 14 ea 1.09 ea 1.04 ea
1. 49 ea 1.44 ea 1.39 ea
1. 09 ea 1.04 ea .99 ea
1. 39 ea 1.34 ea 1.29 ea
Glare Guard
• Cuts 94% of Screen Glare
• Enhances Contrast
• Optically Coated Glass
$ 34.95
Deluxe Roll-Top File
Holds 55 3.5"
$ 15.55
With Lock
$ 17.95
50+ 100+ 400+
await you along the path to interrupt you and steal your most precious possession time. Other banes to your success pop up here and there to bonk you, whack you, roller-coaster you and bump you off the path. When you fall, if you hit a hard surface, you go splat and a little broom appears and sweeps you up, or you reel as if dizzy, or you drop into, well, marble-nowhere. Of course, as long as you still have time left in the level, your ball reappears where it went awry, but you have lost time, the main thing against which you play in this game. And how quickly you finish one level determines the time you’ll have for the next one; it does make some sense how disgusting.
The sounds in the game are funny and clever; the stereo music is excellent accompaniment (though I often turn it down since it can heighten the excitement to a dizzying pitch). The colorful 3-D graphics are so good, they must be seen to be appreciated. The package calls the raceway screens “Escher-like”; I agree. Maybe Rube
Goldberg- and Dr. Seuss-like too. But, they have been dressed with a twisted, carnival fun-house feel that, along with the sound, very successfully creates a madcap atmosphere. Bozoville! Marble Madness gets a gold star in the visual category. In overall design, it is probably the most consistent micro arcade game I have seen.
The game does have a few shortcomings. The levels each take a long time to load. (It does, however, give you time to regain your sanity before the next screen.) It is too bad that you have to go back to the beginning level every time the clock runs out, and start again from scratch. The game, like most arcade games in general, is sort of designed around this approach. You can’t save a game or pause the action (my main complaint what if the phone rings!); at least the instructions don't say so if you can. I found that playing with two players was confusing and not as much fun as alone. Also, I found the mouse to be the most accurate means of control quite a bit better than with a joystick (I don’t have a track ball), and two players using mice presents a logistical problem.
Rubber-nose (or room) Award
Marble Madness is a tremendous micro arcade game, and surely one of the best if not the best arcade games for any microcomputer. It is rivalled at this time in the category of Amiga games only by a few others, such as Commodore’s Mindwalker. It is a “set piece" in challenging, zany, goofy, animated microcomputer entertainment. If you only buy a handful of games for your Amiga, Marble Madness should be one of them.
V. Laughner
Marble Madness Electronic Arts
1820 Gateway Drive San Mateo, CA 94404 415 571-7171
S49.95
No special requirements
Review Update
Scribble! Version 2.0
The programs they are ’a changin ’ often faster than our staff can review them. Take a look at the improvements to Scribble!, originally reviewed in Jan. Feb. ’87 (p. 78).
By Douglas Watt
Scribble! Has undergone extensive renovation, rectifying a number of the difficulties discussed in my last review. Mail merge functions were added, and a spelling checker program was built into the word processor. The new directory access and directory requester layout makes loading and saving files easier and more intuitively logical in “feel.” Instead of being forced to access menus, you can now use command key sequences for all cutting and pasting functions. A truly page-oriented screen is still lacking, however. Once again you are stuck with embedded commands to change margins and other formatting variables instead of having the option to load formatting directives into a line-by-line buffer ("what you see is what you get” on the screen).
Pick a Word, But Not Any Word
Perhaps the most significant change is the spelling checker. Running the dictionary
n
;i-l, --¦ ‘- -- - :
from a RAM disk is relatively easy to set up; simply rewrite the startup-sequence file found in the “S” director)'. With the dictionary in RAM, the program is capable of
rapid document checks, and the UDICT (user-defined dictionary) can be left on the Scribble! Disk so that new words are saved to the disk. Since the current dictionary is rather small, you will have to make many additions for it to find even relatively com-
j
monplace words.
Besides running more effectively under Kickstart and Workbench 1.2, Scribble! 2.0 contains some enhancements only available with these versions. Using the updated Kick- start and Workbench, you no longer need to click the left mouse key on an input prompt within a requester. You can automatically enter information from the keyboard. All requesters accept first-letter commands instead of having to click on the individual icons, speeding up the use of requesters considerably. If a requester is looking for an “OK” or “CANCEL”, the letters “O” or “C" arc accepted from the keyboard.
T he requester boxes themselves have been substantially upgraded, and you are now able to get, store or replace a file while Scribble! Is still reading through the directory, Alphabetically sorted directories and a directory scroll option have also been added. With the new requester, you do not have to wait for the entire directory to appear before selecting another drive or subdirectory name. While a directory is currently displaying, enter a new drive path and hit the return key. Scribble! Will abort the current listing and begin the new one.
Search and Replace are now located under the Project menu and can be accessed with the Right-Amiga S and R keys, respectively, This allows any of the text actions (Cut, Paste, etc.) to be used with Search and Replace, since they are now’ effectively separated. Additional menu functions, such as Project Status and Archive Document, defaults for line*length and tabs and text copy, cut and paste, can now be accessed through the keyboard. “Word delete” has been added, and WordStar commands are also supported. “True backspacing" wTraps the cursor up to the end of the previous line when you reach the left column.
Window Dressing
Scribblel's status line window’ has been removed, allowing easier window sizing, but preventing the deletion of status lines. So, the full window is not available for text. Up to four open windows are still supported. Any Text selection will remain the same no matter what window' you are in. If the mouse pointer is in Cut mode, it will stay that way as you switch from window to window’. Bui, the mouse pointer now changes to a paint roller when highlighting and also allows window scroll. You can cut multiple screens of text by holding the right mouse key down and moving the paint roller to the top or bottom of the screen. The window automatically scrolls in that direction. To abort, move the paint roller to any one of the four corners of the screen and the highlighted text will disappear without making any changes. In addition, the cursor position remains constant when any option under the Text menu is selected other than Edit. This means that if you copy, cut, paste, style or spell using the mouse pointer, the cursor position will remain the same after the function has been completed. If using only one window, Scribble! Will prompt you to quit the program.
To Order:
800-232-6342
NATIONWIDE
801-752-2642
INSIDE UTAH
We’ll beat any advertised price.
MEGATRONICS, INC., 55 N. MAIN STREET. LOGAN. UTAH 84021
Scribble! Now uses dynamic file load allocation to determine window’ size when loading a file greater than 16K. With an expanded memory card, the function loads files of over 290K, a major improvement over the previous limit of 64K.
Scribble! Also has increased flexibility when loading from the CLI. Entering Scribble! = 100 DF1: will load Scribble! With a 100K buffer and automatically log into drive DF1: when archiving documents. If you enter a filename after the drive volume designator, Scribble! Will load the document for you.
Though they neglected to add a page-ori
i*texi200
H09
CABLES Modem or Printer CASES AMIGA Monitor AMIGA Computer EXPANSIONS 256K RAM VS to 2 MEG PROGRAMS Spell croft Talking Trivia MergeMoster
$ 18.95
$ 75.00
$ 79.00
$ 85.00
$ CALL
$ 24.95
$ 19.95
$ 24.95
ented screen and upgrade the printer support, Micro Systems was right on target with their other revisions. Scribble! 2.0 is now a powerful word processor ready for a variety of applications.¦
Scribble! Version 2.0 Broum-Wagh Publishing
16795 Lark Ave. 210 Los Gatos, CA 95030 408 395-3838
S99.95
No special requirements
ACCESSORIES .95 Mouse Pads ,95 Dust Covers .95 AMIGA D05 Keyboard Template NEW ITEMS Stereo Speakers to give you all the sound your AMIGA produces. Infrared Joysticks
$ 5 $ 14, $ 4
for wireless control.
Side AfLTt VI
SLUE SIEVE less (tDnsum 1© sec maud 8 2
A A
¦ 6 slot true Zorro expansion box with 150 watts power ¦
• Attractive Amiga co-ordinated styling, 7 inches wide •
• Amiga bus and Mouse pass-through •
• No covers to remove to change add cards •
• Auto Power-up of SideARM and external equipment •
SideARM VI only $ 799
System Special only $ 1999
(With 2 Mbyte memory & 20 Mbyte Harddisk)
©(0)=3L(0)(0>IP§ per secEndi!
Need ujb soy mars? ----
* TOTALLY INTERACTIVE programming environment!
* OPTIMIZING COMPILER ... all words compile to
inline 68000 assembly code ... brutally FAST!
* OPTIMIZING TURNKEY UTILITY...compiles only whats needed...PLUS...no fees or liscensing required!
* OBJECT-ORIENTED dialect included!
* ELEGANT INTERFACE to all AMIGA libraries!
* FREE Jforth newsletter ... updates available for
shipping, handling & media cost!
Jforth is directly threaded, Only $ 99.95
'JSR' code...the fastest kind! Shipping & handling incl.
(CA residents please add 1%)
send check or money order to
* 40 5*4 Ujilkie Iday Palo Rlto, CR. 94306 (4151-056-3669
Delta Research
A
(inquiries or orders only, please)
Available Now
Circle 202 on Reader Service card
Side Store $ 699
(2 Mbyte RAM with FREE 2 slot box)
COMPUTERIZE YOUR BUSINESS
with Cg COMPUTERWARE® Affordable Business Software
$ 79.95
$ 24.95
$ 179.95
$ 229.95
• Introductory Prices
• Runs Interactively
• In Stock
$ 149.95
$ 99
$ 24.95
No extra charge for Visa or MasterCard.
Side EJJects, Inc.
6513 Johnsdale Road, Raleigh, NC 27612 Voice: 919 876-1434 BBS: 919 471-6436
Dealer Inquiries Welcome.
Prices and specifications subject to change without notice.
Amiga is a trademark of Commodore-Amiga.
Side ARM and Side Store are trademarks of Sirte Effects, Tnc.
96 March April 1987 Circle 132 on Reader Service card.
Power Supply for third drive Cable for fourth drive
Generic Track 5 1 4" drive Generic Track 3 1 2" drive (with case and power supply)
Generic ARM 2 slot box Free with Side, Store
All cables (Rea! DB-23 connectors)
General Ledger S99
A comprehensive double-entry accounting system with complete audit trails, closing procedures, and full reporting
Check Ledger $ 99
A single-entry bookkeeping system with a user-defined chart of income and expense accounts, year-to-date totals, and complete checking account history
Payroll $ 99
A comprehensive system allowing pay rates for standard hours, overtime, and salary Hourly, salary, and commissioned employees may be paid weekly, biweekly, semimonthly. And monthly. Year-to-date, quarterly, monthly, and current totals are maintained Federal reporting and state computations are included.
Call or write lor brochures Dealer inquiries welcome.
Stores cost and quantity information, updates it immediately and otters key management reports Four costs, lour locations sales history, and vendor information is kept of each item
Accounts Payable $ 99
Helps manage and track cash liabilities by collecting vender invoice and information and reporting the business casn commitments and payment history
Accounts Receivable $ 99
Know current customer stalus. Which accounts are past due. Forecast how much money to expect to receive tor cash llow planning, and keep on top ot your customers’ credit positions
Computerware »
Box 668 • Encinitas, CA • 92024
(619) 436-3512_
Inventory Control
ProWrite w Multi Fonts
& Multi Colors ....$ 83
PageSetter ...$ 99
VisaWrite MultiFonts $ 105
Gold Spell ...... $ 33
Gato Entant ..$ 35
Silent Service $ 30
DeluxePaint II $ 99
SONIX Music $ 51
Deep Space ...... CALL
GRIDIRON Football .$ 59
BUSINESS ACCOUNTING
MIAMIGA Ledger ...$ 66
Financial Pius ..... $ 185
ISGUR Portfolio ... $ 125
Nimbus I Record Keeper . $ 189 CINEMAWARE
Defender of Crown ..$ 37
King of Chicago ....$ 37
S D I ....$ 37
Sinbad ..$ 37
DATABASE MANAGEMENT
dBman ...... $ 99
Acquisition $ 199
MiAmiga File .$ 66
Omega File ..$ 55
Organize S65
SuperBase ...S99
LANGUAGES & UTILITIES
Amiga Assembler ...$ 75
Amiga Lisp $ 140
Lattice C Compiler $ 125
Manx Aztec C Comm $ 340
Manx Aztec C Deve S210
A CBasic .. $ 230
A CFortran $ 230
True Basic . $ 105
Tdl Modula II Std ..$ 65
Tdl Modula II Deve S105
TxEd ....$ 30
WORD & TEXT PROCESSORS
Write Hand ... $ 35
Flow, Idea Process ..$ 69
Product subject to availability. Prices subject to change.
Shipping Info: C.O.D. Charge onty $ 3.00 per shipping. We ship UPS Ground. Air, and overnight shipping available. For faster delivery send Cashier Check, Money order, or use MasterCard or Visa. Personal checks allow 20 days to clear. Company purchase orders accepted. Call for prior authorization. Mass. Residents add 5% sales tax.
Amiga Is a trademark of Commodore-Amlga, Inc.
InfoMmder ...$ 65
Scribble ..... $ 65
Paper Clip Elite .....$ 85
MiAmiga Word ......$ 66
VisaWrite. Multi Fonts $ 105
Adv. Const. Kit ......$ 28
Archon II $ 35
TTIrH
mFmmm
Map
5 Elmwood St. Worcester, MA 01602
Artie Fox $ 28
Bard's Tale ..$ 35
Borrowed Time .....$ 29
Chess Master 2000 ..$ 34
ChampShip BaseBall $ 40
ChampShip BasketBall $ 32
ChampShip FootBall $ 33
F 15 ......$ 30
Grand Slam Tennis ..$ 36
Gunship .$ 30
MarbJe Madness ....$ 35
One on One .$ 28
SkyFox ..... $ 28
StarFleet I ...$ 40
Ultima III . $ 44
LeaderBoard .$ 30
Tenth Frame ..... CALL
GameStar Football CALL
Hacker ..$ 29
Hacker II $ 34
Delta Patrol ..$ 20
Monkey Business ...$ 20
Little Comp. People .$ 35
Mind Shadow $ 29
Shanghai S29
Star League Bsbll CALL
Tass Times ToneTown $ 29
Winter Games $ 30
World Games $ 30
World Golf CALL
Bridge.4.0 ...$ 24
Hole In One Golf ....$ 24
Strip Poker ..$ 30
Video Vegas .$ 27
Rogue ..$ 30
Temple of Apshai Trilogy ... $ 30 All INFOCOM Titles . $ 26- $ 36
Deep Space ...... CALL
Guild of Thieves ....$ 33
The Pawn $ 30
Delta Patrol RGB ....$ 20
Hailey's Proiect .....$ 35
_COPIERS_
Marauder II ..$ 29
Mirror ...$ 35
HOME MANAGEMENT
Financial CookBook .$ 35
ParHome . CALL
Money Mentor ......$ 65
2*2 Home Management $ 65
COMMUNICATIONS
OnLine! ..$ 46
Digital Link ..$ 49
MaxiComm ..$ 37
_TRAINING_
Flight Simulator .....$ 38
Jet ......S38
KeyBoard Kadet ....$ 30
Master Type .$ 30
Super Huey ..... • • • $ 30
HARDWARE
AMIGA A1000 CPU. 512KB, Monitor. Bundled with Four
Packages of Software ... CALL
Modems 1200 ..... $ 109
aMega Expansion SLOW
Future Sound $ 139
Midi Interface $ 48
SIDECAR . CALL
GENLOCK ..... CALL
External 3.5" ..... CALL
StarBoard-2 2MEG ...... $ 585
_EDUCATIONAL_
Discovery Spell .....$ 29
Discovery Math . $ 29
Face Maker ..$ 35
Donald Duck .$ 21
Winnie the Pooh ....$ 21
Math Talk S39
Speller Bee ..$ 39
First Shapes .$ 34
Kid Talk .$ 39
GRAPHICS & VIDEO
Animator Images ....$ 99
Aegis Draw Plus CAD $ 170
Impact . $ 125
Dynamic-Cad ..... $ 340
Deluxe Paint II ......$ 99
Digi-Paint $ 43
DeluxePrint ..$ 69
DeluxeVideo .$ 69
Dpamt.Art.Disk ......$ 25
Dprint.Art Disk ......$ 25
DIGI-VIEW Digitizer $ 143
SPREADSHEETS_
BTS The Spreadsheet $ 49
Analyze! 2.0 $ 100
LOGiSTiX.Integrate $ 125
LPD Planer ...... CALL
MaxiPlan $ 99
VIP Professional ....150
SOUND & MUSIC_
DeluxeMusic .$ 69
The Music Studio ...$ 45
Instant Music $ 35
Pro Studio CALL
CREATIVITY & PRODUCTIVITY
Disk Library ..... CALL
D’ Buddy .$ 49
Gizmoz enhanced CALL
BBS ......$ 65
Grabbit ..S24
KeyGeme ...... $ 35
_DISKS_
3. 5 DS DD Box of 10 .$ 23
_ACCESSORIES_
Printer Cables ......$ 17
Modem Cables ......$ 17
DISK HOLDERS
MD 120: Teakwood 120 cap $ 35 MD 64: Teakwood 60 cap. .. $ 28 MD64: Teakwood 60 w lock. $ 31
_PRINTERS_
Cannon . CALL
Okimate 20 ...... CALL
Juki .. CALL
AMIGA
What’s N e w?
OFF*
00
Now your Amiga can cut through IRS red tape,
analyze your writing style and manage your busines
Th* scfr*ar» tn*t wt* cw.v*> in* >e»n ia» of Amiga $ powv u rcw« Mere Syu*Ti» An*.yi», a pcrr»*j pu*- aw i'*nu *prs csn«*t that lO.J-TM Anqa t *j0 mult-
¦aj. '.g cow*r Electronic Aft * D*iu» P*.nt, ¦rt*'*
¦" .lung you can do, 4 can h*tp you do better oa.nt. 0'S*, Jketcn and shade Aegit Animator, a stjnrung hjfi- fyncuyi animation workstaton Plus word procsss ng communications, business applications and more
Circle 61 on Reader Service card.
Vita and Mastercard accepted Amga it a registered tradema-X of Co'nmodcra-Auriga.In;.
The SURGEON it registered ledemarX o ISM.IOC.
MftCintoah version elao *viu!ib!c.
Have you ever wanted to try your hand at being a surgeon? The skill, the pressure, the split-second life or death decisions, this program has it all.
Operate in real time and deal with the complications of the surgery. Keep an eye on the EKG monitor and the patient’s blood pressure while you cxcercise your skill. Feel the satisfaction of a successful operation!!
The SURGEON is also educational!! While performing the surgery you will learn the parts of a human body, medical terminologies and the steps involved in a surgical operation.
For more information or for order call,,,,
ISM, Inc.
P. O.Box 247 Phoenix, MD 21131 Ph: (30I)-666-2672
n- SURGEON for AMIGA
- A surgery simulation game!
Blood Pressure:! 20 80
Time
t 00:00:25
fB
=3
=3
6
O
i
&
uiliu
J5»nge
oount
c>
1 47,-
-
d|i
V
r

4"
4H
Scrub
• Wh.le tin offe- tor the Am-ga and co'or monitor cannot be used witn any oth«f Amiga discoum oWer 't would te a Fre way to use yduf Amiga credit ca'd
TW Amiga ¦* a Tf»d m*fh of CommodO'*-Am.ga inc ‘Vaserati it a 'eg.tiered fTacen'.am o Ott'cne AiFer* S'ase-ai’ Moaena Italy 'S£5 Cvfhhtoao'e E'ect'onics Limited
STORE AKERS MILL SQUARE
2969C Cobb Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30339
404-952-6625
AMIGA GIVES YOU A CREATIVE EDGE
™eB4 =
Dart * Ihguiria* wrtcorry* Price S50 00 pfut pot lag* and handing
R* |jre* Mf*mjm512K and KS 1.2
EKG
Flight Simulator II, B ruce Art- wick’s graphics tour tie force, has been upgraded for the Amiga. It features faster screen updates and more detailed scenery than the Apple II or IBM PC versions. You can have two view windows on the screen at the same time. Flight Simulator II uses pull down menus, but they are not Amiga standard. The Amiga version also lets you fly in formation with a friend via a cable or modem connection, and fly a Learjet instead of a Cessna 182.
Flight Simulator is a comprehensive simulation. You have to master the same controls found in an actual airplane to be a successful pilot. Flight Simulator II lists for $ 49.95. For more information, contact subLQGIC Corp., 713 Edgebrook Drive, Champaign, IL 61820. 800 637- 4983 (in Illinois, 217 359-8482).
Recently, Xebec and Supra Corporation announced harddisk drives for the Amiga. Xebec offers two Amiga-compatible drives, the 9710H and the 9720H. The former offers 10 megabytes of storage; the latter has 20 megabytes. Both drives connect to the Amiga expansion bus via a SCSI (Small Computer System Interface) that is included with the drive system. The SCSI adapter also allows for up to 2 megabytes of RAM expansion.
The 9700 series requires Kick-
Amiga Takes Off!
Compiled by Bob Ryan
Hard Disk Duet
start 1.2. Up to four drives can be daisy chained at once, and the drives can be partitioned. The installation software also includes comprehensive diagnostics. The 971 OH sells for $ 895; the 9720H for $ 1,295. For more information, contact Xebec. 3579 Highway 50 East, Carson City, XV 89701. 702 883-7128.
Like the Xebec drives, Supra’s
three hard-disk systems use the

SCSI. They also include a realtime clock with battery backup and the capability to add RAM expansion modules containing up to 4 megabytes of RAM.
I he Amiga SupraDrive 4X4 comes in three capacities 20,
30 and 60 megabytes. Their retail prices are $ 995, $ 1,195 and $ 1,995, respectively. For more information, contact Supra Corp., 1 133 Commercial Way, Albany, OR 97321. 503 967-
9075.
I he latest from Aegis Development is a note-editor and MIDI-sequencer called Aegis Sonix. The “son of Musicraft” Aegis bought the program from Commodore and upgraded it
considerably. Sonix lets you cn-

ter and edit musical compositions, create anti edit vour own instrument sounds, and control up to 16 external MIDI devices.
In addition to its own instrument and sample files, Sonix supports IFF music and instrument Files, allowing you to swap data with other Amiga music programs. It supports all possi-
Sonix Boom
The best Vegas package deal ever.
Ble keys, durations down to sixteenth notes, and many different time signatures.
So nix retails for $ 79.95. For more information, contact Aegis Development Inc., 2210 Wil- shire Blvd. 277, Santa Monica, CA 90403. 213 306-0735.
A Picture and A Thousand Words
ProWrite is a new word processor from New Horizons Software. Prowrite is designed to take advantage of the Amiga’s capabilities, including multitasking and graphics. You can open up to eight windows at one time, and include IFF color graphics in your documents.
In addition to multiple styles, ProWrite lets you use multiple fonts. It also lets you use different colors for your text, and to print them with a color printer. ProWrite uses the Amiga Intuition interface, and retails for $ 124.95. For more information, contact New Horizons Software Inc., PO Box 43167, Austin, TX 78745. 512 329-6215.
They Call Him Flipper. . .
Tired of your spreadsheets getting cut in half by your 80- eolumn printer? Try Flipside!, a new text utility from Micro systems Software. Flipside! Prints any Amiga text file sideways, giving you an unlimited number of columns across a page. Flipside! Works with popular Amiga spreadsheets and word
processors including Micro-Systems’ own Analyze! And Scribble!.
Flipside! Sells for $ 49.95, For more information, contact Micro-Systems Software Inc., 4301- 18 Oak Circle, Boca Raton, FL 33431. 800 327-8724.
Powered RAM
MEGAmiga is a one-megabyte RAM expansion box for your Amiga. It attaches to the expansion bus, has a built-in 20-watt power supply, and auto-config- ures under Kickstart 1.2. MEGAmiga passes through the Amiga bus, allowing for further expansion.
MEGAmiga costs $ 512. A user-installable upgrade kit that brings the total memory to 2 megabytes lists for $ 256. Contact Analog Precision Inc., 1620
N. Park Ave., Tuscon, AZ 85719. 602 622-1344.
Learning Fun
Unicorn Software has released Decimal Dungeon for the Amiga. The game takes place in a crystal cavern, and students have to answer questions correctly to escape from the cavern. The program, for students aged nine and up, teaches math skills such as decimal addition, subtraction, multiplication and division, and conversion between decimals and fractions. Decimal Dungeon lists for $ 49.95.
Coming soon from Unicorn Software are Kinderama, Read 8c Rhyme, Math Wizard, Frac- ?
Now you can experience Vegas action right on your own computer. Try your luck at a Vegas party with friends... or brush up for your next gambling holiday.
Video Vegas entertains and challenges - whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned pro. Fine tune your strategy with Blackjack and Draw Poker. Challenge the one-armed bandit with Slots. Beat the odds _ with Keno. It’s the four-in-one
software package that looks and plays exactly like the video games in Las Vegas casinos!
It's ready to play whenever you are. Any time of day or night, it’s your best bet yet for authentic casino action - without the crowds.
Available at better software stores nationwide. Or call us now and order yours right away. Dial 1-616-957-3036,
S
Video Vegas is available for the following machines: Amiga, C64,
Apple II, Atari ST, Atari XL XE, IBM. Priced at S29.95-S34.95.
Circle 197 on Reader Service card.
Hors d’oeuvres
Unique applications, tips and stuff
You may be using your Amiga at work, you may be using it at home, or you may be using it in the back seat of your car, but in some way or other, you are going to be using your Amiga m a slightly different way than anyone else. You are gomg to be running across little things that will help you to do something taster or easier or more elegantly, AmigaWorld would like to share those shortcuts, ideas, unique applications, programming tips, things to avoid, things to try. Etc., with everyone, and we'll reward you for your efforts with a colorful, appetizing, official AmigaWorld T-shirt. (Just remember to tell us your size.)
Sena d in, no matter how outrageous, clever, obvious, humorous, subtle, stupid, awesome or bizarre We will read anything, but we won t return it, so keep a copy for yourself In cases of duplication. T-shirts are awarded on a first come, first serve basis So, put on your thmkmg berets and rush those suggestions to
Hors d'oeuvres AmigaWorld editorial 80 Elm Street Peterborough, NH 03458
r
Luhen "Key to C” uuos first introduced, AMIGA microcomputer programmers responded enthusiastically. Nolu, there's a new, extensively enhanced, even better version! The ’C functions ore similar to BASIC. The object library's good, clean working code includes windows, screens, menus, graphics, requestors, and alerts. For even greater productivity, we include our own system utilities.
UNLOCK TH€ MVST6RV UJITH TH€ K€V TO ’C
• Source & Executable Code • Faster & Easier
• Full Documentation • Deliveries Begin Sept. 1
$ 34.95
DRTfl RESEARCH PROCESSING, INC.
5121 Audrey Dr. Huntington Beoch, CA 92649 Phone: (714) 840-7186
* RrT»go a a req«t*«stJ t odemori. Ot Commodoit- mqo. Inc
Circle 172 on Reader Service card.
AC FORTRAN™
Mainframe quality, full feature ANSI FORTRAN 77
compiler includes: Debugger, Linker, Library Manager, Runtime Library-, IEEE math, and C interface. Supports Complex numbers, Virtual arrays, Overlays and full
ROM support. J295.
FORTRAN 020 which includes ail of the above features plus support for 68020 68881 also available. S495.
AC BASIC ™
From the authors of Microsoft BASIC compiler for Macintosh, comes AC BASIC for the Amiga. Companion compiler to the Amiga BASIC interpreter: has more features and includes BLOCK IF, CASE statement, and STATIC keyword extensions, Hill ROM support and executes up to 50x faster. AC BASIC is the new BASIC reference for MC68000 based personal computers. Not copy protected. $ 295.
9b5iiift £ £3
Scientific Engineering Software Telephone orders welcome
4268 N. Woodward, Royal Oak, Ml 48072 (313) 549-711 1
Amiga trademark of Commodore Amiga Microsoft trademark of Microsoft Corp. 187AW
tion Action and Animal Kingdom. For more information, contact Unicorn Software Co., 2950 E. Flamingo Road, Green- view Park, Suite B, Las Vegas, NV 89121. 702 737-8662.
LaserJet Meets The Amiga
C Ltd. Makes it easy to use a Hewlett-Packard LaserJet Plus with your Amiga, JetSet contains three utility programs. The JetSet Textcraft Scribble Utility lets these two word processors use multiple fonts in their documents. The fonts are menu- selectable from the word processor and can be downloaded to the LaserJet Plus.
The JetSet LaserJet Command Set lets you control a LaserJet Plus with simple commands.
The JetSet Text Formatter reads formatted commands in Amiga text files and translates them into instructions to control the LaserJet Plus. The JetSet package sells for S69.95.
Also from C Ltd. Comes JetSet Fonts, which can be downloaded to the LaserJet Plus.
Each disk contains a single font in sizes from four to 30 points. Disks cost from $ 49.95 to S99.95. Contact C Ltd., 723 East Skinner, Wichita, KS 67211. 316 267-6321.
Visual Data
Taurus has released Aquisi- tion, a potent database management system that takes advantage of the Amiga’s powerful user interface. Aquisition uses menus, icons and requesters to guide you through the process of creating, editing and using databases. The program has an enormous capacity to store data. Fields can be up to 10 megabytes long with 10 million fields per record and one- hundred million records per file. The maximum file size is one billion bytes. The maxi- mum number of files in one application is 16.
Aquisition supports all major relational, arithmetic and logical operators. It supports five data types and four file types including IFF picture files. Although the power of Aquisition is available solely from menus, you can use Acorn, a dBase-III-compatible language, to manipulate your data.
Aquisition lists for $ 299. Contact your local dealer or Taurus- Impex Ltd., 3 Bridge St., Guildford, Surrey, GUI 4RY, England.
Who Needs Editors?
Reason is a software package that proofs, analyzes and provides language-use information about your word-processing documents. Reason proofreads text for spelling errors, grammatical goofs and punctuation glitches, and analyzes readability and clarity. Reason will be helpful to anyone who needs to communicate clearly with the written word.
Reason is available from The Other Guys, 55 North Main Street, Suite 301 -D, PO Box H, Logan, IT 84321. 801 753-7620.
Clever Deductions
Double Eagle Software can help you with your 1986 Federal Income Tax return. The Tax Advantage supports IRS Form 1040 and a host of subsidiary forms and schedules. Output from The fax Advantage can be printed directly onto Form 1040 or as a rough draft to be hand copied to the form.
T he program lists for $ 59.95. Contact Double Eagle Software Inc., 2210 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 875, Santa Monica, CA 90403. 213 459-9748.
Stylish Text
Earthbound Software has two packages for the Amiga. Fonts is a disk of Macintosh like fonts, listing for $ 11.95. Font-A-Size is a patch to the Amiga Writable
Control Store that scales Amiga fonts to any size. Font-A-Size sells for $ 14.95.
Also coming soon from Earth- bound Software is Taskmaster, a multitasking utility. Strategic Defense, a missle defense-type game, Fine-Font, a utility that gives you near letter quality output on an Epson or compatible printer and Finc-Fonts, a library of fonts for use with Fine-Font. Contact Earthbound Software, Suite 237, 1005 E. 60th St., Chicago, IL 60637. 312 667-8048.
Two for Businesses
B. E.S.T. Business Management. From Business Electronics Software & Technology', is an integrated business management system. It includes Order Processing, Inventory Management. Services Management, Accounts Receivable, Accounts Payable and General Ledger. B.E.S.T. Business Management integrates the accounting functions. It automatically updates related modules when a change occurs in one, B.E.S.T Business Management retails for $ 395. Contact Business Electronics Software and Technology Inc., PO Box 230519, McMinnville, OR 97128. 503 684-6655.
Computerwarc has also released a line of business software featuring Accounts Payable. Accounts Receivable, Payroll, General Ledger and Check Ledger. These modules can run as stand-alone packages, as an integrated system, or in conjunction with Computer- ware* s General Inventory System. Each program costs $ 99. Contact Computerwarc, Box 668, 4403 Manchester Avc.,
Suite 102, Encinitas. CA 92024. 619 436-3512.
Product Updates
Lattice (PO Box 3072, Glen Ellyn, IL 60138. 312 858-7950) has released version 3.10 of the Amiga C Compiler. The new version includes a Lattice assembler and linker. The compiler features faster math routines, support for the Amiga EFP format floating-point library and object modules that are 20 percent smaller than those produced by the current Lattice compiler.
Softwood Co. (PO Box 2280, Santa Barbara, CA 93120) has released MiAmiga File II. The program now has Save As, scrolling directories, named ASCII files and more. Look for an updated review of this product in our next issue.
AMIGA SPECIAL IN MONT ANA
Interactive Microsystems (PO Box 338, Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142) has a version of MediaPhile that controls the FV-A300 Sony 8mm videotape deck. The entire package including the deck costs $ 699. If you already own a Sony 8mm deck, you can have it modified to work with MediaPhile for $ 120. Modification of other decks is more expensive.
Newsbriefs
Tfie Amiga Microsoft BASIC Programmer’s Guide is a 384- pagc softcover book devoted to Amiga Basic. Written by William B. Sanders, the book is published by Scott, Forcsman and Company, 1900 East Lake Avc., Glenview, IL 60025. It retails for S 19.95.
Sound Effects Library is a six- disk set of digitized sounds in IFF format that costs $ 99.95.
You can add the 290 digitized sounds to any program using IFF sound samples. Contact Karl R. Denton Associates, PO Box 56, Westland. MI 48185.
Electronic Arts is now distributing Star Fleet I, a strategic space game based upon a popular TV and movie series (guess which one). The game costs $ 55. For more information, contact Electronic Arts, 1820 Gateway Drive, San Mateo, CA 94404. 800 245-4525 (in CA, 800 562-1 1 12).¦
V City.
Teh
y MMlGA™
SPECIAL PRICING ON AMIGA SYSTEMS
Amiga Computer Amiga Monitor 256K Expansion Cartridge Cables & Mouse
PLUS FREE SOFTWARE
Graphicraft Textcraft and eight more great programs.
NOW AVAILABLE-Genlock, Sidecar Kick 1.2, Superbase, and the fantastic publishing system-PageSetter1
.TM
901 - 14th St. No. 490 No. 31st St.. Suite 110
Great Falls. MT 59401 Billings. MT 59101
Phone (406) 761-5076
Call Evenings 406-761-5076 for FREE Customer Service
PagrSrttrr i* a registered l adrainjk of Gold Disk I nr AMIGA is a registered trademark of Commodore, AMIGA Inc.
mim
MADE OF QUALITY LEATHER
The Reliable Mouse Pad
• Won't jam mouse with nylon debris • Gives a more natural glide
• Rubber back to prevent slipping and static electricity
• Berter traction than other pads
• Continuously cleans mouse during use
• Protects desk or table from scratches
• Adds a touch of class to user's desk
• Will outlast the other mouse pads
lor -hfMOUSE-HIDE™
at your local computer supply store
ONLY
$ 15.00
or order direct from
Pilot Enterprises, Inc.
5699 Kanan Rd.. Agoura Hills. CA 9130J
DEALER INQUIRIES WELCOME
(818) 706-1818
AW
Please send me _MOUSE-HIDESTV & SIS 00 each
+ S2 ea. For I st class postage & handling (Calif, residents add 9SC tax ea )
i have enclosed Check Money Order in the amount of S_
Name
Address
State,
Zip.
Telephone
. PLEASE ALLOW 3-4 WEEKS FOR DELIVERY
include exec types.h>
include exec exec.h>
include intuition intuitlon.h>
include graphics gfx.h>
include graphics sprite.h>
define ACCURACY 2 * How many dots off the target is still a hit *
* An array of word pairs that defines the shape of our alternate pointer *
UWORD ptr_data (] =
(
0, 0,
Gxfffe, Oxfffe,
OxelOe, OxeOOe,
OxelOe, OxeOOe,
OxelOe, OxeOOe,
OxelOe, OxeOOe,
OxelOe, OxeOOe,
Oxfffe, OxeOOe,
OxelOe, OxeOOe,
OxelOe, OxeOOe,
OxelOe, OxeOOe,
OxelOe, OxeOOe,
OxelOe, OxeOOe,
Oxfffe, Oxfffe,
0, 0
);
-¦' Pointers to the libraries we will load
struct Intuition Base *Tnt uitionBnse; struct GfxBase GfxBase;
m ain()
(
* Pointer to our window's info * Pointer for event messages *
* Class of the event message '¦’! * Code of the message *
* Mouse pointer’s coordinates * Target box's coordinates * Millisecond counters
* Score and total score Number of "hits" *
struc t W i n d o w * m y_ w i ndo w; struct In tui Message * message; * ULONG class:
USUORT code;
SHORT ptrx, ptry;
SHORT boxx, boxy; long millis, oldmillis = 0; *
long score = 0, total = 0; int numhit = 0;
* Open the main Intuition library and the graphics library. F.xit with an error if the opens are unsuccessful *
In tuition Base = (struct Intuition Base *)
OpenLibrary ("intuition.library", LIBR A R Y_VERST0N);
if (Intuition Base == NUM.) Exit (FALSE); Listing continued on p. 104.
Build the four corners of our box.
Text
Having done everything else, we still must display the score. Amiga text actually is a graphics object.
The calls you use to display text are similar to those you use to draw items. We use sprintfQ to turn the numbers into an .ASCII string. We then love() to a location close to the upper left of the window. Finally, we display the text with the TextQ function. TextQ draws the text in the current font, which we assume is one of the system’s default fonts.
Obviously, our sample program did not use all of the Amiga’s many features. For example, we did not define our own screen or menu. We used no requestors or gadgets of our own. However, we used enough of the system’s capabilities to give you a model for further experimentation. In one of the sidebars we suggest a few alterations.
Working with C requires practice, particularly with a system whose operating software is as complex as the Amiga’s. We wish you the best in your C programming efforts! ¦
Mark L. Van Name is vice president and co-founder of Foresight Computer Corp. and a freelance writer. Bill Catchings is a freelance writer and software developer. Write to them at 10024 Sycamore Road, Durham, NC 27703.
The Amiga Connection
AMIGA COMPUTERS PRINTERS SOFTWARE
SYSTEM PACKAGE *1199°°
JUKI 5510C PRINTER $ 45900
EPSON
LX-86 120 cps .239.00
FX-85, FX-286 Call
EX-800, EX-1000 ..Call
LQ-800, LQ-1000, LQ-2500 ....Call
HI80 4 Pen Plotter ......359.00
Free book w purchase HEWLETT PACKARD
Plotters ...Call
JUKI
5510C Color Dot Matrix ...Call
6000 12 cps Daisywheel .Call
6100 18 cps Daisywheel .Call
6200 30 cps Wide Carriage ....Call
6300 40 cps Wide Carriage .Call
NEC
CP660 Color Printer ...589.00
OKIDATA
Okimate 20 Color Printer ...129.00
ML-182 120 cps Dot Matrix 219.00
ML-193 + , ML-292 + , ML-293 + .Call
STAR MICRONICS
NL-10 Font Compatible ...Cali
NX-10 120 cps Dot Matrix .219.00
TOSHIBA
P321 24 Wire 80 column ...479.00
P341 24 Wire 136 column .589.00
P351 24 Wire 136 column ..... 1049.00
Amiga 1000, 512K, Mouse, Amiga 1080 RGB Monitor, Amiga DOS, Basic, Tutorial, Kaleidoscope and Voice Synthesis Library
Genlock Interface .. 249.00
256K RAM expansion .149.00
ACCESSORIES
DATA SHIELD
300 Watt Backup ...
.....379.00
500 Watt Backup ...
589. 00
Turbo 350 Walt Backup
449. 00
P125 Power Director ....
99,99
P150 Power Director w Modem
.....119.00
S85 Surge Protector .....
69.99
KALMAR DESIGNS
3Vz" Disk Cabinet - Teak .
14.99
KENSINGTON MICROWARE
Master Piece ..
..99.99
Printer stand ...
.... 19,99
j
MONITORS
AMDEK
Color 600 Hi-Res (640x240) ......399.00
Color 722 Hi-Res Dual Mode ..529.00
MAGNAVOX
515 RGB Composite ...299,00
DISK DRIVES
COMMODORE
Amiga 1010 3Y2M ...
219. 00
Amiga 1020 5V4” ...
......189.00
MICROBOTICS
20 mb Hard Drive ..
,...1299.00
NEC
JC 1401 Multtsync RGB In Stock
ZENITH
ZVM 1220 1230 ..(ea.) S99.99
ZVM 1330 16 color RGB ....459.00
AMIGA
1080 Hi-Res Color ......279.00
MODEMS
DISKETTES
MAXELL
3V2” DS DD (10) 21.99
574” DS DD (10) 15.99
SONY
3V2" DS DD (5 w case) ..9.99
31 2’’ DS DD (10) .... 21.99
5Va" DS DD (10) 12.99
AMARAY
30 Disk Tub 3V2” 9.99
GENERIC
3V2m DS DD (10) 19.99
3V2m DS DD Bulk 50 Pack ...89.99
ANCHOR
Volksmodem 300 1200 139.00
Signalman Express 1200 EXT ......199.00
Lightning 2400 Baud EXT ..319.00
HAYES
Smartmodem 300 139.00
Smartmodem 1200 .....389.00
Smartmodem 2400..... ..599.00
COMMODORE
Amiga 1680-1200 BPS 179.00
PRACTICAL PERIPHERALS
1200 BPS External .....169.00
Micro Systems
ORGANIZE $ 64"
ACTIVISION
Borrowed Time ..32.99
Hacker ..32.99
Mind Shadow ....32.99
AEGIS DEVELOPMENT
Animation Images ..79.99
BATTERIES INCLUDED
Isgur Portfolio System .169.00
COMMODORE
Textcrafl w Graphic Craft .....59.99
Musicraft .....79.99
TLC Logo ....79.99
Amiga Pascal ....79.99
Lattice “C" .... 119.00
Assembler ...79.99
Lisp ....156.00
Enhancer DOS 1.2 14.99
DISCOVERY SOFTWARE
Marauder Back-up .32.99
ELECTRONIC ARTS
Deluxe Paint 59.99
Archon ..31.99
One on One .31.99
Sky Fox 31.99
Financial Cookbook ......37.99
Seven Cities of Gold ....31.99
Arctic Fox ...... 31.99
Deluxe Print ... 74.99
Instant Music .....34.99
Deluxe Video .....69.99
1NFOCOM
Wishbringer .31.99
Hitchhiker's Guide .31.99
Spellbreaker . ...31.99
Planetfall ...... 31.99
Witness 31.99
MEGASOFT LTD
A-Copier ......34.99
A-Report ......44.99
MICRO ILLUSIONS
Dynamic-Cad ...349.00
MINDSCAPE
Hailey Project ....31.99
Deja Vu ...... 34.99
Keyboard Cadet .29.99
MICRO SYSTEMS
Analyze 64.99
Scribble 64.99
On-Line Comm 49.99
SUBLOGIC
Flight Simulator II ..37.99
V. LP.
V. l-P. Professional . 139.00
COMPUTER MAIL ORDER
In the U.S.A. and Canada
Call toll-free: 1 800 233-8950
Outside the U.S.A. 717 327-9575 Telex 5106017898 Corporate and Educational Institutions call toll-free: 1 800 221-4283
C. M.O, 477 East Third Street Dept. B903, Williamsport, PA 17701
All major credit cards accepted
POLICY: Add 3%, minimum S7.00 shipping and handling. Larger shipments may require additional charges. Personal & company checks require 3 weeks clearance. For faster delivery use your credit card or send cashier's check or bank money order. PA residents add 6% sales tax. Defective software will be replaced wtlh same item only. All items subject to availability and price change. All sales final, returned shipments are subject to restocking fee
on Reader Service card.
GfxBase = (struct GfxBase )
OpenLibrary ("graphics library11, LIB R A R Y_V E R SIO N);
if (GfxBase == NULL) exit (FALSE);
* Create a window with the specified title. Exit on error *
if (wind_create (& m y_windo w, "Fun and Games")) exit (FALSE);
* Ask for mouse button, window closing and window' sizing events *
ModifylDCMP (my_ window, MOUSEBUTTONS | CLOSEWINDOW | NEWSIZE);
* Modify my window's pointer to the shape defined in ptr_data.
The new pointer is to be 13 dots high by 16 dots wide. Make the center the activation point. *
SetPointer (my_window, ptr_data, 13, 16, -8, -6);
* Display a target box and tell me where it is and when it was done *
putbox (my_window, &boxx, &boxy, & old m illis);
* Do this forever! ;7
while (TRUE)
(
* Wait until there is an IDCMP message for my window pending *
Wait (1 my_window -> UserPort -> mp_SigBit);
* Get as many messages as are in the queue for my window's UserPort *
while ((message = (struct IntuiMessage *)
Get Msg (my_window -> UserPort)))
(
* Get. The data we want from the message *
class = message -> Class; code = message -> Code; ptrx = message -> MouseX; ptry = message -> MouseY;
¦'' Translate the event's time into milliseconds (approximately)
millis = (message -> Seconds 10) + (message -> Micros >> 10);
* Reply to the message *
Re ply Msg (message);
¦'- Handle the message based on its class *
switch (class)

case CLOSE WINDOW: * If the window is closed *
ClearPointer (my_window); * restore the pointer, *
Close Window (my_window); * close up the window *
exit (TRUE); * and exit *
case NEWSIZE: * Give a new target if resized :;7
putbox (m y_window, &boxx, Sboxy, & old m illis); break;
case MOUSEBUTTONS: If the mouse button is used
if (code == SELECTUP) * and if it is a selecL up *
(
Check if the pointer and the box are close enough to count as a "hit". If so, compute the score as the milliseconds since the box was displayed less than 3 seconds. Make sure the score is not negative and add it to the total score. Display the results *
Listing continued on p. 106.
Introducing Alegra: The Amiga ™ Memory Expansion Unit from Access Associates.
512 K now.
Now you can add 512 K bytes of external memory to your Amiga. In the smallest package available, a footprint only 3 4"-wide. And Alegra’s no-wait-state design lets your Amiga operate at its intended speed. No delays. With Alegra you get the benefit of fast memory at a surprisingly economical price. AND,
BEST OF ALL. IT'S AVAILABLE NOW.
Upgradeable to 2 MB later.
If you'll need 2 MB of memory in the future, Alegra is still the right choice now.
Our 2 megabyte upgrade (using 1 megabit DRAMs) will give you the memory you need in the same compact package.
I ACCESS ASSOCIATES
laaaaaa***
491 Aldo Avenue
Santa Clara, CA 95054-2303
408-727-8520
Ask for Alegra at your quality Amiga dealer.
- Amiga is a trademark of Commodcfe Ar-iga. Inc
Aegra features a 90 day pans and abor warranty agamst mar.ufacturmg detects
Circle 54 on Reader Service card.
If (fiit_ (ptrx, ptry, boxx, boxy))
(
score = 3000 - miHis + oldmiUis; if (score 0) score = 0; total += score;
write_score (my_window, total, score, ++numhit): putbox ( m v_w indow, &boxx, &boxy, & old millis);
}
break;
}
* This function creates a window with some "reasonable” default parameters. The caller specifies the title of the window and the function fills in the value of the returned window pointer -¦'
v ind_c rea te (win d o w_ptr, t:i til e) struct Window **window ptr; char Title;
¦•' Pointer to a window pointer Requested title *
*1

struct N e w W ind o w del w in do w;
def window. Left Edge = 40; def window. Top Edge = 40; def window. Width = 300; def window. Height = 100; def window, DetailPen = 0; d e f w in d o w. B1 ock P en = 1;
Window starting left edge * * and top edge *
* The window’s initial width * * and height *
def window,Title = title; ¦'• Use the caller’s title '•'
def window.Flags = SM A RT_R EFRESII | ACTIVATE | WIN I) 0 W C LOSE WIN DOW DRAG | WIND0WSIZING | WIN D 0 W DEPT H ; defwindow JDC MPFlags = CLOSE WIN DO W;
2 MB RAM BOARD PLUS
EXPANSION SLOT
499. 00
t) K MEMORY
699. 00
2MB MEMORY
46127 LANDING PKWY • FREMONT • CA • 94538
• Ram Disk Recovery Software Included
• It's Fast - NO WAIT STATE Design
• Auto-Configure Zorro Standard (2 Slots)
• Second Day Delivery Included
• Works With All Popular Software
• 86 Pin Buss Return . . . Optional
• SCSI-Multifunction Board . . . Optional
CALL (415) 656-2027
TO ORDER OR FOR A DEALER NEAREST YOU
panders
def window.Type = W BENCH SCREEN; def window. FirstGadget = NULL; def window.Check Mark = NULL; def window.Screen = NULL; def window.Bit Map = NULL;
def window. Min Width = 100; * Resizing mini mu ms and maxi munis *
def window, Min Height = AO; def windo w .Max W id th = 6 AO; def window. Max II eight. = 200;
* Open the window as specified above. Return failure if unsuccessful *
if ((* windo w_ptr = (struct Window *) Open Window (&def window)) == NULL) return (-1);
Otherwise say that all is 0 K * return (0);
}
* Display the score? *
write_score (window_ptr, tot, score, hits) str u c t W in d o w * w i n d o w ptr; long tot, score; int hits;
¦'• Window for displaying ‘V Total and last score * Number of hits *

char strjlhj; int len;
* Build the string, move to where want to put it and output the string *
len = sprintf (str, "%0Ald %0Ald (%d)1', tot, score, hits);
Move (window_ptr -> R Port, 10, 20);
Text (window_ptr -> R Port, str, len); j Listing continued on p, 108.
FOR USE BY AD AND FILM DESIGNERS, ANIMATORS, ARTISTS AND STUDENTS. WORKS WITH ALL AMIGA GRAPHIC AND CAD SOFTWARE. EASYL™ BY ANAKIN RESEARCH, INC., 100 WESTMORE DR., UNIT 11C, REXDALE, ONTARIO, CANADA, M9V 5C3, (416) 744-4246 DEALER INQUIRIES WELCOME.
Putbox (window_ptr, x, y, millis) struct Window *window_ptr;
SHORT *x, *v; long 514millis;
* Window for displaying *
Where the box was displayed -'! * When the box was displayed :7
* Static box corner array :,7
* If this is our first Lime :;7 * Use a seed based on the time ¦¦•
static WORD corners!8];
ULONG mic, sec; long tmp, rand();
if (* millis == 0)

Current Time (&sec, & mic); srand ((unsigned int) mic);
)
else

}'¦¦ Subsequent times erase the old box. Do this by taking the
background pen and using it draw over the old box s coordinates t hal are still in the static array corners "7
Set A Pen (window_ptr -> Rport, 0);
Move (window*_ptr -> Rport, corners(6], cornersfTj);
Poly Draw (window ptr -> Rport, A, corners);
)
* Get some random x and y coordinates that are within the range of our window’s size *
20) ;
- TO);
while ((top = (rand() & 0x3ff)) > window_ptr - Width
* x = tmp + 10;
while ((tmp = (rand() & Ox Iff)) > window_ptr -> Height
* y = tmp + 20;
* Build the corners around the box's center *
PACKED WITH POWER!
ZINC!™ provides you with a perfect blending of the powerful features available from the CLI environment and the simple and intuitive environment of Workbench™ where files can be manipulated by pointing at icons with the mouse. All of the basic system commands (available in
CLI) have been carefully re-designed into mouse, menu, and function key operations. This not only saves you a great deal of time, but also makes
using the AMIGA® easier than any other computer. ZINC! Is the kind of interface needed since the first
a. ,K1 computers used mouse and window interaction. In addition to enhancing and simplifying the old computer capabilities, ZING! Provides an integrated collection of new tools for the AMIGA. Everyone, from the beginner to the expert, will find using the AMIGA easier and more productive with a sidekick like ZINC!. Order yours now for only $ 79.95 plus $ 3.00 shipping and handling.
MERIDIAN SOFTWARE INCH
P. O. Box 890408 Houston, TX. 77289-0408
A ZING! Keys
TM
ZING! Is a trademark of MERIDIAN SOFTWARE, INC. AMIGA is a registered trademark of Commodore-AMIGA, Inc.
(713) 488-2144
Credit Cards and Dealer Inquiries Welcome!
Corners[0] = torners[6] = :;:x - 4;
corners! 1] = corners[3] = *y - 3;
corners[2] = corners[4] - *x -f 4;
corners! 3] = corners! 7] = *y + 3;
Get pen number one and draw the box with it *
Set A Pen (window_ptr -> R Port, 1);
Move (window plr -> R Port, corners ], corners!?]);
Poly Draw (window_ptr -> Rport, 4, corners);
* Get the current time and translate it into milliseconds *
CurrentTirne (&sec, & mic);
* millis = (sec 10) + (mic >> 10);
)
Check if the user click the pointer "close enough" to the target *
hit (xl, yl, x2, y2)
SHORT xl, vl. X2, y2;

SHORT dx, dy;
dx - xl - x2; f* Get the x and the y coordinate *
dy = y 1 v2; * differences *
* if either difference is greater the ACCURACY required return false, Otherwise return true *
8 MEGABYTES
Now RS DATA'S New POW»R»CARD
Let's You Play Like The Big Boys.
Playing games on your Amiga can be a great deal of fun, but let's be honest there's more to life than playing games. Now you can turn your computer into a real-life professional machine with the POW*R«CARD from RS DATA Systems.
The POW R»CARD is a powerful new expansion board which allows you to mature in your computer use with greater flexibility in multi-processing and multi-tasking.
POW*R*CARD starts you off with a 2 Meg capability and allows you to grow with upgrades to a huge 8 Meg RAM expansion, all on the same board so you don't waste valuable slot space. That means you can run more software without fear of Guru Meditation Numbers, out-of- memory crashes or any other small system boo-boos! What's more, you won't have to rob your piggy bank because POW«R*CARD offers this tremendous growth at a cost lower per megabyte than you'll find anywhere.
With your new POW»R*CARD,
memory expansion is as easy as 1-2-3. The POW*R«CARDand enclosure will pass through the Buss without modification for even greater expansion. So you don't have to play games with your data anymore. Graduate to bigger and better things with the POW«R«CARD from RS DATA!
Upcoming Products from RS DATA;
* New Hard Disk System, 20 & 40 megabyte memory.
• 4 Port Parallel card.
• 4 Port Serial Card, allowing more serial type peripheral use.
• 4 Slot Expansion System with horizontal board placement for system height reduction.
• Much, much more!!!
The POW*R*CARD is available now from your local Amiga dealer... or call RS DATA today!
7322 Southwest Freeway Suite 660
Houston, Texas 77074 713 988-5441
I
Help Key
Don’t pull the plug. Send your letters to Amiga- World, 80 Elm St., Peterborough, NH 03458.
I
00
as
as®
PARALLEL
TO SERIAL CONVERTER
DRIVE YOUR M ASE NNRgpfl FROMTHEPRRM;V£Lru__ '
PRINTER DRIVERS WEIRD CA s SWITCH BOX’S CUSTOM CA*-
SMART CABLES
OVER 2000 CONRGURW'ONS °N
Iredmond
CABLE p
The nation's leading software publishers use 4 Echo Data for high quality, fast turn-around and competitive prices.They don't trust their software to anyone else. Why should you?
Find out what makes Echo Data so good...
CALL: 800-533-4188 215-363-2400 in PA.
WHOLESALE BULK DISKS
MAXELL ¦ SONY - NASHUA - C. ITOH (colored disks)
500 D S Mavoll 33
(Other brands & quantities at similar savings)
Software Duplication
data services, inc.
Marsh Creek Corp Center Lionville, Pennsylvania 19353
206-882,
I We're the Leaders in *

YOUR SERIAL PORT
Moving Drivers
Q: hi the November December ’86 issue, Amiga World reviewed color printers. I now own a Canon PJ- 1080A color printer. My problem relates to the driver. It works fine, but I don't know how to copy it to other disks. I've tried dragging Preferences from one Workbench to another, but with no success. How can I copy my printer driver onto other disks so that I can use my printer with those programs? Also, do you know if there is a printer driver available for the Gemini I OX?
Fred Child Wendell Freeville, NY
A: The Preferences program doesn’t actually contain the Amiga printer drivers; these are contained in the Devs Printers
directory of vour Workbench

disk. Use the CLI to copy the Canon driver from the Devs I Printers directory of your Workbench disk to the Devs Printers directory of your other disks. With a two-drive system, the command line would look like this:
COPY DFOiDEVS PRIXTERS CANON PJl 080A TO DF1: DEVS PRINTERS CANON _PJ1080A.
With a one-drive system, you’ll
7 J
have to use the volume names of the disks instead of the physical device name (dfO:) and do some disk swapping as prompted.
Once you’ve copied the driver to a particular disk, boot vour system with that disk and
J 4
open Preferences. Go to the Change Printer screen and se-
By Bob Ryan
lect Custom as your printer.
Then click on the Custom Printer Name box and change the name to Canon_PJ1080A. Return to the main Preferences menu, click on Save, and your Canon driver is ready to go.
Regarding your second question, use the Epson driver to run your Gemini 10X with the Amiga.
Open Files, Custom Fonts and 1.2
Q: When working with Amiga Basic, I sometimes try to list my program to my printer, using either Llist or the long version of List, only to get a “File already open” message. What is the problem? Did delete a necessary file somewhere? What file is already open?
Secondly, is there any easy way to edit the character set on the Amiga?
I need math symbols for my work that are not available in any of the standard fonts. Is there a good font editor available for the Amiga?
Finally, what are the advantages of Kicks tart 1.2, and will Commodore send free updates to Amiga owners?
Gunter Hartel
Englewood, CO
A: The “File” that Amiga Basic reports being open when you try to list a program is the printer device: Remember, Amiga Basic treats devices as files. My guess is that you opened the printer device in a program and then exited the program without closing the file. To take care of the problem, simply type CLOSE in the output window before listing the file.
COMPUTER
ORDERS 1-800-221-6086
ONLY 1-800-843-3485 AZ.
The 1.2 Amiga Enhancer Software Kit has a font editor in the Tools drawer on the Amiga Extras disk. This is one good example of the 1.2 enhancements; other advantages of 1.2 over 1.1 have been pretty well covered in our info.phile columns in this issue and in the last issue. Everyone with an Amiga should upgrade to the new operating
system.

The 1.2 enhancement (which contains Kickstart. Workbench and the Amiga Extras disk with, among other things, a revised Amiga Basic) is available as of this writing. My local dealer is selling it for $ 12.50: It is not a free upgrade.
Directory Suicide
Q: have two AmigaDOS batch files for working with a RAM disk. As you can see, the first creates a C directory on the disk, moves the CLI commands to the disk, and then designates the Ramx directory as the system command directory. The second file is supposed to delete the RAM disk.
Tnakeram
echo “Putting DOS commands into RAM." Cd sysx makedir ram:c assign x: copy assign d: ramx x: assign d: x: dir d: x: delete d: x: execute d: x: copy d: x: type d: x: list d: x: info d:
x: run d: x: cd d: x: ed d: assign c: ramie
kitIrani assign c: sysx delete ramx ? Delete ramx cd sysx
My problem is with the second file; it fails to delete the Ramx directory even though it does delete all the files in the directory. When I get to the command delete ramie, I get the message “Not deleted-object in use." Why can’t I delete the C directory?
Jim Ernest APO, New York
A: I like the way that you made assignments for Copy and Ramx in your Makcram file thus cutting down your typing but I think that this is the cause of your problem. 1 executed your files under both
Workbench 1.1 and 1.2 and I encountered the same thing you did; the Ramx directory will not delete. Before bashing my head against a wall, however, I tried something different: I removed your assignment of Ramx to d; and edited Makeram, substituting Ramx for d:. Lo and behold, when I ran Killram, the C directory was deleted. Problem solved.
Why did you get the “Object in use” message? I think the reason was simply that you had assigned a logical name to Ramx. The system then considered Ramx “in use” and wouldn’t let you delete ItM
CALL IF YOU DON'T SEE IT !!!
Games
£26 £26 £26 £26 £24 £32 £32 £26 £30 £29 £32 £32 £29 £32
£29 £24-£32 £32 £29 £35 £25 £26 £35 £26 £23 £39
Adventure Constructor! Sel Arch on
A chon II Adept AjcSc Fox Arena AucDud Bard's Tale Borrowed Time Bretaccas Chessmastar 2000 Deep Space Fight Simulator H acker Hacker II
Haley Project Intoccm Games War We Madness Wind shadow Mod* after Rogue Skytox Star Fleet I Super Huey
T am pie erf Asphai Tril ogy Ultima III
Hsrttwgre
2S6K RAW Expansion
£78
2WB RAW Expansion
£595
A-Time
£49
Camera WV1410 wAens
£225
Mas Drive 20
col
PenmouseKurto
£240
Printer -Okim ate 20
£223
Starboard 022 Megabytes
col
Proaram & Uti
lity
BBS PC
£62
C-64 Emulator
cal
D9C3 Ubrary
£127
Dbm an
£106
OiskWk
£36
Lattice *C‘ Compiler
£115
Usp
£139
Mac Library
£64
Manx *C* (Developers)
£203
Marauder II
£29
Mirror
£34
Moduta 2 (Developers)
£112
Pascal
£70
Schematics
£22
Screen Editor
£85
Superbase
cal
Text Utility
£64
Customer Support
(602) 258-4943

I
I
I
I
I
I
I
MAIL ORDERS TO:
Computer Best
P. O. Box 48407 Phoenix, Arizona 85075
We
Gladly
Accept
Discovery Mati
£24
Discovery Speing
£24
First Shapes
£33
Kid Taft
S35
Keyboard Cadet
£29
Utile Computer People
£31
MathTak
£39
Master type
£26
Speller Bee
£35
Taking Coloring Bock
£23
OueueTiles
£44
Business and Home
2 + 2 Home Management
£64
Aegis Impact
£126
Analyze
£63
Financial Cookbook
£33
Row
£74
Gizmos
£37
Maxi-Comm
£32
Maxi-Desk
£45
Maxi-Plan
£97
Mi Amiga Fite
£61
Mi Amiga Ledger
£61
Mi Amiga Word
cal
OnUnel
£46
Organize
$ 63
Rags to Rich as X3L
£139
Scribble
$ 63
Textaraft
£54
Unicalc
£61
Vlp Professional
£145
Sound and GraDhics
Aegis Art Pi* 1
£22
Aegis t>aw +
£170
Animator 4 mages
$ 99
Computer ArtGalery
£14
Deluxe Music
£65
Deluxe Pant II
£85
Deluxe Print
£65
Deluxe Video
£65
Digi-View Digifzar
£143
Digital Unk
£55
Dpaint Art and Ubiety Disk
£19
Dprint Art and Uiity Disk
£19
Dynamic Cad
CALL
Future Sound
£129
Gallery ol Images
£14
Grobbit
£23
Images
£52
Instant Music
£32
M»di Device
£36
Print Master
£32
Perfect Sound
£59
Zuma Fonts
£23
IKE
Buy Any Two Amiga
Electronic Arts™
Programs, and choose any
one of these programs FREE.
Archon Archon II
Adv. Const. 7 Cities
One On One Finacial Ckbf
mmm mmm Hi mmm mmm mma mmm •
ada67%Sa**Ti4-S3C0 Unrrwn Sf>ccv-q . _ Al PfC*«Sut»*ct to CnarQt HopaUy Dow' ) JM
AmigaWorld is a member of CW Communications Inc. group, the world’s largest publisher of computer-related information. The group publishes over 70 computer publications in more than 28 major countries. 12 million people read one or more of the group's publications each month. Members of CWCI group contribute to the CW International Sews Service, offering the latest on domestic and international computer news. Members of the gTOup include: ARGENTINA’S Computerworld Argentina, PC Mundo; .ASIA’S Asian Computerworld, Communications World-, AUSTRALIA’S Computerworld Australia, Communications World. Australian PC World. Australian Macworld-, AUSTRIA'S Computerwelt Oes- terreich-, BRAZIL’S DataSews, PC Mundo; CHILE’S Information, Computacion Personal; DENMARK’S Com- puterumld Danmark, PC World Danmark, RUN; FINLAND’S Tietoviikko, Mikro; FRANCE’S Le Monde Informatique, Distributique, Golden, InfoPC, Theoreme; GREECE’S Micro & Computer Age; HUNGARY’S SZT Computerworld. Mikrovilag; INDIA’S Dataquest; ISRAEL’S People CT Computers Monthly, People Cif Computers Weekly; ITALY’S Computerworld Italia, PC World Magaz i ne; J A PA N ’ S Computerworld Japan; MEXICO’S Computerworld Mexico; THE NETHERLANDS’ Computerworld Setherlands, PC World Setherlands; NEW ZEALAND’S Computerworld Sew Zealand; NORWAY’S PC Mikrodata, Computerworld Sorge; PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA’S China Computerworld; SAUDI ARABIA’S Arabian Computer Sews; SOUTH KOREA’S The Electronic Times; SPAIN’S Computenvorld Espana, Commodore World, PC World Espana; SWEDEN’S Computer Sweden, Mikro- datom, Svenska PC World; SWITZERLAND’S Computerworld Schweiz; UNITED KINGDOM’S Computer Sews, DEC Today. ICL Today, PC Business World; UNITED STATES’ AmigaWorld, Boston Computer Sews. Computenvorld, Digital Sews, 80 Micro. FOCI'S Publications, inCider, InfoWorld, MacW’orld, Micro Mar- ketworld, Setwork World, PC World. Publish!. RUS; V E N E Z U EL A’S Co mp u ter wo rid Venezuela; W EST GERMANY’S Computenvoche, PC Welt, Computer Business, Run. Info Welt
Manuscripts: Contributions in the form of manuscripts with drawings and or photographs are welcome and will be considered for possible publication. AmigaWorld assumes no responsibility for loss or damage to any material. Please enclose a self-addressed, stamped envelope with each submission. Payment for the use of any unsolicited material will be made upon acceptance. All contributions and editorial correspondence (typed and double-spaced, please) should be directed to AmigaWorld Editorial Offices, 80 Elm Street. Peterborough, NH 03158; telephone: 603-924-9471. Advertising Inquiries should be directed to Advertising Offices, CW Communications Peterborough, Inc., 80 Elm Street, Peterborough, NH 03458; telephone: 800-441-4403. Subscription problems or address changes: Call 1-800-227-5782 or write to AmigaWorld, Subscription Department, PO Box 868, Farmingdale, NY 1 1737. Problems with advertisers: Send a description of the problem and your current address to: AmigaW'orld, 80 Elm Street, Peterborough. NH 03458, ATTN.: Barbara Harris, Customer Service Manager, or call 1-800-441-4403.
List of Advertisers
Reader Service S umber
175 AbSoft, 100 54 Access Associates, 105
AmigaWorld Subscription, 64, 65
82
Special Issue, 89 Anakin Research, 52
205
Applegren Computer
29
Systems, Inc., 101 Applied Visions, 63
197
Baudville, 99
58
Best Computer Supplies, 93
57
Bethesda Softworks, 11
163
Brown-Wagh Publishing, Inc., 43
164
Brown-Wagh Publishing, Inc., 45
165
Brown-Wagh Publishing, Inc., 47
42
Byte By Byte, CIV
59
C Ltd., 79
170
Cardinal Software. 74
110
Compumed, 55
114
Computerware, 96
207
Computer Best, 111
161
Computer Discount, 71
41
Computer Mail Orcer, 103
60
Creative Solutions, 78
127
Computer Swap. 6
189
Computer Systems Associates, 48
172
Data Research Processing, Inc., 100
202
Delta Research, 96
46
Digital Solutions, Inc., Cll, 1
89
Discovery Software, 7
193
Eagle Tree Software, 76

Echo Data Services, 110
2
Electronic Arts, 51
51
Finally Software, 73
91
Finally Software, 73
111
Finally Software, 73
135
FutureSoft Applications, Inc., 53
26
Go AMIGA, 14, 15
150
Gold Disk, 59
141
I. S.M., Inc., 98
23
Lattice, Inc., 61
48
M. W. Ruth Company, 74
31
Manx, 57
0
Master Designer Software, 5
180
Megatromcs, Inc., 95
56
Meridian Software, Inc., 108
16
Metacomco Software, 6
98
Metadigm, Inc., 85
Reader Service S umber
37
Micro Illusion, Clll
103
MicroBotics, 75
198
Microprose Software, 16
195
Microsmiths, 91
52
Mimetics, 81
38
New Horizons Software, 13
102
Newtek, 25
119
Newtek, 27
75
Oxxi, Inc., 9
181
Pacific Cypress. 106
200
Pilot Enterprizes, 101
159
Progressive Peripherals & Software. 31
160
Progressive Peripherals & Software. 33
137
Progressive Peripherals & Software, 35
184
Progressive Peripherals & Software, 71
78
RS Data Systems, 109
113
Redmond Cable, 110
67
Sedona Software, 12
132
Side Effects Inc., 96
147
Software Digest, 87
134
Software Shop, 97
201
Spencer Organization, 88
116
Star Flite, 83
208
Supra Corporation, 49
120
Tdl Software Inc, 30
61
The 64 Store. 98
126
The Other Guys, 107
62
Transtime Technologies Corp.
203
Wave Table Technologies, 76
* This advertiser prefers to be contacted directly
This index is provided as an additional service. The publisher does not assume liability for errors or omissions.
TO RECEIVE MORE INFORMATION AMIGA
TEAR
LOOK FOR
CIRCLE
the numbers on the card that correspond to the reader service numbers on the advertisements that interest you.
ORDER
MAIL
out the perforated card. Pfease print or type your name and address where indicated.
Your subscription in 10 to 12 weeks.
The card with your check, money order or U S, currency to; AmigaWorid Reader Service Dept.
P. O. Box 363 Dalton, MA 01227 Or, you may request billing.
A one year subscription to AmigaWorid by circling 500 on the card.
REMEMBER
READER SERVICE
to put the proper postage on the card.
MARCH APRIL 1987
? Mr.
This card valid until May 31, 1987.
? Mrs.
n Ms Name
1
6
11
16
21
XI
208
211
216
221
* 01
* 06
411
416
421
2
7
12
17
22
202
207
212
217
222
* 02
407
412
417
422
Titlp
3
9
13
16
23
203
206
213
210
223
403
408
413
418
423
4
9
14
10
24
204
209
214
210
224
* 0*
409
414
419
424
5
10
15
30
X
205
210
215
220
225
406
410
415
420
425
Address
26
31
X
41
46
226
231
238
241
246
426
431
436
441
446
27
X
V
42
47
227
232
237
242
2*7
427
432
437
* 42
447
t Jitv statp in
23
X
X
43
46
226
233
238
243
246
426
433
438
* 43
446
29
34
X
44
49
220
234
239
244
249
420
434
* 30
444
449
Telephone
30
35
*0
46
50
230
236
2*0
245
250
430
* 35
* 40
* 45
460
51
56
61
X
71
251
256
261
266
271
451
458
461
466
471
A How woukJ vou rat* to* eeue ct A-n jaWoncfT (pek one)
Oil Dgut Canvas C 14 Read* Serve* Card
f- • *> I -» - - - - , v w a-
52
57
X
67
72
252
257
262
267
272
452
457
462
467
472
O 1. GREAT
05 Fa
53
55
X
M
73
251
258
263
266
273
* 13
456
463
* 66
* 73
O 2 Very Good
06 POU
"Z Artoea ? Is Everytong G 13 Ccveri
54
X
64
to
74
254
250
264
269
274
454

464
469
474
C 3 Freer, Good
0 7 Very Poor
55
X
X
70
75
255
200
266
270
275

* 80
* 65
470
475
04 Good
? 9 ’anOe
F Ahcto ot toa tottowmg caegonaa do you plan to puctoaaa xffevt
B Wat w9 be you new major panctoor* n-rctoaa*7
Tom n to* rert 12 moy**?
76
81
«
01
X
276
XI
2K
29!
296
476
* 81
406
401
490
? 1. Monitor
C B Sidecar
0 1. Erttolarmert ? 0. Dautoeeo Managemart
77
52
87
02
97
277
282
267
292
297
* 77
462
487
492
497
? 2 Pr rtnr
0 7 Gen Lock o> Frame Grabber
? 2 Sword Fvcceeeng ? 10. Fvancai Man*gemem
75
X
X
X
96
278
283
2K
293
298
476
* 63
486
493
496
0 3 Modorr
G 9 I4u*c (Md, Keyboard, me)
? 3 Communcatons ? 11. Grapbcs
79
64
X
94
OS
279
264
269
29*
299
479
464
469
494
499
0 4 Memory ;i»i»cr
C'9 Otoer
? 4 Soreadaxeti C 12. Edxabon
ao
65
X
X
too
260
265
290
295
300
460
465
* 90
4X
500
0 5 Oak Owe (hard or fcpcy!
0 5 Home Praducsvfy C 13. Mu*c ? B Proff-arrmng ? 14. Hard*ere Dtofetocmert
C. Check K d toe oncJngj rat bea comc*ia to* aenance Mo* ct
G 7 ScPware Dratogmert ? 15 ScundSpeecb Oevetoomert
1(71

111
116
121
3QT
306
311
316
XI
XI
506
511
516
Xi
AmgeWorid e .
? 8 VoaoGractoc* Oetoon ? 16 CAOK>M
102
107
112
117
122
302
307
312
317
322
502
507
512
517
522
C 1 Jut R>y»
C 6 Uttaoes
G H»re you ewer puctoaaed a product after reoevng toe r*xn*on
103
106
113
116
123
303
306
313
316
323
503
506
513
518
523
? 2 Too Smcla
C 7, Hurotorg
104
109
114
110
124
304
300
311
310
324
50*
500
514
519
X*
? 3 Too Compku
CB Baaed
you've requeaat from an A mgaYAxtJ 'Otokw «ervce card?
N a t... - r- a ii_
106
110
115
IX
125
305
310
315
320
325
506
510
615
520
525
? 4 huff
0 9 iTvakiBbio
? 1. Vea ? 2 No
? 5 UaaAJ
H Where op you buy you compuet produasT (Pleaee pek one)
126
131
IX
141
146
326
XI
338
341
3*6
526
XI
5M
541
5*6
D. Ahal Kora wcUd you l*>e to we covered n Mue eouee ct Amge
? 1 Compuet Dealer C 4 OacourtOeparmer* Gore P ? UU Order n ft Owr
? 3 Man toWOr
127
IE
137
142
147
327
332
337
3*2
3*7
527
532
53?
542
547
Ifttrlcf7 (fftoaao pc* pvoe.)
126
IX
IX
143
146
328
333
333
3*3
3*6
526
533
S38
5*3
5*6
O 1. C Lan age
C 11 how cccrs toe Amge
129
134
139
144
149
329
334
330
3*4
3*9
529
53*

5*4
5*9
C 2 Anga Base
? 12 Boyers Gu»o«
1 Oo you Own en Amrja?
IX
IX
140
145
150
330
335
340
3*5
350
530
535
540
5*5
550
? 3 . CU
O 13 Comparacve Reveyw*
Cl Vk ? 2 No
? 4 Tykeocmmuicaor*
? 14 Muse
351
? 6 Buaneaa Ap(ioHons
? 15 Grertocs
J. Where do you uae you Amga?
151
156
161
IX
171
356
Ml
36€
371
551
556
Mi
565
571
? 6 IBM Comp*4rf*y
? 10 Program Labngs
? 1 Horn* D 5 Boto M (wma and work
152
157
IX
167
172
352
367
362
X7
372
552
557
562
567
572
? 7 Homo ApctcaPons
? 17 New Products
? 2 Wtork C 6 Both M (>omo and Ktoou
153
155
IX
IX
173
353
356
363
368
373
553
556
563
566
573
? B Education
O 16 Qprwn*
? 3 Schoct O 7. 1 doril uea an Am a
154
159
164
IX
174
354
359
36*
369
374
554
59
564
5X
574
C 9 Vdeo
0 19 Hardware ProytoS
0 4 Aj home tor buarme
155
IX
165
170
175
356
360
36$
370
375
555
580
565
570
575
C 10 Scenco and Engneenng
? 20 Oer
K « to* you oocy ct AmgBWtond?
E What are (evorta 1000e abou AmoaWoncf’ Pbase gck to*
G 1 Yea C 2 No
178
181
IX
101
IX
376
Ml
366
391
396
576
581
566
591
596
apery)
0 V Zetgoat (Edtofa Page)
177
IX
187
IX
197
377
382
367
392
397
577
562
537
592
587
? 6 'uonals
L F you are .TQt a aubecrber daase crde 499
173
153
IX
IX
IX
378
383
368
333
396
578
563
568
583
566
? 2 Reoanee (Leoers)
C 7 Hors dbeuwres (hxtsbpa)
M ft you would ** * xe yeat subeoxiux to AmgeWorid (a* eaueei.
179
154
IN
194
139
379
364
389
394
399
579
56*
589
58*
599
? 3. Intarvw*
O 6 Ad ertteemerts
Dtoaso cede 500 on to* cam Each autNCdpoon I* $ 1*97 (Canecia ft
IX
185
IX
IX
200
380
3X
39C
395
400
580
565
590
585
600
? 4 Hatp Key (Quoajona)
0 0. Ftowww*
Mo a co $ 17 97. Fuegn Suiece $ 3* 97. One year c Vy-U a BANK
? 5 rnrtturte
C 10 New*
FUNDS ONLY) Pieeae Mew 10-12 week* tor (Mvery
LU
O
dc
LU
cn cc
LU
O

LU
DC
MARCH APRIL 1987
771 s card valid until May 31, 1987.
? Mr.
? Mrs.
? Ms. Name
Title _
L If you are nc* a auKoce pieaae crcte 499
M. IT yaj *oj*d Iko ¦ one year subacrxxon to A rugeWortd (ex eaues), Dtoaso crda 500 On be card Each tuCempton a 114 97 (Canada & M*.CC 117.97. Rragn SuHaoa $ 34 97 . On* y*to arty (J S BANK FUNDS OnlY) ‘heeet 10-12 weaka tor dto-ary
1
6
11
16
21
201
206
211
216
221
401
406
411
416
421
2
7
12
17
22
202
207
212
217
222
402
407
412
* 17
* 22
3
6
13
16
23
203
206
213
218
223
403
406
413
418
423
4
9
14
19
24
204
200
214
2T9
224
404
400
414
419
424
5
10
15
20
a
206
210
215
220
225
405
410
415
420
* 25
26
31
M
41
46
226
231
236
241
246
426
431
436
44)
446
27
X
37
42
47
227
232
237
242
247
427
432
437
442
447
28
33
36
*3
40
226
233
238
243
246
428
433
43a
443
448
29
34
»
44
40
229
23*
239
2*4
249
429
434
* 39
444
449
X
35
40
*5
50
230
235
2*0
2*5
250
430
435
440
445
* 50
51
X
81
X
71
»1
246
Ml
266
271
451
* 56
XI
4X
471
X
57
X
67
72
252
257
262
267
272
*X
* 57
4X
467
472
X
56
X
66
73
253
256
263
268
773
* 53
* 56
463
* 68
473
54
59
64
to
74
254
250
264
280
274
454
450
464
480
474
55
60
65
70
75
255
260
265
270
275
455
460
465
470
475
76
8!
X
01
X
276
261
2X
291
296
476
461
486
491
4X
77
X
67
X
07
277
M2
267
292
297
477
432
487
* 92
* 97
78
83
X
93
X
278
2X
268
293
296
476
* 33
408
* 93
4X
79
84
89
94
99
270
26*
260
29*
299
479
484
* 80
494
409
X
X
90
X
IX
260
286
290
295
300
400
405
* 30
*x
500
101
IX
111
116
121
301
306
311
316
XI
501
506
511
516
HI
IX
107
112
117
122
302
»?
312
317
322
502
507
512
517
522
103
IX
113
118
123
303
306
313
318
323
501
506
513
SIB
523
104
IX
114
119
124
304
300
314
310
324
50*
506
514
519
524
106
110
115
120
IX
305
310
315
320
325
506
510
515
520
525
126
131
136
141
1*6
326
331
336
341
348
526
Xi
516
5*1
5*6
127
IX
137
1*2
147
327
332
337
342
347
577
532
S37
5*2
5*7
12S
ix
136
1*3
140
326
333
336
343
348
528
533
538
5*3
5*6
129
134
139
1*4
140
329
334
339
3*4
349
529
534
539
544
5*9
130
IX
140
145
150
330
335
340
345
350
530
535
5*0
545
550
151
156
161
IX
171
151
356
Ml
388
371
XI
556
561
566
571
IX
IX
IX
167
172
3X
357
162
M7
372
552
557
562
567
572
IX
isa

IX
173
353
168
363
166
373
553
558
563
566
571
15*
159
164

174
35*
159
16*
169
374
554
550
554
569
574
155

155
170
175
355
160
IX
370
375
565
560
565
570
575
175
181
1X
191
IX
376
Mi
386
391
396
576
56i
5X
591
506
177
IX
IX
IK
197
377
382
387
392
387
577
582
567
592
597
178
IX
IX
103
IX
378
383
386
333
336
578
563
568
583
596
179
164
IX
104
199
379
36*
368
394
399
579
564
569
50*
599
160
165
190
IX
200
380
385
190
395
400
580
565
590
5X
600
Address
LU
O
City State Zip Telephone_
ct VnyeiVyer* (pc* one)
05 he
06 “0U
C 7 very Poor 0 6 Terrt*
K How woud you toe
c 1 GREAT
C ? Good C 3 Pieffy Good ? 4 Good
O 11 ? 12 ? 13 Cowers
Dcam**
? 14 n«ecto Serve* Card C 15 E eryflwng
DC
LU
CO
F. When Ct toe to*ow ng c*egc»es do you p*n 10 puchaee ao*ware (ram n toe nex 12 morms?
? 1. E.teranmart C 2. Wbrd Praceaang C 3 Comrrk«*one G 4. Screotfan C 5 Home Praducsvf,
C 6 PrOgrarmng
B Wh* mI be ou' mayar peripheral purchase?
? 9 Daab Management
? 10 Fnano* Managemart
? 11 Gracbes
? 12. Educator
? 13 Uuac
? 14 Hardware Dtoetoamert
? 15 SomScwcff Oerectrert
? 16 CAEVCAM
C 1 C 2 0 3. C*
O 5
? G 5.1acju
? 7 Gen Lock or Frame Grabber
? 6 Mjbc (Met Keyboard ee) CO. Ouer
Mornear
Modem
Memory Etpenwcr Oak Dme (herd » »ccpy)
C. Chec* at ct toe AmgeWortd e ...* C i. Jm Rtf
C 2. Too Smjro ? 3 Too Corrpte O 4 Fluff
0 5 UaakJ
endngs rut boa crr-am too terrence Me* ct
O 7, Sctiwere Devekxmer* C e Vdeo&Ktoce Creeper
DC
LU
Q

LU
DC
G Have you ewer purchnaod a product after rwww.j r« ntormtfjan you we r k> nit, 1 kom to A ngeWchd read* serve* card?
? I la ? 2 No
H Mher« do yaj buy your eomoutor :¦ ?Jia’ (Pieaae pek one)
C 4 OecoutCeamari Store 05 Oto*_
O 1 Compel* De*er 02 Mat Order 0 3 Mtojfscajrer
I Oo yOu own ST Ayngs?
? I v«
J Vwiere cto you uee you Amga?
? 1. Hcma CZWn C 3 Scroa
? 4 At noma tor bums
K. la toe yxr cop, ct Atioe'fttond’
? 1. Yes
D 'ffffi* tocra wxid you ike la rtWtf? (Fhmn tx* Throe)
O V C Languege
? 2 Amge B**c
C 3 CXI
? 4 Tetacommunearons
? 5 Botin** Appkcacro G 6 IBM Gompatcaty
O 7 Home Aptkcatons
? 9 tJuu*x O 9 Vdoo
C >0 Sconce and Erignoamg
see cowered n hjixe sues ct Amge
Oil Hew ctoars use toe Airsgt C 12 Buyer * Gudas
? 13 Comceracve Renew*
0 i* Mu*e
? T5 Grecbc*
C ifl P-ogram utongs G 17 New Prooxa 016 Concna
? 19 Hardware Projaca 0 20 Otoer
C 2 NO
? 5 Boto « homo and work C 6 Bar m home and eboct
O 7 i ocn i u«e to Amiga
£ Wt* are your te-crto rings about ArngtoVartP (Please ock at n*
* xry)
O 1 Zetge®i fEdtor * Page)
? 2 Repaint Lenus)
? 3. Irwrvtowa
? 4 Halo Key (Oua exi*)
? 5 hft ra
O 2 No
? 6 Tutorials
O 7. Hors d oeuvTss (Nrcsrtga)
? 6 Adrecaemarts C- 9 Rrtvwwn
C 10 New*
TO RECEIVE MORE INFORMATION AMIGA
LOOK FOR
your subscription in 10 to 12 weeks
TEAR
ORDER
a one year subscription to AmigaWorld by circling 500 on the card.
MAIL
out the perforated card. Please print or type your name and address where indicated.
The card with your check, money order or U.S. currency to: AmigaWorld Reader Service Dept.
P. O. Box 363 Dalton, MA 01227 Or, you may request billing.
REMEMBER
to put the proper postage on the card.
READER SERVICE
CIRCLE
the numbers on the card that correspond to the reader service numbers on the advertisements that interest you.
AmigaWorld
PLACE
STAMP
HERE
ATTN: Reader Service Dept.
P. O. Box 363 Dalton, MA 01227
PLACE
STAMP
HERE
AmigaWorld
ATTN: Reader Service Dept.
P. O. Box 363 Dalton, MA 01227
Become A Charter Subscriber And Save Nearly
37% OFF
The Cover Price
YES.
I want to save 25% off the bask rate. Enter my one year subscription (6 issues) to AmigaWorld for the low charter subscription price of $ 14.97. If I'm not satisfied at any time, I will receive a full refund no questions asked!
Name
Address
Zip
? Payment Enclosed
? Bill Me
State
Please make check payable to AmigaWbrld. Canada and Mexico $ 17.97, 1 year only, US funds drawn on US bank. Foreign Surface $ 34.97, 1 year only. US funds drawn on US bank. Foreign Airmail please inquire. Please allow 6-8 weeks for delivery. This offer is for new subscribers only.
City
373B2A
If s the lowest subscription offer you’ll ever find for AmigaWorld... the new computer magazine for users of the newest (!om modore com pi iter.
• AmigaWorld. .. the only Amiga-specific magazine on the market. It’s as fresh and dazzling as the computer itself!
• Amiga World.. .where expert authors will lead you through the exciting and revolutionary features of the Amiga!
• AmigaWorld... helping you discover and utilize a whole new world of computer graphics and sounds!
• AmigaWorld.. .because creative computing was never so exciting and easy!
Get 1 Year (Six Issues)
Of Amiga World At The Special Introductory Rate Of $ 14.97 That’s 25% Off The Basic Subscription Price!
The CW Communications Guarantee
As the world's largest publisher of computer-related information, we unconditionally guarantee your AmigaWbrld subscription. If you’re not completely satisfied, tell us. We’ll refund the full price of your subscription no questions asked.
YES.
I want to
Name
save 25% off the bask rate. Enter my one year subscription (6 issues) to AmigaWbrld for die low charter subscription price of $ 14.97. If Fm not satisfied at any time, 1 will receive a full refund no questions asked!
Address
Zip
? Payment Enclosed
? Bill Me
YES
I want to save 25% off the bask rate. Enter my one year subscription (6 issues) to AmigaWbrld for the tow charter subscription price of $ 14.97. If Em not satisfied at any time, 1 will receive a full refund no questions asked!
? Payment Enclosed

? Bill Me
State
City
Please make check payable to AmigaWorld. Canada and Mexico $ 17.97,1 year only, US funds drawn on US bank. Foreign Surface $ 34.97,1 year only, US funds drawn on US bank. Foreign Airmail please inquire. Please allow 6-8 weeks for delivery'. This offer is for new subscribers only.
373B2A
Name
Address
State
Zip
City-
Please make check payable to AmigaVbrld Canada and Mexico $ 17.97,1 year only. US funds drawn on US bank. Foreign Surface $ 34.97, 1 year only, US funds drawn on US bank. Foreign Airmail please inquire. Please allow 6-8 weeks for delivery. This offer is for new subscribers only.
BUSINESS REPLY MAIL
First Gass Permit No 73 Peterborough NH 03458 POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE
CW Communications Peterborough AmigaWorld PO Box 868 Farmingdale, NY 11737
AMIGA
Become A Charter Subscriber And Save Nearly
NO POSTAGE NECESSARY IF MAILED IN THE UNITED STATES
37% OFF
The Cover Price
I I I I I I II I I I I M I I I I 11 I I t I I I I I M I I I I I I I I H I I I I I ! I I I I
NO POSTAGE NECESSARY IF MAILED IN THE UNITED STATES
111111 a 111E1111 a 111111 • 111111111111 i 111111111111 ¦ 11
NO POSTAGE NECESSARY IF MAILED IN THE UNITED STATES
BUSINESS REPLY MAIL
First Gass Permit No 73 Peterborough NH 03458 POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE
CW Comnumirations Peterix)rough AmigaWorld PO Box 868 Farmingdale, NY 11737
BUSINESS REPLY MAIL
First Class Permit No 73 Peterborough NH 03458 POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE
CW Communicatiuns Peterborough AmigaWorld PO Box 868 Farniingdale, NY 11737
ItTs the lowest subscription offer you'll ever find for AmigaWorld... the new computer magazine for users of the newest Commodore computer.
• AmigaWorld... the only Amiga-specific magazine on the market. It’s as fresh and dazzling as the computer itself
• AmigaWorld... where expert authors will lead you through the exciting and revolutionary features of the Amiga!
• AmigaWorld., .helping you discover and utilize a whole new world of computer graphics and sounds!
• AmigaWorld.. .because creative computing was never so exciting and easy!
Get 1 Year (Six Issues)
Of Amiga World At The Special Introductory Rate Of $ 14.97 That’s 25% Off The Basic Subscription Price!
The CW Communications Guarantee
As the world's largest publisher of computer-related information, we unconditionally guarantee your AmignWbrtd subscription. If you're not completely satisfied, tell us. We'll refund the full price of your subscription no questions asked.
111111111111111111111 n 111111111111111111111111 In I
UNLEASH THE AWESOME POWER OF THE AMIGA!,
WITH PAL SYSTEMS
• Supports Three Half Height Devices
• Hard Disks
• Tape Backup
• CD ROM
• Five DMA Expansion Slots
• Battery Backed Clock Calendar
• Whisper Fan
• Auto-Configure
• 200 Watt Power Supply
• DMA Hard Disk Controller (ST506 412)
• Optional additional SCSI
• 100%Zorro Compatible
• 1 to 9.5 Megabytes of Fast RAM
WITH PAL Jr
• One Megabyte of Fast RAM
• DMA Hard Disk Controller
• 20 Megabyte Hard Disk
• Auto-Configure
• DMA SCSI Pass-through for further expansion
Suggested retail price only S1495
The TIC provides your Amiga with a tiny battery backed clock calendar that conveniently plugs into the second joystick port. The TIC's 3-year battery will maintain time even if temporarily removed from the Amiga. Change the Amiga's internal time simply by moving the displayed clock’s hands with the mouse. Set your Amiga’s time once and for all. It’s about time for TIC. Suggested retail price only S59.95.
The Information Manager. Hierarchial Database that allows you to organize and display text and graphical tiles, e.g. Real Estate Listings. Personnel Files, Digitized X*RaysT Geographical Maps, etc. Fully supports multi-tasking. Fast access by menu or outline. INFOMINDER will revolutionize the way you store and access both textual and graphical information. Get INFOMINDER today at the special introductory price of only S89.95.
the fifouwafon K8Q31CC fot the Amijo
Arboretum Plaza II
9442 Capital of Texas Highway
Suite 150
Austin, TX 78759
(512) 343-4357
AMIGA is a trademark ol Commodore-Arruga, Inc
17408 CHATSWORTH ST., GRANADA HILLS, CA 91344 DEALER'S INQUIRIES INVITED - (818) 360 3715

Click image to download PDF

Amiga World Vol 03 02 1987 Mar Apr

Merci pour votre aide à l'agrandissement d'Amigaland.com !


Thanks for you help to extend Amigaland.com !
frdanlenfideelhuitjanoplptroruessvtr

Connexion

Pub+

65.1% 
9% 
2.4% 
2.2% 
2.1% 
1.9% 
1.9% 
1% 
0.7% 
0.7% 

Today: 111
Yesterday: 134
This Week: 653
Last Week: 692
This Month: 2693
Last Month: 3315
Total: 81396

Information cookies

Cookies are short reports that are sent and stored on the hard drive of the user's computer through your browser when it connects to a web. Cookies can be used to collect and store user data while connected to provide you the requested services and sometimes tend not to keep. Cookies can be themselves or others.

There are several types of cookies:

  • Technical cookies that facilitate user navigation and use of the various options or services offered by the web as identify the session, allow access to certain areas, facilitate orders, purchases, filling out forms, registration, security, facilitating functionalities (videos, social networks, etc..).
  • Customization cookies that allow users to access services according to their preferences (language, browser, configuration, etc..).
  • Analytical cookies which allow anonymous analysis of the behavior of web users and allow to measure user activity and develop navigation profiles in order to improve the websites.

So when you access our website, in compliance with Article 22 of Law 34/2002 of the Information Society Services, in the analytical cookies treatment, we have requested your consent to their use. All of this is to improve our services. We use Google Analytics to collect anonymous statistical information such as the number of visitors to our site. Cookies added by Google Analytics are governed by the privacy policies of Google Analytics. If you want you can disable cookies from Google Analytics.

However, please note that you can enable or disable cookies by following the instructions of your browser.

Visitors

Visite depuis
03-10-2004
Visite depuis
23-02-2014