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Amiga is a registered trademark of Commodore-Amiga. Inc. Lotus 1-2-3 is a trademark of Lotus Development Corporalion. MSS Works!, Analyze!, Scribble! And Organize! Are trademark* of Micro-Systems Software. Have all of the above instantly at your fingertips on ONE diskette at ONE low price in ONE package. THE WORKS! Is ONE complete system. Never again will you move from one program to another, forced to learn a new manual with new instructions. In THE WORKS! Each module uses similar pull down menus and familiar commands. You said “Give me the works”. Now in ONE package, you get THE WORKS! Included is a powerful spreadsheet module (Analyze!) That is as useful in the home as in the office. Whether for your personal budget and check register or your company’s accounting and forecasting needs, the versatile pull down menus and keyboard shortcuts make this module easy to use. Its multicolor 3-D graphs, special macro language and compatibility with be disconnected, it is impossible to manually align single sheets. However, the feed mechanism properly and precisely positions the paper by itself without difficulty. Although the printer accepts any paper, PaintJet’s special quality, heavy stock, micro-perforated paper yields the best results. The power supply is an external black box without a control switch. The control panel consists of a power button, two indicator lights, a top of-form button and the ubiquitous line-feed and formfeed buttons. When depressed during power up, the form feed button generates a sell test, while pushing the linefeed button results in a two-page demo. Holding down the top-of-form button puts the printer into transparency mode. The back panel contains the power jack, interface connector and set-up switches. One interface cable (either a Cen- tronic, RS-232 or HP-IB, depending upon your needs) is supplied with the printer. With the interface provided, the printer is ready to use right out of the box. 250 sheets of the special z-fold paper, five sheets of transparency film and a set of ink cartridges are also included.

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Amiga World Vol 04 04 1988 Apr

Document sans nom April 1988
USA. S3.95 Canada $ 1.50 UK £2.50 An IDGCJI Publication
I
GETTING ON LINE
?Tap The Information Nets 6 Tele-Comm Packages
PLUS!
Exploring BASIC and C Demon DOS Disks
Circle 13B on Reader Servce card
PHOTON PAINT IS A POWERFUL LO- AND HI-RESOLUTION HOLD AND MODIFY (HAM) PAINT PROGRAM, WITH OVERSCAN (NTSC PAL) AND SPECIAL EFFECTS FOR THE AMIGA COMPUTER!
Now many of the features and techniques previously only available in separate Amiga paint programs have been combined and expanded in PHOTON PAINT! These include features that were limited to either a 32 color paint program, or a HAM paint program. Yet if doesn't stop there! PHOTON PaiNT expands your paint capabilities as never before with these features:
• 64 color palette with 4,096 color alterations
• State of the art Surface Mapping • Exceptionally sophisticated brush operations
• Real-time operation of drawing tools • Paint in exactly the color you choose in HAM mode
• Allow HAM to modify colors • Two types of fill functions • All oopular brush operations • Full blend mode - Total menu movability with brush and color palette menu size reduction option • Light source specification, normal, intense or dithered • Unique magnification window with variable pixel sizing • Transparent or opaque background colors • Palette color spreads with both (RGB) AND (HSV) functions
• Compatible with most third party art and animation systems, including Photon Video.
EXPAND YOUR CREATIVITY TO ANEW DIMENSION, PICK UP PHOTON PAINT TODAY!

TM
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Get the maximum graphics power from your Amiga. Create stunning, lifelike computer artwork with Digi-Paint, the first full-featured 4096 color (Hold and Modify) paint program. Break the “32 color barrier” and finally realize the potential of your Amiga with Digi-Paint's advanced features:
• 4096 colors on screen simultaneously
Computer of the Year
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• NewTek’s exclusive enhanced HAM mode
• Dithered HAM gradient fill
• Full screen effects including double, half size, mirror reverse and more
• Full IFF and Digi-View compatibility
• Use 320x200 or HAM hi-res 320x400 resolutions
• Fat bits Magnify mode
• Rectangle, oval, line and other drawing tools
• 12 different paint modes including blending, tinting and smooth shading
• Full lasso cut and paste with automatic edge blending
• Programmed completely in assembly language for fast, smooth response
Find out why Byte Magazine called Digi-Paint “Remarkable”, Available now at your local Amiga dealer or call: 1-800-843-8934.
ONLY $ 59.95
Circle 102 on Reader Service card
? 100 Amazing Levels
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"The First True Amiga Arcade Game "Fast, cool, the best" Only $ 29.95
VOLUME 4, NUMBER 4
CON
APRIL 1988
NTS
Although we have been able to "telecommunicate" (I.e., use telephones) for over 100 years, the very recent advent of personal computers has produced radical changes in the way telecommunications affect our lives. You can now talk not Just to another Individual but to all of Wall Street, access entire encyclopedias, "telecommute" to the workplace, carry on simultaneous "conversations" with dozens of people, go shopping 3000 miles away, . .This month we show Amiga users how to get "on line" to this amazing world of informatlon-on-demand.
F E AT IRES
The Right Connections By Kggy Herrington ......30
Put your Amiga “on line” and share in the wealth of useful services available to you from information networks and bulletin boards across the country.
CAN WE TALK.? By Guy Wright and Bob Ryan . 37
To help get you on line. AW editors review and compare six of the leading communications packages for the Amiga and offer some valuable tips on getting started with telecommunications.
ARTICLES
Just Fiddling Around: Proportional Gadgets in C By jim Fiore ....43
A C programming tutorial for the inveterate “tweaker” to help you program your own Intuition proportional gadgets.
The Great Pretender By Timothy TnmbaU .50
Selling up a virtual MS-DOS disk on your Amiga 2000’s hard disk will let you run IBM PC software more effectively on your A2088 Bridgeboard system.
From Here To Here Again: Recursion in BASIC By Donald r. Homer, Ph.D 53
While dogs who chase their tails may not be bright. BASIC routines that call themselves can often be a useful programming tool.
C 0 LI M S
Zeitgeist 6
Firing off a few rounds to the foot, our editor delivers some curmudgeonly quips about telecommunications and shows himself to be the Benedict Arnold of the BBS movement.
BASIC By The Numbers By Bob Ryan ...... 25
The author of our series on programming your Amiga with Amiga Basic reviews last month's programming “homework" and admits it was a stiff assignment.
INFO.PHILE By BUI Catchings and Mark L. Van Name .. 63
Our columnists turn sleuths to search the CLI for "The Disk That Wasn’t" and show you how AmigaDOS’ RAM disk can save you valuable time and disk space.
DEPARTMEATS
Repartee ... !0
You said it.
Notepad 12
AW reporters brought back lots of news, new products and rumored developments from the recent Computer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas and AmiEXPO Los Angeles.
Hors d’oeuvres ..... 14
Hints and techniques. . .compliments of your fellow readers.
Reviews .. 18
PaintJet Printer I KindWords and TextPro Synthia FastFonts HotLicks I l ime Lord I Analytic Art. Games: Alien Fires Fire Power I Into the Eagle’s Nest,
What’s New? 68
A slew of new products, that’s what.
Help Key ..... 85
“Whizzer" Wallace will wither weighty worries with wily wisdom(?)
OTHER AVAILABLE TITLES
? READ fit RHYME ? FRACTION ACTION ? KINDERAMA ? DECIMAL DUNGEON ? THE WORD MASTER ? ANIMAL KINGDOM ? AESOP'S FABLES ? MATH WIZARD ? MAGICAL MYTHS
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MODULE I
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• High Speed whole hard drive backup with multi-format feature
• Auto configures to multi-hard drive systems or multi-partitions
• Supports up to 8.5 meg of memory
• Uses a unique double buffered file copy routine for lightning fast copies
• Full Intuition interface for maximum ease of use
• Backs up files
1} by creation date
2) with ‘Point and click’ selection (name, directory, drive)
3) using ‘wild-card’ search patterns
• Fully supports Multi-tasking, does not monopolize CPU to achieve-its speed. Designed to operate in the ‘background’
• Compatible with any Hard drive that follows conventional AmigaDOS file protocol
• 512K Amiga required
• Hard Drive NOT REQUIRED. Ultra DOS Utilities Module I works equally well with dual floppy drives!
Ultra DOS Utilities, Module I is only $ 59 5!
905 W. Hillgrove, Suite 6 LaGrange, IL 60525
(312) 352-7323
Publisher
Stephen Twombiy
Editor-In-Chief
Guy Wrtghl
Managing Editor Shawn Laflamme
Technical Editor Robert M. Ryan Senior Editor Linda J. Barrett
Senior Editor Dan Sullivan
Review Editor Barbara Gefvert
Contributing Editors Bill Catchings,
Peggy Herrington,
David T. McClellan,
Mark L Van Name,
Lou Wallace
Art Director
Rosslyn A. Frick
Assistant Art Director Howard G. Happ
Designers Anne Dillon Roger Goode
Production Advertising Supervisor Ruth Benedict
Sales Manager
Kenneth Blakeman
Sales Representative Michael McGoldrick
Advertising Coordinator
Pull Down Menu Heather Paquette 1-800-441-4403
West Coast Sales Giorgio Saluti, manager 1-415-328-3470 Danna Carney
Pull Down Menu Sales Assistant 3350 W. Bayshore Road, Suite 201 Palo Alto, CA 94303
Secretary Sandy Kierstead
Marketing Manager
Wendie Haines Marketing Coordinator Laura Livingston
Business Manager
Barbara Hams
Customer Service Representative Lisa LaFleur
President CEO
Michael S. Perils
Vice-President General Manager
Roger Murphy
Group Publisher Consumer Home Magazines
Stephen Twombly
Director of Corporate Production
Dennis Christensen
Typesetting Manager Linda R Canale
Typographer Doreen Means
Manufacturing Manager
Susan Gross
Director of Circulation
Frank S Smith
Circulation Manager Bonnie Welsh
Direct Marketing Manager Paul Ruess
Newsstand Sales Linda Ruth
Direct Sales Manager Elizabeth R. Kehn 800-343-0728
Director of Credit Sates & Collections
William M. Boyer
AmigaWorld (ISSN 0883-2390) is an independent journal not connected with Commodore Business Machines, Inc. AmigaWorld is published monthly by IDG Communications Peterborough, Inc., 80 Elm St., Peterborough, NH 03458. U.S. subscription rate is $ 24,97. One year. Canada $ 47.97 (Canadian funds), one year only. Mexico $ 29.97 (U S funds drawn on U.S. bank), one year only Foreign $ 44.97 (U.S. funds drawn on
U. S. bank), one year only. Foreign Airmail, please inquire. Second class postage paid at Peterborough, NH. And at additional mailing offices. Phone: 603-924-9471. Entire contents copyright 1988 by IDG Communications Peterborough, Inc. No part of this publication may be printer! Or other wise reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Postmaster: Send address changes to Amiga World, Subscription Services, PO Box 868. Famtingdale, NY 11735. Nationally distributed by International Circulation Distributors. Amiga] brld makes every effort to assure the accuracy of articles, listings and circuits published in the magazine. ArnigaWjrld assumes no responsibility for damages due to errors or omissions.
FOR THOSE WITH A NEED TO
ACHIEVE
We give yriu Professional Page.
We all have different weaknesses. If yours happens to be coming first, we commiserate. We also offer you Professional Page. Ips the last word in Amiga desktop publishing.
Professional Page will give you many advantages. It will enhance your business operations because it's a communications tool that transforms your Amiga into a typesetter. And because it's so easy to use and fun to learn, you'll be out-putting more in less time which only goes to prove what an insufferable success you'll prove to be. And should you wish to become a color separator, Professional Page has a built-in color separator module that will allow you to bypass expensive color separations. Professional Page is truly a high end performance package.
So, what are you waiting for? Fulfill your needs. Make like a super achiever and get Professional Page. You'll find it at your favorite Amiga dealer. If not, call us.
GOLD DISK
Now shipping version 1.1 with now and enhanced features. Registered 1.0 owners will receive version 1.1 FREE automatically.
Requires Amiga 1Mb. Outputs to PostScript laser printers and typesetters. Supports all dot matrix printers (including color), ink jet and thermal printers. A demo disk is available for $ 10.00 (U.S.). All type and layout for this ad was produced using Professional Page.
ZEITGEIST
In which our wayward hero flaps way out on a fragile limb and begins gnawing at his perch.
Part 1. Trunk Scaling
In the computer magazine business, it is taken for granted that the people behind the words not only know whereof they speak but that they enjoy everything about the computer they cover. Keyboard layouts, pin voltages, graphics, spreadsheets, games, printers, user groups, hard disks, CAD packages and PD software. All of it is fascinating and worthwhile. We aren’t supposed to favor one area over another or admit that some things about computers are boring, irksome, or just plain stupid. Computers are wonderful and everything about them is wonderful.
Now you might think that accounting packages are boring, but someone else out there, reading this same magazine, really gets charged up about accounts receivable software and might think arcade games are a waste of time. That's fine. That is why there are separate special interest groups on CompuServe and separate user group meetings for different interests and even separate magazines that focus on different elements of the same computer.
Now AmigaWorld, being a "general interest" magazine, covers just about everything with the same enthusiasm, and if you aren’t interested in a topic we write about, then you just skip that article. If you are interested in that topic, you want the author to be just as excited as you are.
Part 2. Bark Walking
Telecommunications, connections, getting 011 line. That’s our focus in this month’s issue of AmigaWorld.
Telecommunications is a wonderful thing. It is the future. It brings people together. It is an entire world of free software, BBSs, SIGs (Special merest Groups), on-line conferences, articles, news, shopping, airline schedules, research, stocks, chats, etc. There are religous BBSs, pirate BBSs, pornographic BBSs, Amiga BBSs, hospital BBSs, military BBSs. . .somewhere out there someone is probably the SYSOP of a psychic phenomena BBS. You can shop or talk or talk shop. You can browse through services for hours without communicating with another human, or join in a last and furious multilevel debate on a thousand subjects with dozens of people at the same time, each in a different part of the country.
No doubt about it. Telecommunications is one of the great justifications for owning a computer.
Part 3, Balancing Act
Now, I know about telecommunications. Not enough to write my own BBS software, but enough to be dangerous. 1 own more than one modem and a handful of terminal packages. I have downloaded my share of PD software and sent enough E-mail so that I’m not completely lost on line. I have accounts with the major services, I’ve participated in teleconferences. I’ve set up BBSs and been a SYSOP. . .I’ve even done a bit of hacking.
My first brush with telecommunications was about sixteen years ago logging onto the Dartmouth College time-sharing mainframe. While I usually leave the day-to-day information gathering to Lou Wallace (Help Key), Bob Ryan (AmigaWorld's resident techie) and people like Peggy Herrington (contributing snoop), I still get on line every now and then (anonymously) to see what’s going on, how things have grown, how they have improved. I know about the wonderful things out there and I know how to access it all without too much trouble.
Part 4. Chirping and Chewing
In the early days (I sound like someone’s grandfather, don’t I?), telecommunications was no day at the beach. It was confusing and chaotic. Systems were complicated and failed quite often. It seemed like there was more down time than on line, and small, independently run BBSs were flaky at best. But that was back in the dark ages of computing. Before mice and pull-down menus and error checking and protocols. Things have gotten so much better in the past sixteen years, right?
Part 5. Frantic Flapping
OK, enough avoidance. I think it is time that someone admits it publicly. I don’t like telecommunications. Yes, I know how wonderful it is and how “easy” it is and all that, but I just don’t like it. Any of it.
It starts with RS-232, the non-standard standard. I have yet to see an RS-232 printer work properly on the first try.
It usually takes a few hours of fiddling with DIP switches (assuming that by some miracle you have the proper cable in the first place) before you can get more than gibberish. Per- ?
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WISE GU*
“OH, A
‘‘RUFF! RUFF!”

mw*®
From QWLc1
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llMOW and HER 3 BEAUTIFUL DAUGHTERS
_2II!i!l°ut to be thrown out on their ARREARS!
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LAY,NG at a SOFTWARE DEALER NEAR
of Commodore-A8 f0r Commodore 64' ®M PC. Apple llgs, and Atari ST. which are trademarks respectively
' nrga, Commodore Electronics. Ltd.. International Business Machines. Apple Computer Inc., and Atari Inc
cmemaware Corporation, 4165 Thousand Oaks Blvd., Westlake Village. CA 91362
haps thai is the root of it all RS-232.
I don’t like modems. 1 suspect that they are an invention of the phone company. People with computers weren’t making enough phone calls, so the phone company decided to create an insidious device that would let people compute while they were running up their phone bills at the same time. And now that more and more people are getting on line and modems are support* ting higher and higher baud rates, the phone-line quality in the U.S. has steadily declined. You can get a better connection calling overseas than across town. Shouting into the phone is one thing, scrambled data is another. Lousy connections are just part of telecommunications these days.
1 don’t like baud rates, parity, stop-bits, handshaking, user numbers, passwords, TTYs, protocols, capture buffers, E* mail, uploading, downloading, ARCing and UNARCing, autodialing, auto-answering, scripts, macros, pulses, tones, local nodes, Xon, Xoff, Ker- mit, Xmodem, Ymodera, Zmo- dem, GTS, CTR, duplex, echo, CR with LF, CR without LF, VT-100, word length, or any of it. I understand it. I just don’t like it.
Getting into telecommunications is a good way to triple your phone bill overnight. You spend over $ 100 on a modem, up to $ 100 for a terminal package, money for wires and phone jacks (no home computer in history was ever set up within easy reach of a phone jack), $ 30 or $ 40 to sign up with a big service that charges $ 5-$ 10 an hour (in the middle of the night, that is), sometimes extra to download programs or access special databases. Add a few dozen hours on top of your usual phone bill and you’re ready to get started. I would hate to see statistics on the
number of teens and adults, for that matter) who were grounded after they spent a few nights board hopping, and the phone hill comes in higher than the mortgage payment.
But maybe the bill won’t be too terrible if you can find a local node nearby that you can
J 4
get on without dialing over and over and over again.
There is a well known but never verbalized axiom about getting on line. The best boards are always out of state (no matter where you live) and the line is always busy (no matter when you call). Of course, you can have your software keep re-dialing for you. Just spend a week or two with the manual, write your own little macro-script file using ED or some other user-hostile text editor. Set up your baud rate, word length, stop bits, parity, duplex and protocol for the particular service that you wish to log on and you’re ready.
"What are these cryptic terms? What values are you supposed to use?" The novice might ask. Reasonable questions, certainly. But according to manufacturers of telecommunications software, the answers are all so painfully obvious to everybody that they are never explained in any manual. I guess people are supposed to learn it all by osmosis or genetic memory.
But let’s assume you fought
your software to a draw, don’t

mind extra decimal places on your phone hill, like to make calls at three in the morning and are ready to go. First you play the telecommunications version of radio giveaway. "If you are caller number four hundred ninety-seven, you have won yourself. . ." It isn’t really quite that had. Sooner or later you will Get On Line.
Now you can meander about cryptic menus for an hour or two until you find something worth downloading.
However, you can’t just download it because it won’t run on an Amiga if it lias trailing zeros. The zeros have to be filtered or chopped. You can get public-domain choppers and filters for free on line. . . Somewhere... if you can find them. But wait. It’s an ARCed file. No problems with chopping, ARC does that automatically. All you need is a copy of ARC or UNARC to download things. Fine. How do you get a copy of ARC or UN ARC? Download it, of course!
As computers became more sophisticated, telecommunications just became more complicated. Sometimes getting on line seems like a cross between a 24-hour automatic-banking machine and Zork.
I'm sorry. I’m sure there are thousands of people out there who love telecommunications. Who have built extensive software collections. Who write script files in a few minutes. Who have no trouble getting on line, finding what they want, download and upload files all the time, send messages, chat with SYSOPs, shop, check stocks and do all of those wonderful things. But how many hours of frustration went into learning the ropes? How high were the bills? How much money did you spend before downloading that first feeble game of computer Blackjack? Add up all the money you spent and divide it by the number of usable programs you downloaded. How much did that “free” software cost you?
Part 6. Thirty-Two Feet Per Second Per Second
Why hasn’t it gotten any easier for the novice? Why is it so confusing? There used to be two choices for error checking, now there are dozens. There was one baud rate, now there are dozens. There were one or two services, now there
are dozens. There were one or two private BBSs, now there are hundreds.
Some day you will be able to buy a modem, plug it in and turn on the computer. An icon for telecommunications will appear. Clicking on it will activate the modem, it will dial a BBS number service and return with the most current list of BBS numbers and sendees. All the protocols, bauds, parities and other stuff will be set automatically when you pick the service with a click. Your computer will talk to their computer and then tell you how much it is going to cost.
If you agree to the charges vou’ll be on line. Nice neat menus (or icons and windows for each area?). Find something you want to download, click "Would you like a copy of this program? Yes No" and it will all he done for you.
You shouldn’t have to know how to rebuild a carburetor to drive to the supermarket, and you shouldn't have to know about protocols, emulations, passwords, stop bits, file filters, macros, etc. to get on line.
I'll keep poking through the services and trying new software, but I won’t enjoy it. Thousands of people enjoy fighting in the wire wars. It’s like colonizing a new planet, but I think there are thousands more who don’t want to hop on the next arc until most of the man-eating vegetables at the other end have been domesticated. The concept is great, the results are great, but the process is obtuse, complicated and frustrating.
If you feel the same way I do, then drop me a postcard. If you disagree with all this, send me some E-mail.
Discovery Software is
your Amiga software powerhouse! Our wide range of products includes something for everyone from the arcade game player to the sophisticated power user. And each Discovery product is backed by aur first-class reputation as an established leader in the Amiga software marketplace.
Anyone who knows Amiga will tell you we have earned aur good name. We always deliver software of unparalleled value and performance for the money, roday and tomorrow DSI, the software powerhouse, brings vou the best software values at my price! See for yourself!
ARKANOID
lassie video arcade action bursts onto your Amiga screen with this spectacular rendition of the 1 arcade blockbuster from Taito. It seems so simple at first, but this dazzling brick and paddle game will capture the whole family for countless hours of fun. Explosive digital stereo sound! Electrifying animation! 33 spellbinding levels of play!
Kk * ? ??? The most obsesive game to come down the bit stream in along while. ...it stopped traffic... INFO f
AMNIX
Turbocharge your Amiga with the new CLI super C-shell. Over 40 high speed memory resident commands replace the slower AmigaDOS counterparts while retaining 100% CLI compatibility. AMNIX is a high performance, economical, compact utility that frees you from constant disk swapping.
AMNIX provides keyboard macros, command line history, inline editing, information about Exec, UNIX style batch files, enviroment variables, and much more. Even without our excellent documentation it's easier to use than the CLI.
A must have for Amiga "power users", AMNIX is engineered to save you time and memory.
MARAUDER II
Over 30,000 enthusiastic users and raves from reviewers can’t be wrong. Marauder II is the best archival back-up utility made for the Amiga. It's the standard of performance the others simply can't beat. Don't take our word for it... just read the reviews for yourself...
Without a doubt one of the most useful programs you can buy. - INFO
k k Every Amiga owner should have a copy. BYTE
with exciting new features that improve on an existing legend, the DX Series are indispensable utilities for all Amiga owners. The DX16 is the ultimate programmer's resource for its dazzling array of functions performed on numbers from 1-64 bits in decimal, hex, octal, or binary. The DXIVs extensive scientific operations make it the perfect tool for everything from advanced number- crunching applications to balancing your checkbook. Both calculators make up the DX Series, another multi- tasking power tool from the wizards at Discovery.
You always get the most performance and value for your money every time you buy a Discovery Software product.
GRABBiT
This 10K background-resident utility can print or save almost any Amiga screen in an instant. Used at most Amiga magazines to produce every issue. You also get a bonus program, AnyTime, free on your disk. Check it out!
DX SERIES
Ur nlock the computational capabilities of your Amiga with the xnighty new DX Series calculators! Benchmarked at up to 250 times faster than their HP counterparts,
800 34-AMIGA
REPARTEE
Comments, complaints and concerns from Amiga World readers.
Keeping Up With The Joneses
COMPUTER OWNERS ARE beginning to exhibit the same pitiful thinking that has given us shocldy, disposable cars. Recent letters from unhappy Amiga 1000 owners read to me like the jealousies associated with “keeping up with the Joneses.” My Amiga 1000 not only does all that 1 need it to do, but a great deal more. My recently published book on Chinese film was written on the Amiga using Scribble!, and I am writing another. It does not upset me that the 2000 or the 500 have other, presumably more advanced features. To upgrade to the 2000 for me would he somewhat like trashing my perfectly serviceable ’59 Ford Custom 300 just because I can now own a car that will tell me, in a nasal twang, that my seatbelt is unfastened.
George 5. Setnsel
Losing Faith
I RECENTLY TRADED in my Amiga 1000 for a 2000. While I anticipated the joys of the new features, I have yet to be able to use them. My machine has spent most of the first month of ownership undergoing “warranty repairs.”
The first problem was that the machine ignored the first keystrokes made at each prompt. Commodore advised my dealer to correct the problem by “clipping a couple of
capacitors." What happens if six months from now 1 buy an expansion unit that needs those capacitors? Second, when mv dealer tried to install a memory upgrade, they found that my 2000’s expansion bus was not functional and needs repairs.
Third, I have found that the ScreenDump feature on the included Workbench does not function.
1 am greatly concerned that this low level of quality control will quickly earn Commodore’s "business” machine the reputation of an unreliable, souped-up toy.
G. L. Isdell
Annandale, VA
Tell Me Why
I AGREE WITH the "proud owner” [Dec. ’87, p. 8] about the capabilities of the Amiga
500. Overall, the A500 is a worthy machine with great features that no other PC has to offer. And the price is right. But, when I received mine last Christmas, I was very displeased with the power supply and the short cable to the 1010 disk drive. Commodore must have been asleep at the helm when they designed these items.
First of all, the power supply could have been made more professional. Why are the two cords running out of opposite ends of the unit?
Why is the on off switch in back of the unit instead of in
front, where it would be more convenient?
As for the external disk drive, why does it have such a short cable? Why is the disk drive light red instead of green?
Now I’m searching for a better designed power supply. I can live with the disk drive.
David T. Hawkins
Garland, TX
Can Do
I APPRECIATE Lou Wallaces and Boh Ryan’s honesty about what the Bridgeboard and 68020 CPU Board can and can't do. [See Amiga World, Feb. ’88.] The “can’t” is especially helpful, so that when I go to buy these products, I’ll have an accurate picture of their strengths and weaknesses.
Your departments are also very interesting and useful, especially Notepad. I look to magazines such as yours to provide me with information that is not available through any other channel. Notepad, Hors d’oeuvrcs and What's New? Do an excellent job of providing me with that information.
Kevin C. Rohrer
Wadsworth, OH
Out in the Cold
I AM TRYING to purchase a new Amiga 2000, but there is no Amiga dealer in my isolated little town in northern Canada. I called every dealer advertising the A2000 in your magazine, using their 800 numbers. Not one has opened access to their toll-free lines to calls coming from Canada.
I fully realize that you have no control over your advertisers in this respect; however, would you consider reminding them that you don’t fall off the world when you step north of the 49th parallel?
Those advertisers may find it interesting that, had I gotten through on one 80(1 number, 1 most likely would have purchased my system from that company.
Graham J, Kerr
Fort Smith, NWT, Canada
I HAVE A suggestion for the advertisers of Amiga products: When a reader circles a product’s corresponding number on the reader service card to get more information, please send them the information instead of leaving them out in the cold. If you don’t have any information to send them, then don’t instruct them to circle a number. I would rather know up front if there
is any information available,
*
rather than wait several weeks for information that never comes.
Jennifer M. Markley
Carrollton, TX
Send your letters to: Repartee, Amiga War Id editorial, 80 Elm St., Peterborough, NH 03458. Letters may he edited for space and clarity. ¦
Powerful software
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NOTEPAD
Edited by Linda Barrett
HELD IN mid-January, Ami- EXPO Los Angeles gave west coast Amiga owners a chance to see the latest and greatest. The most striking product on the floor was NewTek’s Video Toaster. For those on a tighter budget, Hash Enterprises showed Video Stand, a low-cost graphics effects generator.
Videophiles were congregating at the Sony AmiEXPO Theatre, where Amiga videos aired on Sony equipment. AmiEXPO plans to have a similar theater at the Chicago show (July 22-24), so interested Amiga artists should send their slides and videotapes to: AmiEXPO, 211 East 43rd St., Suite 301, New York, NY 10017 or call 800 32-AMIGA (in NY, 212 867-4663).
Gold Disk’s Professional Page, the Amiga’s first high- end desktop publishing program, won’t be lonely for long. Soft Logik announced their
EVEN IN HIS wildest hallucinations, Hunter Thompson could not have imagined what waited at the Consumer Electronics Show. If the walking ergonomlcally-deslgned joystick that welcomed us to the Las Vegas Convention Center wasn't enough to drive the gonzo journalist straight, seeing the Three Stooges' Curly promoting computer games would be. The roving joystick was really just a model dressed as WICO's ERGOSTICK, but she personified the show's predominant theme entertainment.
The wise guy at the Cinemaware booth was a Curly look-alike, but their THREE STOOGES game was quite real and full of befittingly buffoonish escapades. The second half of Cinemaware's double-feature was ROCKET RANGER, a Flash Gordon-Inspired, movle-like, interactive adventure with sound effects.
Elsewhere on the floor the action was equally frenzied. Accolade previewed 4TH AND INCHES (a hard-hitting pro football game), PINBALL WIZARD (pinball games that eat players, not quarters) and BUBBLE GHOST (where you guide a bubble-blowing ghost through a hazard-filled maze). Microlllusions displayed GALACTIC INVASION (another of the One-to-One series) and EBONSTAR (a seek-and-destroy space adventure). For those who wanted to create their own planets, Microlllusions’ resident Walt Disney demonstated Photon Paint (a full-featured HAM paint program) and Cell Animator, the first module of their integrated video animation system.
Mlndscape Introduced two new games: IMPACT (similar to Breakout and Arkanoid), where players attempt to
destroy barriers with a bouncing ball while dodging stun bombs and lightning icons, and HARRIER COMBAT SIMULATOR, in which you must destroy enemy air and ground forces from the cockpit of a Harrier jump jet.
Electronic Arts exhibited two new entertainment creations. INTERCEPTOR is a combat flight simulation that lets
you choose between two different fighter planes (the F-18 Hornet and the F-16 Falcon) and six combat missions
Who Was That Bearded Man?
CONTRARY TO THE caption i7i the February '88 issue, the master of 3-D on page 11 is not Allen Hastings, but fellow Aegis 3-D magician Stuart Ferguson, author of Modeller 3-D,
professional system, Publishing Partner. Infinity's Shakespeare, a color desktop publishing system, is also on its way to dealers’ shelves.
In hardware, CSA showed their 68030 68882 board, semiofficially named the “Over 30” board (jokingly called the “baby Cray”). The Over 30 board should run about four times faster than their 68020 68881 combination. Preliminary tests indicate performance near 8 Mips (Unix Mips). Other interesting hardware included a Bernoulli Drive and interface from
Inner Connection.
Micro-Svsteins Software and
i
Brown-Wagh announced Excel lence!, a professional-quality word processor that has ii all: spelling checker, thesaurus, grammar checker, colors, IFF graphics, math, footnotes, headers, index and table of contents generation, PostScript and more. Watch out, WordPerfect.
Another “whisper in the ear” product we discovered is Panasonic’s WORM (Write Once Read Many) drive, scheduled for March release. Access speeds are about 2.5
MB sec. What’s the big deal? Each flippable laser disk will store 400MB.
To our chagrin, we discovered AMIC Term, which could set a new standard in Amiga telecommunications software. AMIC Term has just about everything (in a few different ways) you’d want in a telecommunication package. Unfortunately, our discovery was too late to include in our telecommunications software roundup. Watch for future reviews and What’s New? Announcements.
RR &GW
that take place In the San Francisco Bay area (you can even swoop under the Golden Gate Bridge!). THE BARD’S TALE II: THE DESTINY KNIGHT gives Bard's Tale fanatics six cities, 25 dungeon levels, new spells to acquire and new monsters to worry about. EA is also continuing its support of the Amiga video market with DELUXEPRO- DUCTIONS, a 16-color, hl-res graphics animation program for video professionals. DataSoft, an EA affiliated label, has been busy with THE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER, a submarine combat simulation based upon the novel; ALTERNATE REALITY: THE CITY, a fantasy adventure game; and BATTLEDROIDZ, an action strategy game.
Strategic Simulations presented QUESTRON II, a sequel to the fantasy-adventure game Questron. The author of Three-Sixty's Harpoon demonstrated his military-war simulation game that should be released this fall, while Mlcro- Prose took to the air with an Amiga version of GUNSHIP, their popular helicopter simulation.
A number of software publishers new to the Amiga community unveiled some tantalizing surprises. OmnlTrend exhibited PALADIN, an animated fantasy combat sport. Konami Software arrived with a bang actually, five bangs: CONTRA, JACKAL, RUSH 'N ATTACK, BOOT CAMP and GRADIUS. Each game provides the opportunity to become a hero if you can survive! BG & SL
COLOR STREAMS FROM every corner of Pete Flusser's office as light pierces amethysts, rubies, citrines, diamonds and an Amiga 2000's monitor. Under the practiced eye of Flusser (a founding member of the American Gem Trade Association whose firm, Overland Gems, cuts as many as 20,000 stones a month), the Amiga has been placed in a new setting the jewelry business.
One of the biggest headaches for wholesale jewelry traders is mailing heavily insured stones to prospective buyers. With a fast dose of the Digi-View digitizer (NewTek) and a modem, Flusser has cured this expensive inefficiency. “The Amiga can send a picture over the modern or by disk for the customer to look at; then if they like the stone, you've got a serious customer, instead of sending a stone out blind," he explained. “Digitizing is far cheaper than sending a photograph, and you know immediately if an image looks right. You don’t have to wait to get a picture back from the lab.”
In some cases, Flusser achieves more accurate results with digitized pictures than photographs. For example, film can not capture the green chromium hue, so a bright
green stone might look like an olive in a photograph. Flusser added, “If you see a fine picture of an emerald, it has been retouched. Using the various paint programs, you can come much closer to matching the color without sending the work out to a lab.”
The Amiga’s ability to match gems’ brilliant hues promises an inexpensive way to color- grade stones. “We'd like to work out a program like Digi* Paint (NewTek) with a larger on-screen HAM palette and a white square next to it,” described Flusser. “You would hold your stone up to the white square it) match the color and then record the RGB readings. From here in Los Angeles, I could call a jeweler in New York who also has an Amiga and describe a ruby or emerald by giving its color as an RGB value. If we go one step further and have templates to call up in the shape of the stone with proper shading, we could duplicate almost exactly how the stone looks.” Flusser is not limiting the colorful Amiga to merely charming long distance buyers. As a promotional tool, the computer can sit in a jewelry store's window playing an endless loop of beautiful digitized gems to attract customers. Flusser plans to
supply a complete software package including a monthly sendee of disks for in store displays and an Amiga adaptation of the IBM’s BOS jewelry accounting and inventory program. Interested jewelers should contact: Pete Flusser, Overland Gems, 550 South Hill St., Suite 1555, Los Angeles, CA 90013.
Ben and Jean Means
HORS D’OEUVRES
Hints, tips and techniques from your fellow Amiga users.
Arc Tips
HERE ARE HINTS for using Arc to un- Arc programs acquired via your modem.
First, place Arc in the “C” directory of your system disk; this allows Arc to be used as a regular AmigaDOS command. Second, you can direct the results of a
de-Arc to a directory other than the di-

rectory your Arced program is in by logging into the desired directory with CD. Then type your Arc command including the path to the source Arced program. For example, let’s say that on dfl: we have a directory called dee, and dee contains several Arced programs including the file foo.arc. You want the contents of foo.arc to go to dfO:. You type
CD dfO:
Arc x dfl :dee foo
This will cause Arc to extract the files in foo.arc and put them in the current directory.
Charles Jagou)
Chesapeake, VA
Simulated Double Buffering
IF YOU ARE looking for a very simple method to double buffer your C-lan- guage animation programs, but you can’t quite figure out what is written in the Amiga ROM Kernel Manual, then give this a try.
Under Intuition, create two screens and windows with the OpenScreen (&myscreen) and OpenWindow (&mywindow) commands. You could call the screen si and s2. If you opened si first, it will he hidden behind s2. Draw into the hidden screen (si) and then use the command ScreenToFront(sl) to display it in front of s2. Now that s2 is hidden, draw an updated version of your animation into it and then use Screen- ToFront(s2) to bring it to the front. Continue doing this "screen shuffling updating” until your animation is finished.
I’ve used this method with BOBs and found it to he just as nice as the more complex ROM Kernel procedures. The animation is fast, and best of all, flicker- free.
David Alves
San Jose, CA
Inexpensive Disk Boxes
AFTER SHOPPING AROUND for a wav to hold a lot of disks, I was upset to see cases with 50-disk storage capacities costing SI5 to $ 40 (as if the 3.5" disks aren't expensive enough!). Then a friend showed me a way to save on the disk cases. . .recipe files! By checking office supply shops, I found file boxes (e.g.; Sterling Plastics, 5" x 8", model 530) that are deep enough to hold over 50
3. 5" disks. The disks are stacked sideways, there is room on top for reference cards and dongles, the lids simply snap shut, the units stack well, are often available in different colors, made of very sturdy plastic, and they cost about $ 2.75! All you have to do is keep your eyes open (even supermarkets sometimes carry them) and make sure the disks will fit before buying.
Darryl Davidson
Pocatello, ID
Basic Sleep
AS A VETERAN of large mainframes but a relative newcomer to the Amiga, I would like to point out one or two things about multitasking that should save BASIC programmers from some problems in the future. I have seen in recent months many papers and books that tell programmers to "WAIT” for menu and mouse input by using statements like
10 IF MOUSE(O) = 0 THEN 10
This gives you the illusion that the task (in this case the BASIC program) is waiting for the mouse to be clicked.
Some books that 1 have studied even say that it is waiting. It isn’t. The CPU is in what is known as a spin loop and the task is eating up CPU cycles as fast as possible.
In a multitasking environment, the CPU must be shared by all tasks that are ready to use it. Tasks that are spinning are always ready to use it. The svstem
i * J
therefore divides the CPU between the tasks on a time-share basis. This has the same effect as each task running on a slower CPU.
A word of advice: If you don’t need the CPU, don’t ask for it. Wait for mouse and menu input by using something like
10 IF MOUSE(O) = 0 THEN SLEEP
This should speed the execution of other programs running at the same lime, and it is a good habit to get into for the future.
David Walton
Vedhaek, Den ma rk
Copy Alternatives
IF YOU ARE tired of using the regular diskcopy program on your Workbench disk, here is a trick that will help you out. First go to the system directory on your copy of the Workbench disk and delete diskcopy. Now take your favorite copy program and rename it diskcopy (I like to use the PD program Quickcopy). Now put your new diskcopy back in your
Id April 1988
It’s Time To See How Your Word Processor Stacks Up To ProWrite ™ 2.0
Now You Can Trade Up To ProWrite And Save $ 50
See for yourself trade in your current word processing software, and get $ 50 off when you order ProWrite, the only multi-font color graphics word processor for the Amiga'! ProWrite 2.0 has a number of powerful new features. A spelling checker with a 95,000- word dictionary. Mail merge. The ability to read hold-and-modify (HAM) pictures, and to resize pictures as well. In addition, ProW rite has the Workbench 1.3 printer drivers, for much faster and higher quality graphics printing. All this, plus ProWrite’s flexibility and ease-of-use combine to make ProWrite die best word processor for the Amiga
Here’s the offer: just send us the master disk of the word processor you’re using now, and get ProWrite, version 2.0, for only $ 75! That’s a savings of 40% which makes this a perfect time to reconsider your word processor. Because now, when you compare ProWrite and the competition, it really pays!
CALL FOR A FREE BROCHURE ON PROWRITE AND FLOW ,
THE IDEA PROCESSOR FOR AMIGA.
New Horizons
First In Personal Productivity And Creativity.
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PriAVntc is a trademark of New.- Horizons Software, Inc Amiga is a registered trademark of Commodore Amiga. Inc
Circle 38 on Reader Service card.
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I’M READY TO MOVE UP TO PROWRITE 2.0!
Here’s my word processor master disk and a check or money order for $ 75 payable to New Horizons Software, Inc. Send me the new ProWrite 2.0! (Texas residents please add S6 sales tax),
NAME
vi'K ; unit iikinf t uin+ fiiilii Iik l vidiinl In tU* Vn p lJi PM*in|l l i di'.nr.'. lie* ikui iiimlm- |i u, Plri» .' Itrwic.ii lip
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system directory. You can now slide your disk icons on top of one another and your copy program will load. Just remember to put your Workbench disk back in DFO: before exiting your copy program.
Ken Hodel
program looks like this:
10 AS = TRANSLATES(“bird’s name„pretty bird!")
20 SAY AS
30 FOR 1 = I to 4550 : NEXT 1 40 GOTO 20
He hasn’t learned to speak yet, but he seems to like it anyway.
Tim Salt
Bountiful, UT
AmigaTerm Redial
IF YOU ARE an AmigaTerm user, then I am positive that you are well aware of the frustration involved in manually redialing a telephone number via typing “A ” in command mode or hitting a user- defined Meta-key (function key).
Fortunately, 1 have stumbled upon a less aggravating solution not discussed in the AmigaTerm User’s Manual (I received AmigaTerm when I purchased the Amiga 1200 RS modem). Select the full range of result codes by typing “AT X2" in command mode. Now when you issue any of the available commands to dial a telephone number (ATDT, AI or a Meta- Key), AmigaTerm will attempt to place the call up to ten times, automatically!
This can he a great key saver for those hard to reach BBSs.
Also, this option will work regardless of your Verbal (AT Vn) and or Monitor Speaker (AT Mn) settings.
Michael Chiofolo Trenton, NJ
Batch Compile,
Assemble and Link
WHEN I STARTED programming on the Amiga I realized that I would need a good set of batch (execute) files to accomplish the three necessary steps: compiling, assembling and linking. After looking through all the AmigaDOS commands and giving it a bit of thought, 1 came up with the following set of files.
The first, MAKEIT, is similar to a subroutine in a program. It is called repeatedly from the second, MAKE ALL, until all the files are compiled:
;this file should be named MAKEIT .key file
echo “ compiling file>.c ...” if exists ftle>.o delete file>.o end if
South San Francisco, CA
Editor's note: Be sure that you are doing this until a COPY of your Workbench disk NOT your original. Also note that in order for this tip to work you must be able to make a copy of your copy program in the first place. Many copy programs won V copy themselves.
Addbuffers To Downloads
MOST MODEM USERS probably know by now that the quickest way to download files is to direct them to the RAM: device. I’m also sure that most users who use this method have been burned at
one time or another by “Volume RAM: is

full” or by not having a CLI available to copy the file to disk. AmigaDOS version
1. 2 users have a better way available to them. The command is:
ADDBUFFERS df x>: 25
where x is the drive where the files will be downloaded. This command can be executed from either the CLI or in the startup-scquence.
I have found this method to be only slightly slower than downloading to RAM: and much safer. Unfortunately, nothing is free. Each buffer added takes approximately 500 bytes of memory or
12. 5K for 25 buffers.
Charles K. Edwards
Manassas, VA
Polly Tutor
I WROTE A very simple program in Amiga Basic that says the name of our bird, pauses for a few seconds, then says “pretty bird,” pauses for five to eight seconds and starts the whole process over again and again.
I set the bird on his perch next to the Amiga and start the program. I turn off the monitor (I have the sound playing through my stereo, but you could just turn down the brightness to save the picture tube), turn off the lights and let the bird listen to this all night long. The
cc -o file>.o file>.c if not exists file>.o quit 20 endif
The second file, MAKE ALL, should contain the names of all the files that need to be compiled, calling MAKEIT for all of them. Then MAKE ALL will do the linking and error-checking, as follows:
;this is MAKE ALL failat 20
echo “starting compilation” execute makeit file 1 execute makeit file2 execute makeit file‘3 execute makeit file4 execute makeit fileo
In file I.o file2.o file3.o file4.o fileo.o
- lc -o main.exe if exists main.exe
echo “successful link” skip END endif
echo “unsuccessful link”
LAB END
The “failat 20” at the top of MAKE- ALL. Combined with the “quit 20” in MAKEIT, will cause MAKEALL to stop if MAKEIT wasn’t able to compile any one of the files. The whole process is started by typing “execute MAKEALL” from the
CLI. If you don’t need to compile all the files every time, all you have to do is load in MAKEALL, delete the “execute makeit ...” lines you don’t need, save the remaining file as TEMP, and, from the CLI, type “execute TEMP”.
This is in the format expected by the Manx compiler, but could easily be changed to work with Lattice or AmigaC. Once my programs got beyond two source files, I found this to he a great time saver.
The Amiga could also be made to actually tell you the progress of the compile by replacing every “echo” above with a “say” and taking out the quotes.
Michael A. Sokolewicz San Francisco, CA
If you have an idea you'd like to share uhth our readers, send it to Hors d'oeuvres, AmigaWorld Editorial, 80 Elm St., Eyter- borough, NH 03458. If your idea gets published, you'll receive an AmigaWorld T-shirt for your efforts. (Don't forget to tell is your T* shirt size.) ¦
cmmsmnm
armed with heat- seeking missiles, 30mm cannon, advanced radar, chaff, flares.
The whole shebang.
Plus, you've got VIFF options to let you lay some new moves on those bogies who roil, dive, loop, spin, fire afterburners to jump on your tail.
You're at war in 3-dimensional space
with an enemy who can destroy you. But with the Harrier, some strategic thinking and some skill, yours may not be Mission Impossible.
MiNDSCAPf INC
destroy the enemy's j k 4 F desert command post ™ "" and key oil reserves.
The Harrier's hot They've got an air-
to go but she lifts off force, ground forces, slowly like vertically tanks and 350 SAMs,
rising thunder! Then Big deal. buVe
after pausing motion- got the world's first
less at 100 feel, she combal-proved verti-
rips into the sky at cal take-off fighter
FLIGHT SCHOOLS OVER- NOW GO TO WAR
REVIEWS
PaintJet
Squaring off with pigments on paper versus the glowing phosphors of Amiga graphics.
By Morton A. Kevelson
THE PAINTJET COLOR Printer had a tough act to follow. An established leader in electronics engineering, Hewlett-Packard, PaintJet's maker, has gained considerable respect for their laser printers and precision plotters. This release needed to perforin some fancy, dependable footwork to garner the same respect.
As with most other color printers, PaintJet uses black ink along with cyan, magenta and yellow. The color balance of the PaintJet's inks is such that blue shades tend to print true. The tradeoff is that greens tend toward blue. (By comparison, most other color printers try to get the greens right while shifting blues toward purple.)
Ink is provided on two cartridges: one contains black and the other holds the colored inks. The cartridges also contain the primary ink jets, which are activated by a double row of electrical contacts, also built into the cartridge. This feature should make PaintJet relatively maintenance free because replacing cartridges effectively replaces the ink jets as well. Because the black cartridge contains 30 jets and the tricolor cartridge has 10 jets per color, PaintJet can lay down a black swath three times the width of the individual colors.
Hewlett-Packard rates the black cartridge ($ 27.95) for 1,100 pages of text, and the color cartridge ($ 34.95) at 180 pages of color graphics. Factoring in the cost of the special PaintJet paper ($ 17.95 for 250 sheets) the estimated cost per ful 1-page color graphic is between 30 and 40 cents, which is in the middle range for the color printers I have worked with. Consider, too, that a replacement ink cartridge also buys you what amounts to a replacement printhead.
Ink cartridge installation is easy: Hip open a hatch at the rear left corner of the printer to expose the priming pump, insert the cartridge into the primer, press down and wait for the three transparent windows to fill with ink. Then, to expose the wiper and printhead carriage, open the right front hatch. Simply pass the cartridge through the wiper, pop it into place, flip up the latch and close the lid. The self test should verify that all is in order. If printing problems arise,
just clean the electrical contacts with the brush contained in the front cavity. The procedure is fully outlined and illustrated, complete with a sample of the test, on a pull-out plastic card.
The PaintJet accepts continuous, z-fold paper as well as single sheets in US (8% x 11 inches) and Metric 210 x
304. 8 mm) sizes. The built-in paper-handling device consists of a friction-feed mechanism with pin feed. The pin feed’s minimal adjustment range precludes the use of narrow-width continuous feed papers, and since the friction feed cannot ?
THE AMIGA® COMPUTER STARTER KIT
WORDPROCESSOR • SPREADSHEET • DATABASE
Lotus 1-2-3 make it powerful as well.
The full featured word processing module (Scribble!) Includes a spelling checker and mail merge facility. Full support of the Amiga clipboard is provided as well as complete styling control. You may mix bold, italic, and underline in various combinations on a single line, and show 4 documents on the screen.
The professional database module (Organize!) Helps you collect and manage information or data easily. The reports you prepare are completely customized and can be printed to paper, screen or disk. Portions of records may be blocked for confidentiality. From a recipe file to a customer mailing list, all information is at your fingertips.
Developed by:
I
See your local dealer or call:
Brown-Waeh
Publishing
1-800-451-0900
Scribble!, Analyze!, Organize!
Priced separately total *349.85
Now...The Works!
$ 199'
1 “408-395“3838 (in California)
Micro-Systems Software
only
16795 Lark Ave., Suite 210, Los Gatos, CA 95030
Amiga is a registered trademark of Commodore-Amiga. Inc. Lotus 1-2-3 is a trademark of Lotus Development Corporalion. MSS Works!, Analyze!, Scribble! And Organize! Are trademark* of Micro-Systems Software.
Have all of the above instantly at your fingertips on ONE diskette at ONE low price in ONE package. THE WORKS! Is ONE complete system. Never again will you move from one program to another, forced to learn a new manual with new instructions. In THE WORKS! Each module uses similar pull down menus and familiar commands. You said “Give me the works”. Now in ONE package, you get THE WORKS!
Included is a powerful spreadsheet module (Analyze!) That is as useful in the home as in the office. Whether for your personal budget and check register or your company’s accounting and forecasting needs, the versatile pull down menus and keyboard shortcuts make this module easy to use. Its multicolor 3-D graphs, special macro language and compatibility with
be disconnected, it is impossible to manually align single sheets. However, the feed mechanism properly and precisely positions the paper by itself without difficulty. Although the printer accepts any paper, PaintJet’s special quality, heavy stock, micro-perforated paper yields the best results.
The power supply is an external black box without a control switch. The control panel consists of a power button, two indicator lights, a top of-form button and the ubiquitous line-feed and formfeed buttons. When depressed during power up, the form feed button generates a sell test, while pushing the linefeed button results in a two-page demo. Holding down the top-of-form button puts the printer into transparency mode. The back panel contains the power jack, interface connector and set-up switches.
One interface cable (either a Cen- tronic, RS-232 or HP-IB, depending upon your needs) is supplied with the printer. With the interface provided, the printer is ready to use right out of the box. 250 sheets of the special z-fold paper, five sheets of transparency film and a set of ink cartridges are also included.
With PaintJet’s maximum horizontal and vertical resolution of 180 dots per inch (dpi) and a dot size of 0.0085 inches, you can generate some very detailed printouts. At this resolution, the PaintJet can print in the four basic ink colors as well as red, green and blue. PaintJet also supports a 90 x 90 dpi resolution, in which case it can generate up to 330 colors. But, because the Amiga's printer driver does not use the lower resolution mode, the driver generates all 4,096 colors by dithering in a four-bv- four dot matrix at 180 dpi.
Unlike most dot-matrix printers, PaintJet neither needs nor offers a draft- text mode. PaintJet prints out an impressive, near-letter-quality text at a very respectable 167 characters per second (cps) for 10-character-per-inch (cpi) text. Hewlett-Packard rates the printer at 16.7 inches per second, which means that printing speed goes to 200 cps for 12 cpi text, and 300 cps for 18 cpi text. (Note that text prints bi-directionally while graphics do not.) The built-in fonts are Courier at 10 cpi and Letter Gothic for the smaller sizes.
Basic text features include underline and bold; italics are not supported. A generous selection of foreign language symbol sets, including British, Danish, French, German, Italian, Norwegian, Spanish and Swedish are provided. You can also download alternate character sets from your computer into PaintJet’s eight-kilobyte RAM buffer. While the PaintJet will not generate subscripts and superscripts via a direct command, you can print them through a combination of vertical offset and condensed printing, as the printer can vertically position paper in pixel increments.
What a Difference A Driver Makes
PaintJet’s eolor-dither patterns, generated by the Amiga’s printer driver, were the tightest I have seen. Colors, as well as blacks, are satisfactorily intense. Although the standard blacks were not the deepest I have seen, those generated through transparency mode were. (However, transparency mode tends to oversaturate most colors.)
It appears that Commodore will support PaintJet by including a driver for it on future releases of AmigaDOS. The version 1.2 printer driver required 24 minutes to generate a full-page (8J(, x 11 inches) lo-res dump. A preliminary copy of version 1.3 reduced the dump time to less than five minutes, laying down two to nine times as many dots as its competitors do in the same or greater amounts of time. Version 1.3 corrects the color balance (to true blues and true greens) in exchange for slightly fewer unique colors.
Based on the overall quality of its text and graphics, the Hewlett-Packard PaintJet comes out ahead of the other color printers I have worked with. Although its initial cost may seem a bit high, operating costs are moderate, and PaintJet seems able to provide maintenance-free service. An historic look at Hewlett-Packard printer pricing suggests that PaintJet's price might drop substantially as distribution increases. If you are in the market for a color graphics printer, then take a good look at PaintJet.
PaintJet Color Graphics Printer Hewlett-Packard
19310 Pruneridge Ave.
Cupertino, CA 95014
800 367-4772
$ 1,395
No special requirements.
KindWords TextPro
Tell your story with words and pictures.
By Neil Randall
1987 MARKED THE beginning of the word processor explosion, and at year’s end KindWords and TextPro arrived on the scene. In many ways their appearance rounded out, at last, the selection of Amiga word processors. Both merge text and graphics, and both show on screen what you will ultimately see on the printed page.
KindWords
Complete with spacing and justification icons, margin and tab markers, and ruler line, Kindwords appears to be a reworking and upgrading of that old standby, Textcraft. It even imports Textcraft Files
with all formatting. The colors default to a very readable but somewhat bright black on white, and a menu command allows you to switch to whatever colors you have set up in Workbench. Cut,
Paste and Copy are all accessible from the Edit menu.
Through menus and submenus, KindWords lets you control Cut, Paste, page size and document format, use superscripts and subscripts (which appear as such on the screen), change type styles (Roman, italic, bold, underline and any combinations) and open, save and insert files. Those familiar with Textcraft will take to these functions immediately, and find the interface superior. ?
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KindWords’ Print Merge feature, well explained in the manual, allows you to integrate a data file with a document.
You can change the specifics, such as the names and addresses, to customize a standardized letter, for example. It allows you to merge files and import low- or high-resolution IFF graphics. These images can contain up to 16 colors. The program lets you see the image in monochrome, gray scales, or if you prefer, all 16 colors (at the expense of screen redrawing speed). The graphic can be moved horizontally on the page, cropped or resized.
Other unique features include a command that opens Workbench. This is useful for accessing other programs, formatting data disks and working with Preferences. Headers and footers can run to 15 lines; they allow all text styles, as well as the insertion of current date and time. Pagination is available in five different styles including upper- and lower-case Roman numerals. One command changes to the Foreign keyboard, with various foreign characters, and another changes it to the Symbols keyboard, with its lines, boxes and other special symbols. Also available is a fast, easy-to-use, 90,000-word spelling checker which displays the misspelled word along with several similar words from
within the dictionary.
.
KindWords’ use of fonts is one of its most interesting features. The program abandons those of Workbench in favor of its own Roman font in point sizes eight, 12 and 14. To print your document, you must select Draft, Final (nearletter) or KindWords’ special SuperFont quality. The program contains custom printer drivers for eight printers (with promises for more) which make use of the specially-designed fonts. SuperFonts produce attractive, high-quality printouts even from inexpensive dot-matrix printers.
KindWords is too slow for a serious touch-typist (1 regularly find myself typing beyond the screen display), but it is highly usable. It does not allow more than one document in memory at a time and it contains no indexing or table of contents generation, but these are it’s only serious drawbacks,
TextPro
Where KindWords will appeal to those who don't want to stray too far from familiarity, TextPro seems to strive for uniqueness. A port from the Atari ST, TextPro’s manual establishes from its opening pages that it is not meant for beginners. The first thing you have to do is install it, which means typing in personal information such as your name, address and the disk serial number. You must then select a printer driver, and finally you are allowed to type.
Deciding on the appropriate printer driver isn't especially easy. The screen displays a list of rather cryptic abbreviations from which to choose. Standard Printer (an Epson configuration) is the default, but also shown are such items as hrlo.prt, lqSOO.prt, Ikmll92.prt, sglO.prt, and sl80-ai.prt. I have an old Star Gemini 10X printer, so I guessed that sglO.prt would be the one I needed. But nowhere in the manual were the abbreviations explained, and I’m still not positive I selected the correct one. Nor does the program seem to allow you to default to a Preferences printer driver. For those with printers not directly supported, a lengthy appendix explains how to create your own driver.
Unless you use standard-sized paper and the standard defaults, formatting and printing can be somewhat confusing. To set such necessities as line spacing, page size and header and footer spacing requires calling up a requester. This requester refers to line spacing not as single or double, but as calculations of typographical points. Thus a single space for most printers will be 12 (12 72"), while for others it will be 10 (10 60").
If you change some of the figures, you will have to re-calculate the printable height and spacing from top and bottom otherwise your page might
not break at the perforation.
TextPro allows you to create an output list for printing linked documents from disk, and it lets you choose either your floppy drives, your hard drive or your RS-232 interface for saving and loading files. The program includes a C-Source mode, designed for editing C-programs, which indents braces and checks that opening braces have corresponding closing braces. Unlike Kindwords it does not hinder fast typists, and its on-screen font is the most readable 1 have seen on the Amiga,
Like KindWords, TextPro imports IFF graphics. But although it doesn't support color graphics, the program adds two important features to the process. You can merge text with graphics in the same horizontal area, by first placing the text and then overlaying the graphic. Although hardly easy to execute, the process adds considerably to the outcome. TextPro includes a utility called BTSnap, which lets you take snapshots of Amiga screens. You simply load it into memory and then load the program you want to capture. By simultaneously pressing the Amiga and Help keys you invoke BTSnap, which lets you frame a portion of the screen and save it on a RAM disk or a specified drive as an IFF graphic for import into TextPro,
Unquestionably, TextPro’s most impressive single feature is its customizable function keys. You can assign any text string, command function or strings of functions to any function key. There are 30 such assignations: the 10 F-keys by themselves, the F-keys in combination with the Shift key, and the F-keys in combination with the Alt key. Each assignment can be up 160 characters long.
This is a useful and friendly macro system, and TextPro users will find themselves invoking the function keys quite often.
So Which to Choose?
If you like Textcraft and just wish it had more to offer, pick up KindWords. If you want something different, with features designed for those unafraid of the technical side of things, TextPro has a great deal to offer.
Neither program is destined to replace WordPerfect or desktop publishing software, but both KindWords and TextPro are very good values for non-
Continued on p. 76 ?
TAKE A DRIVE INTO TOMORROW
Tomorrow’s disk drive is here today. From CALIFORNIA ACCESS™ comes the CA-880, a powerful new 3 V2" disk drive for all Amiga® computers.
This highly reliable disk drive formats a 3 Vz" double-sided, doubledensity diskette for 880 kilobytes of storage. The CA-880 is fully compatible with the Amiga 1010 disk drive, but offers much more. The CA-880 is half the size, is considerably quieter, and has an extra long cable.
The CA-880 also has a connector that allows you to attach an additional disk drive.
So why wait until tomorrow for what your computer needs today.
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SOURCE LEVEL DEBUGGER
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If you’re a pro at working with low level Amiga debuggers, you’ll recognize what a source level debugger can mean time savings. Time you’d rather spend creat- ng than debugging. And if you’re a beginner, SDB will make you a pro in no :ime.
But SDB is also full of unexpected, incredibly sophisticated features. There’s reusable command macros and procedures. Back tracing. Active frame context switching just to name a few. Wait till you see SDB in action it will blow you away!
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BASIC By The Numbers
Wherein our intrepid guide to Amiga Basic tries to explain
why two of the programs he “suggested” you try last month can’t really
be done with Amiga Basic.
By Bob Ryan
Shooting From the Hip . . . And Hitting My Foot
23
THIS MONTH, as usual, I'm writing Basic By The Numbers at the last minute (actually, after the last minute). This time, however, I have a legiti- mate excuse. I've been trying to do the “homework” I left you with last month, namely, to reproduce exactly the programs in the Workbench Demos drawer using Amiga Basic. Little did I realize as I wrote last month’s column what a chore two of the programs would be. As you remember, I did Dots last month, and as it turns out the Boxes demo isn’t difficult to reproduce, either. Lines and Spots are another story, since both incorporate features not readily available to Amiga Basic programmers. Before I get to the problems with these programs, however, let’s examine how you go about programming tHe Boxes demo in Amiga Basic.
The most important step in programming is identifying the problem you want to solve. In our case, we first want to reproduce the output of the Boxes program. When you run Boxes, it displays an infinite, randomly-sized and randomly- colored series of rectangles. The output window is movable and resizable, and no part of any rectangle is drawn outside of the display window. We’ve got to do the same thing with Amiga Basic.
Drawing rectangles with Amiga Basic is a function of the LINE statement, which, as you can imagine, also lets you draw straight lines. Looking at page 8-72 of the Amiga Basic manual, you’ll see that the LINE statement draws a line between two points that you specify, in the color you specify. If you include the “b” option, the LINE statement will draw a rectangle using the specified points as opposite corners of the rectangle. The “f” option tells Amiga Basic to fill the just created rectangle with the specified color. To see what I mean, try these examples:
REM Line Drawing LINE (25,35) (600,150),3 END
REM Box It
LINE (25,35) (600,150),3,B END
REM Fill It
LINE (25,35)-(6Q0,15Q),3,BF END
As vou can see, LINE is a ver-
i
satile statement.
Note that the coordinates and color number used in the LINE statement don’t have to be constants; you can just as easily use variables for these
r
values. To recreate the Boxes demo, you use the RND function (see Basic By The Numbers, March ’88) to generate these values. Your Boxes program should look like this:
REM Amiga Basic Boxes RANDOMIZE TIMER Loop: x1 = INT(RND’64Q) y1 - INT(RND*2Q0) x2 = INT(RND*640) y2 = INT(RND*200) colnum = INT(RND*4)
LINE (x1,y1)-(x2ly2},colnumlBF GO TO Loop END
Since the standard Amiga Basic output window is 640 pixels wide and 200 pixels high, you have to generate random x-coordinates between 0 and 639 and y-coordinates between 0 and 199. You also have to generate color numbers between 0 and 3. All this is done in lines four through eight of the program. Line 9 puts the rectangle into the output window and line 10 loops to draw another random rectangle.
Although close to the Workbench demo, the program doesn’t function exactly like ? The Boxes demo. The difference is that the Workbench demo only draws in the visible portion of the output window while the above program draws in a 640 x 200 area even if you resize the window to a smaller size. To get the program to adjust to the size of the window requires a method to detect the current size of the output window.
REM New Boxes RANDOMIZE TIMER Loop: xmax = WINDOW(2) ymax = WINDOW(3) x1= INT(RND*xmax) y1 = INT(RND*ymax) x2 = INT(RND'xmax) y2 = INT(RND'ymax) colnum= INT(RND*4)
LINE x1,y1)- x2Iy2)Icolnum,BF GO TO Loop END
This program introduces the WINDOW(h) function. When you call the WTNDOW(w) function with a 2 parameter, the function returns the x dimension of the current output window. WIN DOW (3) returns the y dimension of the window. (For more on the WINDOW(n) function, see page 8-160 of the Amiga Basic manual.) The program is now a good replica of the Workbench Boxes demo.
Line Up
24
THE LINES DEMO wouldn’t be difficult to reproduce if Amiga Basic let you define windows larger than the output resolution of the Amiga. Intuition, the Amiga interface system, allows programmers to define windows up to 1024 x 1024 pixels. This is the type of window used in the Lines demo. Since Amiga Basic windows are restricted to the maximum visual resolution, you can’t produce a Lines demo that scrolls the way the Workbench demo does. Given that, you can still write a program that works like the Lines demo. It might look something like this:
ing the dimensions of the window by reversing the appropriate delta value when the endpoints get close to the edge of the display. The counter at the bottom of the loop randomly changes the color of the lines drawn and the number of lines drawn in the last chosen color. Due to the lack of scrolling, the program isn’t an exact duplicate of the Workbench Lines demo, but it’s close and an interesting program nonetheless.
25
REM Amiga Basic Lines RANDOMIZE TIMER x1 = 15 y1 = 15 x2 = 70 y2 = 45
dx1 = INT(RND*10) + 1
dy1 = INT(RND*1Q) +1
dx2 = INT(RND*10) + 1
dy2 = INT(RND*10) + 1
colornum = 3
length = INT RND*25) + 5
Start:
LINE (x1,y1)-(x2,y2),colornum
x1 = x1 +dx1: IF x1 > 630 or x1 10 THEN dx1 = dx1 * -1
y1 = y1 +dy1: IF y1 > 190 or y1 10 THEN dy1 = dy1 * -1
x2 = x2 + dx2: IF x2 > 630 or x2 10 THEN dx2 = dx2 * -1
y2 = y2 + dy2: IF y2 > 190 or y2 10 THEN dy2= dy2 * -1
count- count+ 1 IF count = length THEN colornum = INT(RND*4) count= 0
length = INT(RND*25)+ 5 END IF GO TO Start END
In this program, the variable pairs xl,yl and x2,y2 represent the endpoints of the line drawn in the LINE statement. The variables dxl (for delta, or change in, x), dyl, dx2 and dy2 are randomly chosen values that indicate how much xl, ylt x2 and y2 change each time through the line drawing loop. The conditional statements keep the values of the endpoints from exceed
Here Spot!
REPRODUCING THE SPOTS demo dredges up some interesting problems. Before discussing them, let's look at the program.
REM Amiga Basic Spots RANDOMIZE TIMER Loop: xmax = WINDOW(2) ymax - WINDOW(3) cx= INT(RND’xmax) cy = INT(RND'ymax)
IF cx > xmax * .5 THEN maxrx = xmax-cx ELSE maxrx = cx END IF
IF cy > ymax * ,5 THEN maxry = ymax-cx ELSE maxry = cy ENDIF
IF maxrx > maxry THEN rmax = maxry ELSE rmax = maxrx END IF
racU INT(RNDVmax) aspect = RND
colrtum = INT(RND*4)
CIRCLE (cx.cyj.rad.colnum,,,aspect
GO TO Loop
END
So far so good. This program draws random circles and ellipses on the screen in random colors. The convoluted IF. . .THEN statements, which come after the program determines the center (cx,cv) of the object, keep the program from using a radius that would draw part of the object out of the window. Once a usable radius is determined, the program picks a color and an aspect ratio (see page 8*33 of the Amiga Basic manual) and draws the object.
The problem is that the program only provides the outlines of the objects; it doesn’t fill them in. To do that, you can either write your own cir- cle fill routine or you can use the PAINT statement. In the interests of brevity, let’s try the PAINT statement. ?
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TRY INSERTING THE following line into the Spots program just after the line with the CIRCLE statement:
PAINT (cx,cy),colornum,colornum
The PAINT statement is a general-purpose fill command. From the specified pixel, it paints all pixels in every direction the color specified by the first color number until it reaches a border consisting of pixels of the second color number. In other words, it fills in an area defined by the second color number with the color specified by the first color number. In my example, since the color numbers for the paint and the border are the same, the statement paints all pixels inside the border (the
circle or ellipse drawn by the CIRCLE statement) with the color of the border.
The problem with using the PAINT statement in the Spots demo is that it doesn't necessarily paint the entire circle or ellipse. Notice that some parts of some objects don't get filled in. The PAIN E statement looks for any border, not just the edge of the object you drew with the CIRCLE command. Therefore, it will sometimes use previously painted objects as a border, instead of the edge of the newly drawn circle or ellipse, and stop filling prematurely. This results occasionally in unfilled circles.
The PAINT statement can be trickv to use. It also exhibits an

annoying tendency to crash my system for no apparent reason. I suspect the PAINT statement contains a bug of some sort.
Spring Break
27
TIRED OF USING the four drab Workbench colors? Next time, I'll show you how to define your own colors. At the same time, you'll see how you can increase the number of colors available to you by creating custom screens. Until then, send along any questions or comments to Basic By The Numbers, Amiga World, SO Elm St., Re ter borough. Nil 03458. ¦
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A magazine for Amiga. A very special kind of magazine for Amiga a magazine on floppy disk.
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BING CROSBY’S FATHER O’Malley of “Going My Way” and “The Bells of St. Mary’s” would probably have been the 1940s equivalent of the SYSOP of today's electronic bulletin board service. Remember, all you had to do to have any ques- tion answered or problem solved was to “Dial O, for O’Malley.” Well, Bing is long gone, but you can still dial “O” to get an awful lot of valuable information and advice.
Enjoy the many pleasurable and useful benefits of both large information networks and local bulletin board services.
Whether fogging on to a large commercial information provider with hundreds of useful serv ices and database flics, or just linking up with other Amiga users on a local bulletin board, you can gain access to a world of on-line information and shared interests. All you need are the “right connections” And while Father O’Malley may have had the right connections with The Man Upstairs, all you’ll need is a modem, communications software and access to the telephone lines.
Of all the peripherals you can connect to the Amiga, the small and relatively inexpensive modem is one of the most versatile. This little box gets its name from the fact that it Modulates and DEModu- lates binary data (ones and zeros) into audible tones that can be sent over standard telephone lines. Connected to a computer, a modem will take you to a world of communications that was all but unknown to novices a few ' ears ago and is still unknown to many. And you can get to that world from the comfort of your den, bedroom or office, 24 hours a day.
By Peggy Herrington
Want to know more about this fantastic realm of almost instant communication, information and shared experience? The following guide will help get you on line and, with a little practice, will have you “riding the wires” with the best of them.
THE FOLLOWING IS a fairly comprehensive list of commercial networks, or “information providers” as they are known, that would be of most use to Amiga users. Membership fees and baud rates for accessing these services are contained in the sidebar “Commercial Network Fees and Rates" accompanying this article.
Friendly Action: American PeopleLink
Although things change rapidly when it comes to electronic media, the network consistently offering the mosi Amiga activity For the past couple of years has been American PeopleLink, known to familiars as “Plink.” Structured like most computer forums or on-line clubs, Plink’s AmigaZone consists of separate message and program libraries and a live, real-time conference area in which you navigate by following menus or typing commands on your screen. Its strength lies with its knowledgeable and friendly chairman, Harv Laser, and his crew and with Plink’s affordable connect fees, which have attracted an enormous membership and make it very people-oriented. Information is fresh and updated continually hundreds of public messages “scroll off the top” of the system (become unavailable) every few weeks and participation is very high and very keen. It’s a rare evening or weekend afternoon that doesn't find a group of Amiga owners discussing industry news or hot new programs, despite the fact that regular conferences on specific topics (graphics, music, games, programming and so forth) are held four or five niglus a week. The AmigaZone’s Sunday night general conferences consistently attract scores of people.
Offers a consistently high level of Amiga-specific activity, with new services added on a fairly regular basis.
Plink, through its AmigaZone,
More new public domain and shareware programs are uploaded to Plink each week than even I care to download. All the networks encourage uploading the process of transferring files to them (for members to download) by making upload time free of connect fees. There are literally hundreds of public domain and shareware programs available merely for the cost of downloading them. Programs range from handy system and programming utilities and productivity software to spectacular animations and music files, and many are as good as their commercial counterparts. When “Windowed Xmodem” (WXModem) protocol is used, Plink’s rate of transfer is the speediest of all commercial networks, including CompuServe and Genie with their dedicated phone lines. Considering Plink can be had at 2400 baud for as low as $ 2.25 an hour plus $ 10 a month for the Frequent Flinkers club, and S30 for PC Pursuit (see “Fees and Rates” sidebar for a description of this service), you can do a lot of communicating and or download several dozen programs for less than you would spend on the average commercial package (say S100).
Despite the lack of a decent operations manual (members get a pamphlet with some cryptic abbreviations in it). Plink, through its AmigaZone, offers a consistently high level of Amiga-specific activity, with new services added on a fairly regular basis (shopping, for instance, was introduced recently), and a lively CB emulator offering (PartyLinc) that is proving more popular than many similar services on other networks. Overall, the
d
system is geared to computer users, leisure-time activities and live communications. It’s good value with a heavy Amiga emphasis.
Rubbing The Lamp: Genie
If you hunger for more diversity in your on-line fare, Genie offers a wider variety of on-line sendees than does Plink.
.
Newsgrid, for instance, will automatically put stories containing designated keywords in your on-line mailbox, and Grolicr’s Encyclopedia is available to help the kids with their homework. Stock market reports are updated daily, and Charles Bowen gives you telecommunications industry news in weekly doses. American Airlines’ Easy Sabre is available, there is a shopping sendee that discounts Amiga software, and CB offers more family-oriented conversation than most similar offerings on other networks.
The Amiga RoundTable, managed by Deb Christensen, has message and program libraries along with a live conference area, and at $ 5 per hour for 1200 baud you can do a lot of “talking” and downloading for the money. Xmodem protocol over dedicated Genie phone lines makes for flawless file transfers at just slightly slower speeds than Plink, and the number of Amiga files on line is comparable both systems have more good software and info than you can shake a joystick at. The message base is structured differently, in that messages remain available and are segregated into categories and topics for reference once you learn to navigate “command mode.’’
Genie sports a killer interactive flight simluation game for Amiga and Macintosh users. According to Aces I’ve played with, “Air Warrior” is what the dogfight mode in subLOGIC's Flight Simulator II should have been. You can fly a variety of WWII airplanes, and there are colorful views, sound effects and maps that you download along with the software providing the graphics and terminal program needed to play it on line with other Genie subscribers. Depending on your efficiency, downloading it requires three or four hours of connect time, but the off-line practice mode and instruction files let you earn your wings without being a sitting duck for the opposition.
Another hot game prospect, GernStone, a multiplayer text adventure in the style of Dungeons & Dragons, debuted on Genie as this article was being written. Although it can be played with any brand of computer, GernStone is a distinctively Amiga-oriented game. Indeed, Us designer, Dave Whatley, developed and programmed GernStone on the Amiga because its multitasking capabilities made it the only personal computer suited for the job. Live, participating GameMasters and attention to detail promise ?
Commercial Network Fees and Rates
COMMERCIAL NETWORKS CAN be accessed without Incurring long-distance telephone charges from almost any decent-slze population area. If you live In an outlying area, you'll have to pay long distance to the nearest city with direct CIS or Genle lines, Telenet or Tymnet access. Connect fees are shown here by the hour but are actually prorated to the minute while you are on line. Rates are higher for weekday business-time access (called prime time), 7am to 6pm local time, except through Tymnet where prime time Is 7am to 7pm. Nonprime time consists of non-busfness hours on weekdays and all hours on weekends and designated holidays. In the listings below, the abbreviations "PT" and "NPT" refer to "Prime Time" and "Non-Prime Time,” respectively.
PC Pursuit
Telenet provides a service called PC Pursuit, which (for $ 30 a month, plus a one-time $ 25 sign-up fee) lets
American HeopIeLink
800 524-0100 voice MEMBERSHIP FEE: None AVAILABLE VIA: Telenet, PC Pursuit, Tymnet
BAUD RATES (hourly)
NPT: $ 4.95 (300 1200), $ 11 (2400) PT: $ 12.95 (300 1200), $ 14.95 (2400)
With PC Pursuit (Fee: $ 25 mo.) NPT Only: S3 (to 2400)
With Frequent Pllnkers (Fee: $ 10 mo.)
NPT Only: 25% discount (to 2400) With Both Services (Fee: S35 mo.) NPT Only: $ 2.25 (to 2400)
BIX
Byte Information Exchange 800 227-2983 voice 603 924-7861 from New Hampshire MEMBERSHIP FEE: $ 39 (one-time) AVAILABLE VIA: Tymnet BAUD RATES (hourly)
NPT: $ 11 (to 2400)
PT: $ 20 (to 2400)
you call computers In 25 major metropolitan areas during non-prime time (6pm to 7am weekdays, 24 hours weekends and holidays) without incurring long-distance telephone charges. Accessible from over 18,000 local Telenet phone numbers, PC Pursuit packet switches data and therefore will not work for voice. The service is available during prime time for $ 10 to $ 14 per hour. For more Information call 800 TELENET voice.
Although often requiring repeated dialing because of heavy usage, PC Pursuit offers its members during non-prime time hours unlimited connect time with computer-owning friends and electronic bulletin boards (literally any computer In the areas serviced) and reduced connect fees on such networks as PeopleLlnk (Chicago) and The Well (San Francisco) that otherwise charge $ 2 per hour for access through Telenet or Tymnet. Members may call into 25 cities (with more to be added this year) determined by the area code of the an
as
CompuServe Information Service 800 848-8199 voice 614 457-8650 from Ohio MEMBERSHIP FEE: None AVAILABLE VIA: CIS direct lines, Telenet, Tymnet BAUD RATES (hourly)
Any Time: $ 6* (300), $ 12.50* (1200 2400)
’Plus $ .25 hr. for CIS phone lines
• Plus $ 2 hr. For Telenet or Tymnet (NPT)
• Plus $ 6 hr. For Telenet or Tymnet (PT)
CB Service Only (Fee: $ 25 mo. Or $ 100 mo.)
Any Time: $ 4* (at $ 25 mo. Fee) Any Time: $ 1* (at $ 100 mo. Fee)
• Add on CIS, Telenet or Tymnet access fees
swering computer:
404-Atlanta GA 617-Boston MA
312-Chicago IL 216-Cleveland OH
214-Dallas TX 303-Denver CO
313-Detroit Ml 818-Glendale CA 713-Houston TX 213-Los Angeles CA 305-Miami FL
414-Milwaukee W!
612-Minneapolis MN
201-Newark NJ 212-New York NY
215-Philadelphia PA 602-Phoenlx AZ 503-Portland OR 919-Research Triangle Park NC 801-Salt Lake City UT
415-San Francisco CA 408-San Jose CA 206-Seattle WA 813-Tampa FL
202-Washington DC ?
PH
Genie
General Electric Information Services 800 638-9636
MEMBERSHIP FEE: $ 29.95 (includes $ 10 on-line time) AVAILABLE VIA: Genie dedicated phone line
BAUD RATES (hourly)
NPT: $ 5* (300 1200), $ 12.50* (2400) PT: $ 35* (300 1200), $ 42.50* (2400)
• Plus $ 2 hr. From some outlying areas
The Well
Whole Earth Software Catalog 415 332-4335
MEMBERSHIP FEE: $ 8 mo. AVAILABLE VIA: Tymnet, PC Pursuit BAUD RATES (hourly)
NPT: $ 5 (300 1200)
With PC Pursuit (Fee: S25 mo.) NPT: $ 3 (300 1200)
challenging adventures for user-designed characters from fighters to clerics.
Granddaddy Of ’Em All: CompuServe
You can't beat the diversity of services available from CompuServe Information Sendee (CIS), one of the original “popular" networks. CIS is nothing less than vast offering extensive (occasionally surcharged) financial services and stock market reports, on-line shopping, great interactive games, a wildly popular CB simulator and special interest groups, or "forums," devoted to every conceivable focus.
But despite a membership of nearly 300,000 users, when it comes to Amiga information, the pickings are relatively slim. Plink and Genie have more to offer. AmigaForum program libraries are sparse by comparison, and the conferences are less well-attended. CIS also has hefty connect fees of $ 12.75 per hour for 1200-baud access. Its one strength is that the message libraries are surprisingly active and contain quite a high level of technical opinion.
Techie Haven: BIX
If you are an Amiga developer or if you arc after technical expertise, BIX (owned and operated by Byte Magazine) is the place to be. Although lacking any form of real-time, live communications and sporting somewhat pricey connect fees (SI 1 hour for 1200- baud access), BIX lets you rub elbows with Amiga engineers and programmers and tap into a library
The New “Look” of Communications Software
A DAZZLING GENERATION of communications software has come to life with the Amiga. Featuring the drama of color graphics and sound, they come with all the bells and whistles you will ever need to get on line, capture text and transfer (and '‘chop" Xmodem) files. These programs AGO, Access, AM1C and Conference Television are not available retail, nor are they in the public domain; they are shareware. Although they are copyrighted and are freely distributable on disk or electronically, their authors ask only that you make a small contribution If you use and like them.
Shareware Stars
ACO, based on popular but plain COMM by D.J. James of PeopleLink, is designed to be used in real-time conference there. User-created graphics, usually in the form of expressive faces, fill chairs along the top and bottom of the screen, so that you can see what the people you are talking with look like at least to themselves.
Access, programmed by Keith Young, does not have user-created graphics, but it too is based on COMM. It presents a black screen with compact rows of colorful Icons along the top or bottom on which you click the mouse to do such things as transfer files, change parameters or dial your favorite computer service. Designed as general-purpose communications software, Access has Xmodem, Wxmodem and CIS '‘B + ” protocols, to name a few.
AMIC (see Notepad, p. 12), by Dave Salas of BBS fame, Is also based on COMM (although, like Access, you might not know it unless you look closely). It Includes several protocols and there is a special section for registered users on Genie where you can get help directly from Dave.
Finally, Conference Television, designed by Micro Cybernetics Corp., is conferencing software for use especially on CompServe’s AmigaForum, CTV, as it Is commonly called, features animated user-designed faces and arms with real digitized sound you can broadcast to other Amigans who are also on line at the same time with each participant's animation and text appearing In a separate small window on screen.
A Useful Disk
These are all full-featured programs and, like many shareware and publlc- domain programs, are of superior quality. As far as I’m concerned, they are as functional (not to mention more attractive and cheaper) than their commercial counterparts. Each eliminates the need to strip Xmodem padding from files transferred electronically, allows multitasking and has standard pull-down menu operation. With the possible exception of their documentation (sometimes a disk- based text file that is an ongoing narrative as successive versions are released, which can be tough to sort out), they are the stuff that commercial programs are made of. While widely available on line, if you can't get your hands on them, I have put together a disk of those I find most useful (terminal programs, utilities and text-based help files for ARC, ZOO and other necessary evils) that I will send you for the princely sum of ten bucks, providing you promise to make shareware donations for the ones (if any) that you actually use. To order this disk, send a check or money order for $ 10.00 (payable to me, not the magazine) to:
Peggy Herrington Telecommunications Disk c o AmlgaWorld 80 Elm Street Peterborough, NH 03458 ?
Of tutorials and programs that could save you substantial de- velopment time. Capturing the delightful weekly message digests compiled by moderator Joanne Dow and her assistants, and determining those you are interested in offline (along with writing your responses and questions there and quickly uploading them later), can cut your costs substantially. Al-
j
.Amiga .America 619 364-3816 SYSOP: Chet Solace
Chet's "Final List" of Amiga BBSs is available on the networks, too.
AMIC
707 579-0523 SYSOP: Dave Salas
Dave is the author of the popular Amiga terminal program AMIC.
F. AX.G.
415 595-2479 First Amiga User Group
Use scripts or macros to dial a highly popular service.
Though everything is technically
oriented, BIX offers a variety of

interesting “conferences” besides those devoted to the Amiga.
A Wee Dip: The Well
Many PC Pursuit members and west coast Amigans are fond of accessing The Well, a smaller network with relatively extensive Amiga information and programs on line. Although user information is there, too. The Well is a delightful resource for the more technically minded, as it offers access to USENET, Several methods of one-to-one chat are available, but, like BIX, there is no conference facility for groups.
A New Opening: Portal
Although there's little Amiga-specific information on line as 1 write this, a relatively new service called Portal is available to PC Pursuit subscribers ($ 30 per month) through Telenet. Coming in at a flat S10 per month for unlimited access, Portal is a dandy resource for CB communications and electronic mail. The system is not entirely glitch-free, but that may be, we hope, because of its newness. It does, however, offer an internet link via USENET to ARPANET and BITNET. Complete information about Portal is available by connecting with your local Telenet number and typing C PORTAL at the @ prompt.
LEARNING TO MAKE your way around a menu- driven ASCII-based commercial network system can he confusing. One way to get your feet wet without swamping your wallet is to become familiar first with an electronic bulletin board system (BBS) or two. The advantage is that BBSs are similar in design and concept to the networks (except for live conferencing and the volume of things available) and most are freely accessible to anyone with the telephone number. Removing the pressure of paying by the minute makes a big difference in your ability to concentrate on what you are doing so you can get the hang of using menus, shortcuts and downloading. There are hundreds of Amiga “hoards” and finding phone numbers for one nearby is usually as easy as asking your Amiga dealer or user group. Lists of hoards around the country are popular on line and readily available.
Although there is a possibility that the FCC may heavily surcharge data carriers to the detriment of the entire industry (a highly controversial topic that has prompted thousands of protest letters and telegrams), as I write this you can still access hoards in 25 major U.S. cities without incurring long distance charges for $ 30 a month through PU Pursuit, a Telenet service described in the “Fees and Rates" sidebar. Whether you call locally, long distance or through PC Pursuit, here are some popular Amiga hoards to get you started (see box). Some contain lengthy lists of other Amiga BBSs. CompuServe also has a list of Amiga hoards.
Get A Modem!
A modem can take you intellectually out into the world where you can find help using your Amiga, download dynamite programs, play games and make friends. Working in tandem with appropriate communications software, the modem (through its hardware capabilities) determines the speed at which you can communicate or travel, so get the fastest one you can. (For a comparative analysis of a number of telecommunications packages for the Amiga, see “Can We Talk?” hv Guy Wright and Boh Ryan, p. 37.) 300 baud is fine for live communications hut don’t even think of transferring Amiga programs at that rate. 1200 baud is the standard and 2400 is rapidly gaining acceptance. Any Hayes-compatible modem will work with the Amiga (although you will need a special cable if you have an A1000), and the LEDs and speaker on most models are more than handy. Several 2400-baud modems (which will communicate at slower speeds as well) are available for substantially under $ 200, including the one I use Supra’s Modem 2400.
Connecting with people changes the flavor of computing for the better no longer are you stuck off in a room alone. But he forewarned that it can he habit forming. You may need a sudden inheritance to pay for your spiraling connect costs once you get hooked on line. ¦
Peggy Herrington is a contributing editor to Amiga World. She writes regularly for a number of microcomputer publications and specializes in telecommunications and music. Write to her do Amiga World, Editorial Dept., 80 Elm St., Peterborough, NH 03458.
The Great Communicator
The direct-connect Hayes® compatible 1200 Baud modem for ONLY $ 99.95
Now that you’re able to do all those stand alone applications with your Computer, like word processing, spread sheet analysis, and many others, you are probably thinking “It would sure be nice if I could expand the amount of data I have access to.” You are right, everything from Electronic Mail (E-mail) to stock quotes and huge databases of every imaginable type is now on line to the small computer owner. You can even send and receive messages anywhere in the world. All you need is a telephone and a modem which allows your computer to communicate with others through these services.
The next question: “Which modem is best for me?” Let us first say that almost all modems (and services) are set up to communicate in one of three speeds; 300,
1200 and 2400 Baud. If you look around you will find that there is a flood of 300 baud modems on the market being dumped because most computer users prefer 1200 Baud. (1200 Baud is about 4 times as fast which means you spend about Va the time and money getting the data you want and more time enjoying it.)
You may also be wondering about getting a 2400 Baud modem. 2400’s are great (and quite expensive), only if you have a dedicated, data-grade phone line. Here’s why. The regular phone system usually doesn’t have the signal clarity and bandwidth to support more than about 1200 baud and as a result, 2400 Baud modems will usually run at either 1200 or, on a real bad line, 300 Baud. They adapt to the worst-case line conditions and will slow transmission accordingly. Why buy a 2400 Baud modem for a lot more money when it’s going to transmit at 1200 Baud much of the time anyway? (Kind of like buying a sports car and never letting it go.)
You will also notice a few very cheap 1200s on the market at “too good to be true prices”. They are. The usual reason is that they are either not truly Hayes compatible, therefore not usable in all situations and with all services or cheaply built foreign units with poor (or nonexistant) support. The Aprotek Minimodems1” are American built, Hayes compatible and 1200 300 baud. Why not get a modem that will satisfy your present AND future needs by going directly to an Aprotek
Minimodem™ especially since we have it on sale?
What do you get for S99.95?...Everything! You don’t need to worry about cables, compatibility or anything else! We don’t just sell hardware, we sell solutions. The Aprotek Minimodem-AM™ plugs directly into your computer’s serial port. Minimodem-AM,M is a full feature, 1200 Baud modem with Auto Answer, Auto Dial, Touch-Tone or rotary dialing, has the full complement of status indicators on the top panel and has a built in speaker with volume control. Just plug it into your computer and standard phone jack with the supplied cable. Minimodems™ are supplied with a very comprehensive terminal program which makes it easy to do everything with your modem. Also included is a free trial subscription to CompuServe" , a very useful user database with local access numbers and about every feature imaginable. Aprotek Minimodems™ are packed with features but are tiny. While only 43 4" long, 23 4,r wide and high, they are the smallest yet best featured modem on the market. Order yours today!
NO RISK POLICY
Try any Aprotek product for two weeks. If you are not satisfied, send it back for a prompt refund.
NOW for the best part, the price!
MINIMODEM-AM™ (for Amiga 500, 2000) order 6216 .S99.95
MINIMODEM-H™ (for RS-232 serial DB-25) order 6214 (specify computer) ....$ 99.95
Modem shipping Cont. US $ 6.00. UPS Blue. CAN, AK. HI, APO S10.00
J dPtOEK
1071-A Avenida Acaso, Camarillo, CA 93010
ORDER INFORMATION California residents add 6% tax. All prices are cash prices VISA and MC add 3% to total. We ship the next business day on money orders, cashier’s checks, and charge cards. A 14-day clearing period is required for checks. Prices and availability subject to change CALL. Dealer inquiries invited.
For information call 805 987-2454
TO ORDER CALL TOLL FREE 1 (800) 962-5800 - USA
1 (800) 962-3800 - Calif. (7~6 PST)
Or send order to:
YOUR FRIENDS HAVE regaled you with lists of the
free software they downloaded from the networks.

Your sister met her boyfriend on a bulletin board service. You want to join in the fun, but are confused by all the telecommunications packages available. After many hours of connect time, we have reached some conclusions about six of the commercial telecommunications programs: Online!, Diga!, Macro- Modem, A-Talk II, SKEtcrm and AmigaTcrm. The following product snapshots were not designed to be
full-blown reviews, but to give you an idea about each program’s special features, strengths and weaknesses.
ONLINE!
At over two years old, Online! Is the “elder statesman” among Amiga telecommunications packages. Micro Systems Software’s current version is a feature-laden package that comes with a thorough, helpful, indexed manual. Online!'s powerful script language lets you automate your telecommunication. You can program ?
Online! To log onto a service, download files and leave messages completely unattended.
Coupled with multitasking, this is a big timesaver, because Online! Can be running automatically in the background while you work on another Amiga project.
A-Talk from Oxxi sports dozens of new options and is one of the most powerful telecommunications packages on the market.
A second advanced feature is OnlincTs ability to pass files through translation tables. These tables let you change one or more of the 255 ASCII character codes to any other ASCII code. This is important when you are working with a computer or software that uses different codes or that handle codes differently, such as dedicated typesetting systems. Finally, Online! Lets you customize your display with multiple colors, fonts and resolutions. For instance, you can display up to 132 characters on an overscanned screen, specify a borderless window or one without a title bar.
Online! Is a proven product that can handle most telecommunications needs. While its wealth of options can be intimidating, you’ll find the package hard to outgrow.
DlGA!
Released last year by Aegis Development. Diga! Is a very ambitious program. It was designed to be the only telecommunications package you’d ever need easy for beginners to operate while providing the advanced features experienced users demand. Aegis succeeded in developing a powerful program, but they did not make telecommunications much easier for beginners. To be fair, though, until we see the day when we won’t have to worry about things like baud rates, transfer protocols, local echo and transfer buffers, telecommunications will always be confusing to beginners.
In addition to the standard features, Diga! Supports a protocol called Doubletalk that lets two Diga!- equipped Amigas chat with one another while simul- tancouly transferring files. To automate your on-line sessions, you can define macros, activated by the function keys, and write script files. Diga! Also has extensive support for Tektronix graphics emulation and a utility that transfers Tektronix images into Aegis Draw and Draw Plus formats. Diga! Also supports a large dialing directory and lets you use your Amiga as a mini-bulletin board system.
Our biggest complaint about Diga! Is the manual, which alternates between going into great detail and skimming over features. Also, the index is organized by menus rather than alphabetically, making it difficult to use for reference.
Aegis went for the whole enchilada with Diga!.
While they didn’t quite get it, the) did take a big enough bite to satisfy many feature-hungry telecommunicators.
MacroModem 1.2
Macro Modem from Kent Engineering 8c Design is a do-it-yourself package. As the name indicates, this is a heavily macro oriented program (even the initial set-up sequence is a macro). Besides its own special macro editor, the program has a unique system for commenting each line of a macro with a help string. You can define an unlimited number of macro sets containing 36 macro keys (the Alt- key plus letters and numbers). Each macro holds 35 characters but can call other macro keys for longer command chains. Macro sets can be chained together, as well, providing even more programming flexibility. MarcoModem pushes even further in its programmability quest, offering a shell-like customizable interface called the Command mode; plus you can activate new CLI windows from within the program to execute AmigaDOS commands. If you call the same services continually and would like to customize your sessions, MacroModem is the route to go. For insurance against losing part of a file, MacroModem’s file filter, or chop utility, is a separate module that you run on a file only after the download is complete. This might seem like an inconvenience, but would you rather have a filter remove something from a file after you have a copy on disk or before you get it?
A-Talk II
Formerly A-Talk Plus (and before that A T alk 1.1), A-Talk II from Oxxi sports dozens of new options and is one of the most powerful telecommunications packages on the market. Terminal emulations are A- Talk Ips forte. The program supports all the features of the Tektronix display terminals including Alpha, Graph, GIN, Point Plot and Incremental Plot modes. You can store downloaded graphics in IFF format for use with DeluxePaint II (Electronic Arts) and Aegis Draw. With over 40 commands (including keyboard polling, gotos and conditionals), A-Talk Ips script language is quite powerful. The manual could be more comprehensive, but it is better than most. A good package with few flaws, A-Talk II is probably the most complete telecommunications program available.
SKEterm 2.01
SKF.term is a workingman’s telecommunications package with on-screen help for most features. Everything about SKEterm is fairly easy to use. It has an extensive phone library system that loads macro key ?
Getting Started
TELECOMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE Is the most important link in the telecommunications chain. These programs let you control a modem and place calls to distant computers by entering a number and then directing the modem to dial It, Most telecommunications packages let you store the phone numbers of many different BBSs and services in a phone directory. Some directories save additional information, Including the parameters, scripts and macros you use when you access a particular number.
The Basics
Communications parameters define the exact nature of the signals sent between two computers over a phone line. The parameters include the baud rate (the number of bits sent per second), how the data is packaged, and some simple parity error checking. The most common parameters used are 300, 1200 and 2400 baud, and eight data bits, one stop bit, and no parity.
Scripts are sequences of prompts and replies that you set up in advance of going on line. Scripts can be as simple as supplying your user name and password to a service or as complex as logging onto a service, downloading stock quotes and logging off. Scripts let you automate your telecommunications sessions. Macros let you enter a long string of characters or commands with one keystroke.
Terminal Case
Another feature offered by telecommunications packages is terminal emulation. The basic emulation offered Is TTY, which Insures that your screen reacts as expected to carriage returns, line feeds and form feeds. Other types of terminals have more complex screen formatting features and many software packages let your computer act like one of these dedicated terminals. The most popular terminal emulations offered are DEO (Digital Equipment Corp.) VT 52, DEC VT 100 and ANSI. Increasingly popular are emulators that let your computer act as a Tektronix graphics terminal. Of course, you can only use terminal emulators if the computer you're accessing supports the type of terminal you want to emulate. Specialized terminal emulators are nice, but most people use TTY 100% of the time.
Observing Protocol
Any telecommunications software package should let you exchange files with other computers and to capture data as it arrives across the phone lines. You should be able to capture text at any time you're on line and to send the text to a disk file or to your printer. No special protocol is required to send or receive text information.
Exchanging programs, pictures and music files is a different story. Since these files contain binary information, they can't be captured the way text flies can. Downloading binary files from another computer requires the use of error-checking protocols. Many different protocols, such as Kermit and Xmodem, have been developed to help ensure that the data recleved is identical to the data sent. Most protocols send data in chunks along with a value based upon the data in the chunk. If the receiving computer comes up with the same value for the chunk implying that the chunks are identical the next chunk gets sent; otherwise, the current chunk Is resent.
The important thing about protocols Is that the same one must be used on both ends of the telecommunications link. The more protocols your software supports the better.
Chopping Block and ARC
In the earliest days of Amiga telecommunications, BBSs and the on-line services were filled with angry users who found they couldn't run the programs they had downloaded. The problem stemmed from the fact that the header to AmigaDOS program files contains the length of the file.
Because transfer protocols send information in chunks of 128, 256 or 512 bytes, they pad the last chunk of a program file with meaningless information if the last chunk isn't exactly 128, 256 or 512 bytes long. When users ran the downloaded programs, AmigaDOS checked the length of the file as it appeared in the header with the actual length. If the two lengths weren't Identical and they weren’t when a file had been padded AmigaDOS would say that the program wasn’t an object file and wouldn’t run the program.
To get around the problem, utilities were soon developed that would lop padding from the end of a file. Your telecommunications package should have the ability to chop files either while they're being received or after you have them on your disk.
Chopping utilities are not perfect, however, so users and on-line services have come to rely upon a shareware utility called ARC, developed by Raymond Brand, to use in conjunction with protocol file transfers. ARC (for Archive) is a utility that packages programs, text, graphics and other related data files into a single unit. This unit is then made available for downloading. Once you’ve downloaded this unit, you must use your own copy of ARC (or a subset of ARC called UNARC) to extract the program file, documentation file and any other material from the ARC file. This system gets around the problem of padding because you don’t run the ARC file; you run the program only after it has been unARCed. Of course, you need a copy of ARC or UNARC In order to extract files from an ARC file. You can get ARC by sending for a public-domain disk that contains it (Fred Fish 40, for example), by downloading the file ARC. EXE, or by copying it from a friend.
ARC may seem confusing, but it is very simple to use. You'll get the hang of it In no time and never have to worry about chopping again. ?
GW & BR
A Comparison of Telecommunications Software
PRODUCT'
Online! 2.01
MacroModem 1.2
A-Talk IF
SKEterm 2.01
Diga! 1.0
AmigaTerm
Company
Micro Systems Software Inc.
Kent Engineering & Design
Oxxi Inc.
SKE Software
Aegis Development
Commodore
Price
$ 69.95
$ 69.95
$ 99
$ 49.95
$ 79.95
$ 49.95
Memory
Required
512K
256K5
512K
256K3
512K
256K
Protocols
Supported4
X, X-CRC, Y, Y-Batch, Z, K.B
X, X-CRC
X, X-CRC (CRC-16 and CRC-32), Y, Y- Batch, Z, K, K-Server
X, X-CRC, X-Win* dowed, K
X, X-CRC, Y, K, B, Doubletalk4
X, B
Baud Rates'1
300, 600, 1.200, 2,400, 4,800, 9,600, 19,200
112 26,2000
30 31,250
300, 1,200, 2,400, 4,800, 9,600, 19,200, 38,400
300, 1,200,2,400, 4,800, 9,600, 19,200, MIDI7
110, 300, 1,200. 2,400 4,800, 7,200, 9,600, 19,200
Parities
Supported"
E, O, N, M, S
E, O, N
E, O, N, M, S
E, O, N, M, S
E,0, N,M,S
E, O, N,M,S
Emulations
TTY, VT52,
TTY, ANSI, VT52,
TTY, ANSI, VT52,
TTY, ANSI, VT100,
TTY, ANSI,
TTY, ANSI, VT52,
VT100, VT102, Tektronix-4010
VT100
VT100, H19, Tektronix-4010, 4014 and 4014-1
D-200, ADM-3A
VT52, VT100, Tektronix-4010 and 4014
VT100
On-Screen Help
No
Yes9
Yes
Yes
No
No
Auto-Redial
0 15
Through macros
Selectable
Infinite
Once or infinite through scripts
No
Auto-Answer
Yes10
No
Yes"
Yes'"
Yes"
No
Capture To Disk
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No"
'Chart is based on the latest versions of the software.
* Formerly A-Talk Plus marketed by Felsina Software.
’Manufacturer suggests 512K for optimum use.
4X = Xmodem, Y = Ymodem, Z = Zmodem, K = Kermit, B = Compuserve-B. All packages support straight ASCII, XON XOFF, 7- and 8-bit word length, half- and full-duplex, some form of CR with LF adjustments, any Hayes compatible modem and most others (but not every modem). None of the packages are copy protected.
’Doubletalk is an Aegis protocol that allows two Diga! Users to run a chat mode while simultaneously up or downloading another file.
"Because a baud rate is supported does not mean you can run a 1,200 baud modem at 9,600 baud or that you can transfer data over a phone line at 262,000 baud. The practical limit for phone line transmission is about 2,400 baud. The higher the baud rate the more errors (and for many on-line services the higher the charges). Straight, direct wire data transfer (using null modems and two computers in the same room) has a higher limit.
The rate at which MIDI compatible musical instruments transfer data, 31,250 bps.
¦E « even, 0 = odd, N = none, M = mark, S = space.
• MacroModem also supports user-written help and comments In macro files. ,0Both ONLINE! And SKEterm support auto-answer (with an auto-answer modem) but they are not designed for unattended or remote use.
11 A-Talk II and Diga! Both support limited remote use but are not designed as BBS (bulletin board system) software.
'‘Not continous; saves to disk only after a transler is complete.
"Uses PAR: rather than PRT: so Preferences printer settings are bypassed. "Prints only after a transfer is complete.
"Rudimentary editing only.
1BThe ability to compose a complete response in a separate window before it is sent all at once. Handy for CB-style teleconferencing.
"Diga! Has a different type of chat mode. See footnote 6.
"Some packages support different fonts in the additional sense (Ruby, Gar-
sets, script files and such, all of which can be chained for almost unlimited flexibility. SKE Software stresses that most of the effort designing SKEterm went into the terminal emulations. Their VT100 emulation was the first “totally compatible” emulation available for the Amiga, and now they arc the first to offer D200 (Data General) terminal emulation with full support of all 60 function keys.
The largest drawback to SKEterm is the disk-based manual. If you want a hardcopy to flip through you can cither print it yourself (over 40 pages) or you can order one from SKE for $ 10. Either way, it is not very well organized and has no index.
SKEterm is a contradiction. It offers more onscreen help than any other package and is simple to get started, but for the more advanced features there is little help, and using some features is hit and miss for a while. While SKEterm does have strengths (for D200 or VT100 emulation, SKEterm is the best of the lot), they are kept hidden.
AmigaTerm
AmigaTerm from Commodore Business Machines is the most limited telecommunications package we looked at, offering the fewest features and the worst manual. Its only unique features are the ability to adjust the tab settings on the screen and the use of sliders for changing the screen colors. Beginners be-
40 April 1988
Capture To Pnnter
Resize Capture Buffer
Scroll Buffer (Up Down)
Edit Buffer'*
Chat Mode10
Multiple Fonts'"
Speech
Bell
(Sound Flash) Phone Directory Macro Keys'*'
Scripts*1
Unattended
Calling*1
Up Download
Retries**
File Filter*7
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
40 + chain 20 F-keys (04 chars)
Yes
Yes
3
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
No
Yes
30 + chain
30 keys (30 chars) + chain*0
No”
Yes*1
Infinite
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Unlimited 30 F-keys (30 chars)
Yes
Yes
15
Yes
Yesls
No
Down
No
Yes
No
Music
Yes
30
94 keys (90 chars) + chain
Yes
No
10
Yes
No11
Yes |
Yes
No
No'7
Yes
Yes
Yes
Unlimited 50 F-keys (80 chars)
Yes
Yes
10
Yes
No11
No
Down
No
No
No
No
Yes
No
10 F-keys (32 chars)
No
No
NA“
No
net, etc.); others only support a few preselected fonts used only for 132- column screens, interlaced modes, etc.
’•Most packages use the function keys for macro storage, which may cause conflicts with VT-52, VT-100 or VT-102 emulation as these use predefined function keys. In A-Talk II, emulation definitions will be loaded unless you define the function keys. In AmigaTerm, the terminal emulation definitions overwrite user definitions of the function keys.
"MacroModem has a predefined set of function key macros, but letter and number keys are programmable. MacroModem is the only package with a built-in macro editor (see footnote 22). These macros can call other macros, even macro sets from disk.
A,None of the packages that support script files supply an editor to create them. You will have to use a word processor or text editor that can save text as straight ASCII.
"MacroModem's macro keys and chaining eliminate the need for scripts. "The ability to program the software to make a call, automatically log-on, check E-mail, download files, etc., while unattended. All of the packages that support this require some fancy script programming.
"While this is possible through macros, the company does not recommend it because of the infinite retries on downloads (see footnote 26). If there were a very bad connection, MacroModem would keep trying to get the information until turned off manually.
“Some packages will automatically try to up or download files a number of times if an error is detected during transmission. MacroModem will keep trying indefinitely until you manually abort.
“Information not available.
“Certain protocols such as Xmodem send files in packets of a certain size (128K blocks). If there aren't enough bytes in the last block, then zeros are automatically added to the file. The Amiga won’t run a program file if the zeros are present, so some packages have a file filter utility to chop off the zeros automatically. Unfortunately, some IFF pictures within a program file can look like filler to a filter.
Ware: Fewer options does not mean less contusion. I lie condescending manual obscures any clear points and doesn’t bother to explain complicated elements of the program. In 20 illustrated pages, the manual tells you about the wonderful world of telecommunications, what a menu bar is, how to use the mouse to select and save your settings, how the buffer works and winds up with file transfer protocol and keyboard remapping. Nowhere does it tell you how to make a call with AmigaTerm. Check the index. You will find no entries for call, dial, numbers, phone, telephone, logon, bulletin hoard, BBS, on-line services, uploading or downloading. If you got AmigaTerm free with an Amiga modem, you probably should not open the package. Using AmigaTerm may sour you on telecommunications before you buy a usable program.
The Checkout Line
A-Talk II is the top commercial telecommunications program for the Amiga. Close behind are Diga! And Online!. Each has extensive flexibility and power. MacroModem and SKEterm tied for third only because they’re a bit daunting for novices. MacroModem is a natural for people who want to create a custom telecommunications environment without writing a complete program. SKEterm is the “best buy,” but the advanced features aren’t explained well. AmigaTerm wasn’t even in the running. ¦
AmigaWvrld 41
SuperGen Makes it Hatoi
Amiga Makes It Possible. .
Desktop Video.
Studio quality video production on a desktop. The Amiga makes it possible. The SuperGen Genlock makes it happen!
Video Professionals understand the power the Amiga Computer brings to the industry and the potential it has for enhancing their work. With its revolutionary hi-resolution graphics and processing power, the Amiga represents a sophisticated video production solution.
The SuperGen Genlock and overlay device is the link between the Amiga’s video potential and your own video productions. SuperGen allows you to create and produce professional broadcast quality video with special effect graphics and titles created on your Amiga.
Some SuperGen™ features:
True Broadcast quality video output
Real RS-170A. No ifs, ands or buts! Accurately locks to non-time base corrected signals such as VCR output. Very accurate RGB encoder for true Amiga graphic colors.
Two independent fade controls.
For external video through background and external video through graphics. Slider or software controllable.
Selectable Auto-Fade mode.
Amiga graphics black level fade.
The black level of the Amiga graphics determine the fade level.
Switchable 3.58Mhz Notch filter
helps eliminate chroma artifacts.
Selectable blanking
Internal or external.
Actual un-retouched photographs of composite video screens The flower is live video, the Butterfly is created on the Amiga. SuperGen is overlaying the Butterfly onto the flower.
The top sequence shows Amiga graphics fading in.
The bottom sequence shows the Amiga background fading in
BNC Connectors
A500, 1000, and 2000 compatable
SuperGen™ $ 4y.yo
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JUST FIDDLING AROUND:
Proportional Gadgets In C
WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM THE AMIGA’S INTUITION, YOU CAN TURN YOUR C PROGRAMS INTO A TWEAKER’S PARADISE OF PROPORTIONAL GADGETS.
By Jim Fiore
TWIDDLING WITH KNOBS and tweaking adjustments should be a national sport. The equipment is plentiful. Any proportional control will do: a TV s volume, an FM receiver, a stereo equalizers plethora of knobs and sliders, even Amiga software (for example, a word processor's scroll bars, or the omnipresent RGB color controls).
If you're fluent in C and have good Intuition, you can train for the tweaking big leagues by programming your own proportional gadgets to fiddle with. Similar to a standard slide potentiometer (or pot, for short), proportional gadgets are used whenever your program needs to collect data from the user as a percentage of some value. A proportional gadget is made of two parts: the knob, which the user moves with his mouse, and the surrounding container. Clicking inside the container (but not on the knob) moves the knob toward the ?
Click. Another advantage of Intuition proportional gadgets over their hardware counterparts is their ability to change size. The example drawing program, SimpleProp.c (see Listing 1), concentrates on the easiest gadget to manipulate, the slide pot for RGB color adjustments.
Structured Sliding
Before you start adjusting your sliders, you must initialize Gadget and Proplnfo structures, attach them to a window and monitor the 1DCMP (Intuition Direct Communication Message Port). For more information on Intuition and IDCMP, see the March April ’87 AmigaWorld for “Fundamentals of C: Playing with Intuition.” No matter what type of Intuition gadget you are using (proportional, Boolean, string or integer), you must adhere to the following structure.
Struct Gadget

struct Gadget
USHORT
USHORT
USHORT
USHORT
APTR
APTR
struct IntuiText LONG APTR USHORT APTR }
"NextGadget;
LeftEdge, TopEdge, Width, Height; Hags;
Activation;
GadgetType;
GadgetRender;
GadgetSelect;
’GadgetText;
MutualExclude;
Speclallnfo;
GadgetID;
UserData;
NextGadget is a pointer connecting a linked list of Gadget structures. For the final gadget in the series, set the field to NULL. LeftEdge, TopEdge, Width and Height determine the size and location of your gadget’s select box, which indicates the gadget's active area. Here you can enter relative offsets or absolute numbers, depending on the Flags variable.
Flags, itself, is rather complex. Once the gadget is selected, you can highlight it with GADGHCOMP, which complements the colors within the select box (the knob, in this case), or GADGHIMAGE, which displays an alternate image. If you would like to key the gadget’s size to your window, set GRELBOTTOM (Gadget RELative to BOTTOM), GRELRIGHT, GRELWIDTH or GRELHEIGHT. A gadget’s position is normally referenced to the left edge of its window.
If you set GRELRIGHT, for example, the left edge of the gadget will be relative to the right edge of the window. If the window is resized, the gadget always remains on the right side. If you desire special graphics for your gadgets, set GADGIMAGL (as opposed to GADGHIMAGE). For a more lengthy discussion, see the Intuition Reference Manual, which describes several other flag types.
To monitor pot movement through IDCMP, you
need Activation flags. RELVERIFY produces the IDCMP message type GADGETUP, which, unlike other gadget types, will he received even if you move off of the gadget’s knob. (Note how the knob moves even though you vector away from it.) Setting GADGIMMEDIATE provides GADGET DOWN messages.
For a real-time update of the pot value, set the FOLLOWMOUSE flag, which broadcasts IDCMP MOUSEMOVE events to you. You can update mouse location values with each MOUSEMOVE, or by collecting moves and responding to the net move. Because users can generate many MOUSEMOYF. Events quickly, most programmers prefer to use the net method (as the sample program does).
Specify PROPGADGET for Gadget Type. GadgetRender should point to an uninitialized image structure if you are using the default imagery (a rectangle within a larger rectangle), or to an initialized structure if you have a special rendering in mind. If you set a GADGHIMAGE flag, SclectRender must point to your alternate image structure. Without GADGHIMAGE, set it to NULL. If you want a text requester or such, GadgetText should point to an IntuiText structure.
In the example, MutualExclude is not implemented. For Speciallnfo, you must enter a pointer to a Proplnfo structure that outlines the sliders movement. GadgetID allows you to distinguish between various gadgets via the I Address Field of the associated IntuiMessage. Finally, UserData contains a pointer to whatever you deem appropriate.
A Proportional Heart
The heart of the proportional gadget system is the Proplnfo structure.
Struct Proplnfo

USHORT
USHORT
USHORT
USHORT
USHORT
USHORT
}
Flags;
HorizPot, VertPot; HorizBody, VertBody; Cwidth, Cheight; HpotRes, VpotRes; LeftBorder, TopBorder;
You have several choices for Flags. AUTOKNOB gives a simple default image of a rectangular knob inside of a rectangular container. FRLLHORIZ and FREEVERT let the knob travel horizontally and vertically. Set both and the knob moves two-dimen- sionally like the Preferences screen positioning gadget. KNOBHIT is automatically set by Intuition when the knob is clicked on. PROPBORDERLESS eliminates the default rectangular border.
HorizPot and VertPot hold the current pot value and let you determine what the user has entered. Because the value can he anywhere between 0 and Oxffff, some form of scaling usually is required. When scaling, think of the pot value as a percentage with
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A dozen menu driven tools allow you to make a child’s voice sound like a titan or turn a TV pitchman into an alien from another galaxy. Record MIDI input in real time. Mix voices and instruments and control their playback using a MIDI keyboard. Overdub from 16 digitized “sections” and play back four of them at a time. Supports advanced MIDI features such as tempo adjust and external sync. Store sounds in IFF “instrument" or "one-shot” (8SVX) files for use with other compatible programs.
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Window Screen RastPorl G f x B a s e V i e w P o r t I n t u i M e s s a g e G a d g e t struct Image struct IntuiText struct. Propin fo USH0RT i n t
static USH0RT * initial knob *
struct struct struct struct struct s t r ii c t struct
x 6 x 1 * Oxffff , Oxffff, 0x0000, 0x0000, Oxffff , Oxffff) ; 0x0000, 0x0000, Oxffff , 0 x f f f f , 0x0000, 0x0000};
A 8 0x0000, 0x0000, Oxffff , Oxffff, 0x0000, 0 xOOOO,
static USHORT
Listing 1. SimpleProp.c
* SimpleProp.c by Jim Fiore, dissidents.
Compiled and linked under 1.2 usin§ Manx Aztec cc +L SimpleProp.c In +Cdb SimpleProp.o 1c 3 2 32 bit ints used. (+ L and c32 for Manx)
Manx requires * for line continuation. La t nice
users can ignore ’ . Inage data must reside in chip memory, (+Cdb for Manx) *
include "functions.h"
include "intuition intuition.h"
*--------------defines-------------------------*
define 1NTLI1TI0N_REV 331.
define CRAPHICS_REV 331.
define TOTAL 4
*--------------Globa Is-------------------------*
struct IntuitionBase *IntuitionBase;
* d_window, *g_window;
* m y_s creen;
* d_rast, *g_rast;
* GfxBase;
* tl_v_por t ;
’ message; gadget[TOTAL] ; image[T0TAL+1 ] : itxt[TOTAL]; p ro p[TOTAL ] ; gadg_i d: mouse_moved;
* image data idat[ ] = (0 x f f f f,
Oxffff,
0x0000,
0x0000,
Oxffff ,
Oxffff , i d a t 2[ ] = (0x0000, Oxffff,
0x0000, Oxffff,
* alternate knob * Oxffff, 0x0000,
Oxffff, 0x0000,
0x0000, Oxffff,
0x0000, Oxffff,
Oxl'fff as 100%. For a resolution of one part in 50, multiply the pot value by 50 and then divide the result by Oxffff. (When using Integer math, consider that the fractional portion of a value is truncated.)
You can initialize your pot to an arbitrary value, but remember knob movement down or to the right will increase the pot value. To do the opposite (increase volume as the slider rises), subtract your pot value from Oxffff, then scale normally.
I lorizBody and VertBody represent the percentage showing (out of Oxffff) of the gadget you are accessing. When you use AUTOKNOB, the percentage is reflected by the size of the knob. If you are scanning a directory with 20 names, and five are visible at any given time, the knob will be l4 the size of the container.
The pot value indicates whether you arc at the
*--------function dec larat ions-------------------*
VOID
open_all(), damp_mop(), create_gadget(),
c. r ea t e_p r op ( ) , creat e_i txt ( ) , create_image(), handle_mcssages(), ha n d 1 e_g_w i n :i o w ( ) , h a n d 1 e_d_v i n d o w ( ) ,
upda t e_p rop() ;
struct Window * creat e_wi n d ow( ) ;
struct Screen *create_screen();
*-----------start of ma i ii ( )---------------------*
Listing continued on p. 90
beginning, middle or end of the directory. Clicking the mouse on either side of the knob moves it a distance equal to the knob’s size. This proportional movement occurs even if you are not using AUTO- KNOB. In the example program, an alternate image is used with a body size larger than the image itself, producing large jumps. Intuition sets and maintains all of the remaining variables in the structure.
The Proof is in the Painting
The example program, SimpleProp.c, is a very simple paint program with a gadget window and a drawing window. By holding the left button, you can sketch freehand with the mouse in the draw window. Set the color of your drawing pen with the gadget window’s three horizontal sliders, one each for red, green and blue.
The red slider uses a stock AUTOKNOB gadget, while the green slider is BORDERLESS. Its knob is automatically a little larger, because it does not need to compensate for a border. The blue slider uses special imagery for both selected and unselected knobs. Note how blue’s body is % of the slider even though the image is considerably less. The upper left corner of the gadget window houses four numbers, indicating which of the three gadgets is presently active and the red. Green and blue values (zero to 15) of the drawing pen. Respectively. For sake of example only, an inactive relative AUTOKNOB gadget is positioned in the right window border. Notice that its body is ' , of the slider no matter how you size the window.
As a paint program, SimpleProp.c leaves a lot to he desired. Menus, requesters and the like were left out to decrease clutter, and the "Okav to draw" flag is oversimplified. (Make sure that you reactivate the draw window by clicking on the depth arranger or title bar, otherwise you will get an extraneous line.) Exit the program by clicking on the draw window’s close gadget.
As a programming exercise. SimpleProp.c offers ample room to experiment and tweak gadgets. (Remember: If you have an expanded machine, all image data must be in the lower 512K of memory, otherwise the blue slider will be rendered without a knob.) For starters, try repositioning the sliders and altering their sizes. One convenient thing about Intuition is that you can resize your window, destroying the gadget imagery, without the program crashing. Sliders will still produce correct values when moved. If they are moved, resizing the window will refresh the gadgets. You could change the orientation of the sliders or make them two-dimensional. Changing pot and body values is also a useful warmup exercise. With a little practice, you’ll be ready for the major leagues ot tweaking. ¦
Jim Fiore is an Assistant Professor in the Electronics Department of Mohawk Valley Community College. Write to him at 130 Dawes Ave., Utica, NV 13502.
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Empire
$ 36
Pub Games......
S25
Archort II
S19
Ferrari Formula 1 ..
$ 36
Quizam
$ 25
Arctic Fox
S26
Financial Cookbook
Si 9
Reach i the Stars
S33
Arts Part 1
S19
Golden Oldies
$ 19
Return to Atlantis
536
Arts Part II
$ 59
Gridiron .. ..
S44
In StoCK1
Awesome Arcade
Hot & Cool Jazz Disk $ 24
Roadwars.
$ 26
Pak
$ 36
Hunt for Rea Oct ...
S36
Rockford - -
$ 26
Bard'S Tale
$ 32
Instant Music.
$ 32
Seasons & Holidays
$ 23
Battle Droidz
S26
Instant Music Data
$ 25
Seven Cities
Black Cauldron .
$ 29
Intellitype . .
$ 35
of Gold -
$ 19
ChessMaster 2000
$ 30
King's Quest 1.2.3
Call
Skyfox ..
$ 19
Deluxe Music
$ 63
Lounge Lizards . .
$ 38
Skylox II .
S29
Deluxe Paint II
$ 84
Mad Libs. .
$ 16
Space Quest li
S37
Deluxe PhotoLab
$ 74
Marble Madness
$ 32
Starfieet I
S36
Deluxe Print II .. .
Call
Mavis Beacon
Thexder
$ 26
Deluxe Productions S144
Teaches Typing
S3 3
Winnie the Pooh ...
$ 26
Get a free 1986 Teams Disk with the purchase of Earl Weaver Baseball while they last!
NEW PRODUCTS MR VE D MY!
NOW IN OUR THIRRMOMNLYYEAR!
ABACUS
AssemPro In Slock!
BeckerText ... Call
DaiaRetfieve Call
TextPro .. Call
ABSOFT
AC Basic S139
AC Fortran ......$ 199
ACCESS SOFTWARE
J Echilon Call
Leader Board $ 27
Lipstick Plus ....S 19
Tournament Disk S 14
ACCOLADE
Famous Courses 2 S 17
Fight Night Call
Graphic Studio .S 43
Hard Bail Call
Mean 18 $ 27
Test Drive .. S 31
ACS
Brush Works lor2 S 24
EFX .... S225
Grade Manager $ 69
Music Student Cali
Quickmerge .....S 44
QuizMaster . Cali
Station Manager CaL
ACTIVISION
Beyond Zork. $ 35
Game-* Basketb S 29
Game-* Baseball S 29
Game-* Golf .S 29
Game-* Football . S 29
GB Air Rally ....$ 28
infocom Titles!! Call
Little Comp People .. Call
Lurking Horror .S 29
Music Studio ... S 3S
Portal S 29
Shanghai .. S 29
ToneTown .. $ 29
ADDISOH-WESLEY
Hardware Manual Call
Intuition Manual. Call
Puppy Love S 24
Rom Kernal
Manuai . Call
Rom Exec Manual . Cali
AEGIS
Animator Images. . S 84
Art Disk .S 24
Arazok's Tomb S 32
Agdiomaster $ 43
Oiga ..$ 56
Draw Plus $ 149
Images ...$ 26
impact S 54
Nr*'Port 01 Call ....$ 36
Sonic S 49
Videoscape 30 . ... SI29
Video Tiller ...... Call
AMIGA
MindWalker ....$ 38
1 2 Update ......S 14
ANCO
NiV BMX Challenge $ 19
Nt«' Flight Path 737 S 19
x,i.! Grid Start $ 19
Ni» Harrier Mission $ 19
Nt* Las Vegas S 19
Nt-'Sky Fighter. S 19
kH*XR35 S 19
APPLIED VISIONS
Ki*' Sargon III ......$ 38
ARTWORX
Bndge 5 0 ...... Call
n,*’ Centerfold Squares $ 25 Linkword Languages $ 24
Strip Poker ......$ 32
SP Data Disk *4 S 15
SP. Data Disk *5 ...$ 15
KiJ Thai Boxing .....$ 17
ASDG
FACC II ...S 27
BANTAM
AmigaDOS Express $ 25
DOS Manuals.....$ 22
BAUDVILLE
FIRST BYTE
Award Maker
..5 39
1st Lettrs & Wrds .
$ 36
Video Vegas. .
.$ 29
First Shapes
$ 34
BE.S.T.
Kid Talk .
S 34
Business Mom*. ...
$ 319
Math Talk ...
S 34
BLANK SOFTWARE
Math Talk Fractions.
. Call
N**‘ Sound Lab.....
. Call
Smoothtalker
.$ 3b
BROWN WAGH
Speller Bee
$ 14
Express Paint
Call
FULLER COMPUTER
.$ 37
(New Version f!)
Project D ....
Publishers- ...
. Call
FUTUREWORKS
kV Softwood File llsg
.. .S 74
LexCheck ......
.$ 34
kiiJ Stellar Conflct.....
...S 29
G IMPEL
TV Show
S 74
Lint
S 35
TV Text ..
$ 69
GOLD DISK
1,.-' Word P ex ...
S 25
Color Separalor
Call
Ni-' Write & File
S 79
Comic Setter
S 74
Zuma Fonts (ea
$ 26
Font Set 1
$ 26
BYTE BY BYTE
Gold Spell ...
$ 34
Ammate 3-C .
... Call
Laser Script
$ 35
InfoMmder ...
...5 69
Page Seder
$ 94
Sculpt 3-D
Call
Prof. Page Setter
Call
CAPILANO
HAITEX
Logic Works .
... Call
Hcslc
$ 44
CENTRAL COAST
HASH
DISK-2-DISK In Stock’
Animator Apprent
Call
DOS-2-DOS
S 39
Animator Appr Jr
Can
Precisely ...
$ 64
Animator Flipper
S 29
Quarterback ..
...$ 54
to* Shape Libraries
Call
COMMAND SIMULATIONS
HILTON ANDROID
Biitzkneg ......
Call
Kt* Aesop's Fables.....
$ 19
COMPUMED
Chicken Lirtie
S 24
Hacker Package...
.. S 34
m-' Little Red Hen
S 24
Mirror ..
..$ 34
Three Little Pigs
$ 24
CONSTELLATION SOFTW.
IMPULSE
All Titles .
Cali
Prism ..
$ 49
COSMI
Silver
$ 119
Super Huey ..
.. $ 26
INFINITY
CREATIVE SOLUTIONS
Galileo
.$ 49
MultiForth ....
.. Call
Galileo li .... .
Call
CRYSTAL ROSE
Go ..
Call
Analytic Art .
..$ 44
Grand Siam Tennis
.$ 38
DELTA RESEARCH
Hot Licks......
S M
J-Fohh
..$ 89
Shakespeare
Cali
DIGITAL CREATIONS
INOVATRONICS
D'Buddy ......
S 58
CAPE 68K
Can
Digital Link.
$ 49
InovaTools 1
Can
Gizmos 2.0 ...
.. Call
Power Windows....
.$ 65
DIGITAL SOLUTIONS
INTELLIGENT MEMORY
LPD Senes ...
... Call
Emmetic Skimmer
$ 27
LPD Writer .....In Slock!
Galaxy Fight
S 35
DISCOVERY
Garnson , . .
Call
Amnix ..
Cali
Mousetrap
S 22
Arkanoid ......
... Call
Witchcraft. ......
S 35
DX Senes ..
Call
INTERACTIVE SOFTWORKS
GrabbiC ..
S 24
Calligrapher.....
$ 79
Marauder II .
$ 25
Newsletter Fonts .
S 25
EAGLE TREE
Studio Fonts
$ 25
Butcher 2.0.....
S 25
ISM
El DER SOFT
Surgeon .
$ 39
Mi* Amiga Karate
..S 24
JAGWARE
EPYX
Alien Fires ....
. Call
California Games .
..$ 29
JDK IMAGES
Destroyer
. $ 29
Pro Video CGI ......
, Call
X;,-’ Dive Bombe'......
$ 29
Mi*1 Pro Video Pius......
Call
M**' 4x4 Off Road Race
. $ 29
font Library 1.....
S 79
Rogue
$ 25
Font Library 2
$ 79
m**' Street Cat ..
..$ 19
JENDAY
Sub Battle ...
..$ 29
Conv. W Comp
$ 24
Summer Games
S 25
JHM
Temples of Apshai
$ 25
Talking Color Book
S 24
World Games
..$ 25
LATTICE
EQUAL PLUS
C - Regular .
S153
Financial Plus.....
S188
C - Professional
$ 284
ESCAPE SEQUENCE
dbC III Library
$ 119
n -' Photosynthesis
Can
Other Products
Call
FELSINA
LIGHTNING SOFTWARE
A-Talk Pius ...
$ 79
Big Picture
Ca.'J
FINALLY TECHNOLOGIES
LION S AMIGA ART STUDIO
Animation ....
S 74
Font Sets 1 & 2
$ 25
Dr. Xes ....
S 37
Newsletter Fonts.....
S >5
Nancy________________
$ 45
LYNN S LUNA C
Phasar ....
S 61
Ki*-' WBExtras
Call
Senor Tutor ..
.. Call
MANX
Talker
$ 46
Aztec C - Comm .
$ 315
FIREBIRD
Aztec C - Devel
S199
Guild of Thieves....
$ 32
Aztec C - Prof
$ 149
Golden Path ..
..$ 35
Source Levi Debug'r.
Call
Jewel of Darkness..
..S 25
MERIOIEN SOFTWARE
Knight Ore ....
- S 34
xitJ- Demonstrator ..
$ 27
Pawn
..$ 32
Zmg ..
,$ 49
Silicon Dreams......
..S 25
Zing Keys ......
$ 36
StarGiider ..
Call
Zing Spell ....
$ 38
METACOMCO
Assembler Call
Lisp ...S154
Make ..$ 57
Pascal S 68
Shell .... $ 45
Toolkit S 35
METADIGM
MetaScope ......$ 79
MICHTRON
Air Bail S 28
Cashman ...... S 24
Gold Runner ....S 28
Karate Kid II S 28
Time Bandits .$ 28
MICRO ILLUSIONS
Black Jack Acad .... S 29
CAD System Call
Discovery Data Disks
Now Available!
Dynamic Word. $ 139
Discovery S 25
Fairy Tale Ac? . In Slock!
Fire Power .....5 19
Galactic Invasion .... S 19 Land of Legends $ 37
Music X 3219
x;,-' Photon Pam: ... Call
Photon Video ... Call
Planetarium ...$ 51
Roman*. Encountr S 29
Turbo S 19
MICRO MAGIC
Forms in Flight $ 69
MICROPROSE
Gunship ...$ 23
Silent Service.. ,..$ 24
MICROSEARCH
City Desk .S110
Desktop Artist 1.....S 23
Head Coach ....$ 39
MICROSMITHS
Fast Fonts . Call
TxEd ..S 32
MICROSYSTEMS SOFTWARE
Analyze 2 0 ...$ 74
BBS-PC .$ 62
’Excellence ...... Call
Flipside __________ $ 3:
On-line S 42
Organize ..S 53
Scribble ..$ 61
Works .....$ 131
MIMETICS
Soundscape
Pro Midi ..$ 130
Soundscape Util 1 $ 39
MINDSCAPE
Balance of Power ,.,.S 31
Ni*’ Block Buster ....S 37
Bratacus .$ 32
Defender of Crown...S 31
Deja Vu ...$ 32
Gauntlet ... Call
Hailey Project ..... S 30
Harner Combat .... $ 37
High Roller ..... Call
N. *’ Ice Hockey Call
Indoor Sports $ 35
Into Eagle's Nest Call
Keyboard Cade! Call
King of Chicago S 34
Piutos . Call
Q Balf S 22
Racier $ 28
Rocket Ranger . Call
SAT Preparation S 52
S D l .S 31
Shadowgate ....S 35
Sinbad $ 31
Tbree Stooges ..Call
Uninvited .S 31
MINDWARE
Descartes $ 26
Holmes ......S 37
Page Flipper ....S 39
NEW HORIZONS
Flow ...S 69
ProWrite ..S 75
NEWTEK
A500 Adapter ..$ 20
Digi-Adapter ..... Call
Digi-Droid S 59
Cigi-Paint $ 49
Digi-View 2 0......$ 146
Video Toaster ..... Call
NEW WAVE
Dynamic Drums. . S 59 NIMBUS
Accounting ...$ 99
OMNITREND
u«*' Breach ---------------.$ 29
Ereach Scenario
HtJ Disk .....$ 19
ORIGIN SYSTEMS
AutoDuel .S 35
Moebius $ 38
Ogre Call
Ultima ill Call
Ultima IV Call
OPCODE SYSTEMS
Music Mouse S 66
OXXI
Benchmark (2)...... Ca t
Encore $ 29
Maxipian S 99
Maxiplan P us S127
WOW $ 29
PDJ SOFTWARE
AiRT Call
POLYGLOT SOFTWARE Crossword Creator $ 38
Dommoes.....S 19
PROFESSIONAL SOFTWARE
fleet Check .... Call
PROGRESSIVE
CLI-Mate .S 25
IntroCad .....$ 53
Logistix $ 35
MicroLawyer ... Call
PixMate $ 54
Superbase ...$ 31
Superoase Prof Call
Vizawrite $ 81
PROLIFIC INC.
Pro-ASM S 73
Pro-Board Call
Pro-Net Call
PSYGNOSIS
Arena $ 16
Barbarian $ 28
Terror Pods S 28
READY SOFT
The 64 Emulator Call
RIGHT ANSWERS GROUP
Director ... Can
S ANTHONY STUDIOS
LaserUp'.....$ 64
Laser Utilities S 32
SEDONA
Money Mentor S 74
SEVEN SEAS Doug's Math sis Aquarium $ 59
C64 Emulator ... Call
SUPPED DISK
Investor’s Advantage $ 77 SOFT LOGIK CORP
Publishing Partner. Call
SOFT TOUCH
Custom Screens $ 49
Paymaster Plus......S1Q9
SOFTWARE TERMINAL Telegames S 26
SOFTWARE VISIONS McroFiche Filer S 79
SPENCER ORGANIZATION N**’ APL 68000 Call
SSI
Kampfgruppe S 46
Fhantasie ... Call
Roadwar Europa S 3i
Road War 2000 S 32
Wrath of Ntcode Call
SUBLOGIC
Flight Simulator $ 32
Jet . Call
Scenery Disk 7 . . S 18
Scenery Disk 11 S 20
SUNRIZE INDUSTRIES
Perfect Vision .. Call
Studio Magic S 75
SYNDESIS
Interchange Call
TAURUS
Acquisition ...... Call
X-CAD Designer Can
TOI
All Products Available Modula il Comm $ 207
Modula ll Oeve!......S109
Modula H Reg ..S 64
THE DISC COMPANY
n. JKind Words S 74
THE OTHER GUYS
Match-lt ..S 29
Omega File S 60
Promise Spel er $ 39
Reason ... Call
Synth a . .. Call
THREE SIXTY SOFTWARE Nr*1 Dark Castles S 24
TIGRESS
Diskw.K.....S 36
TOP DOWN
M- Vyoe' ..... $ 24
TRUE BASIC. INC.
True Basic $ 74
9 Libraries (each) ...S 39
Runtime S109
UNICORN
Adv. Of Smbad S 35
Aesop's Fab.es $ 35
Animal Kingdom......S 35
Arabian Nights S 35
Decimal Dungeon ....S 33
Fraction Action S 33
Kinderama ......S 33
Logic Master S 35
Magical Myths S 35
Math Wizard ...S 35
Read & Rhyme ______$ 33
Read-A-Rama ...S 35
The Word Master.....S 35
UNISON WORLD
Art Gallery' I. II ..S 20
Printmaster Plus.....$ 33
VIP TECHNOLOGY
Professional SI 14
VISUAL AURAL
Mindlight 7 Call
WESTCOM
ADFO. S 45
Hardhat ...S 55
WORDPERFECT INC Worn Perfect . . ... Call ZEN SOFTWARE
System Monitor S 39
ZIRKONICS
Prof Text Engine. $ 80
HARDWARE
ACCESS ASSOCIATES
Alegra 512K .... Call
AMAZING DEVICES
Time Lord $ 34
Progr's Rele'ence S 15 AMIGA
A500, 1000. 2000.... Call All other products .... Call ANAKIN
Easyl .$ 399
Easyl 500 2000 ...... Call
ANCHOR AUTOMATION
Omega 80...... $ 165
APPLIED VISIONS
Futuresound $ 144
ASDG
NiJ- RAM Boards Boxes.. Cali AVATEX
120QHC Modem......$ 115
BYTE BY BYTE Byte Box A500
in Stock! S 49
S 39 . S 64
TIC.....
C. LTO.
Tit*1 C View Cables
Timesaver
CSA
Accelerators .... Call
CREATIVE MICROSYSTEMS
Kickstart Elimin S109
RF Modulator A500... Call
DIGITAL CREATIONS
SuperGen ...... Cali
ECE
MIDI-500 ..... CaL
EPSON
EX-800 . Call
EXPANSION TECHNOLOGIES
Escort 500 .... Call
FINALLY TECHNOLOGIES
Hurricane Accel Call
works tv A500 1000 2000 FUJI
10 D-S Disks ... $ 19 99 Free disk case wi ever box' GO AMIGA
Printer Cables. . S 25 Modem Cables $ 25 Disk Head Cleaner $ *5 30-Disk Case S 10
Mousepad $ 10
Sony Momtr Cable S 35 GOLDEN HAWK TECH.
MIDI Gold .....S 69
GRAB. INC.
LIVE’ by A-Squared Call INKWELL
Ni**1 Light Pen . $ 99
MICHIGAN SOFTWARE
A500 Expansion...... Call
Drive Ext Cables..... Call
insider Call
Multi-Start Call
Quicksort ......S149
MtCRDBOTICS
A2000 Adapter . . . Call
A2000 Products..... Call
Multifunction ... Call
Starboard 2MB . Call
Starboard2 A500 Call
Other Sizes Available MICRON TECHNOLOGIES
Memory Boards Call
MICROWAY
Ricker Fixer......Call
MIMETICS
Am.Gen Genlock $ 157
Audio Digitizer Call Frame Butter Call MIDI Interface S 45
OKIDATA
Cki20 Col. Rbbon.. S 10
CK20 Bik Ribbon S 9
Ckimate 20 with Plug n' Play S199
PACIFIC PERIPHERALS
Mi*1 CverDnve . Calf
Subsystem Call
PANASONIC Camera Lens for
DigiView Call
1080i Mk II Printer... Call 1091 i Mk II Pnnler . Call
PHOENIX
A500.A1000 H Drives Call CPS50OPwr Supply $ 84 PROGRESSIVE
ProDnve External. $ 199 ProDrive f A2000 ... Call
ProGen...... Call
SCI-TECH
Nt-'GenKey. Cai1
SONIC
Soeakers w Amp $ 89
SPIRIT TECHNOLOGIES
1. 5MB for A1000 $ 469
A500 Expansion Call SUN RIZE
Perfect Sound S 69 Perfect Vision .. S189
SUPRA CORP.
2400 Baud Modem Call Hard Drives Call
XEBEC
9720H 20MB Drive $ 799 XEROX
4020 Color Ink Jet Call
This is a selection from ihe over 750 Amiga products we have in slock. New products arrive every day please call for latest price and availability information
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G R
A T
THE
PRETENDER
THE “PRETENDER” HERE IS A DIFFERENT KIND OF “PLATTER” A VIRTUAL MS-DOS DISK ON YOUR A2000’S HARD DISK TO LET YOU RUN IBM PC SOFTWARE ON THE A2088 BRIDGEBOARD MORE EFFECTIVELY.
Sing an IBM PC without a hard disk would have been like taking your snarling, souped-up '57 Chevy out once a week to drive three blocks to Burger Haven. You've got the horsepower, so why not use It? The same is true of using an Amiga 2000 Commodore A2088 Bridgeboard system with only a 5%-inch floppy drive; developers of most of the powerful PC software recommend or require you use a hard drive. You could spend $ 400 for a hard disk on a card and install It in the IBM compatible data bus, or you could save your $ 400 and conjure up a virtual disk from a hard drive on the A2000. Basically a fake drive, a virtual disk Is a file on the Amiga's hard disk that appears to be a real disk drive to you and, more Importantly, the Bridgeboard. All you'll need for this sleight of storage is a little knowledge of IBM MS-DOS, the A2000's MS-DOS disk and a blank S -lnch disk.
U
BY TIMOTHY TRIMBALL
An IBM PC XT on a card, the A2088 Is a peripheral board that resides in one of the “bridge" slots of the A2000, The Bridgeboard spans the operating system gap with one connector in the Amiga bus and one connector In the PC bus, letting you run IBM software from an internally mounted 5%-lnch floppy drive in your Amiga. For a detailed performance analysis, see "Bridge Over Troubled Waters" in the February '88 isssue of AmigaWorld, p. 20.
NOTHING UP MY BOOT
Access the Bridgeboard by opening the PC drawer on your hard disk or the 3Vinch disk labeled 2088 Software for PC Bridgeboard. In the PC Window you will see five icons PC Mono, PC Color, PCDisk, LPTt and PCPrefs. PC Mono Is for using the your monitor in monochrome, while PC Color lets you use an IBM color display. PCDisk allows you to use the Amiga hard disk from the Bridgeboard and transfer files between the Amiga and Brigeboard. LPT1 accesses the Amiga printer port from the Bridgeboard; PCPrefs is for setting your Bridgeboard preferences. You should always double click the PCDisk icon before actually accessing the DOS disk. After loading PCDisk, click the PC Mono for a full screen window to the MS-DOS environment. After the copyright notices appear, enter the correct date and time or return through the requests, until you reach the DOS prompt, A>. The A; indicates you are using drive A, the 5% floppy drive.
Now, you must format and populate a new disk for booting up the Bridgeboard and virtual drive. At the DOS prompt type: FORMAT A: S and press
Return. The S tells DOS to copy the boot programs to the floppy also. When told, put the disk to be formatted Into drive A: and press any key. When finished, DOS will ask if you want to format another disk. Just press N and Return to say no.
While your new disk will boot DOS on the Bridgeboard, it is still missing the programs needed to use the Amiga hard disk, Jdisk.SYS and Jlink.EXE. To put these on your boot disk, insert the 5%-inch Bridgeboard Utilities disk into drive A: and type COPY JDISK.SYS B:. As copying progresses, swap the Bridgeboard Utilities disk and the boot disk when you are told. (DOS fakes the Bridgeboard Into thinking that you have two drives, A: and B:, when In fact they are both the same drive.) Repeat the procedure to copy Jlink.EXE.
Jdisk.SYS is a Device Driver, a program that attaches to DOS in memory and tells DOS how to communicate with the virtual disk. Without it in memory, DOS would not know how to let you use the Amiga hard disk as a virtual drive. To load Jdisk.SYS Into memory you must create a configuration file, Conflg.SYS, that Includes the statement DEVICE = JDISK.SYS. With your new boot disk in drive A:, type:
COPY CON:CONFIG.SYS
DEVICE = JDISK.SYS
FILES = 20
BUFFERS = 15
Press the F6 function key to save your keystrokes. If you make a mistake, simply press F6 and retype the file. Reboot the Amiga with your new disk and follow the same path to access the Bridgeboard and DOS. When you arrive at the A> prompt, you're ready to create your virtual disk.
ABRACADABRA. . DISK!
Jlink.EXE materializes your virtual disk out of existing storage space by putting a file in the root directory of the Amiga’s hard disk. Determine the virtual disk's name and size, and type: JLINK C: HD0:VDISK C:1000. In this case, the file Is called Vdisk, has a size of 10MB (half the Amiga hard disk) and links as drive C:. If you have any problems, refer to the Bridgeboard User's Guide, Appendix C. The manual also recommends that you create a partition on the hard disk first and create your virtual disk in the secondary partition to prevent accidental erasure of the virtual disk file from the Amiga hard disk. If you are willing to go to the effort of building a partition, it is a safer construction. However, if you're careful about not deleting the Vdisk file from the hard disk or try not to move it anywhere else on the disk, then you shouldn’t have any problems.
Every time that you want to use the virtual disk, you must tell DOS to link to the file on the Amiga hard drive. A shortcut is to enter a batch file (Autoexec.bat) to do it for you. With your boot disk in drive A: type:
COPY CONiAUTOEXEC.BAT
JLINK C: HD):VDISK
C:
DATE
Press the F6 key to save the file. Autoexec.BAT is similar to the Amiga's Startup-Sequence; when the Bridgeboard boots, the Autoexec.BAT file executes. Putting the Jlink command in this batch file automatically links the Bridgeboard and DOS to the Vdisk file, drive C:, each time you boot your machine.
When you’re finished with your virtual disk, you should unlink it. As long as Vdisk is linked, it is an open file on the Amiga hard disk. If you turn off the computer or reboot with Vdisk open, the file will be corrupted and unusable. Again, a batch file will save you time and trouble. At the DOS prompt, type:
COPY CON:UNLINK.BAT
JLINK C: HD0:VDISK U
F6 saves your file. When you conclude a work session with your virtual disk, simply type UNLINK.
With your virtual disk and all its companion files completed, you are ready to fill it with IBM compatible software. Remember, you have DOS and the Bridgeboard thoroughly fooled; as far as they are concerned, Vdisk is a real, physical hard disk. To the Amiga, it's just a phantom of the operating system, and can be deleted from the hard disk while in AmigaDOS, so be careful and always unlink the file when you're finished working. ¦
Timothy Trimball is a systems analyst at AshtonTate. Write to him at: 6034 Pacific Coast Highway, Apt. 9, Redondo Beach, CA 90277.
AT LAST!
.real-time, LIVE! Video on your Amiga’s screen.
• True Color: just as it comes from your video source: camera, VCR,
TV, anything. Direct, moving, in your Amiga's memory...our patented technology.
• Fast: video images in black & white, 32-color, and 4,096-color HAM.
See 15 new images every second in black & white, 12 in color, 4 in HAM.
• Save: moving video, play it back, use it in other programs. Unlimited stills, too.
• Video Effects: real-time mouse-controled...posterization, fades, color- keying. Strobes, more.
• Roll Your Own: programmer’s video library, hardware documentation, examples in C, Basic.
• $ 295. Immediate delivery. This is hot.
To order call toll-free anytime: Nationwide: 800-452-4445, ext. 1156 California: 800-626-9541, ext. 1156
For more information, contact:
d
A-Squared Distributions Inc.
6114 La Salle Avenue, Suite 326 Oakland, California 94611 415-339-0339
FROM HERE TC HER E AGAIN:
RECURSION IN BASIC
Bv Donald R. Horner, Ph.D.
*
Some Kind of Loop
THIS SENTENCE IS the first sentence in this article about recursion in BASIC (for details, see sentence three). Understand? If so, you have read enough of this paragraph and may go on to the next; otherwise, read on. If you are reading this third sentence (referenced by the first sentence), you need to reread this paragraph from the top: Please do so.
If you ever make it to this paragraph (which is paragraph two), congratulations; you have just escaped from the befuddlement of recursion. Recur sion is a case of the dog chasing its own tail; it is an instance where something refers to itself (or re fers to itself referring to itself, or. . .oh, never mind). In programming it is the act of a routine calling itself and is often a useful device. This article deals with the use of recursion in BASIC programs.
Recursion in BASIC may he direct as in: 1000 GOSUB 1000:RETURN
or indirect, as in:
1000 GOSUB 2000.RETURN 2000 GOSUB 1000:RETURN
In the latter case, the first subroutine calls the second, which then calls the first; effectively, the first ?
Sometimes it’s useful to send your RAJSIC program off to where it already is. Just don’t get caught in the loop.
Subroutine called itself. These examples, though trivial, make it clear that recursion is really a looping technique. They often look like infinite loops, but in fact behave quite differently from the following truly infinite loops:
1000 GOTO 1000
Recursive routines often resemble infinite loops, but they behave quite differently.
And
1000 GOTO 2000 2000 GOTO 1000
Whereas GOSUB loops will cause program termination with an Out of Memory error message, each GOTO loop will cause the machine to run until it is interrupted. Of course, most useful loops will have a nonerror exit or terminal condition.
Why do the earlier loops cause an out of error message? For each subroutine call (GOSUB), BASIC places certain information (such as the address of the next instruction after the GOSUB) in a memory segment. The purpose is to know where to transfer control and what to do upon encountering a RETURN. Both of our GOSUB loops execute repeated GOSUB statements without ever executing a RETURN. Therefore, they repeatedly place information on the stack until allocated memory is exhausted. Try it.
A Recursive Example
Using recursion for stripping leading blanks from a string is easy. One simple solution might be stated:
If sS has a leading blank, strip it off and repeat this instruction.
Otherwise, quit.
Like all good recursive routines, this one has three parts: 1) an exit or terminal condition (no leading blank); 2) a general condition requiring a recursive call (one or more leading blanks); 3) a process for moving the general condition closer to the terminal state (strip a blank). Listing 1 illustrates this.
The recursive routine is located at the label strip. The driver portion (main or calling program if you prefer) creates sS with three leading blanks. That string is printed out and the call to strip is made. Let's track the action:
CALL 1: remove the leading blank from s$ and call strip. Return will be to main.
CALL 2: sS still has a leading blank remove it and call strip.
CALL 3: sS still has a leading blank remove it and call strip.
CALL 4: s$ has no leading blank return to Call 3. Call 3 is complete return to Call 2.
Call 2 is complete return to Call 1.
Call 1 is complete return to main.
Print the new s$ .
You might increase the size of x% just to see
where your machine will run out of memory. I had the earliest failure at x% ~ 122 using a 512K machine and default system allocations. At that point, too many return addresses (and other information) had been stored on the stack by the nested subroutine calls.
A Second Example
The act of creating powers of positive numbers gives another chance to show recursive thinking. We will restrict the problem to powers that are whole numbers (non-negative integers). T he idea goes something like this:
IF THE exponent c is 0 then bAe = 1 while if e is 1, bAc = b (terminal states).
OTHERWISE, cut c in half and reapply this whole process.
WHEN FINISHED, calculate bAe by squaring the returned value if c is even or squaring the returned value and multiplying by b if c is odd.
Listing 2 shows this routine to be a little more complicated. A major difference from the earlier program is that there is some calculation to be performed after returning from a recursive call. In Listing 1, the only thing to do after returning from a recursive call was to RETURN.
The main routine in Listing 2 starts us with b = 2 and c% = 5. The answer bAe = 32 will be returned as r. lx*fs track the recursive calls, starting with the main program's call to power.
CALL 1: e% = o is neither 0 nor 1 and c% MOD 2=1. T hus, reset e% = 5 2 = 2 and call power.
When we return, the calculation will be r*r*b.
CALL 2: e% = 2 is neither 0 nor I and c MOD 2 = 0. Reset e% = 2 2 = I and call power. Upon return, the calculation will be r*r.
CALL 3: c% = 1 so set r = b = 2. This call is complete return to Call 2.
To complete Call 2, calculate r=r*r=2*2 = 4.
Return to Call 1.
To complete Call 1, calculate
r = r*r*b = 4*4*2 = 32. Return to main.
Print the value of r, which is 2A5 = 32.
A Binary Search
Suppose you have an array of values stored in increasing order. T hat is, the second entry is larger than the first, the third is larger than the second and so on: Each entry exceeds the one before it. You wish to search the array, looking for a specific value.
Of course, you could start at the first array entry and check all entries sequentially until you either find the value being sought or you encounter an array entry larger than the target value (i.e., the tar get value is not in the array you have gone beyond where the target value should be). Binary searching is a nice alternative. ?
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The idea behind binary searching is pretty straightforward and is recursive:
CHECK the “middle” array value. If that value is the one being sought, note its index value and quit (terminal state).
OTHERWISE, determine whether the value being sought should be in the left half of the array (smaller indexes) or in the right half (larger indexes) (general condition).
APPLY this process to that “half” of the array suspected of holding the target value (move closer to a terminal state).
The main program in Listing 3 establishes an array of 5,500 values, each value being double its index. The recursive binary search routine is located at the label search. The values passed to search are the starting index lo% = 1, the ending index hi% = 5500 (we will look through the entire array) and the target value x = 3374. Since 3374 is the value of array (1687), the returned and printed value of result% should be 1687. Let's trace the action in search and be sure.
Before beginning, note the first line of search. That line gives a second terminal condition the ability to quit when you know that the target value is not in the array.
CALL 1: x = 3374, lo% = l hi% = 5500. Set m id % = 2250. X array(2250) so set hi% =2249.
Call search.
CALL 2: x = 3374, lo% = I, hi% = 2249. Set m id % = 1125.
X>array(l 125) so set lo% = 1126.
Call search.
CALL 3: x = 3374, Io% = 1126, hi% = 2249. Set mid% = 1(587.
X = array(1687) so set result % = 1687 and return to Call 2.
CALL 2 is complete return to Call 1.
Call 1 is complete return to main.
Print result % (i.e.,1 (587).
We found our answer with only three nested subroutine calls; it could take longer. However, with 5,500 entries in the array it will never take more than 13 nested calls (2A13 = 8K>5500)1 That means that at worst, we will have to check only 13 different array values in any search of this array.
True Confessions
You can alter the program to look for various values of x, some of which are not in the array. Altering lo% and hi% will let you search only a portion of the array. Try lo%>hi% and see what happens.
I have to admit: These examples are not too startling. But, 1 have a bigger confession to make: These examples avoid the real problem with writing recursive programs in BASIC. . .the problem of local variables.
If you feel adventurous, find some recursive Pascal routines and convert them to BASIC.
Variables local to a subroutine are variables whose values are alterable only within the subroutine itself. BASIC subroutines normally do not have local variables. Fundamentally, any variable mentioned anywhere in a BASIC program (except in an Amiga Basic subprogram) is accessible by any other line of code in that program. This is not true for languages designed for block structuring and recursion (e.g., Pascal). For such languages, the values of local variables are saved on the stack (along with return addresses, etc.) during a recursive call. When control returns, the original values of local variables are restored. To write recursive programs in BASIC it is entirely possible that the programmer will have to create and manage stacks to save variable values during recursive subroutine calls. One final example serves to illustrate the point.
Word Jumbles
You know those annoying scrambled word puzzles in the newspaper that drive you berserk because you can't find all the answers? Well, the problem lies in the difficulty of thinking recursively, for finding all the scrambled variations for a word is a recursive process. Consider this approach to solving tlie problem:
IF THE WORD has only one letter, it is already scrambled.
OTHERWISE, remove the first letter.
Repeat this routine for the shorter word.
Upon returning, replace the removed first letter in each possible position for each word returned.
To illustrate the last instruction, suppose the removed letter is t and the returned words were oy and vo. The combinations generated, then, are toy, oty and oyt for oy, and tyo, yto and yot for yo.
Note that the number of words made from each returned word is one greater than the length of the returned word. A first try at scramble might look like this: scramble:
IF LEN(wordS) = 1 THEN RETURN ELSE
LS = LEFTS(wordS,1) word$ = MID$ (word$ ,2)
GOSUB scramble However, a recursive call to scramble will generally rewrite LS, causing us to lose the letter just stripped off. We need that letter eventually, so it must be saved. Listing 4 gives one solution using a stack to retain those important letters.
T he main program is set up to handle words of up to six letters without running out of system-allocated memory. In this case, it is not recursion that uses so much memory; it is the array ans$ () that holds all the resulting combinations. For a word of length k, there will he k! Such combinations (k! Is the product of the integers from I through k).
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The recursive routine begins at the label scramble. The exit condition causes a single letter to be placed in ans$ () and indicates that only one word is being returned in the array. The general case strips the first letter from wordS and pushes it onto the stack L$ ), updating the pointer top: top points to the next available place to push a value onto the stack. The recursive call follows.
Upon returning from the recursive call, top is decremented so that we can recall the “letter-to-be- remembered” from the stack. The value p counts how many new words will be made from each returned word. The calculation for k simply finds the location in ans$ () for each returned word while m finds the location into which each newly formed word will be placed. As a matter of fact, it is this placement of words within ans$ () that provides most of the complexity of the algorithm.
The placement of each word must be predictable and easily calculated, but must be done in such a way that a returned word is never overwritten before it is captured in temp$ . Why all the bother? Because using two or more arrays is too costly memory-wise. (INT(total nextcnt) just spreads the new words evenly throughout that part of ans$ () that will be filled. (p1(i- l)+j)+ 1 increments the value of m by INT(total nextcnt) whenever either i or j increases.)
Trace out the execution of the program in a
Listing 1.
X%=3
s S = S P A C E $ (x % ) + " t his PRINT sS:GOSUB stri END
string P:PR I NT
s$
strip:
'If left char is blank 'strip leftmost char 'and continue recursion.
'Otherwise return.
IF LEFTS(sS,1)=" sS=MID$ (s$ ,2) GOSUB strip END IF RETURN
THEN
Listing 2.
B = 2 e%= 5
GOSUB power:PR TNT r END
power:
Calculate result and return in either terminal case.
For any other case:
'If even power, continue
IF e%=0 THEN
r = 1
ELSEIF e%=1 THEN r = b
0 THEN
ELSEIF e% MOD 2 =
Listing continued on p. 60
manner similar to that above. The activity in ans$ () will look like: ans$ (1)= “y”
ansS( 1) = “oy” ans$ (4) = “yo”
ansS( I) = “toy” ans$ (2) = “oty” ans$ (3) = “oyt”
ansS(4) = “tyo” ans$ (5) = “vto” ans$ (6) = “vot"
Suggested Problems
If you want to experiment with recursion in BASIC, try these:
FIND the largest (or smallest) number in an array: If the arrav has one element, it is the largest. Otherwise, split the array in two halves and repeat this process on the “left” half and then on the “right” half. Select the larger of the two returned values. SORT the numbers in an array into increasing (or decreasing) order: If the array has only one value, it is sorted. Otherwise, split the array into two halves and repeat this process for the left half and then for the right half. Merge the two halves.
Both techniques will require some mechanism for remembering one or more local variable values when making recursive calls. Observe that each routine calls itself twice rather than once. These problems, although not terribly difficult, are not necessarily elementary.
If you feel adventurous, find some recursive Pascal routines and convert them to BASIC. A word of caution, however: Do not try to use Amiga Basic’s subprogram facility; it, unfortunately, will not allow the recursive call. The AC BASIC compiler, however, does allow recursive subprogram calls.
Summary of the Summary
Because BASIC is not designed (with local variables) to support recursion, extra work may be needed to make a go of it. Sometimes, though, it is worth the effort. Recursion is a beautiful way to think about some problems the Towers of Hanoi being one well-known example. Recursion, however, docs use overhead memory to manage the system stack. And because of the subroutine calls that must take place, recursive programs may also be slow.
So (you ask) why use it? Well, sometimes a problem just “smells” of recursion. However, generally, if the program is to be very efficient, it can be altered to use some other forms of looping, i.e., the GOSUBs will be replaced. Recursion can always be avoided, but this is sometimes quite difficult and demands a careful look at how to approach certain problems. (And that sounds like the subject of another article, doesn’t it?)
This sentence is the last sentence in this article on recursion in BASIC and is itself recursive; please return to paragraph one. ¦
Dr. Homer teaches computer science at Eastern Washington University. Write to him at Route 2, Box 54, Cheney, WA 99004.
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recursion
e =e% 2:GOSUB power ’after cutting power in half.
'Upon returning, calculate result
r = r * t
KI.SE
07
, j |- (l(| (I powe r , continue recu r s i on
* % = e% 2:GOSIJBrpow 'r catting power in
half.
R=r*r*b ’Upon returning, calculate result,
END ip
RKTURN 'and return.
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Listing 3.
Lo%=I :h i % = 5 $ 0 0 ’„SlJB search:PRlNT result
END
s°arch:
IF !o%>hi% THEN !Tv° tcrrninal states:
PRINT "value not found” stop - error
else
mid%=(lo%+hi%) 2 , and
t F x = a r r a v ( m i d Z ) T H K N f
, ' r • 1 -v stop - value ound.
Resu 11 % = m i ... »« .
Pi enr THEN Otherwise
h 1. S E I r x a r r a y ( m 1 d « > 1
hi%=mid%-l GOSUB search ELSE
1o% = m id%+1 GOSUB search END IF END IF RETURN
Listing 7.
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n=72()
DIM ans$ (n) top= 1
AMIGA?
'Initialize up to six-letter words wor(i$ =,,toyM t ot a 1 = I
l-’OR i =2 TO I.KN( word$ ) t otaIstola 1 *i NEXT i
number of scrambles GOSUB scramble FOR i=] TO total PRINT ans$ (i)
NEXT i END
sc ramble:
IF LEN(wordS)=1 THEN ans$ (1)=word$ wordcnt=l
ELSE ’stack left letter and strip 1 rom word L$ (top)=LEFT$ (wordS,1)
t o p= t o p+1
word$ =M 11)$ ( wordS ,2)
GOSUB scramble
top=top-l 'reset stack pointer p=LEN(ans$ (l))+l ’set « of insertions nextcnt=wordcnt*p ’and total words FOR i=l TO wordcnt 'locate each existing word
o 1 dloc=INT( total nextent ) *( p*( i-1 ) + j) +1 tcmp$ =ans$ (o1d1oc)
FOR j=0 TO EEN(tempS) ’construct each new word newloc=INT(total ncxtcnt)*(p*( i-1)+j)+l ans$ (newloc)=EKFT$ (temp$ ,j)+LS(top)+MIDS(tempS,j+1) j ’and store appropriatlv
NEXT i
wordcnt=nextcut ’update word count for the next cycle END 11- RETURN
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AEGIS DEVELOPMENT
Animator Images ......83.99
Draw Plus ... 149.00
Impact ....53.99
Diga .....54.99
Sonix .....49.99
ANAKIN RESEARCH
Easyl 500 .299.00
Easyl 2000 369.00
BROWN WAGN
TV Text ...68.99
Zuma Fonts (ea.) ......24.99
COMMODORE
Textcraft Plus ...59.99
Enhancer 1-2 DOS ....14.99
DISCOVERY
Grabbit ...23.99
Marauder II 26.99
ECR
ECR Midi .49.99
ELECTRONIC ARTS
Deluxe Music ..62.99
Deluxe Paint II .97.99
Deluxe Print ...74.99
Deluxe Video 1.2 ......97.99
Earl Weaver Baseball ..36.99
Intellitype .34.99
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Financial Plus 189.00
FUTURE WORKS
Lexcheck .39.99
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Pagesetter Prof 249.00
Gold Spell 34.99
Laser Script ...34.99
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JDK IMAGES
Pro Video CGI ...Call
Font Library I or II (ea.) .76.99
LATTICE
C-Regular 162.0C
C-Professional 279.0C
dbc HI Library .119.0C
OXXt
Maxiplan 500 ..99.99
Maxiplan Plus 134.00
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The Worker ..129.00
Analyze ...66.99
Scribble ..66.99
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Midi Interface ..44.99
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Keyboard Cadet 29.99
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Digi-Paint .47.99
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Jet Flight Simulator ....31.99
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TDI
Editor ....35.99
Examples . 21.99
Grid Database .35.99
Modula ll-Comm ......199.00
Modula ll-Regular .....63.99
Modula ll-Dev ..99.99
TRUE BASIC
True Basic 73.99
Libraries (ea.) ..37.99
Runtime ..99.99
VERSASOFT
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In the U.S.A. and in Canada
Call toll-free: 1-800-233-895(
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info.phile
The Disk That Wasn’t
Knowing how to use AmigaDOS’ RAM disk and the ASSIGN commands can save you valuable time and disk space.
By Bill Catchings and Mark L. Van Name
IN OUR LAST column we discussed the AmigaDOS CLI (Command Line Interface) and the power that it offers. If you have had a chance to use the CLI since then, you have found yourself typing a command and then waiting for your Amiga. First, it reads your Workbench disk, then it reads the disk that is the object of the command, and then the command gives you its output. The second read is unavoidable; if the command needs data from a disk, then it must read that disk. The First read occurs because AmigaDOS is disk-based all of its commands are stored on the Workbench disk. If you, like us, hate the time spent waiting for the system to complete that First disk operation, read on to Find the solution.
The RAM Disk
The key to solving this problem is the Amiga’s RAM disk. Just as you can store Files on disks, AmigaDOS lets you make part of your system’s memory pretend to be an additional disk drive. The standard disk drives are known by their device names: DFO: for the internal floppy, DF1: for the First external one and so forth. Similarly, this memory-based, pseudo-disk drive has a device name: RAM;. AmigaDOS manages RAM: much like it manages any device with a program called a device handler. The RAM: device handler is RAM-Handier in the L directory of the system disk. AmigaDOS loads it into memory when you First use the RAM: disk. If this File is not on the system disk, you will not be able to use the RAM: disk.
RAM: acts much the same as any other disk drive, except that it is faster. You can perform any of the normal File and directory commands on it, including creating directories in it, copying Files to it, renaming them, deleting them and typing their contents. You refer to a file in the RAM: disk by using RAM: as the First part of the File's name. For example, to copy a File FRF.D from the internal disk drive to the RAM: disk, you would use the command
COPY DFO:FRED RAM:
This command creates a File with the full path name RAM:FR£D.
Like any other disk drive, RAM: can have an icon appear on the Workbench display. Just as no icon appears for a disk drive until a disk is inserted in it, you will not see that RAM: icon until you first use it. You do not have to copy a File into it to make the RAM: disk icon appear. If FRED is the First File in RAM:, a RAM: icon will appear on the Workbench display. You also could make that icon appear just by referring to the RAM: disk with a command like
CD RAM:
The RAM: icon does not, however, behave exactly like the icon for the standard disk drives. When you close the icon for a disk and remove the disk from the drive, that icon disappears from the Workbench display. If you delete the last File from RAM:, you would expect the RAM: icon to disappear as well, but it does not. Once you have stored a file in RAM:, the RAM: icon remains until you reboot your system.
There are a few other important differences between the RAM: disk and other disk devices. On the plus side, it is several orders of magnitude faster than any disk drive or hard disk. You will not Find yourself waiting for the Amiga to read any RAM: Files. Also, it is not a Fixed size. While a disk is an 800K container, the RAM: disk is only as big as the sum of the sizes of the Files in it. It frees memory as you delete Files, and grabs what it needs, in 512-byte chunks, when you put new Files in it.
The only limit on the size of RAM: is the amount of memory in your system. A 512K Amiga has about 400K left after you boot the system, so a RAM: disk on that system can hold only 400K of data.
In fact, you should never completely consume your system’s memory for the RAM: disk, because there is a good chance that the system will crash. Also, any memory that you use to store files is unavailable for programs. This means that you must maintain a balance between the memory required by your applications and the memory you use for ? Your RAM: disk. If you have an Amiga with 1MB or more of memory, this is fairly easy. You have to be much more careful with a 512K system, however, or many of your favorite applications might not run.
The biggest negative difference between the RAM: disk and the other disk drives is the durability of the data stored in it. Disks are more or less permanent storage containers: As long as you wait for a disk drive’s light to go out before you turn off your system or remove a disk from it, you are unlikely to hurt the data on the disk. In general, that data will survive even a visit from the guru (which happens when your system crashes). By contrast, the RAM: disk is a temporary container: All of the files in it are lost when you reboot your system or when the guru appears. Some companies market recoverable RAM disks, the contents of which can survive system crashes, but the one that is included with AmigaDOS is not that hardy. In general, you should avoid putting anything in the
RAM: disk that you cannot afford to

lose. If you use it to hold such files, be sure to copy those files to a disk before you turn off or reboot your system.
Moving AmigaDOS Commands To RAM
What we want to put into the RAM: disk are the AmigaDOS commands. Then you will not have to wait while the system reads those commands from a disk, because it can read files in RAM: almost instantaneously. Fortunately, AmigaDOS makes this job easy by keeping ail of its standard commands in one place: the C directory on the Workbench disk. To move those commands to RAM: and tell the system to look for them there, enter the CLI and type the following three commands:
MAKEDIR RAM:C
COPY SYS:C TO RAM:C
ASSIGN C: RAM:C
The first two commands make a C directory in the RAM disk and then copy the AmigaDOS commands from the C directory on your Workbench disk into the new RAM:C directory. These commands will consume about 200K of your system’s free memory; on a 512K Amiga, you will have about 201K free after executing these commands. (The rest of the memory is used for other operating svstem and Workbench software.)
Note that the COPY command does not use a device name or even the name of the Workbench disk. Instead, it uses SYS:, which is a logical device name assigned to the Workbench disk. Logical
devices are short names for directories, typically ones in which AmigaDOS finds its command files and other required files. Like other device names, logical device names always end in a colon (:). AmigaDOS comes with several preset logical devices. Because the AmigaDOS system software contains many different files, it would be foolish to assume that all of those files were present in your current directory. Instead, AmigaDOS uses these logical names to find any files it needs. The two logical devices we used above are SYS: and C;. SYS: is assigned to the directory that holds all of the system files. This is preset to be the root directory of the system disk. C: is assigned to the directory that contains the AmigaDOS commands, which initially is the C directory on the system disk.
Our first two commands move the AmigaDOS commands into the RAM: disk, but it is the third one that tells the system to stop looking in SYS:C for its commands and instead to look in RAM:C. The ASSIGN command lets you define logical device names. You can create new logical devices or change the meaning of existing ones. ASSIGN’S first parameter is the logical device name you want to set (here C:), and the second is the directory (RAM:C) to which that name will refer. You also can use ASSIGN to get a list of all of your current logical device names by typing it without any parameters or with the single parameter LIST.
Logical device names are not static.
You can reassign them at any time, or even remove a logical device name completely. To reassign a logical device you do what we did above: Give it a new target directory. To remove the logical device name entirely, you only have to omit the second parameter when you assign it. For example, you could undo the effect of our earlier three commands by simply reassigning C: to its original directory on the system disk:
ASSIGN C: SYS:C
Alternatively, you could remove the logical device name C: by typing the following command:
ASSIGN C:
Be careful, however, for this command completely removes the logical device C:. Because the system counts on that name pointing to the directory that contains its commands, you can end up unable to tvpe those commands without using a full path name. Avoid removing the logical device C:, and instead leave it defined as the name of a directory that contains the AmigaDOS commands.
You also should be careful about deleting the commands from RAM:. If you reassign C: to a directory on a disk, then it is safe to delete those commands from RAM:. Do not, however, delete them until you have reassigned C: because you will be unable to execute anv
commands. The system will look in C: for the commands, which will not be there, and you will he stuck.
You may want to delete a few files, however, in order to recover some of the memory occupied by command files that you use rarely. For example, if you never use the line editor EDIT and rarely need the DISKDOCTOR command, you could free up some memory by using the following command:
DELETE RAM:C EDIT RAM:C DISKDOCTOR
You will recover back about 27K of memory. If later you need those commands, you will have to refer to them with a full path name, as in
SYS:C DISKDOCTC)R DF1:
The memorv freed here, however, should
j
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2052 2MB RAM $ 399
2088 Bridgeboard w drive..S535!
2090 SCSI Board ..$ 325
68020 Boards ..CALL
DigiVicw ....$ 149
Insider 1 MEG ...$ 349
Perfect Vision ....$ 169
Starboard2 1MEG .$ 409
Starboard2 MFM ..$ 77
Starboard2 MFM w FPU ....$ 225
Supra 20 Amiga 1000 ..S739
Supra 20 Amiga 500 ....S739
AMIGA SOFTWARE
AMIGA ACCESSORY
NEC p2200 24 pin S419
Amiga 500 Par. Cable S15
Amiga 1000 Par. Cable....$ 15
Amiga 500 Scr Cable $ 14
Amiga 1000 Scr Cable $ 14
2 Pos Par Switch $ 32
2 Pos Ser Switch $ 32
Mouse Pads ....$ 6
S29
Animate 3D .$ 94
Arkanoid $ 37
Audiomaster .$ 34
B. E.S.T $ 299
Black Cauldron ...S29
Dark Castle ...$ 32
Deluxe Paint II ....$ 89
Deluxe Video ......S89
Diga! ..S45
Digi-Paint .....$ 44
Draw Plus .....S145
Firepower .....SI 8
Flight Simulator II ...S37
Gee Bee Air Rally ...$ 28
Hardball .$ 34
Instant Music .....$ 32
Karate Kid II $ 27
LPD Writer ...$ 82
Marauder II ...$ 29
Marble Madness ..S32
Maxiplan 500 ....SI09
Maxiplan Plus ...S137
Plutos .$ 21
Ports Of Call .$ 32
Professional Page ..S246
Return to Atlantis $ 34
Sculpt3D $ 63
Sinbad .$ 36 Gravis Joystick
Sonix .$ 45
Flicker Master $ 12
1200 bd Modem ......$ 119
2400 bd PB Modem SI99
3. 5T,DSDD Disks $ 15
Sony DS DD 3.5" .....$ 19
Amiga 1000 RF Mod $ 29
AMI 1000 &Mon. Cover ..S16
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Test Drive .....$ 31
Textcraft Plus $ 65
The Bards Tale ....S32
Thexder .S24
Videoscape 3D ..$ 125
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outweigh the minor inconvenience of a few extra keystrokes.
Making It Automatic
By copying the AmigaDOS commands to RAM: you can make your Amiga run faster. Unfortunately, every time you reboot vour svstem you lose both your AS-

SIGNed logical device names and all of the contents of RAM:. You would have to retype these commands every time. You can avoid this boring task by taking advantage of the fact that each time your system boots it executes a CLI batch file called STARTUP-SEQUENCE. That file sets the system up, loads the Workbench and then transfers you to the Workbench program. START UP-SEQUENCE is stored in the S directory on your Workbench disk. To make our three commands a part of the standard boot process for your system, you have only to add them to your STARTUP- SEQUENCE file.
STARTUP-SEQUENCE is an ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) text file, so you can use any editor to work on it. We used the standard ED editor that comes with AmigaDOS. As always, before you edit a system file, make a backup copy of it.
Add our three commands above to STARTUP-SEQUENCE after the line that reads BindDrivers and before the following line (LoadWB). (BindDrivers makes the system aware of any special device software you might have, while LoadWB brings up the Workbench.) If you want to delete any commands from RAM:C, you can put the appropriate deletion commands after the three basic commands we just added. Save your changes to STARTUP SEQUENCE and the next time you boot you will have a faster system!
As is true with most tools, AmigaDOS offers more power to those who take the time to learn to use it fully. T he combination of the RAM: disk and logical devices is one that can make your Amiga a faster and more pleasurable system. As long as you leave enough memory for your applications to run, the technique we outlined can make the CLI an even more powerful computing tool. ¦
Bill Catchings and Mark L. Vati Name are contributing editors to AmigaWorld. Write to them at 10024 Sycamore Road, Durham, AY? 27703.
TRUE BASIC LANGUAGE SYSTEM
Speed, great graphics and enough built-in power to let you really fly: that’s what you expect from your Amiga®.
And that’s what you get from programming in True BASIC.
It's a structured language that's easy to use. A compiler, editor and debugging tools rolled into one. It’s the latest from Kemeny and Kurtz, the inventors of BASIC.
With the Developer's Toolkit you can launch sprites and bobs. Add pull-down menus, and get at all the Intuition and Kemal features. But if portable code is important, there's True BASIC for the PC, Macintosh™ and Atari® ST as well.
As your programs get bigger, you'll want to build your own external libraries.
But if you're just learning how to fly, True BASIC will coach you with on- line HELP. Friendly error messages, and a tutorial- based User's Guide.
Find out why thousands of engineers, developers, and students use True BASIC for their flights of fancy. Visit your Amiga dealer, or call us today at 1-800-TRBASIC.
La ngu age System $ 99.95 Runtime Package $ 99.95
Developer's Toolk it,
3-D Graph ics Library, Sorting & Searching, Advanced String Library
$ 49.95
each
If you crunch numbers, you'll appreciate floatingpoint math that's very fast. Support for large, dynamic arrays, and built-in 33mtax for matrix algebra.
And True BASIC makes graphics even easier. Define your own coordinate schemes and color palettes. Plot entire arrays with a single statement. Apply built-in 2D transforms. Or use the 3D Graphics Library to put some depth in the picture.
Inc.
LANGUAGE
COMPILER DEBUGGER
• multi-line functions
• compiles to fast, compact
• SELECTCASE, IF ELSE IF
b-code
• local, global variables
• separately-compiled libraries
• recursion
* parameter type-checking
• GKS graphics
• set breakpoints and continue
• immediate mode execution
LIMITS
? Strings to 1 megabyte each
EDITOR
* floating-point 5e-309 to 1.8e+308
• full-screen, mouse-based editor
• unlimited program size.
• global search, replace
arrays, data
• block copy, move, delete
• names up to 31 characters
• menu, function key, command
• automemory management
line interfaces all supported
Amiga is a registered trademark of Commodore*Amiga Macintosh is licensed to Apple Computer Atari is a registered trademark of Atari Corp True BASIC is a trademark of True BASIC, Inc.
They can be separately compiled, in BASIC, C or assembly. Debug with breakpoints and immediate mode. Create keyboard macros to complement True BASIC's fantastic editor.
WHAT’S NEW?
All the new toys from CES, AmiExpo cmd AmigaWorld’s overflowing mailbox.
Compiled by Barbara Gefvert
Fun-by-Numbers Kit
WHO SAYS NUMBERS can't be fun? Math-Amation promises to take the teclium out of number-crunching with its onboard control of such features as statistics, geometry and algebra environments, a variety of on-screen calculators and a numeric “dictionary.” The system employs WIMP (windows, icons, mouse and pull-down menus), 36 global memories and an expressions editor. On the off-chance you don't re- member your last 50 results
and the means by which you

generated them, Math-Amation does. Both the matrix and
scientific calculators are fully

programmable; your expressions may be 200 characters long, and if you fee! Really expressive, the scientific calculator allows 600. Math-Amation converts formulas, technical measurement units and conversion constants. I'he Business Graphics module will automatically scale 3-D pie, bar and other charts for easy presentation. The package sells for $ 99.95. For a number of good times call Progressive Peripherals and Software Inc., 464 Kalamath St., Denver, CO 80204. 303 825-4144.
Math-Amation’s colorful scientific calculator.
Amiga Assembly
COULD YOU USE help mastering Assembly Language Programming, and a better understanding of the Amiga, too? The ToolCaddy 2.0 includes 21 utilities to make the learning process more productive.
The program offers seven step-by-step lessons covering AmigaDOS, the Exec, Intuition, Graphics, System Structures and the Binary File Structure, and 18 source files that provide examples in Assembly. Send your questions (or S49.95) to The ToolCaddy Works, PO Box 1188, Canyon Country, CA 91351-2600, 805 252-0485.
What a Way to Paint!
PHOTON PAINT ALLOWS all 4096 Amiga-accessible colors on the screen at once. You can reposition the brush gadgets and color palette, or remove them from the screen altogether. Brush operations include twisting, adjustable
Swinging From C
CB TREE IS a C programming tool an indexing system that works with both the Manx and Lattice compilers. The program increases rclrcival and comes with a thoroughly- commented C source code.
Key and record sizes are un-
*
limited, and records may have transparency and mouse-operated perspective tilting, and you can wrap the brush onto any 3-D object. Photon Paint is $ 99.95 from Microlllusions, 17408 Chatsworth St., Granada Hills, CA 91344, 818 360-3715 or 800 522*2041.
Both fixed and variable lengths. CB Tree boasts complete B + tree implementation of industry standard B + tree algorithms, and a $ 99 price tag. Branch out to Peacock Systems, Inc. at 2108-C Gallows Rd., Vienna, VA 22180, 703 356-7029 or 703 847-1743.
New and Improved
DISKWICK 2.0 ADDS a number of features to tiie previous release. The upgraded disk editor and repair utility includes disk search for hex and ASCII strings, hard-copy capability for disk sectors, requester for file searches and forward reverse keyboard control within files. Checksums Boot Blocks and Checksums Kickstart Disks arc also part of the package, as are refined Hex editing and Info functions. DisKwick's retail price is $ 49.95, hut those who own version 1.0 can upgrade for $ 10. For details call Tigress. PO Box 665, Glendora, CA 91740, 818 334-0709. ?
Wtan it comes to won!- processing, good looks are everything
• a . y mightnotlmowit judging from the looks of other Arnica™ wordprocessors. Their printouts are fuzzy. Unclear. Sometimes, they’re just plain ugly. All of which makes KindWords™ such an attractive alternative. KindWords is the best quality Amiga wordpnocessor available. Bar none.
It can print both graphics and text with spectacular resolution, on any printer. And die size of the graphics can be adjusted to fit neatly within the copy.
You could never do that with a program like ProWrite™ Or programs like Scribble™ and TextCraft,™ which don’t even have graphics capabilities.
What’s more, KindWords has a 90,000 word spelling checker. A selection of font sizes and styles to create just the look you want
And a price that’s lower than most other programs.
Just $ 99.95.
So visit your local Amiga dealer for a demonstration of KindWords.
And compare it with any other word- processor on the market You’ll arrive at the same conclusioa
There’s no contest
KindWords
. I ¦} t-,, iim,riv4 v™, nrwraii* «.our amtntu rdprocessor to KinciWcfds foe $ 49 95 For complete details, call The Due Company at (313) 66 >5540
Ata nS£:‘o -n*o««Hfw™*tsoosr*.cw««ao«
" IV 4 TV Cvc C~tar W S *n, « j linn fe-pn-i
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Be a Sport;
DC) YOU LONG for snow?
Avoid Detection, Accomplish Defection
DATASOFT’S THE HUNT for Red October casts you as Soviet submarine Captain First Rank Marko Ramius. As Ram- ins, you aim to take your fully- armed. State-of-the-art submarine Red October, and defec t to the United States. To succeed. You must develop a strategy of stealtli and speed, keeping the 113-man crew unaware of your plan. The route you must take is heavily traveled by Russian subs, and consequently, by U.S. and NATO forces, too. NATO and the
U. S. do not know your true intent, and the Soviet Northern Red Banner Fleet will do anything to stop your defection.
Your sub’s speed, depth and bearing are continually displayed. Other navigation tools include a contour map of the seabed (you can superimpose a sonar sweep to plot positions), a main display window to scan the Atlantic, a peri
T hen hoot up a blizzard with Winter Challenge, Olympic- style competition for up to six players. You can go for the gold in the ski jump, downhill, bobsled, giant slalom and biathlon events. The game is popularly priced at $ 14.95, and saves you a trip to Calgary. Thunder Mountain's distributor is Mindscape.
Switching seasons (or locales). World Tour Golf offers you a choice of over 20 of the world’s classic courses (it's purported to be accurate down to the weather conditions) or you can design your own! Any combination of four human or computer players can compete; if you’ve always wanted to stroll the fairways with Jack Nicklaus, then simply clone him on screen! You get the advantage of both "golfer’s-eye” and overhead views on a split screen. Greens fees are $ 39.95. Call Electronic Arts for membership details: 1820 Gateway Drive, San Mateo, CA 94404, 415 571-7171.
PROGRESSIVE'S SPRING CROP
You can test your abilities as player, coach or owner general manager in Superstar Soccer.
If you don’t feel up to feinting, trapping, kicking and juggling, then turn your field experience into coaching savvy: make lineups, run the training camp, call on-field strategies and just generally crack the whip. If you think you have an eye for talent, you can try a stint of trading and recruiting, but stay on your toes players do age with each season, and you don’t want to miss out on a championship! Challenge the computer or another player. The disk is $ 39.95 from Mindscape, 3444 Dundee Rd., Northbrook, IL 60062, 312 480-7667.
IF YOU NEED a telecommunications terminal system stat, then make an appointment with Dr. Term Pro. The doctor can link your Amiga to a mainframe, and because he's always “on call” via Remote mode, you can transfer files from one computer to another. His phone book can accommodate 300 entries with custoni coniniunication parameters, and you can program 40 different macros over your function keys and define and execute a series of commands with Script Language.
A file utility system. Disk- master allows you to bypass the CL1, and. For most operations, bypass the keyboard as well! Rename and delete files, make directories and create multiple file copies with a click of the mouse. Adjust page length, margins and page numbers with the print display scope for detailed views and an early-warning detection system. All options are icon- driven. You can issue orders by mouse or joystick. Scrolling windows display the effects of your orders, new develop-
option, and access, view and copy IFF pictures using the view utility. You can whip your disks into shape for $ 49.95.
Framegrabber is a fast video image digitizer. It will capture color and black-and-white images from VCRs and video cameras. The included image- processing software allows you to filter, enhance, change the brightness and contrast and more. Framegrabber will save whole or partial frames in IFF or RGB format. It’s priced at $ 499.95.
What do you want in a genlock? How about BNC connectors, and parallel Chromatic Processing based on custom VSLI chip technology?
ProGEN offers this plus seven adjustable points to make it compatible with your professional equipment. With the included software, you can make anv of the 16 available colors mcnts and incoming messages. T he Hunt for Red October is $ 49.95 (see your bank for conversion to rubles) from Data Soft’s distributor Mindscape, 3444 Dundee Road, Northbrook. II. 60062. 312 480-7667.
Transparent for overlaying video effects, and select foreground, background. Amiga- out and video-in options. ProGEN provides composite color video output for all Ami- gas, and won’t distort graphics. The stand-alone unit connects via the RGB port and sells for $ 399.95. Progressive Peripherals, 464 Kalamath St., Denver. CO 80204, 303 825-4144.
Disassembly Required
DSM. A DISASSEMBLER from OTG Software, is fully compatible with the Amiga assembler. Send any questions (or $ 30 for the program) to OTG at 200
W. 7th Street, Suite 618, Fort Worth, IX 76102. ?
CACT EE SHIPPING** EVEN ON HAPnu>A r.
Amt°u RTEOUS SERVICE * FEDERAL EXPRESS L* AUTHORIZED BY COMMODORE * SALES AN ILABLE
lf By Some Oversight We Do Not Have the in SERVICE Call and Give Us A Chance to Beat Brice Any Quote You May Have Rer k on
all prices reflect A 3h cash discoumt Ann eivea.
ON SOME ITEMS MAY BE LIMITED PRICES F°* CREDrr CARO PURCHASES. COO ORDERS ADO PER BOX. ORDERS iiunCQ
FINAL RETURN OF DEFECTIVE MERCHANm ? 10 VYITHOUT NOTICE. APO. FPO AOO 6H AOOfTIONAL ShlP* ESJ.100 °° ADO $ 4.00 SH_
POLICIES AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST REPLACEMENT ONLY WITH AUTHORIZATION. AUTHORIZED RETURNS ARE SUBJECT S 0RDCRS ACTUAL FRFIGwt HANOUNa QUANTTHES
- TO A Restocking fee all sales are
- PLETE LISTING OF ALL SALES
?
?
24”
24”
24”
21”
24”
24-®
18*'
18*'
24”
24”
3(7"
36°'
36*'
15*'
23*'
11”
23*'
23*'
26*'
26*'
26*’
26”
23”
23*’
26*'
26”
26*'
23*'
23*'
23*'
29”
17”
17”
23”
59”
29”
29*’
41”
71”
71”
71”
24”
24”
24”
24”
18”
30”
30”
24”
27*'
60”
60"
18”
78”
60”
18*'
60”
15”
30”
30"
30”
21”
30”
30"
30”
30’
30'
42*'
12*'
26*'
23*'
23*'
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29”
29”
26*'
29*'
23”
B”
23*'
23*'
26*'
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41”
23*'
17*'
29*'
23*'
29*'
29”
29”
14”
47*'
29*’
59”
119”
89”
59"
47*'
29”
89"
59”
29*’
41”
59*'
59*’
11”
23”
11”
26”
26”
14”
23”
14”
26"
29”
29”
23”
23”
83”
20”
75*
155”
23”
29”
47”
53”
47”
17”
20”
17”
23”
41”
47”
77”
149”
59”
89”
8”
119"
59”
59”
29”
29”
kFT *r- COLORING BOOK _
- T . SCHOOL FO’S ACCEPTED
COD. • MASTER CARD • VISA • ~•
peach, Florida 33139
S & S Wholesalers, Inc. 226 Lincoln Road • Miami ers over sioo.c
Circle 36 on Reader Service card - - ----
GUNSHIP 23"
SILENT SERVICE 23”
DISCCMRYMATH 23”
DISCOVERY SPELL 23”
DISCOVERY TRIVIA 23'
FAERY TALE ADVENTURE 29”
MICROLEAGUE BASEBALL 35”
QUINTET • 26”
BALANCE OF POWER 29”
BRATACCUS 29=
DEFENDER OF THE CROWN 29*1
D6JAVU 29*
H ALLEY PROJECT 26” KEYBOARD CADET 23* KING OF CHICAGO 29*' MASTERTYPE 23”
RACIER 26“
SDI
SINBAD 2*'
THE PERFECT SCORE 47"
29”
LEADER BOARD TOURNAMENT DISK- LEADER BOARD 10TH FRAME BOWLING FAMOUS COURSE DISK MEAN 10 BORROWED TIME HACKER HACKER II
UTTLE COMPUTER PEOPLE MINDSHADOW MUSIC STUDIO PORTAL SHANGHAI TASS TIMES AEGIS ANIMATOR W IMAGES AEGIS ART-PAK 01 FOR IMAGES AEGIS DRAW AEGIS DRAW PLUS AEGIS IMAGES ARAZOKS TOMB DIGA IMPACT SONIX BRIDGE 4 0 BRIDGE 50 HOLE IN ONE GOLF STRIP POKER BTS THE SPREADSHEET l*S DEGAS ELITE l*S PAPERCUP ELITE ISGUR PORTFOLIO SVSTEM AMIGA ASSEM8LER AMIGA C
AMIGA ENHANCER AMIGA LISP AMIGA PASCAL AMIGA TEXTCRAH
amigaterm graphicrar
IBM PC CROSS DEVELOPMENT PKG MIND WALKER GI7ZMOZ THE DIGITAL UNK LPD FILER LPD PLANNER LPD WRITER ADVENTURE CONSTRUCTION SET ARCHON ARCHON II: ADEPT ARCTIC FOX ART PARTS VOL 2 AUTOOUEL BARDS TALE BLACK CAULDRON CHESSMASTER 2000 DELUXE MUSIC CONSTRUCTION 2.0 DELUXE PAINT DELUXE PAINT DATA DISK * 1 DELUXE PAINT II DELUXE PRINT DELUXE PRINT DATA DISK 2 DELUXE VIDEO DONALD DUCK S PLAYGROUND EARL WEAVER BASEBALL FANTACIDE
FINANCIAL COOKBOOK GOLDEN OLDIES INSTANT MUSIC KING S QUEST WNG'S QUEST II KING S QUEST III MARBLE MADNESS MAXIDESK NEW TECHNOLOGY COLORING BOOK
OGRE
ONE-ON-ONE
POLICE QUEST QU1ZAM!
RETURN TO ATLANTIS ROAD TO MOSCOW ROCK AND ROLL- INSTANT MUSIC SEASONS & HOLIDAYS ART DISK
SEVEN CITIES OF GOLD
SKY FOX
SPACE QUEST
ULTIMA III
ULTIMA (V
WINNIE THE POOH
ROGUE
TEMPLE OF APSHAJ TRILOGY WINTER GAMES WORLD GAMES GUILD OF THIEVES PAWN STARGUDER UNIV. MILITARY SIMULATOR CHAMPIONSHIP GOLF CHAMPIONSHIP BASEBALL GBA CHAMPIONSHIP
basketball
GFL CHAMPIONSHIP FOOTBALL A MIND FOREVER VOYAGING BALLYHOO BUREAUCRACY CUTTHROATS
deadline
ENCHANTER HITCHHIKERS GUIDE TO GALAXY hollvwooohuinx
INFIDEL
rather GODDESSES OFPHOBOS MOON MIST
piantfall
seastalker
SORCERER
SPELIBREAKER
STARCROSS
SUSPECT
SUSPENDED
TRINITY
WlSHBRINGER WITNESS ZORK I ZORK II ZORK III ZORK TRILOGY
A-COPIER A-DISK A-FILER A-GRAPHIC A-MAILER A-REPORT A TERM
X-RATED GRAPHICS LIBRARY ZING
ZING KEYS AMIGA PASCAL CAMBRIDGE USP LATTICE C
MACRO ASSEMBLER METACOMCO SHELL METACOMCO TOOLKIT ANAIYZE BBS-PC BULLETIN BOARD SYSTEM FUPSIDE ON UNE ORGANIZE SCRIBBLE
Desktop Associate
PUBLISHING PARTNER Professional, a desktop publishing program ported from the Atari ST, is now available for the Amiga. Its many features include kerning, hyphenation and text flow around graphics regardless of shape in the automatic category. P-squared will gTOup and size multiple objects, reorder pages, import formatted documents from other word processors such as WordPerfect (WordPerfect Corp.) and allow you to view six documents at once. You can define text size down to 1 3600 of ail inch even mix point sizes within characters to create unusual sizes. You can also slant and twist images, and rotate them in one-degree increments, for a complete run down (or printout) of all features, contact Soft Logik Corp., 1II37 South Towne Sq. Ste. C, St. Louis, MO 63123, 314 894- 8608,
Time to Change Fonts
SysFont. Aaija's t**t just jot fcott r. Ftrigo’s text jtsi got botttr.
SfcsFonG *:?c?s tec just ?ct bet: sr. : y*. Disc's .vr ac*
Visualize This
YOU HATE READING manuals I know you do! RGB Video Creations knows it too, and that’s why they’ve created DeluxeHelp for DeluxePaint
II. T his interactive tutorial runs simultaneously with the Electronic Arts paint program, and includes visual demonstrations of each function along with written explanations. You can select any function to study from the basics to the most complex using pulldown menus. For $ 34.95, your “personal tutor" will help you get the most out of DeluxePaint II. So close your manual and ring up RGB Video Creations, 2574 PGA Blvd., Suite 104, Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410, 305 622-0138.
WITH SYSFONT, YOU can
change the Amiga’s text font in the Command Line Interlace mode. SysFonl allows you to replace Topaz with any compatible font. The program itself supplies 10 options, some of which have been rendered in single-pixel width (as opposed to the double-pixel width of Topaz) to reduce brightness and glare. You can invoke an alternative font anv
hit *stjtfkttr.
Bwm $ ss?*r'r pm He *r*tt sjrw hr pe ftrih cotter. Sfttk fr UNT >??*- *ffrs i with tf m* ?** stjks gm sias, ti * hd* w wr mb . Ftir tfrr br.
Replace Topaz with your choice of fonts.
From London to Zork
THE CROWN JEWELS have been stolen, and with just 48 hours to go before the Queen’s jubilee, the crime’s solution is in vour hands. Sher- lock: The Riddle of the Crown Jewels puts you in the shoes of Watson, with the world’s greatest sleuth by your side. Rhyming riddles and on screen dues will help you as you explore Victorian London in search of the villain. Your first clue: $ 39.95.
A new chapter in the lore of the Zorkian Universe, Beyond Zork presents the Great Underground Empire in chaos; the magical wizards have mysteriously disappeared and monsters now rule. T he few time during a CLI session from WorkBench or the AmigaDOS startup sequence. You can also re define text and background colors to any of the four Preferences colors through a single option. Among compatible text editors are ED, MicroEMACS 1.2 and TxEd (all by Micro- Smiths). SysFont is $ 24.95 direct from Era ware, PO Box 10832, Eugene, OR 97440.
Remaining enchanters commission you, a peasant adventurer, to reclaim and hide the Coconut of Quendor. Which stores the essence of magic. You begin by formulating your character from six attributes. Winning battles and gaining experience increases your powers, as shown by the growing bar c harts. To speed your quest you can jump from room to room with the mouse, until at last you venture into the underground lair, where horrible beasties guard the treasure. If want to gel chummy with the monsters,
you can name them and in-

crease the game’s vocabulary. You can play with or without
DRIVE Those Floppies!
FEATURING LOW POWER consumption, a 23-pin external jack and a 30 inch cable, the PFD-135 3.5" external floppy drive is available for all Amiga models. The drive is encased in an all-metal chassis and sports a spring-loaded dust door. S299 gets you the drive and its one-year war- ranty. A2000 owners might be interested in the internal 3.5" floppy drive. It includes hardware necessary for mounting, and retails for $ 189. Phoenix Electronics can he reached at PO Box 1565, Clay Center, KS 67432, 913 632-2159.
Looks Like War
BREACH, A SINGLE-PLAYER tactical-squad combat game, involves intelligent opponents and multilevel combat areas.
Create your own combat see-

narios, or play with the several included. You can arm yourself for S39.95. Aim your questions at Omni-Trend Software, PO Box 733, West Simsbury, CT 06092, 203 658-6917.
Maps (with zoom) and window displays on the four-color screen, and keystroke control is available for frequently-used commands. The Undo command makes taking those death-defying risks less deadly and more defiant. A ticket to Zork is $ 49.95. Start either quest by calling Infdcom Inc., 125 CambridgePark Drive, Cambridge, MA 02140, 617 492-6000. ?
Accessories
Ece 500 Amiga .. $ 49
A500 Centronic Cables ...... $ 17
A-3 Data Switch . $ 55
A 9 C D Switch Box . $ 78
Ep x Joystick ... S18
Gender Changer . $ 20
Jitter Flicker ..... S14
M. ji Cable ...... $ 19
Modem Cable ... $ 17
Mouse Pad ...... $ 10
Polaroid 3.5 DS DD Disks ... $ 21
Printer Cable .... $ 17
R F Modulator ... $ 45
A B C'D Switch Box . $ 78
Tac-3 Joystick .. $ 18
Teakwood 120 Cap .. $ 35
Te.ikwood 64 Cap ... $ 28
Teakwood 60 w Lock $ 31
Tine Saver ...... $ 65
Business Accounting
BE ST
$ 310
$ 199
$ 69
$ 66
Nimbus I Record Keeper ...$ 120
Financial Plus .
Investors Advnnlagn
Miamiga Ledger (Softwood)
Cinemaware
$ 35
$ 35
$ 35
$ 35
Defender ol Ihe Crown
King of Chicago ......
S D I ...
Sinbad .
Communications
BBS PC .. S65
Diga ..... $ 55
Digital Link ...... S49
Mat ro Modem ... $ 52
Copiers
Hacker Package . $ 35
Marauder II ...... $ 29
Mirror .... $ 35
Quick Nibble .... $ 30
Creativity & Product.
Analytic Art ..... $ 42
Art Gallery I ..... $ 25
Art Gallery II .... $ 25
Brur.hworks ..... S25
Fastfont .. $ 30
Flipside .. $ 44
Fon:set I . $ 25
Gizmoz Enhance . $ 40
Grahbit ... $ 24
JDK Bulletin Bold Font ...... $ 25
Kwickstart $ 159
Microlawyer ..... $ 42
Prm: Master Plus $ 37
The Surgeon .... $ 35
TV * Text . $ 70
Zuma Fonts I .... $ 25
Zuma Fonts II ... $ 25
Zuma Fonts III ... $ 25
Database Management
Acquisition ...... $ 199
Microfiche Filer .. $ 89
Organize' . $ 65
Softwood File II SG .. $ 79
Suptrbase $ 99
Superbase Professional . Call
'roduct subject to availiability. Prices subject to change.
Ihipplng Info: C.O.D. Charge only 3% per shipping. We ship UPS Ground. Air, and overnight shipping available. For faster delivery send Cashier ;heck, Money Order, or use MasterCard or Visa Personal checks allow 20 days to clear. Company purchase orders accepted. Call for prior uthorizallon. Mass. Residents add 5° « sales tax.
Diskettes
5% DS DD Floppy ..Call
Fuji Double Sided Disks .... S22
Maxell MF2 DD . $ 22
Sony 3 5 DS DD $ 23
TDK 3 5' DD Disks . $ 22
Desk Top Publishing
City Desk ......$ 109
Page Setter ..... S99
Professional Page ...$ 265
Publisher 1000 ..$ 145
Educational
Aesop's Fables ..S35
Animal Kingdom .$ 35
A Talk Plus ......$ 73
Decimal Dungeon $ 35
The Demonstrator ...$ 25
Discovery Math ..$ 29
Discovery Spell ..$ 29
Discovery Triva ..$ 29
Donald Duck s Playground ..$ 25
Dr Xes ...$ 37
First Shapes .....$ 34
Fraction Action ..S35
Grade Manager ..$ 59
Great States .... $ 29
Kid Talk ..$ 39
Kmderama ......$ 35
Lmkword French .$ 25
Lmkword German $ 25
Lmkword Italian .$ 25
Lmkword Russian $ 25
Lmkword Spanish S25
Match It ..S32
Math Talk $ 39
Math Talk Fractions ..S34
Math A Magician .$ 32
Math Wizard .....$ 39
Music Studenl ...$ 42
New Tech Or. Book .$ 37
Puppy Love .....$ 24
Quiz Master .....555
Read & Rhyme . 535
Speller Bee ......535
Talker ....$ 48
Talking Coloring Book ......$ 25
Wjnme the Pooh .$ 21
Word Master .....535
Entertainment
Alien Fires $ 30
Arazoks' Tomb ..$ 30
Archon II ......$ 35
Arctic Fox $ 28
Auto Duel $ 35
Barbarian $ 30
Bard's Tale ...$ 35
Bridge 4 0 $ 24
Challenger ......$ 25
Championship Baseball .....$ 30
Championship Basketball ...$ 35
Chess Master 2000 ...$ 34
Championship Football ....$ 33
Championship Golf ..$ 30
Chess Master 2000 ...$ 20
Computer Baseball ..$ 30
Dark Castles ..... $ 35
Deep Space ..... $ 35
Delta Patrol .....520
Demolition ......525
Dr Fruit . 525
Early Weaver Baseball ..... $ 37
Faery Tale ...... S35
Famous Courses S17
Final Trip $ 25
Financial Time Machine
$ 30
S20
$ 20
S35
$ 30
$ 27
$ 30
$ 45
$ 30
FirePower .....
Galactic Invasion ......
Garrison
Goldrunner .....
Golden Pyramid
Grand Slam Tennis ....
Gridiron Football ......
Guild of Thieves
A-500
Hacker II $ 33
Hardball . $ 33
Hex ..... $ 28
Indoor Sports ... $ 35
Into the Eagles Nest $ 30
Jewels ol Darkness . $ 25
Kampfgruppe ... $ 39
King Quest I or II or III ..... $ 35
Karate Kid II .... $ 30
Knight Ore ..... $ 25
Land of Legends $ 35
Leader Board ... $ 30
Libyans in Space ... $ 23
Little Computer People ..... $ 25
Lounge Lizards . $ 36
Magician Dungeons . $ 26
Marble Madness $ 35
Mean 18 . $ 30
Mmd Walker .... $ 37
The Pawn ...... $ 30
Phalanx . $ 25
Phantasie ...... $ 30
Phantasielll .... $ 30
Plutos ... $ 25
Portal ... $ 35
Q-Bail ... $ 25
Quintette $ 30
Quizam . $ 29
Roadwar 2000 ... $ 30
Shanghai $ 29
Silicon Dreams . $ 25
Space Battle .... $ 25
Space Fight .... $ 25
Space Fleet I ... 549
Space Quest .... $ 35
Star Glider ..... 535
Strip Poker ..... 533
Telegames ..... $ 27
Temple of Aphsai $ 33
Terropods ...... 53Q
Tournament Disk ... $ 7
Utlima III 544
Utlima IV Avatar $ 42
Uninvited $ 39
Video Vegas .... $ 27
Winter Games .. $ 30
World Games ... $ 30
Graphics & Video
Animator Images ... $ 85
Aegis Art Pack *1 ... $ 27
Aegis Draw Plus S170
Calligrapher .... $ 65
Deluxe Paint II .. $ 95
Deluxe Paint Help .. $ 21
Deluxe Print .... $ 69
Deluxe Video VI 2 ... $ 99
Digi-Paint ...... $ 45
Dpaint Art *2 ... $ 25
Dpamt Art Disk . $ 25
Dprint Art Disk . $ 25
Dynamic Cad ...$ 340
E FX Station Manager ......$ 195
Express Paint ... $ 54
Forms in Flight . $ 54
Logic Work .. Call
Pageflipper ..... $ 39
Pro Video ......$ 135
Sculpt 3-D ...... $ 69
Seasons & Holidays . $ 25
Video Fonts .... $ 35
Videoscape 3-D .$ 139
Home Management
Home Inventory Mgr ...... $ 30
Money Mentor .. $ 65
Phasar Home Acct. Sys ... $ 69
Hardware
Amiga 500 ...... Call
Amiga 1000 ..... Call
Amiga 2000 CPU ... Call
Amiga 256K Expansion .....$ 100
3. 5 External Drive ...$ 225
5 25 External Drive ..$ 215
Amiga Modem 1680 .$ 135
Atime Plus ..... $ 49
Avatex 300 1200 $ 109
Avatex 2400 Baud Modem ..$ 259
Avatex 1200 HC $ 126
Bridgecnrd W 5 % Drive .... Call
WV1410 Camera w Lens ...$ 235
Copy Stand .... $ 60
Digi-View ...... $ 145
DIGIVIEW PACKAGE Buy Digiview, Panasonic WV1410 camera with lens, DigiPaint, and copystand. $ 459.00
Easyl ..... $ 379
E. C.E. Midi Interlace . $ 55
Miniscribe Hardisk M8438F .. $ 399
Perfect Sound ... $ 65
Seikosha Printer MP 1300 ...$ 405
Seikosha Color Kit ...$ 129
Sony 12090 Monitor ..$ 559
Spirit Expan A1000 1 5MG ..$ 469
Spirit Expan A500 1 5MG ...$ 459
Languages Utility
A C Basic 5145
A C Fortran ..... $ 230
Amiga Assembler $ 75
Aztec C Commercial 3 4 ..... $ 350
Aztec C Developer 3 4 ...... $ 225
Aztec C Professional 3 4 .... $ 169
CLI Mate . $ 29
Cross Assembler . $ 69
Custom Screen .. $ 42
The Debugger ... $ 65
Oos to Dos ...... $ 39
Disk to Disk ..... $ 37
Editor Sources ... $ 35
Enhancer . $ 14
Example Programs ... $ 20
Expert Programs . $ 20
Expert System Kit ... $ 40
Face II ... $ 27
Kermit File ...... $ 25
Lattice C . $ 149
Lattice C Professional $ 275
Menu Maker .... $ 45
Power Windows . $ 75
Shell ..... $ 49
Sorting & Searching . $ 37
System Monitor ... $ 37
True Basic Libraries .. $ 39
TDI Modula II Commercial .. $ 225
TDI Modula II Dev. (N V) .....$ 110
TDI Editor Source ..... $ 35
TDI Modula II STD (N V ) ..... $ 69
True Basic $ 105
Txed ...... $ 30
Zing ...... $ 55
Zmg Keys . $ 30
Printers
Okimate 20 Interface . $ 80
Okimate 20 ...... $ 225
Panasonic KX-10911 $ 345
Sound & Music
Deluxe Music ..... $ 69
Dynamic Drums .. $ 52
Inst-Music Data Disc 1 ...... $ 25
Inst-Music . $ 35
Hot & Cool Jazz .. $ 25
Music Studio ..... $ 45
Pro-Midi Studio Soundscap ..$ 134
Sonix ..... $ 55
Sound Sampler ... $ 89
Spreadsheets
Analyze1 2 0 ......$ 100
Haicalc .... $ 39
Maxi Plan 500 ....$ 109
Maxi Plan Plus (N V) ..$ 139
VIP Professional ..$ 129
Training
Flight Simulator II $ 38
Key Board Kadet . $ 30
Master Typo ...... $ 30
Scenery Disc 7 or 11 ...$ 24
Silent Service ..... $ 30
Super Huey ...... $ 30
Wordprocessors
Flow. Idea Processor .. $ 69
Gold Spell . $ 33
Laser Script ...... $ 33
Lexcheck .. $ 35
LPD Writer $ 89
Miamiga Word .... $ 66
Promise ... $ 35
Prowrite ... $ 89
Scribble* 2 0 ...... $ 65
Viza Write .$ 109
Word Perfect .....$ 239
Make a New Impression
IMPRINT VERSION 3.0 al-
Saturday Morning on the Amiga
lows users to interface a Polaroid Palette Film Recorder to your Amiga. Using the batch file, you can set up 36 automatic exposures. Produce 35mm or Polaroid instant film output from any software package, using any IFF or HAM image. Imprint will capture up to 16 million colors, and will rid angled lines of the staircase effect (at least to the naked eye). The program also allows you to push reds, greens, blues and white, and includes a rastcr-fill option. You can also type in up to 60 characters for a title, numerically stamp pictures for any order, and label them with time and date. Send $ 495 to Liquid Light, 2301 W. 205th St.. Suite 106, Torrance, CA 90501, 213 618-0274.
CAN THE THREE Stooges
save one orphanage from foreclosure? Why, soitainlv! But it’s up to you. As you maneuver Moe, Larry and Curly through a series of odd jobs (prize fighting, pie throwing and more) to earn money. Sound effects, voices and graphics are digitized from original films.
T he year is 1940. You have just received a message from the future a future that saw the Nazis win World War II. A
Dewey Decimal Perfection
AN .ASSORTMENT OF desktop accessories and productivity tools are catalogued in the WordPerfect Library. With Notebook you can organize information, then save the data in a WordPerfect merge file. Calendar is a time-scheduling and organizing aid. And Calculator computes mathematical.
Number of underground scientists have risked their lives to send you a rocket suit, ray gun and secret decoder wheel. Defeat vile Nazis and survive mind-control machines, and you can save mankind. Rocket Ranger features arcade sequences. Strategy and a nonlinear plot. Each game is $ 49.95 from Cinema ware Corp., 4165 Thousand Oaks Blvd., Westlake Village, CA 91362, 805 495-6515.
Financial, scientific and programming calculations. Create, display, delete and print directories with the File Manager. A Program Editor is also included. SI29 covers a lifetime of overdue fines! Check out a copy from WordPerfect Corp., 1555 N. Technology Way,
Orem, UT 84057, 801 227-4020.
A Window OntheBank
WINDOUGH IS NOT vour or- dinary crossword puzzle. Rather than a list of clues, you work from a pre-scored word list, placing words onto the puzzle diagram. But that's not where the differences end; the object of Windough is not only to maximize your point earnings (each letter has a point value), hut your dollar earnings as well. For $ 16.97 you can get the one-time-plav puzzle, and start racking up points to win one of five prizes. The grand prize will be at least $ 2,500, and the jackpot will grow as the number of players increases. To cash in on details (don't delay your contest entry must he postmarked by April 30, 1988) contact CompuPu??lcs, 1037 University Ave., Rochester, NY 14607, 716 473-1402. ¦
500 COMMAND
OUTSTANDING FEATURES:
? ORGANIZES WORK SPACE
? CONVENIENT LOCATION OF DRIVES & MONITOR
? HANDY DISK STORAGE
? MUCH MORE, -n
FOR ONLY ( 99.95J
DELUXE MODEL FEATURES:
? BUILT-IN POWER STRIP
? SURGE PROTECTION &
NOISE FILTER
? BUILT-IN COOLING FAN
? FINGERTIP CONTROL OF COMPUTER &
PERIPHERALS
? MUCH MORE,
FOR ONLY
P. O. Box 203, Oakdale, IA 52319 FOR FAST SERVICE, CALL: 1-800-626-4582 1-319-338-7123 (IN IOWA) SHIPPING AND HANDLING:
Continental U.S. APO FPO Canada Puerto Rico
$ 4.50 for each Command Center Hawaii Alaska S2.00 for one accessory item $ 13.00 for each Command Center $ 3.00 for two or more $ A.00 for one accessory item
accessories $ 6 00 for two or more accessories
COMMAND CENTER ALSO AVAILABLE FOR:
128 ....124.95
64 ....109.95
64C ...109.95
ACCESSORIES:
PHOENIX HEAVY DUTY
POWER SUPPLY .
. 94.95
SUPRA 20 MB DRIVE......
. 745.95
SUPRA 30 MB DRIVE......
. 945.95
JOY STICK EXTENSION ....
. 12.50
TILT SWIVEL
MONITOR STAND
. 14.95
DUST COVER .....
. 19.95
ELECTRICAL UPGRADE KIT
89. 95
ASK ABOUT OUR NEW
ACOUSTICAL PRINTER
ENCLOSURE THE
“SOUNDTRAP”
1 -800-423-7347
AMIGA
AMIGA 500 1 MB, COLOR AMIGA 1000 512 K, COLOR AMIGA 2000
HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE
$ 999.00
$ 1069.00
CALL
$ 750.00
$ 825.00
$ 120.00
$ 299.00
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Continued from p. 22 professionals. I welcome these quality alternatives!
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Synthia
(Mich a wave!
By Bob Lindstrom
WALK COOL AND carry a big checkbook. . .these have traditionally been words to live by for electronic music enthusiasts. Keyboard synthesizers are rela-

lively inexpensive, but high-quality, flexible hardware costs dearlv. The Ami-
J
ga's ability to generate a wide range of sounds means that, when complemented by specially-designed software, it can actually replace that costly equipment.
Enter Synthia, the program that equips your Amiga with many capabilities of expensive professional synthesizers. Synthia’s modules simulate five different types of synthesizers: subtractive, additive, interpolative, percussion and plucked string. With these modules, you can create IFF-format instruments for use in other Amiga music programs.
Like ocean waves lapping against the shore, sound waves break against your eardrum with varying levels of air pressure. Synthesizers create sound by manipulating the shapes of waveforms in several ways; each technique is ideally suited for a different set of applications. Synthia’s five synthesizers aim to provide the right tool for the job.
The subtractive synthesizer emulates a variety of filters low and high pass, band pass and band limit that enable you to remove certain qualities of a waveform in order to produce the sound of an instrument. It excels at the kind of “classic" effects heard in, say, 1950’s sci- cnce-fiction films. The additive synthesizer "piles” the waveforms of 16 harmonics on a basic sound and produces output associated with popular music’s synthesized sound. The interpolative synthesizer varies a waveform through time and does an excellent job of simulating woodwinds. Synthia’s plucked-string and percussion modules arc designed to credibly imitate those types of instruments; in the plucked-
,
Finesse a plucked-string waveform.
String module you can choose to simulate metal or nylon strings.
Each of Synthia’s modules is a standalone program that you can multitask with the other modules or with another program, such as a note editor. Though module capabilities differ dramatically, design similarities provide continuity. If you learn the basics of one module, vou’ll be able to move easily to another.
Experimentation Required
The sizeable manual details the features and operation of each module but does little to explain the basics of synthesis. Unless you’re familiar with instrument design, oscillators and band-pass filters, you’ll find yourself learning through trial and error. This is not really a problem though, because no matter how complete your intellectual understanding of sound synthesis, it takes time and effort to learn the actual effects of twisting a dial. The manual encourages this kind of experimental discover)' with several tutorials.
Each module opens onto an instru- ment-design window. Here you choose, design or draw a basic waveform. From
this home base, clickable buttons open a variety of other multitasking windows that offer tools for manipulating the waveform from adding reverb to layering on the complex textures of wave- shaping. Choose a window, adjust the levels and sliders, then select Do Sound to save your creation.
One feature turns the Amiga keyboard into a music keyboard, thus letting you test the sound of your changes. If you like the outcome, you can go to a filters window or select a special effect and make more changes. If the results aren’t quite what you expected, the Undo button will erase the most recent change saved.
Although the process of creating an instrument sound is calculation intensive, Synthia generally accomplishes the task in a few seconds, and maintains a brisk pace during instrument design, too. Speed is important since you will spend a lot of time running down blind alleys and fine tuning.
Synthia’s sound quality is impressive, often approaching the caliber of digitally-sampled instruments. The special effects, filters and waveform-editing tools involve simple freehand drawings as well as elaborate mathematical transformation. T hese enable you to produce results ranging from fantastically fanciful to remarkably realistic (including imperfections that distinguish real-instrument sound from electronic simulation, which is often unconvicingly perfect).
You can also use Synthia to customize digitized instruments, or extract the envelopes of a digitized instrument and use them as a foundation for your own creations. This ability to create complex waveforms, however, carries some complications. It could take hours to precisely realize a sound from your mind’s ear. Getting proficient with Synthia’s intricacies will take weeks or months, even though you can produce results almost immediately.
Like the digitally-sampled instruments they imitate, Synthia’s instruments are prone to clicks and pops, particularly when choosing the location of repeat loops. Synthia’s repeat sliders are clumsy and inadequate compared to the zero- seeking function of a good digital editor; therefore, you may want to have a sample editor on hand to perforin surgery on your Synthia instruments.
Synthia produces one- to five-octave
instruments over an 11-octave range your Amiga can reacli clown to the groaners and up to the screechets as never before. Unfortunately, not all Amiga music programs will recognize the extreme ranges. To remedy that, The Other Guys have included a proprietary, 32-track SMUSPlayer on disk that will reproduce the full range of Synthia-created instruments. Also included is a second data disk with sample instruments and several excellent pop-music scores.
One bug in the program is more irritating than destructive. When choosing a menu selection while you're sounding a note, the note will persist until you repress its keyboard key. More troublesome was a crash that occurred whenever the Flange effect was used three times in a row.
With its multitasking window design, speed and impressive flexibility, Synthia is an extraordinary achievement. Both musicians and hobbyists will appreciate it, whether they miss their synthesizers, want to avoid the ins and outs of digital sampling, or demand flexible design. Synthia makes the most of the Amiga.
Synthia
The Other Guys
55 North Main, Suite 30ID
Logan. UT 84321 801 753-7620
$ 99.99
512K required.
FastFonts
A triple-dip treat
for customizing programs.
By Carl Mann
ONE OF THE AMIGA’S outstanding features is the ease with which you can reconfigure its attributes to meet your needs. FastFonts, by Microsmiths, is a non-copy-protected program that can help you establish your Amiga’s own personality.
FastFonts is a carefully crafted trio of extremely compact, multitasking enhancements and support resources. Each of the three modules exploits a different set of capabilities to your advantage you decide which particulars to add to each of your own applications.
Because FastFonts is designed for use with other programs, each compact module runs on less than 10K.
The modules can be launched from Intuition, invoked from the GU or called directly from a startup-sequence. From Intuition, the defaults give you an instant taste of FastFonts’ power. All modules accept arguments from the CL1 or startup-sequence, making the program immediately useful to the novice, and putty in the hands of any seasoned user.
Modular Modeling
Fhe FastFonts module speeds 80-column text display by up to 500%. While the increased pace is noticeable with the standard CLI, you can see an even greater improvement when running it with your word processor. Text that normally crawls along zips with the help of FastFonts.
This module also provides a choice of four new, highly readable fonts in eight-, nine- and 11-point sizes. Another benefit this one undocumented is improved cursor control. Even with the Preferences key repeat rate pushed nearly to the maximum, my cursor stopped the very- instant I released the backspace or delete key.
The distribution diskette actually con- tains two versions of the FastFonts module. The “fancy” version has a full
i
Intuition interface for first-time fiddling and dedicated mouse users. The smaller one is for disks that are nearly full; it works from the CLI or startup-secjuence.
The FunKeys module “civilizes” Amiga's windows. FunKeys enables you to bring forward and activate any window without fumbling through a hodgepodge of front and back gadgets. Window sizing is automated, too just show FunKeys which windows to shrink to what size. With this feature you can keep secondary applications running in reserve until you need them. Then, a simple keystroke will bring forward and enlarge the window you need.
Two text macro keys turn repetitive jobs both complex CLI command sequences and simple tasks (like typing a return address) into sheer, automated joy. All the FunKeys functions, as well as the on off switch, are accessed simply bv pressing the left Amiga key in combination with the corresponding function key. You can select any one of five activation key options. ?
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The ScreenBianker module automatically dims the monitor screen while vou arc not using the keyboard or mouse, thus keeping images from being permanently burned into those delicate phosphors. The 60-second default can be adjusted to any desired interval through the CLI or startup-sequence arguments, and since ScreenBianker consumes only
1. 5K of RAM, it can even he installed on a 512K Amiga running a paint program.
FastFonts includes two versions of this module, too. One dims the screen to half-brightness (enabling you to keep your place in the midst of a fragmented work 11 ow) and the other version totally blanks the display. I expect Screen- Blanker might return the cost of the entire package in terms of extended CRT life.
Performance Plus
In nine months of continuous use, FastFonts has not provoked a single glitch or crash. (I run all three FastFonts modules plus two other enhancement programs along with my word processor.) The manual is written in clear terms and the examples are excellent. I had to reread certain sections before I understood just how to make the FastFonts modules work from my startup-sequence, but the finished effort worked just as planned on the very first try. A reference strip is not supplied for function keys, so you will have to create your own.
The defaults are reasonable, and the modules will work quite well for you as shipped, so you can benefit even if you’re strictly a “mouse person.” However, out of over 55 major files, only four are represented by icons. That means restarting them manually every time you boot up, unless you automate them through the startup-sequence. If ever there was a good reason to start using the CLI and ED, FastFonts is it!
The CLI-only goodies include nine fully-documented assembly-language replacements for common AmigaDOS commands. Microsmiths is advancing an effort to replace all command files, which were written in the now-obsolete BCPL, with their assembly-language equivalents. The FastFonts disk includes new CD, Echo, Protect, MakeDir, File- Note, Prompt, Stack, Break and Run commands, all of which are much better than the originals. The package also includes a benchmark program and a
demo version of Microsmiths' excellent ED replacement, TxEd.
I have a large collection of convenience tools, most of which are moderately helpful. But I reach for FastFonts every time I crack the seal on a new software package. My heavily-customized Workbench disk includes the FastFonts library as standard startup procedure. FastFonts is a bang-for-the-buck bargain, and I’ll vouch for it wholeheartedly, lake a bow, Microsmiths!
FastFonts Microsmiths, Inc.
PO Box 561 Cambridge, MA 02140 617 576-2878 $ 39.95
No special requirements.
Hot Licks
How hoi is hot?
By Michael Brown
ACCORDING TO INFINITY Software, their first music program was “designed to be a fun, easy-to-use performance tool with editing functions” Hot Licks’ controls are logically displayed on a 16- color, medium-resolution screen that resembles a cross between an electronic synthesizer and a tape deck. A window on the screen displays directories, files and other information, and lists the available instruments. Using the scroll and select buttons you can peruse directories and activate instruments.
A 72-key piano keyboard is laid out across the bottom of the Hot Licks screen. Two sets of sliders, located immediately above the on-screen keyboard, control the range of notes that you can access via the the QWERTY board. Other gadgets include tempo and volume sliders, and a set of tape-deck controls (fast forward, rewind, play) for playing and editing. The program features pull-down menus, but keyboard alternatives are available for most items. While the screen cannot be sized, you can toggle a drag bar and pull the screen down with the mouse. You can easily exit the program by clicking the power button in the top, right corner of the screen. I do like this idea, but I found it easy to accidentally select this gadget while looking for something else, thus los
ing all work in progress. The graphics are nice, but because there is no visual display of musical data, the program's editing tools are difficult to use.
Heated Harmony
The program supplies 19 instruments and five sound effects, some of which are quite good. But for a program designed to be a performance tool, I found the lack of control over the instruments to be a major deficiency. There are no provisions, for example, to change attack or decay times. Because the piano sound doesn’t fade, it doesn’t sound authentic when used in a musical passage. Although you can load up to 20 instruments at once (chip memory permitting), only one instrument can be played or recorded at a time. To select instruments or sound effects, simply use the function keys. After a directory has been read from disk, it remains in me 111017 f°r quick access should you decide to reconfigure your instrumentation. This is a nice feature, but the program is still quite a chore to set up, since you must access the directory every time you want to select an instrument. It would be much faster to select a slot and an instrument to fill it at the same time.
The chord mode, accessible through the QWERTY keyboard, allows you to play three tones by pressing one key, so that a fourth (solo) voice can play over them. However, you can’t mix the volume levels of the four voices, so the chords tend to overpower the solo line. Hot Licks also allows you to turn off the low-pass sound-chip filter of the Amiga 500 and 2000. This, I found, produced a richer sound. (Toggling the filter had no effect on the 1000.)
Notes are played using the on-screen keyboard and mouse, the Amiga’s QWERTY keyboard or both. A drawback of using the mouse to play the synthesizer, though, is that the program cannot keep up with even relatively slow mouse movement. As the program tries to catch up with the mouse, runs of notes become uneven and notes continue to sound long after the mouse has stopped.
The program features a visual and audible metronome to help you stay in time while recording. Whenever I played fast sequences, however, the metronome beat went haywire. And it seemed that all sequences, whether recorded trom the keyboard or mouse, never started on the
downbeat when played back.
You can save scores in either of two formats: simple SMUS (for use with programs like Sonix from Aegis) or fancy SMUS (for use with programs like Deluxe Music Construction Set from Electronic Arts). One option for replaying scores is the Jukebox mode, which delivers several compositions in a row. Setting up jukebox selections is needlessly complex though; you must create a script File of command strings. 1DIR, for example, is a command to change the directory in which the instruments are found, and SDIR is used to change the directory in which the scores are to be found. Instead, why not supply a pop-up window where this information can be typed in?
The program multitasks without a hitch. It does not, however, support MIDI, which I consider to be a drawback. With the large number of inexpensive MIDI-compatible keyboards hitting the market, Amiga developers are missing a major opportunity by ignoring this feature.
The manual is brief, but adequate. The first quarter covers the functions of the screen gadgets, the next half is comprised of tutorials for playing, composing and editing, and the rest consists of brief appendices and an index. Although the package advertizes that Hot Licks contains nothing to preclude making copies or installing it on hard disk, the program is protected by the look-this- word-up-in-the-manual arrangement. The only problem here is that many passages displayed on screen cannot be found on the page indicated.
Hot Licks is a synthesizer, but it doesn’t give you real control over the sound chip. It’s also a sequencer, but it’s approach to recording and editing is awkward and just plain inaccurate. It is a composition program too, but it doesn’t display musical notation. Hot Licks tries to accomplish much. It offers great features, but I am sorry to report that it doesn't follow through with great execution.
Hot Licks Infinity Software 1144 65th St., Suite C Emeryville, CA 94608 415 420-1551 $ 49.95
No special requirements.
Time Lord
Mastw the moments from within. By Sheldon Leemon
TIME LORD IS an inexpensive battery- backed clock calendar for the Amiga
1000. But price is not the only thing that sets it apart from other clock calendars. Since it’s installed internally (in the Complex Interface Adapter chip socket), Time Lord doesn’t preclude using devices that ping into the joystick or parallel ports. (As a result it is somewhat more difficult to install and remove than those which plug into an external port.) Time Lord does, however, make it impossible to use devices that plug into the 68000 socket (memory expanders and accelerator cards, for example), as the installed module hangs over the 68000 chip.
Installing the Time Lord module requires opening the 1000 a somewhat daunting prospect for the average user. Fortunately, Time Lord comes with both a written manual, composed mostly of diagrams, and an on-line instructions with IFF picture files and a viewer program. The picture files are particularly helpful; color cycling highlights areas of interest.
Reaching your target area (where the clock is to be installed), entails removing 19 screws as well as the Amiga’s plastic lid and the metal cover underneath.
T hen you must unplug the floppy drive connector to expose the CIA (Complex Interface Adapter) chip. The next step, actually removing the CIA chip, is probably the most critical part of the operation. Unfortunately, the instructions go no further than to say that you should carefully remove the chip.
A typical removal method involves gently prying alternate ends of the chip.
It is important to be sure that you are prying the chip, though, and not the underlying socket, since that can cause serious damage to the computer. The prying method is especially difficult to use on the CIA chip, since one end of the chip is practically inaccessible. Working as carefully as I could, prying from just one end, I could not extract it without bending some pins. Although I was able to straighten them, it is possible to bend the pins so badly as to require a new chip about a $ 20 mistake. A far better ?
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FONTS AND BORDERS FOOTBALL FACTS FOOTMAN
FORMS IN FLIGHT
FORTRESS UNDERGROUND FRACTION ACTION GALACTIC INVASION GALAXY FIGHT GALILEO GARRISON
GEE BEE AIR RALLY GENERAL LEDGER GENERIC MASTER LIBRARIAN GEOMETRIC LIBRARY GIZMOZ 2.0 GNOME RANGER GOLD DISK FONT SET *1 GOLD SPELL
GOLDEN PYRAMID (GAME5HOW)
GOLDRUNNER
GRA33IT
GRADE MANAGER
GRAND SLAM TENNIS
GREAT STATES
GREAT STATES II
GRID START CAR RACE
GRIDIRON-FQQTBALL GAME
GUILD OF THIEVES
HACKER II
hacker-text ADVENTURE
HA I CALC
HALLEY PROJECT
HARDBALL
HEAD COACH
HEX
HITCHIKERS GUIDE HOLLYWOOD HIJINX HOLLYWOOD POKER HOT & COOL JAZZ
HOT LICKS
HUGE PRINT
IMPACT-BUSINESS GRAPHICS INDOOR SPORTS INSANITY FIGHT INSTANT MUSIC 1.2 INTERCHANGE INTERCHANGE OBJECTS 1 INTO THE EAGLEf S NEST INTROCAD INVENTORY MGMT INVESTOR'S ADVANTAGE IT'S ONLY ROCK £ ROLL J FORTH
JEWELS OF DARKNESS KAMPFGRUPFE KARA FONTS
KARATE KID II
KARATE KING
KARTING GRAND PR1X
KEY GENIE
KEY TO C
KEYBOARD CADET
KICKWORK
KIDTALK
KINDERAMA
KINDWORDS
KING OF CHICAGO
KING'S QUEST I
KING'S QUEST II
KING'S QUEST III
knight ORC
KWIK SPEAK
LAND OF LEGENDS
LATTICE C 4.0
LATTICE C PROFFESIONAL
LAZERSCRIPT
LEADER BOARD TORNA DISK LEADER BOARD-GOLF GAME LEASURE SUIT LARRY LEATHER GODESSES LEXCHECK
LIBYANS IN SPACE LINKWORD DUTCH LINKWORD FRENCH LINKWORD GERMAN LINKWORD GREEK LINKWORD ITALIAN LINKWORD PORTUGUESE LINKWORD RUSSIAN LINKWORD SPANISH LINT (GIMPLE)
LISP 1.3-BY METACOMCO
LITTLE COMPUTER PEOPLE
LITTLE RED HEN
LOGIC WORKS
LOGISTIX
LOTTERY MAGIC
LPD WRITER-WP
LURKING HORROR
LV BACKUP
MACROMODEM
MAD LIBS
MAGICAL MYTHS
MAGICIAN'S DUNGEON
MARAUDER II-DUPL1CATION
MARBLE MADNESS
MASTER TYPE
27. 47
QUIZ MASTER
49. 98
MATCH IT
25. 71
QuiZAM
23 .10
MATH MAGICIAN
27. 49
R. R. AESOP'S FABLES
19. 48
MATH TALK
31. 25
RACTER
30. 90
MATE TALK FRACTIONS
31. 25
READ « RHYME
31. 23
MATH WIZARD
31. 23
READ-A-RAMA
31 .23
MAXIPLAN 500
93. 13
REASON:ATtT WRITERS W.B
271. 56
MAXIPLAN PLUS
124. 40
RETURN TO ATLANTIS
34. 32
MEAN IB COURSE DISK
14 .96
ROADWAR 2000
27. 47
MEAN 18 GOLF
28. 77
ROADWAR EUROPA
29. 21
METACOMCO ASSEMBLER
68,72
ROGUE-ADVENTURE GAME
27. 46
METACO.MCO PASCAL
68. 72
ROLORASE PLUS
58. 46
METACOMCO SHELL
48. 10
RUNTIME PACKAGE TRUE BASIC
103 . 10
METACOMCO TOOLKIT
34 .34
SARGON III
35,75
METASCOPE DEBUGGER
59. 95
SCENERY DISK 11 EAST COA
18. 72
MIAMIGA FILE
29. 95
SCENERY DISK *7 EAST COAS
18. 71
MICROFICHE FILER
69. 95
SCRIBBLE
62. 32
MICROLAWYER
37. 47
SCULPT-3D
64. 97
MIND WALKER
34 .34
SDI:CINAMAWARE SERIES
34. 34
MIND FOREVER VOYAGING
27. 47
SEASONS AND HOLIDAYS
21. 60
MIRROR DISK COPIER
35. 71
SEVEN CITIES OF GOLD
14 .40
MIRROR HACKER PACKAGE
34 .34
SHADOW GATE
31. 23
MISSION ELEVATOR
34 .95
SHANGHAI-STRATEGY GAME
27. 46
MODULA-2 COMMERCIAL
206. 22
SILENT SERVICE
25. 95
MODULA-2 DEVELOPER
103. 09
SILICON DREAMS
19. 95
MODULA-2 REGULAR
6B.72
SILVER 3-D
109. 95
MOEBIUS
39. 95
SINBAD 4 FALCON
34. 34
MONEY MENTOR C VERSION
59. 98
SKYFOX 1.2
14 .95
MOONMIST
27. 47
SMOOTH TALKER
33. 95
MOUSETRAP
12. 96
SOFTWOOD FILE
62. 43
MT-32 EDITOR
97. 47
SOFTWOOD FILE SG
78. 21
MULTI-FORTH
59. 95
SORTING & SEARCHING
36. 13
MUSIC MOUSE
51. 35
SOUNDSCAPE UTILITIES 1
35. 71
MUSIC STUDENT
37. 4B
SPACE BATTLE
19. 95
MUSIC X
184. 98
SPACE FLIGHT
19. 46
NANCY-SPELLING CHECKER
34 .34
SPACE MATH
29. 95
NEWSLETTER FONTS COLOR
19. 50
SPACE PORT
27. 38
NIMBUS 1:RECORD KEEPER
93. 80
SPACE RANGER
13. 00
NINJA MISSION
13. 00
SPACEQUEST
33. 00
OGRE
32. 46
SPELLBOUND
25. 96
OMEGA FILE
54 .99
SPELLER BEE
31. 25
ONE-ON-ONE
14 .40
STAR GLIDER
30. 90
ONLINE 2.0
43. 56
STARFLEET I
36. 30
OO-TOPOS
19. 48
STATION FALL
27. 47
ORGANIZE
62. 32
STRIP POKER
27. 46
OUTLINE
31. 25
STRIP POKER DATA 4
12. 97
PAGE FLIPPER
31. 23
STRIP POKER DATA DISK 5
12. 98
PAGESETTER
93. 72
STUDIO FONTS VI (COLOR]
19. 50
PAR HOME I
25. 00
STUDIO MAGIC
43. 73
PAR HOME II
62. 48
SUB BATTLE
24. 95
PAR REAL I
93. 15
SUPER HUEY-COPTER GAME
23. 36
PASCAL
137. 46
SUPERBASE
93. 73
PAYMASTER PLUS;PAYROLL
93. 10
SUPERBASE PROFESSIONAL
CALL
PAYROLL
62. 95
SYMPHONY SONGS (EACH VOL)
15. 95
PERFECT SCORE
54. 97
SYNTHIA
59. 95
PERSECUTORS
15. 56
SYSTEMS MONITOR
28. 95
PHANTAS IE
27. 47
T £ L GALLERY
9. 95
PHANTASIE 3
24,95
TALES FROM ARABIAN NIGHTS
31. 95
PBASAR-FIN'L MgtiT
62. 48
TALKER-TALKING WP
48. 10
PIXMATE
45. 47
TALKING COLORING BOOK
18. 73
PLUTOS
19. 46
TASS TIMES IN TONETOWN
27. 46
PORTAL-ADVENTURE GAME
34. 35
TELEGAMES
23. 95
PORTS OF CALL
34. 95
TELEWARS
24. 97
POWERWINDOWS 2.0
62. 46
TEMPLE OF APSHAI
27. 46
PRE CALCULUS
36. 33
TERRORPODS
25. 77
PRINTMASTER
31. 23
TEST DRIVE
34 .95
PRISM PLUS
45. 43
TEXTCRAFT PLUS
64 . 93
PRO MIDI STUDIO
130. 3B
TEXTPHO
49. 95
PRO VIDEO BULLETIN
25. 17
THE 64 EMULATOR
49. 95
PRO VIDEO CGI
144. 00
THE CALLIGRAPHER
62. 50
PRO VIDEO COMPETITION
25. 17
THE DEMONSTRATOR
21. 85
PRO VIDEO FONT SET *1
72. 00
THE DIRECTOR
45. 47
PRO VIDEO FONT SET 2
72. 00
THE EXPLORER
36. 22
PRO VIDEO FUTURE
25. 17
THE GRAPHICS STUDIO
38. 96
PRO VIDEO SHOW TIME
25, 17
THE MIRROR COPIER
34 .34
PRO-CLIP
18,75
THE MUSIC STUDIO
34 .35
PROBABILITY THEORY
36,22
THE PAWN
30 . 90
PROFESSIONAL PAGE
247. 50
THE SURGEON
31 .23
PROJECT D
31. 23
THE WORKS
124. 97
PROMISE:SPELLING CHECKER
34 .36
THREE LITTLE PIGS
19. 48
PROWRITE
78. 10
TRANSCONTINENTAL RAILROAD
25. 96
PUBLISHER PLUS
124. 98
TRIGONOMETRY
36. 22
PUPPY LOVE
18 . 68
TRINITY
27. 47
Q-BALL
21. 41
TRUE BASIC
68. 72
QUARTERBACK
45. 47
TRUESTAT
57 .97
QUICK MERGE
37,95
TURBO
16. 95
QUINTETTES
30. 90
TV SHOW
65. 01
TV TEXT 62.32
TXED 24,98
TYPING TUTOR WORD INVADERS 22,73
ULTIMA III 28,57
UNCLE D CON SOUND TRATION 25.97
UNINVITED 34,34
VADER 19.46
VIDEO JUKEBOX 19.48
VIDEO MASTER 62.48
VIDEO VEGAS 24.10
VIDEOSCAPE 3D 124.98
VIDEOT1TLER 99.95
VIP PROFESSIONAL 103.10
VIZAWRITE 93.75
VYPER 21.95
WESTERN GAMES 31,95
WINDOW PRINT II 22.75
WINNIE THE POOH 16.50
WINTER GAMES 27.46
WISHBRINGER 10.25
WORD MASTER 29.95
WORD PERFECT 219,00
WORLD GAMES 27.46
WRITE 'N' FILE 59.95
X-CAD 374.98
ZING 49.98
ZING KEYS 31.25
20RK TRILOGY 48.10
ZUMA FONTS VOL 1 21.85
ZUMA FONTS VOL 2 21,85
ZUMA FONTS VOL 3 21.85
15' CAMERA CABLE 12,97
20MEG HD i CONTROLLER CALL
ALEGRA E:512K BOARD A1000 199.00
AMIGA 2052 2 HEG RAM CARD CALL
AMIGA 2010 2nd 3.5“ DRIVE CALL
AMIGA A501 512K RAM CALL
AMIGA BRIDGE CARD WITH DRIVE CALL AMIGA LIVE! 270.00
AM I GEN GENLOCK 149.95
ASDG 8 MEG BOARDS WITH OK 399.00
AUTOPAL-EXPANDER KIT 27.50
AVATEX 2400 BAUD MODEM 229.18
BOARD 2-BY EXP TECH 227.50
BYTE BOX 0K-RAM OPTIONAL 249.00
CAGE II-OK;2MB EXPANSION 271.25
CAGE II;2MB POPULATED CALL
CAGE II;4 MB POPULATED CALL
CASIO CZ101 KEYBOARD 336.22
CASIO CZ230S KEYBOARD 343.75
CASIO HT700 KEYBOARD 350.00
CEP 500 512K RAM EXP 139.00
CPS 500-POWER SUPPLY A500 74.97
CSA TURBO 68020 68881 BRD CALL
EASYL 2000 TABLET 369.00
ECE MIDI 500 2000 48.71
ESCORT 2-2M3 CALL
ESCORT 2-2MB FOR A500 CALL
ESCORT 2.OK EXPANSION BOX 282.10
EXP-500 512K RAH EXP 149.00
FUTURE SOUND-AUDIOSAMPLER 142.20
HARD DISK CONTROLLER A2000 319.00
HURRICANE 16MHZ TURBO CRD 999.00
INSIDER CALL
KWICK START 149.47
LIPST1CK+ VOICE CONTROL 26.97
MICRON 2 MEG FOR A2000 399.00
MINISCRIBE 20M3 3.5“ FAST 329-00
MINISCRIBE 40MB HARD DISK 420.00
MINISCRIBE 40MB HD 25MS FAST CALL NEC CP6 COLOR 24 PIN PRINTER 621.20 NEC P2200 24 PIH PRINTER 418.75
NEC P6 24 PIN PRINTER 506.25
PERFECT SOUND DIGITIZER 67.47
PERFECT VISION DIGITIZER 169.95
PHOENIX 20 MEG HD FOR 500 819.00
PITCHRIDER 4000 162.50
PRACT. PER. 24003 MODEM 199.95
PRODRIVE 219.00
PRODRIVE 2000 2nd DRIVE 149.00
SCRIBE-CARD 30 FOR 2088D 420.00
SOUND SAMPLER 86.63
SPIRIT 1.5 M3 FOR A500 CALL
SPIRIT 1.5MEG FOR A1000 CALL
STAR NP-1G PRINTER 159.95
STAR NX1000 PRINTER 199.00
STAR NX1000 RAINBOW CALL
STAR NB24 24 PIN PRINTER CALL
STAR30ARD 2 A100Q OK 299.00
STARBOARD 2 A500 OK 299.00
SUPRA DRIVE 20 MEG A10QO 699.00
SUPRA DRIVE 20 MEG A500 699.00
SUPRA DRIVE 60 MEG HD CALL
XEROX 4020 INK JET COLOR 1140.00
XEROX 4020 STARTER KIT 156.00
AHIGA 2000 DUST COVER 10.79
AHIGA 500 DUST COVERS 6.97
AMIGA 500 MONITOR STANDS 29.95
AMIGA INTERACTIVE CABLE 4.10
AMIGA LIGHT PEN 97.47
AVATEX 1200E MODEM 81.25
AVATEX 1200HC MODEM 119.99
C-V1EK A500 COLOR COMPOS, 36.19
CASIO AS-20 POWER SPEAKERS 89.95
COPY STAND,2 LIGHTS, STD 49.35
CRIMSON CROWN 12.97
CURTIS EMERALD 40.22
DATALIGHT COPY HOLDER 19.46
DISKETTE LABELS 100 8.95
DOCUMATE 2 COPY HOLDER 10.36
DRIVE CLEANING KIT 6.95
DRIVE EXTENSION CABLE 14.95
FLICKER MASTER 13.95
FUJI MF2DD 10 PACK 19.95
FUJI MF2DD 10 PACK BULK 17.18
GENDER CHANGER BENDER 20.5B
GRAVIS MARK VI JOYSTICK 28.56
IM-II CABLE TO IMAGEWRTER 21.42
IMAGEWRITER II 2500 21.42
LENS 16MM FOR KV1410 21.85
MD 120 WOOD DISK HOLDER 26.21
MD 60L WOOD DISK HOLDER L 26.21
MD 64 WOOD DISK HOLDER 60 22.46
MICRO 50 DISK HOLDER 6.50
MICROSTORE DISK HOLDER 9.71
MIDI GOLD FOR A1000 64.20
MIDI LINK 6fMIDI CABLE 7.30
MIMETICS MIDI INTERFACE 43.00
MOUSE HIDE 4 MOUSE TOP 10.00
MOUSE HOUSE 4.97
MOUSE MATS 6.95
MOUSE WASHERS 5.95
NEC P6 COLOR OPTION KIT 119.95
OKIMATE 20 PLUG N PRINT 199.00
PANASONIC WV1410 CAMERA 224.96
PANASONIC WV1500 CAMERA 319.95
PARALLEL CA3LE A500 A2000 14.95
PARROT 1200 MODEM 109.95
PEOPLE METER 48.70
POWERBUSS 13.00
PRINT 4 WEAR 13.95
PRINTER CABLE A500 A20QQ 19.00
PRINTER PAPER 1000 COUNT 17.95
SAFE STRIP SURGE PROTECT 19.95
SERIAL CABLE A1000 19.00
SERIAL CABLE A500 A2000 19.00
SK080 DISK FILE 80 3.5“ 19.95
SONY DISKS 10 PACK 19.95
SONY MONITOR CABLE 27.30
SUNCOM PRINTER STATION 4.49
SI7PRA 2400 MODEM 152,49
THE EASYL-ALL MODELS-SPECIFY 369,00 TIMESAVER 57,97
TOUCH IT STATIC WRAP 6,95
TRACKBALL 39.95
TRANSVESTOR 1000 23.36
TRAN5VESTOR 2500 21.30
TURBO-VAC 12.96
VISIONS RGB CABLE 19.97
WAVE PAD 7 . 97
This is a selection from over 760 Amiga products we have in stock.
Creative Computers is both a mail order company with a store’s support and a store showroom with mail order prices. Please call us for any item not listed. If possible drop by our store and you will be
Amazed! _ _
MINIMUM ORDER: $ 20
SHIPPING INFO: Call for shipping rates.
RETURN POLICY1. Defective merchandise under warranty will be repaired or replaced. Returned product must be in original package. We do not offer any refund on defective products or for products that do not perform satisfactorily. We make no guarantees for product performance.
CONDITIONS. Creative Computers reserves the right to limit the sale of any items to local in-person pick-up only. Prices subject to change without notice.
WE ALSO RUN A 24 Hr. BBS: Call (213) 394-5988 with your modem. I
Store front address: VISA
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Santa Monica, CA 90401 Circle 199 on Reader Service card
Visit our store soon!!
AmigaWorld Back Issues
March April 1987 The Amiga 2000. Capturing I
Amiga mft|onmpe|rfr2ywrcuslom
color jf %i k|ench I'm
provemments. I
January February 1987 Desktop video. Digital sound samplers. Hardware Buyer’s Guide. Creating menus with Intuition. I
November December 1986 Software Buyer’s Guide. Going on-line with the Amiga. A look I at color printers. Amiga Basic graphics primer. I
I
September October 1986 Animation tech- I niques on the Amiga. Using libraries from Amiga Basic. File management advice.
Jul Aug 1986 Music and Sound Designing Amiga's sound, sound and music synthesis, p@jpyid Amiga,
Amiga IjOcV* ilip.kfindi Vtfs It C pt.l, Apple connection. Reviews of Rags to Riches, Time and Task Planner, CD20 Hard Disk System, Brataccas.
May Jun 1986 Software Explosion Using CUI, using the Amiga editor, computerizing a small business, AI in business, business graphics, Amiga Basic overview, Amiga in the schools, IFF standard. Reviews of OnUine, Oki- mate 20, One-on-One, Seven Cities of Gold, j Borrowed Time. Mindshadow, Monkey Business
Mar Apr 1986 Interactive video VIVA from Knowledgeware, interactive videodisc technology, A-Squared Systems and the Amiga digitizer. Basic graphics, CD-ROM, programming in MCC Pascal. Amiga Music Studio, using Intuition. Reviews of Deluxe Paint, Bose speakers, Maxicomm.
Jan Feb 1986 The Creative issue Interview with Andy Warhol, Artists and the Amiga, Personal art, wizard of Wishbringer, programming Cambridge Lisp, intro to TLC-Logo, list of Amiga regional representatives.
Nov Dec 1985 The Amiga in business Comparing the Amiga to the Mac and IBM-PC, intro to spreadsheets. Music and Midi, programming in C. Review of Textcraft.
Premier 1985 The Future is Here First look at the Amiga computer. A peek at the 68000 chip, the Amiga as a teaching tool, and | speculation about the future of the Amiga com- | puter.
Solution is to purchase a chip extractor tool (I found one for $ 6.95), which allows you to easily remove chips without damaging them.
After you’ve removed the CIA chip, all that remains is to plug it into the 2%n x 3" Time Lord module, and plug the module into the empty socket. Both operations require you to carefully line up all of the pins, making sure each goes into the correct hole of the socket. When you’ve connected the floppy drive cable again, you’re ready to test the operation of the computer and clock. If all has gone well, your system should boot normally from the Kickstart disk.
The Time Lord package includes two programs, Settl and Gettl, that you can add to your Workbench disk. Together, they allow you to set and read the clock calendar. A Gettl command in the si startup sequence file of your Workbench disk will automatically read the Time Lord module and reset the system clock each time you power up. Although the Gettl and Settl programs work well, it would have been nice if Amazing Devices had used a format similar to that of the Commodore Setclock program so that you could use the standard startupsequence file from the new 2000 500 Workbench disk.
Although the installation procedure may at first seem complex, 1 was able, without any real hardware experience, to read all the instructions, view the picture files, install the Time Lord, test it and reassemble the Amiga in under 45 minutes.
The Time Lord module I installed worked on the first try, and proved accurate and reliable in operation. Still, considerable caution is in order. Poking around in your computer without a good idea of what you are doing can lead to serious problems. Accordingly, the instructions make it very clear that you install the clock at your own risk. If you are comfortable with plugging in chips, though, you may find Time Lord to be a worthwhile investment in keeping your Amiga 1000 up to date.
Time Lord
Amazing Devices PO Box 611075 San Jose, CA 95161-9973 $ 39.95
No special requirements.
Analytic Art
Put a fractal under your Amigascope
By Louis Wallace
THERE SEEMS TO be some sort of force surrounding the Amiga, compelling creative individuals to spend countless hours transforming obscure mathematics into iconological entities, abandoning the math itself in favor of the intricate, graphical end-results. Those of us with an inclination to assault unexplored areas of the Mandelbrot function welcome this force, as it has added new playthings to our arsenal. My newest toy of this genre is Analytic Art,
Only one fractal, the one provided, is at your disposal, 'flic Fractal Generator allows you to examine any area of the supplied Mandelbrot function at any level of detail, zooming in and out with ease. You have a choice of four screen formats, 320 x 200, 320 x 400, 640 x 200 and 640 x 400. Each uses the maximum number of colors (16 or 32, depending on the resolution). The program is very fast, and unless you have zoomed into a particular)' complex area, it draws the screen in only a few minutes. Although you cannot change the math formula, you can get different perspectives by switching back and forth between the Mandelbrot and Julia Set another form of fractal related to the area of the Mandelbrot you are exploring).
Another module, Spheres, is an excellent IFF mapping program. It maps any IFF image to the surface of a sphere. You can change the size of the sphere, make it elliptical and change the poles from north south to east west. T hese images can be saved in IFF format for later use in another program.
A third utility, 3D, allows you to manipulate a Finished Mandelbrot (or other IFF image) in three dimensions. You can change the viewpoint, magnify, reduce and rotate the image. You can also create various forms of stereo images from your pictures. One of the 3-D functions I jiked most is 3D Plot, which allows you to create topological maps of the image, with the height based on the color of each dot. You can reconfigure any map by reassigning height values to colors. ?
There are two other modules that are fun to play with but don’t have much practical use. With the Sierpinski Gasket Generator you can produce sonic very intricate images using random numbers, the given fractal and some simple input. The Henon Orbit Plotter module can create a form of contour map.
The documentation mentions a sixth program, the Gallery, which was not implemented on my version. Evidently it will be a slide-show generator with color cycling and other special effects.
I had a lot of fun with this program. By itself, the Fractal Generator is really 110 better than other fractal programs 1 have seen, some of which are public domain. But it offers so many special features including the ability to generate Julia Sets that although I have several
good Mandelbrot generators, I Find Analytic Art uniquely useful.
Analytic Art Crystal Rose Software
109 S. Robles Ave.
Pasadena, CA 91101-2417
818 795-6664
$ 59.95
512K required.
GAME SHORTIES
Alien Fires
ALIEN FIRES IS the First of a series of science-Fiction adventure games involving innovative player-perspective graphics, ease of play and fascinating use of the Amiga's speech capabilities. The story is this; you have been sent into the future by the TimeLord Elders. Somewhere on this small planet is Samuel Kurtz, the scientist who has created a time-travel device. Your mission is to locate Mr, Kurtz and his time machine, destroy all traces of the device and thereby save time itself.
All the controls are well-designed, usable and effective. You can wander around the planet by using the arrow keys (the left and right arrows turn you, the down arrow moves you backward, the up arrow sends you forward) or by clicking the on-screen arrows. You do not actually see yourself (except when you are dead a fascinating philosophical point); rather, you see whatever lies directly in front of you. At any point during the game you can check your stats (strength, dexterity, etc.), which you con Figure at the start of the game.
The game’s most impressive element is its emphasis on vocal interaction. When you meet one of the planet’s many characters, you can either Fight or talk with ?
Don’t miss the boat
with Amiga expansion products that limit expansion
5ob, AOT0 The Advantage™
A two megabyte RAM expansion card for use in the Amiga 2000 and the Subsystem.
¦ No-wait-state design
¦ Auto configures with all Amiga 1.2 software
• Designed to A2000 form factor
¦ Very low power consumption
¦ User may install inexpensive 256K x 1 dynamic RAM
A1000
A500
SubSystem™
Use cards designed for the A2000 with your A50Q 1000, not out-of-date A1000 cards. The Subsystem gives you two expansion slots for A200G cards and a space for an optional second floppy drive. The Subsystem fits under your Amiga, completely out of the way. Only 1.5 inches tall, the SubSystem raises the keyboard to the height of an average typewriter and actually makes it easier to use. A UUCSA-approved power supply is included that guarantees additional cards will not overtax your Amiga. The optional floppy drive is state-of-the-art CMOS design with extemety low power requirements. Cards and disk drive can be easily installed at a later date.
$ 249
with floppy drive $ 399
Subsystem
1000
FOR AMIGA 1000
$ 199
CALL
Unpopulated (OK) Populated (.5. 1 or 2 MEG)
Sab
A2000
Sy*trmr
TM
OverDrive
Direct Memory Access (DMA) SCSI Interface. Just because you have an Amiga 500 doesn't mean that you won't want the speed of DMA. Using the SubSystem with our 2000 card gives you what others only offer to A2000 owners. No matter what Amiga you own, Pacific Peripherals makes a SCSI for you. Our SCSI offers you compatibility with proven Apple Macintosh external storage devices. As a matter of fact, all of our drives are Macintosh compatible. 11 you use the SCSI in your A2000 you have an additional bonus, . .the ability to add a hard drive Inside your Amiga and still use external devices. In addition to 30 megabyte and 50 megabyte (and larger) drives, Pacific Peripherals offers the Infinity removeable media drive. Once you have purchased the Infinity, you have unlimited capacity. Each 10 megabytes of memory costs a whopping S18. (Does 10 megabytes for $ 180 sound more impressive?) With all this rapacity you still get 75ms access time.
OverDrive cad only $ 249
OverDrive “hardcard1' CALL
External Hard Drives rat i
Pacific
Peripherals
Policy: Add 3% for VISA or Mastercard. All 3 weeks for checks to dear. Send cashiers checks or money orders lor faster shipment. California residents add 7% for sales tax. No charge for UPS ground delivery Next day and 2nd day delivery available. Prices subject to change.
(415) 651-1905
P. O. Box 14575, Fremont, CA 94539
t traoamart of Commoaxe Bua*uaa Wacftrta* Cap* II. Na Mv*nt*ga. SubSyMam ara
infinity * a tradamart of Panphar* Land Uacmoafi * a tradwnam of An** ComfxAm Inc Ana 4 trMamanti of PacA: lV(Wsa
him. To speak, press the "S” key or one of the on-screen icons, and type in your question. If you ask the right question correctly, the character will respond solely through the Amiga’s speech synthesizer with valuable information.
This is a truly great idea! However, it has two major problems. Because the pitch and intonation is not quite right, the Amiga’s voice is difficult to comprehend (updated versions now include text). More importantly though, learning to ask the right questions is hard work, and the program doesn’t offer much help. If the character can’t answer or doesn’t understand your question, lie will mutter one of a few stock responses. “I don’t know” is great; “Sorry; I don’t follow you” is Fine; “I’m sorry, I don’t understand” is okay; “Give me a break, buddy how should I know?” is objectionable; and “What do I look like, an information booth?” is funny the first time, annoying the second and infuriating and insulting by the third.
The game has two other problems. While you can save your adventure, each time you do so you must re-boot the system. The manual has instructions for loading the game into expanded RAM, and it can be put on a hard drive (two very positive features), but for those of us with 512K and floppies this isn’t much consolation. Also, the plaver-per- spective feature is designed so that even though you can see down an entire corridor, a wandering character doesn't appear on the screen until you are nose-to- nose with him. This effectively negates the whole visual emphasis of the game.
As a result, you can fortunately or un- fortunaltcly avoid unpleasant characters, even if you occupy the same room, by simply walking wherever they’re not!
Alien Fires is impressive, but its flaws are significant. The concept is extremely strong, and with proper attention to logistics, the Alien Fires games could evolve into an important series. ($ 39.95, Paragon Software, distributed by Electronic Arts, 1820 Gateway Dr., San Mateo, CA 94404, 415 571-7171. 512K required.)
Neil Randall
Fire Power
I ADMIT IT. I like arcade games the good, old-fashioned shoot-em-ups where
you’ve got to get them before they get you. Fire Power, a fast-paced war game, poses you as a tank driver whose main objective is to capture the enemy’s flag. Along the way you get to fire at anything that looks threatening or doesn’t get out of your path.
This is the first release of Micro- Illusions One-To-One arcade series, designed so that you and ail opponent can blast away at each other simultaneously. You can opt to wage war against the Amiga, another person sitting beside you or with someone at the other end of a modem line.
The game is played on a large and intricate battlefield. In person-to-person mode, each player has half the screen as their viewport. Each can see his tank and a small part of the battlefield. Your perspective is from above, and as the tank moves, the screen scrolls quickly and smoothly. Across the battlefield are scat- tered a variety of objects such as trees, roads, buildings, fuel depots and military bases. Some of the buildings are yours, some belong to the enemy. You can usually find a way into a base either by passing through a gate, or by my favorite method using the tank’s gun to shoot a hole through the protective wall. Sometimes when you destroy an opponent’s building, soldiers will flee. It's great fun to chase them and run them over with the tank (this produces a squishing sound and leaves a blood stnear behind). To win extra tanks, you must find and destroy the enemy jails that house some of your men. When you hit these buildings, you can drive through the burning wreckage, rescue the soldiers and deliver them to your camp’s medical center.
Meanwhile, the enemy doesn't idly sit by and watch you destroy his city; he challenges your installation and people, too. To make things even more interesting, armed helicopters from both sides continually patrol the area. The tanks will occasionally run into gun towers that try to keep them from making it home. And if ever the two tanks find each other, look out!
The game features excellent digitized sound effects, from the rumbling of tanks and the whirling of helicopters to the explosions of artillery. These, combined with the excellent graphics, give you a war game that does justice to the Amiga’s special features. If you like hardcore violence, steady action and realistic sound effects, Fire Power is for you. ($ 24.95, Microlllusions, 17408 Chatsworth St., Granada Hills, CA 91.344, 818 360-
3715. 512K required.)
Louis Wallace
Into The Eagle’s Nest
A SINGLE-PLAYER joystick game, Into 'The Eagle’s Nest casts you as an Allied soldier. Your mission is to enter a Nazi controlled castle, rescue the prisoners and destroy the castle. Of course the Na- zis don’t plan on making your life easy!
The Eagle’s Nest offers an aerial view from which you can see the walls, doors and inhabitants of the castle, as well as your soldier. You move through hallways, trying to find keys to open the metal doors (keys can only be used once). It’s important to always remain on the lookout for more ammunition and medical supplies, because you can take only so much damage before you die. Sometimes you can find extra-point baubles like gems, paintings and vases, but more often you run into enemy soldiers. They are fairly easy to kill, but you’re sometimes faced with so many that you must find a place where you can shoot from, but avoid being fired at.
The prisoners are hidden throughout the castle’s four levels, as are detonators that will prove useful for exploding the Nazi stronghold when (and if) you make it out. You can choose either easy or hard mode (at the advanced level the Nazis will not only show less mercy, blit they will sustain more damage, too).
There are two complete castles, so even if you master the first, a more challenging manor awaits.
Only couple of things bothered me. One was sound effects. While the game starts off with some excellent music, the combat sounds are somewhat tame. Maybe I’m fussy, but 1 expect gunshots to sound exactly like gunshots, not muffled bangs. The other problem is that the screen scrolls too quickly. Instead of gliding smoothly as you move, your player jumps abruptly from place to place.
Overall however, I like Into The Eagle’s Nest. Between the two castles, you can do a fair amount of playing. . . If you can stay alive! ($ 39.95, Mindscape, 3444 Dundee Rd., Northbrook, IL 60062, 312 480-7667. 512K required.)
Louis Wallace ¦
HELP KEY
While spring cleaning his bulging mailbox, Load-and-Run answers 500, 1000, even 2000 questions.
By Louis R. Wallace
Baffled Booter
Q: have an A2000 with three megabytes of RAM, a Bridgeboard and an internal hard drive. My first problem is the length of time it takes to load the operating system. All arress is from the floppy up to the point the hard drive takes control. My hard drive has a complete set of Workbench files and directories, so why can't I boot directly from the hard drive and get everything eight to 10 times faster (like MS-DOS machines)? Also, my system won't automatically load the correct printer driver when I turn on the machine. I must load Preferences, choose my printer and then select save. Each time I boot I have to repeat the process. What am I doing wrong?
D. Sanders
Norfolk, NE
A: To shorten boot lime, vou
7 4
could assign the system to the hard drive immediately after it is mounted, by adding ASSIGN SYS: Di 10: to your startup-scquence. The command would turn operation over to the hard-drive-based software at the earliest possible moment. From then on all access to the C directory would be from DHO:. As for hooting Workbench directly from the hard drive, the 1.2 operating system does not allow that. However, the promised 1.3 system should be capable of doing so.
Your second problem is caused by having two complete Workbench systems, one
on the hard drive and one on DFO:. When vou select Prefer-
j
ences, it is loaded from the SYS: directory, in your case DHO: (after completing the startup-scquence. SYS: is DHO:), and saved to DHO:. But you are booting from DFO:, so its Preferences are used when you first start the computer. DF0:’s Preferences are not altered by the changes you saved to DHO:. The solution is easy, however. After you boot the machine, load Preferences and set the parameters as you want them. Select the save option. Then, from the CLI, copy those Preferences over to DFO:. COPY DH0:PREF ? TO DFO: will install the proper Preferences information on your boot disk (DFO:), so it will appear when you boot.
500 Games
Q: I bought several older Electronic Arts games, but they won’t run on my system (an A500 with the A501 512K RAM board). I thought the Amiga 500 was fully compatible with the A1000.
What’s wrong with my A500?
D. Stone Boston, ALA
A: Nothing is wrong with the computer; the problem lies in the software. Some early Amiga programs (including some Electronic Arts games) will not work properly if the machine has more than 512K of memory installed. You have two options. If the programs do not auto-boot, you can use

the 1.2 Workbench tools No- FastRam and SlowMcmLast (found in the System drawer on the 1.2 Workbench) before running the program. Your only other choice is to remove all memory beyond 512K. On the A500, you must remove the A501 memory expander. On the A2000, however, there is no such solution, as it comes with one megabyte of unremovable RAM on the motherboard.
Don t Go To Pieces
Q: 1 use my Amiga 1000 mostly for playing games. thought it would be fun to change some parts of the games such as voices, background detail and perhaps even game play. Is there any way to decompile a program? Are there any books on the subject?
. War go
Utica, NY
A: You can't change a compiled (or assembled) program back to the source code used to generate it. But you can disassemble ii (list it as assembly language) if you have a machine language monitor like the MetaScope Debugger from Metadigm. However, unless
vou are very skilled at 68000

assembly language, what you get is likely to be completely meaningless to you. As far as changing the program, unless you have the original source code (C or assembly) and are proficient at programming the
Amiga, you won’t be able to make any changes or alterations. While there are no books that describe decompiling software, you could get a good book on C or 68000 assembly programming, and learn to write your own programs.
Safety First
Q: have several basic but nagging quest ions. Is it safe to leave Kicks tart, Workbench or any Amiga disk in a drive when the machine is off? Does it hurt to leave the Amiga on for long periods of time? When displaying a 100 x 100 BOB (or any large BOB) from Amiga Basic, it flickers like crazy. Why, and can I eliminate the flicker?
C. White
Missoula, MT
A: It is probably okay to leave a disk in a drive while the machine is off (I do it all the time), hut to be safe always use a backup of the disk. Keep the master disk in a safe place, so you can make another copy if your working disk becomes damaged.
As for leaving your Amiga on all the time, that's more difficult to answer. All electronics have a finite lifetime, and the Amiga is no exception. By leaving the computer on all the time, you increase its chances of needing service, but that time may still be a
i
long way off. Turning the machine on and off all the time ? Is certainly more dangerous, because a weak chip is more likely to die when it receives a power surge than when it is in normal use. In the AmigaWorld offices (where Amigas get a workout five days a week), we turn the machines on once in the morning and leave them on for about 10 hours. The Tech Editor’s A1000 is an original developers model which has had just about every third- party device invented installed in or on it over its career. After about two and a half years of daily use, the machine still hasn't had a problem. Sturdy little computers, these Amigas! Finally, your ROBs flicker because Amiga Basic is constantly refreshing the image, Unlike Sprites, BOBs actually become part of the bitmap. Unfortunately, Amiga Basic is just not the proper language for BOBs. To get rid of the flicker you must use double-buffering techniques (draw on one screen while looking at another, then change the screen you are looking at to the newly created image), which Amiga Basic does not support. However, if you are not constantly ani- mating the BOB and just want it to sit without flickering, you can use the screen Get and Put commands. Load the BOB and place it on the screen with the normal Amiga Basic animation commands. Use screen Get to put that area of the screen in an array, then use Put to place it back in the same location and turn off the BOB. The image will sit there without flickering.
The Path Not Taken
Q: am having problems with the CLI commands PATH, ASSIGN ajid CD. I have a 512K A1000, and want to put the frequently used commands in the RAM disk.
I want to use the PATH command to search the RAM directory before AmigaDOS searches the current directory, but I can't get PATH to forget about the current directory.
J. Trotter Downey, CA
A: First, use ASSIGN to direct AmigaDOS to look in your RAM:C directory for the commands you placed in RAM, then use PATH to have it search for the remainder of die CLI commands in the C directory. The example batch file copies often used GLI commands to RAM, assigns the C directory to RAM:C, then uses the PATH command to create a path back to the normal C directory to find the other commands.
Makedir ram:c
copy df'O:c dir ram:c copy df0:c copy ram:c copy dfO:c cd ram:c copy df'0:c assign ram:c copy df0:c ed ranv.c copy df0:c run ram:c copy dfO:c execute ram:c assign c: ramie df0:c path df0:c
You can run this file with the EXECUTE command, or add it to your startup-sequence.
Where To, Buddy?
Q: J would like to write to Commodore for some information.
What is their address?
A. DeBusk
5th Signal Command
A: Write to Commodore Business Machines at 1200 Wilson Drive, West Chester, PA 19380. Dial 215 431-9100 for the main switchboard, 215 430-4200 for the customer-support line. ¦
TRANSFER FILES
Don't tumble around with your Amiga tiles. Let QUARTERBACK manage your valuable data. The Quarterback sneak scores every time!
TRANSFER C64 C128 files to and from your Amiga!
Quarterback is a FAST Hard Disk to Floppy Backup Utility for the Commodore Amiga, featuring:
• Fast backup - 20MB in less than an hour* Full Subdirectory lncremental backup
• Full Subdirectory Smgle File Restore • Automatic formatting ot diskettes * Automatic catalog ot files • Automatic diskette sequence numbering and checking • Runs with Workbench or CLI * Includes excludes files by name and or wild card * Selects tiles by date • Selects files by Archive bit * Estimates number of floppies needed • Accepts batch command files * Validates writes • Restores original file date time stamp • Prints backup restore report • Allows easy access to subdirectories * Beeps for floppy change • Provides AmigaDOS access from within • Convenient user friendly error recovery • Multitasking • No copy protection • Works with all AmigaDOS compatible hard disk drives
You'll have fewer"time-outs" with QUARTERBACK managing your file backups.
Put Quarterback on your team for only $ 69.95 plus $ 3.00 for shipping and handling. CA residents add 6% sales tax.
DISK-2-DISK reads your PaperChp. SpeedScript and Pocket Writer documents or other hies on floppy disk directly into your Amiga. Transfers all file types Use these transferred files with your favorite Amiga programs.
• Reads writes 1541 4040 and 1570 1571 disk formats.
• Converts Commodore PET ASCII to Amiga ASCII and vice versa.
TRANSFER MS-DOS and ATARI ST files to and from your Amiga!
D0S-2-D0S reads Lotus 123 worksheets, wordprocessing documents or any other files on floppy disk directly into your Amiga for use with your favorite Amiga programs.
• Reads writes both 5 25 AND 3.5* MS-DOS disks.
• Reads writes 3.5 Atari S- diskettes (GEM format)
• Converts ASCII file line ending characters.
Disk-2-Disk requires Ihe Amiga model 1020 5 25 disk drive Dos-2-Dos runs on any standard Amiga DiSk-2-Disk $ 49 95, Dos-2-Dos S55 00 Add $ 3 00 for shipping and handling. CA residents add 6°a sales tax
Central Coast Software
TM
268 Bowie Drive, Los Osos, California 93402 • (805) 528-4906
WS US'
THE READERS’ CHOICE
“HOW COULD HE be so positive negative about such an awful outstanding program? 1 could rate it better than that!” Go ahead, now’s your chance to tell us what you think. For the past two years, we editors have applauded our favorite products with the Editors’ Choice Awards. This year we leave the voting up to you. On the supplied coupon (or a postcard), rate your hardware and software over a scale of one (the lowest) to 10 for each of the three criteria (A, R and C) listed in the appropriate category. Send your votes to: The Readers’ Choice, AmigaWorld, 80 Elm St., Peterborough, NH 03458.
In the December issue, we’ll present the 1st Annual Reader’s Choice Awards with all the pomp and glitter they deserve. However, unlike the Academy Awards who employ the prestigious accounting firm of Price Sc Waterhouse for their tabulations, AmigaWorld*& results are entrusted to the firm of Cutrate 8c Watergate, infamous for their security leaks. While they can count accurately, they can’t keep secrets. In upcoming issues, watch for pre ceremony peeks inside the envelopes.
CREATrVTTY (graphics, video, music, desktop publishing)
A) ease of use
B) flexibility (special equipment needed, integrates with other programs)
C) professional features (Can you use it in your business studio?)
Games
A) playability
B) presentation (graphics, sound)
C) longevity (How long does it hold your interest?)
HARDWARE (memory expansion, hard drives, digitizers, genlocks)
A) ease of installation
B) ease of use
C) technical support
HOME (educational, finance)
A) ease of use
B) documentation (complete reference, examples, tutorials)
. C) flexibility (Does it have a variety of uses or will you grow out of it?)
*
; PRODUCTIVITY (spreadsheets, databases, account- ! Ing, telecommunications, word processors)
* A) ease of use
* B) flexibility (import files from other programs, a ; variety of applications)
! C) advanced features (Can you grow into the
! Program?)
¦
*
; Programming (languages, utilities)
; A) documentation (complete reference, examples,
! Tutorials)
' B) flexibility (integrates with other libraries, routines)
; C) advanced features (Will it support more compli-
; cated applications?)
*
*
* Miscellaneous (whatever is left)
*
• A) ease of use
•p
; B) documentation (complete reference, examples,
! Tutorials)
! C) performance (Does it do what was promised?)
Products Rating
A B
Comments
Products You Would Like To See Reviewed
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Desktop Artist p 1 Head Coach
Call
$ 30
neet cnecx PROGRESSIVE
Ulll
Mindlight *7 VIP TECHNOLOGY
MICROSMITHS
C LI-Mate
52-4
pin
Professional
590
Fas! Fonts
S24
to-BntroCad
$ 48
WESTCOM
TxEd
S24
LOQiStlX
$ 80
ADFO
$ 45
MICROSYSTEMS SW
Micro Lawyer
$ 36
$ 42
Hardhat
$ 55
Analyze 2 0
$ 90
jjt*iPuMale
WORDPERFECT INC.
BOSPC
$ 60
Superbase
580
Word Perfect
$ 200
UuvJ 1 v
Wexcellems
$ 180
to-'Superbase Prol
SI 80
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Word Perlect Library
Call
Flipside
On-line
$ 30
Vizawrile
580
ZEN SOFTWARE
S42
PROLIFIC INC.
Call
System Monitor
$ 39
Organize
$ 60
Pro-ASM
ZIRK0N1CS
Scribble
$ 60
Pro-Board
Call
A ¦ |
Prof Text Engine
SGO
Works
$ 120
Pro-Net
Call
MIMETICS
PSYGNOSIS
$ 24
$ 24
to-'Capture toJFramebuiter Midi Interface
$ 120
$ 420
Barbarian Terror Pods
$ 40
READY SOFT
Sound Sampler
• Utilities 2
$ 80
$ 30
The 64 Emulaloi RIGHT ANSWERS GROUP
We have over
Pro Muir Studio MINDSCAPE
$ 125
fWDirector S ANTHONY STUDIOS
$ 42
800 Amiga
Balance ot Power Bratacus
$ 30
S30
LaserUp! Laser Utilities
$ 64
$ 32
products in
Defender ot Crown Oeja Vu
$ 30
$ 30
SEDONA
Money Mentor
$ 60
stock - and
to*'GaurHlel Hailey Project
$ 30
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SEVEN SEAS
Doua's Math Anuanum
new products
to*'Harrier Combat fjcJlmpact
$ 30
S30
SIS
C64 Emulator
arrive every
tvjlndoor Sports iinto Eagle's Nest Keyboard Cadet Kmq ol Chicago Plutos Racier
$ 30
$ 30
$ 24
$ 30
$ 18
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SOFT TOUCH
Custom Screens Paymaster Plus SOFTWARE TERMINAL
Telegames
$ 42
$ 90
$ 21
day. Please call for latest price and
SAT Preparation S D I
$ 48
$ 30
SOFTWARE VISIONS
MicroFiche Filer
$ 60
availability.
800-433-7756
rders Only:
VISA
Michigan: 313-427-7713 B
stomer Setvice: 313-427-0267
X: 313-427-7756
urs: Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m.-6 p.m
No Surcharge for MC-VISA'DISCOVER Sorry no walk in traffic
Ail returns must have RA% Merchandise found defective will be repaired or replaced We do not otter refunds lor defective products or for products that do not perform satisfactorily We make no guarantees Ini product performance Any money back guarantee must be handled directly with the manufacturer Call lor shipping & handling info Puces subject to change without notice 12864 FARMINGTON ROAD. LIVONIA. Ml 48150 We cannot guarantee compatibility
Send Mail Orders To: M .C.S. 12864 Farmington Ftd.. Livonia, School RO.’s Accepted - Call For Terms
DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED
48150
CheckOTHERAds then I EfCHECKOUR PRICE!
• 256K Ram. ... $ 70
• Insider (1 Meg). . . $ 300
• PRO DRIVE . .$ 180
1010 compatible
• 1010 Drive. .. $ 200
• 20 MEG.....$ 650
• 40 MEG.....$ 950
• 1680 Modem .... $ 120
• GENLOCK $ 200
AMIGA MAKES IT POSSIBLE ... MCS MAKES IT AFFORDABLE!
500 2000
SPECIAL PROMO...
$ CALL
• PRO GEN
SPECIAL PRICING
• Bridge Card
• 2 Meg Ram
• Hard Drive Controller
• FRAME GRABBER
Special Introductory Price!
• 512K Ram
..$ 120
• 1 Meg .
..$ 300
• 2 Meg .
..$ 400
Magnavox 515...
.. $ 275
1084. ...
. . $ 275
Sony 1302 MultiScan .
.. Scali
18 C.P.S. Letter Quality
I. B.M. Compatible Printer
$ 100
• MARAUDER II . .
. . $ 24
• ARKANOID
$ 30
SUPERBASE
PRO
s180
0KIMATE
20
With Interface
$ 180
WORD
PERFECT
200
$
DIGIVIEW
2. 0
130
$
DIGIVIEW CAMERA
W 16mm Lens $ 200
ALL I.B.M. SOFTWARE 40% OFF
Tired of Syntax?
*
Includes:
• AiRT Editor
• Compiler
• Print Utility
• Forms Picture Editor
• Extensive AiRT Programming Manual
* make AUTOKNOB pots *
PDJ Software
111 Thornwood Dr. Marlton, NJ 08053
(609) 596-8991
r
1 2 Kickstart 512K Amiga Required
AiRT is a trademark or PDJ Software * AMIGA is a trademark of Commodcre-Am ga
Ci-de 215 on Reader Service card
Mainframe quality*. Hill feature ANSI FORTRAN 77
compiler includes: Debugger, linker, library Manager, Runtime Library, IEEE math, and C interface. Supports Complex numbers, Virtual arrays, Overlays and
Linking. Not copy protected. $ 295.
Version for CSA 68020 68881 Turbo board also available $ 495.
From the authors oi Mi croft BASIC compiler for Macintosh, comes AC BASIC for die Amiga. Companion compiler to die Amiga BASIC interpreter: has more features and includes
BLOCK IF, CASE statement, and STATIC keyword extensions and executes up to 5Ox faster. AC BASIC is die new BASIC reference for MC68000 based personal computers. Not copyprotected. $ 195.
R, r. . ,, r Telephone orders welcome
Scientific Engineering Software 1
h268 N. Woodward, Royal Oak, Ml 48072 (313) 549-7111
Amiga tradcTiKirk of Commuilorc Amiga Micnfcott trademark ot MicnNift Orfp___
Lets You...
...assemble groups of pictures from our library of over 80 functions to visually construct a program!
AC FORTRAN
AC BASIC
from p. 46
ma i n ( )
(
ULONG flags; int count;
*-----open Intuition and graphics
o pen_a11();
--create propinfos, itext, images, and gadgets--1' for(count=0;count (TOTAL-1); c o u n t + + )
c r e a t e_p rop(count); create_itxt(0, "R”); create_itxt(1, "G"); create_itxt(2, "B") ; create_image(2, Sidat); create_image(3, &idat2); create_gadget(0, 50, 40) create_gadget(1, 50, 60); create_gadget(2, 50, 80);
*-------changes to color sliders--------------- - *
prop[1] ,Flags|=PROPBORDERLESS; * no border for * prop}2].Flags=FREEHORIZ; * green; alternate * prop}2] . HorizBody=0xffff 0x4; * image blues knob * gadget [ 2] , Flag s=GADG HIM AGE | G A DC. IMAGE ; gadge t[2 ] .SelectRender=(APTR)&image|31;
* this one’s different so we'll do it manually * p r o p[3].F1 a g s = A U T O K N 0 B | FREEVERT; prop}3] .VertBody=Oxffff 0 x 0 3 ;
* knob is 1 3 of container * gadget[3].NextGadget=NULL;
* final one in the list * gadget[3] .LeftEdge=-l5; g a d g e t} 3 ] ,TopEdge=10; g a d g e t} 3 ] . W i d t h = 1 5 ; gadget[31.Height=-19;
gad ge t [ 3 ] . F1 ags = GADGHCOMP | GRELR1GIIT | GRELHF.IGHT ; gadget[3].Activation=NULL; gadget[3]. GadgetT v pe = PR0PGA DGE I; gadget[3].GadgetRender=(APTR)&image[4]; gadget}3] ,SelectRender = NULL; gadget[3].GadgetText=NULL; gadget[3] .Mutual Exclude = NULL; gadget}3] .Special Info = (APTR)Sprop(3]; gadget}3] •GadgetID=3; gadget[3].UserData=NULL;
*------------Open a screen----------------------*
if(!(my sereen=crente_screen(" > SimpleProp >"))) exit(FALSE);
------------Open windows------------------- *
flags = SMAR T_R E FRESH | WINDOWDEPTII | W T N DOW DRAG | WINDOWSIZING; g vindow=create_window("Gadget Window”, flags,
20, 20, &gadget|0l);
ModifyIDCMP(g_window, GADGETUP | GADGETDOWN | M01JSEM0VE) ;
f 1 ags = ACTl VATE | SMART_REFRESH | W I NDOWGI.OSE
R EP0RTM0US F. | W I N D0WI) EPTH | W I N DOWDR AG
WINDOWSIZING;
d window=create_window("Draw Window", flags, 100,
40, NULL);
ModifyIDCMP(d_window, MOUSEBUTTONS | CLOSEWINDOW | M0USEM0VE);
* obtain Rports, and ViewPort for d_window-----*
d rast-d_window->RPort;
d“v_por t-V i ewPo r t Ad d r es s(d_w i ndow); g rast = g_window->RPort;
*T-----set drawing pens---------------------*
SetRGB4(d_v_port, 3, 0, 0, 0); * black *
SetAPen(d_rast, 3);
SetAPen(g_rast, 1);
*_______set up IDCMP read loop----------
FOREVER
W a i t( (l d_window->UserPort->mp_SigBit) |
(1 g_window->UserPort->mp_S i g B i t) ); h a n d1e_messages();
) * end of main() *
*------opens Intuition and graphics--------------*
VOID open_a11()
EXTERNAL
3. 5"
DRIVE
$ 159.95
SCSI HARD DRIVES

IntuitionBase=(struct IntuitionBase *)OpenLibrary ("intuition*library", INTUITION_REV); if (IntuitionBase==NULL) exit(FALSE);
GfxBase= struct GfxBase *)OpenLibrary
("graphics.library", GRAPHICS_REV); if (GfxBase==NULL) exit(FALSE);
$ 1595.95 $ 949.95 $ 879.95 $ 659.95
150meg
65meg
40meg
20meg
}
-closes windows VOID damp_mop()
(
(g_wi n dow)
(d_w i nd ow)
(my_sc reen) (GfxBase)
RAM
screen, graphics, Intuition--*
Hard Drive comes complete ready to use. Prices include SCSI controller, fan cooled power supply with case and a true SCSI Hard Drive,
Close Wind ow(g_w i n d o w); CloseWindow(d_w i nd ow); CloseScreenfny_sc reen); CloseLibrary(GfxBase) ;
AMIGA 500
512K Internal $ 119.95
1. 5 M Internal $ 389.95
'ill lllllllf MliftlMMIMMHi ¦ ¦¦¦¦a a iiiiiiiitiMiiiMBiulll
AMIGA 1000
1. 5M Internal $ 389.95 2M External $ 449.95
if if if
if.....
if (IntuitionBase) C1oseLibrary(IntuitionBase); exit(FALSE);
)
* set up a simple horizontal
VOID create_prop(id) i n t id:
BE SURE TO ASK ABOUT OUR REMOVABLE DRIVES
slide pot-----*
struct Proplnfo *p = &prop[id ] ; p->FIags=AUTOKNOB | FREEHORIZ; p->HorizPo t = 0; p->VertPot=Q; p->HorizBody=0xffff 0x20;
* knob is 1 32 of container * p->VertBody=0;
1
*----------receive
VOID create_itxt(id i n t id;
UBYTE *string;
CABLES
PARALLEL OR SERIAL
$ 9.95 each
id and string string)
PIONEER (801)942=1174
COMPUTING
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- BLAZING NEW FRONTIERS IN PERSONAL COMPUTiNG-
struct InLuiTexL *t=&itxt[id] t->F rontPen=1; t->BackPen=NULL; t->DrawMode=JAMI; t->LeftEdge=-20; t->TopEdge=l; t->ITextFont=NULL; t->IText=string; t->NextText=NULL;
Circle 169 on Reader Service card.
* place to right of gadget *
)
*
6 x 1 blocks-------*
data)
- ------uses 48 x
VOID create_image(id i n t id;
USHORT * da ta;
struct Image *i = &image[id |;
i->LeftEdge=0;
i->To pEd ge = 0;
i->Width=48;
i->Height=6;
i->Depth=l :
i->ImageData=data;
i->PlanePick=0x1;
i->Plane0n0f f = 0x0;
i->Next!mage=NULL;
1
*-set size of gadget to 250 x 10, it's prop type-*
VOID create_gadget(id, left, top)
USHORT id;
SHORT left, top;
f
Your Texas Amiga Source Immediate Access to over 400 Amiga Titles.
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struct Gadget *g = &gadget[id 1 ;
CALL TOLL FREE 800-443-8236
g->NextGadget=&gadget[id+1]; * make sure that *
g->LeftEdge=left; * you NULL last one in list *
g->TopEdge=top;
g->Wi d t h= 2 50;
g->Height=* 10;
g-> Flags = GADGHCOMP;
g->Activation=GADGIMMEDIATE | RELVERIFY |
FOLLOWMOUSE; g->GadgetType=PR0PGADGET; g->GadgetRender=(APTR)Simage[id]; g->SelectRender=NULL;
Listing continued on p. 92
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flP WITH HIGHEST QUALITY SOFTWARE FOR YOUR AMIGA!
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O 002 Amiga Learner
Fantastic CLI tutorial disk!
O 005 Amiga Basic Programs
Excellent utilities anti games. 1
O o l I Sounds Edit and plus sounds.
Hear Kirk. Spock. Star Wars + more
0014 Desktop Video
Only Amiga makes it possible!
O0I8 General User Utilities
A must for every serious user.
GRAPHICS AND GAMES
O 001 Best Graphics and Games
Just the Amiga classics!
O 007 Mandelbrot and Fractals
An and science! Fascinating beauty!
O 008 Assorted Games
Hours of challenge and fun!
O 009 Graphics and Animations
Eye-popping Amiga demos!
0013 Interactive Graphics cad.
Create 3D objects. Ray Tracer + more
O 03! Amiga PD Artwork images.
O 015 Icons and Icon Utilities Only with Amiga!
O 017 Emacs Editors Current versions.
O 019 Unixlv-type Commands
O 021 Telecommunications
Great modem utilities + BBS list!
O 023 Word Processing Also Daiabasing.
O 024 Home Finance Spreadsheets. More!
O 025 Program Languages Lisp. Fonh.
AMIGA PUBLIC DOMAIN CONNECTION ORDER COUPON
ENTER DISK NUMBERS DESIRED
ANY 5 DISKS 5 $ 29.95 ANY 10 DISKS 5 S59.90
““I Buy 10 lake I FREE!
10-slot Diskette Case
Ca Residents add 7% state sales las
Full Name
Address
Shipping Si. Handling (Enter $ 7 for overseas)
SEND COUPON (OR COPY) WITH CHECK OR MONEY ORDER (NO VISAMC) TO
APDC BOX 9015 BERKELEY CA 94709
Circle 92 on Reader Service card
DEMO DISKS S10 each Probe Sequence (512k) RGB (1 meg)
Check or money order payable to; Right Answers
Plus $ 3 shipping and handling. Calif- residents add sales i.ix
from p. 91
g->GadgetText=&itxt[ id] ; g->MutualExc1ude=NULL; g->SpecialInfos(APTR)&prop[id]; g->Ga d get1D = i d ; g->UserData-NULL;
]
?--receive gadget list, start location, etc.--* struct Window * create_window(name, flags,
x, y, gadget)
SHORT x,y;
UBYTE *na me;
UL0NG flags;
struct Gadget *gadget;
(
struct NewWindow w;
v. LeftEdge=x;
w. TopEdge=y;
w. Width=500;
w. lleight=150; w . D e t a i 1 P e n = - 1 ;
w. BlockPen=-l;
w. Ti11e = name;
w. Flags=flags;
w. 1DCMPFlags = NULL; * set afLer open via *
w. Type = CUST0MSCREEN; * Modify IDCMP() *
w . F i r s t G a cj g e t = g a d g e t ;
w . Ch ec kMa r k = NIJ LL ;
w. Screen=my_screen;
w . BitMap=HULL;
w . MinWid t h=2 50;
w. MinHeight-50;
w. MaxWidth=6A0;
w. MaxHeight=200; * 400 for interlaced display * r e t u r n (0 p e n V i n d o w ( & w ) ) ;
)
*---2 deep, hires, non-interlaced-----------*
struct Screen * createscreen(name)
UBYTE * name;
(
struct NewScreen s;
s. Lef tEd ge = 0; s . T o p E d g e = 0 ;
s. Width-640;
s. Height=200; * 400 for interlaced display *
s. De pt h = 2;
s. DetailPen=0;
s. BlockPen=l;
s. ViewModes = HI RES ; * add | INTERLACE for 400 *
s,Type=CUSTOMSCREEN;
s,Font=NULL;
s. DefaultTi tle = name ;
s. Gadgets=NULL;
s. CustomBitMap=NULL;
return(0penScreen(&3));
?-branch to a required window IDCMP routine--* VOID hand 1e_messages()
vhi1e( message= struct IntuiMessage *) GetMsg(d_window->UserPort) )
h a n d1e_d _w i n d o w();
* set up to respond to net mouse move instead of each individual move via mouse_moved flag * m o u s e_m oved = FALSE;
whi1e( message=(struct IntuiMessage *)
GetMsg( g_window->l-serFor t) )
h a n d1e_g_w1n d o w(); i f(mo use_mo ved) updat e_p r o p(g a d g_i d) ;
*-------do IDCMP for draw window--------*
VOID handle_d_window()
(
UL0NG me lass=message->Class;
USH0RT mcode=message->Code;
SHORT mmx-message->MouseX, mmy=message->MouseY; static SHORT priorx, priory; static int draw_ok;
ReplyMsg(message);
Listing continued on p. 95
|Q|The Pull-Down Menu
?a
This is Your Amiga's External Disk Drive.
Ing The Master 3A 3.
Only T89
HTTirara Associates, Inc. THE DISK SPECIALISTS
lizJLHL* Fujitsu Kasel, Sony, etc.: DISTRIBUTORS
3. 5" DSDD, 100% Certified, Lifetime Warranty!
SPECIAL LIMITED OFFER 50 Rainbow Disks $ 60.00
Prices subject to change w out notice. + ? Limited availability Shipping Handling: £5 00 min . Plus £3.50 per 100 disks. NY residents add Tax. COD's add £5.00. MasterCardAfea accepted: Min. purchase £50,00, Wo ship worldwide. Other brands and quantity pricing available. Write call for AMIGA product listings. Educational, Corporate 4 Dealer inquiries Invited.
Exceptional Service & Quality MCP Associates, Inc., 28-21 Astoria Blvd., Dept. AW, Astoria, NY 11102(718)858-8000_
Introducing The Master 3A 3.5" Disk Drive for the Amiga.
- 28" Cable
• Daisy Chainable
• High-Tech Gloss Black Face Plate
• Quieter OperaUon
1010 Compatible & Slimmer 1010
Call Toll Free
800-548-9669
In Calif: (408)462-9494
P. O. Box 1836 Capitola, CA 95010
Dealer Inquiries Welcome
O T Surfside I I Components X International
APL.68000
Get on-line with employers throughout the country! Subscribe to the ELECTRONIC MEDIA NETWORK’S online employment classified advertising database:
216 241-2612 (3 12 bps with 8N1 setting)
To subscribe, send S16 (check Visa MC) for 2 hours access to: ELECTRONIC MEDIA NETWORK, INC One Public Square, Suite M-3 Cleveland, Ohio 44113-2101 800 Services available to Paid Subscribers,
(Mention ‘AMIGAWORLD’ and receive 2 additional free hoursl)
$ 99
A HIGHLY OPTIMIZED ASSEMBLER BASED APL INTERPRETER FOR FAST AND POWERFUL PROGRAMS. FEATURES A COMPLETE INTERFACE TO THE AMIGA ENVIRONMENT WITH PULL DOWN MENUS. REQUESTER AND ALERT BOXES. SPEECH, SOUND AND GRAPHIC FACILITIES.
SPENCER
ORGANIZATION, INC
Westwood, N.J 07675 P 0 3o* 2-18
(201) 666 601 1
Order Direct for S99 + 7 shipping, S10 Canada V ISA MC AMEX + 4% NJ res. + 6% sales tax.
Me MicroEd
Educational Software K thru ADULT
ALL CURRICULAR AREAS*INCLUDES RELIGIOUS PROGRAMS SEND FOR A LIST OF OUR SOFTWARE
MicroEd, Incorporated
P. O. Box 24750 Edina, MN 55424 612-929-2242
AUG
AMIGA USER’S GROUP of SJ
Join the largest user's group dedicated to the AMIGA. Receive our official newsletter. Evaluations on software and hardware, advanced updatings, technical information, problem-solving, program exchange (over 50 disks in our PD library), Buying discount service, etc.
Send $ 18.00 US for Membership to: T5T
AUG
Box 3761- Attn: Jay Forman-AW1 Cherry Hill, NJ 08034
(609) 667-2526 Add $ 1.00
DELUXEHELP IV • DELUXEHELP FOR AMIGA DOS
305-622-0138
35mm COLOR SLIDES
from your IFF or HAM files
• Brilliant Color * No Curvature Distortion as low as $ 1 slide Call or Write for order form, price list & sample
11280 Washington Place Culver City, Ca. 90230
(213) 390-3010
presents
DELUXEPAINT • CALLIGRAPHY DELUXE PAINT II • PHOTON PAINT
Use the Ultimate Tutorial System
2574 PGA BLVD, SUITE 104. PALM BEACH GARDENS. FL 33410
305-622-7049 BBS
WB®i®
if 3 (-L OijlT VVA [£lJ’, FREE CATALOG
PayroN Inventory ca or write today!
Accts Receivable Accts Payable
Check Ledger General Ledger (619) 436-3512
COMPUTER ®
Box 668-A Encinitas, CA 92024
WANTED: AMIGA DEALERS
THE SOFTWAREHOUSE offers a wide selection of Amiga software at competitive prices. As an authorized distributor of COMMODORE AMIGA brand software, we feature:
commodore ASSEMBLER GRAPHICRAFT
A IV 71 I AMIGATERM LISP
Z rVl I Vj C COMPILER MINDWALKER
- ------ CROSS-DEVELOPER TEXTCRAFT PLUS
ENHANCER V.1.2 1688 MODEM
We require no minimums on any product line (including pre-bookings) and offer same-day service on most orders We're easy to work with, so give us a call for your COMMODORE AMIGA and other software needs.
THE SOFTWARE HOUSE, Route 7, Box 409, Golden, CO B0403 303-642-3063
DESKTOP AUDIO VIDEO SYSTEMS
Editing Database Automatic Playback Training
Interactive Micro Systems Landmark, Suite 20
P. O. Box 1446 Haverhill, MA 01831 USA
1987 COLLEGE FOOTBALL DATA DISK and THE COMPUTER FOOTBALL LEAGUE (CFL)
1987 COLLEGE DISK Every BJG 8 team plus 12 selected Top 20 teams including Miami, USC. Michigan Sate, Syracuse. Wishbone and Power-I offenses included. 20 teams in all!
THE COMPUTER FOOTBALL LEAGUE -Recruit and coach your own pro team1 Start with S8 million and draft from over 400players CFL will beupdated annually Order year 1 today1
$ 14.95 each, both for $ 24.95 (KS residents add 5% sales tax). Send check or money order to or write for more information at
BETA SOFTWARE • P.O. Box 20537 * Wich.to. KS 67208*GRIDIRON'.s a trademark of Bethesda Softworks
ANNOUNCING: 1987 GRIDIRON! TEAMS
mi
TV
ie P
ii 1
1 1
1 -1
nr
1 III 1
"1
U
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1 1
11
LI J
L J
L J
U L
J W 1
1
H
y 11
Antiga-Coinitiodore Computer Users Show
Santa Clara Convention Center
Santa Clara, CA Sat.-Sun. May 14-15, 1988 Reserve early & be part of the most exciting Amiga- Commodore show in the West Coast. This will be a selling show with state of the art lectures and seminars.
For more information write or call:
Coldcn Cale Shows »POBoxS87 Corle Madera, CA 94925 ¦ (415) 388-8893
Great Amiga PD Software Only $ 4 to S6 per Disk!!!!!!
SE 13 Banner Printor SexQO Telecommunications Programs Seff113 TRON game SE l 17 DataBase program SE 121 Backgammon SE l24 Wiles Bournes game SE 127 Wheel of Fortune game SE*131 PacMan '87 game
SE 23 Monopoly game 3D Break
SE 3? Business Programs SE 108 Juggler Demo SE 116 Sproaasheol Program SE*120 Pictures Irom Workbench SE 123 Cribbage SE*126 Amiga Utilities I SE 129 Amiga Utilities II SE* 133 DOS Helper
SE lQ5 3D Breakout game SE*115 Vtord Processing SE 119 CAD program SE*122 Sol rt are SE*125 Olhelki game SE*128 Gravity Wars game S E * 132 Video W ake r Utilities Most of the disks contain many programs listed are the highlights* * Disks are $ 6 each Order 5 to 14 disks tor only S5 each S4 each for 15 or more. FREE Same-day shipping (foreign add $ .50 dlsk) FREE Catalog with order
SOFTWARE EXCITEMENT
“Service with Excellence”
_PO Box 5069, Central Point, OR 97502 (503) 772-6827
s&tupa fiutftAccd Sewtcea
* any art digitized hi-res to disk
• film recording of IFF disk image (slides-prints- 3" x 4" transparency)
* 4 color separations!!!
* NO RASTER LINES OR SCREEN WARPING
Ae44qH&ui anttdfo
Mueller Visual Productions 4024 28th Ave. 2 Rock Island. IL 61201 1*800-255-2255 ext. 1586
NO SCAN LINES! TOP QUALITY FAST
SLIDES
NEW LOW PRICE!!
ANY IFF FILE PROCESSED DIRECTLY FROM YOUR DISK!
2k resolution 35mm slides $ 6.75 each and as low as $ 2.75 each. Also digital color separations. Now accepting Visa MC, minimum order $ 25.00.
Calf or write for our full service list:
ImageSet 555 19th St., San Francisco, CA 94107
(415) 626-8366
I IB
Let Tour Amiga sing out In
( stereo
...Without stealing the voice from your monitor.
There'S nothing quite like tho Amiga's stunning digital sound in brilliant stereo But there are limes when the speaker on the monitor will do just fine The problem is only one set of audio output jacks is provided and cable swapping can be a nuisance
(Amiga 1000 only) Dealer Inquires Welcome
CORETECH P.O
Thought of using Y-connectora? Forget It!
When you he together left and right channels foe input to your monitor, you electronically mix the signals and disable channel separation to your stereo But there is a solution A custom cable which brings combined monaural audio to your monitor from the TV mod jack of the Amiga 1000 This leaves your audio jacks free to provide brilliant, uncompromised stereo. To order your auxiliary audio cable ( AAiOi), send check or money order for$ 12.95 (includes shipping and handling) to:
BOX 58023 SEATTLE, WA 98138
MOUSE WASH. A SPECIALLY DESIGNED BALL THAT CLEANS YOUR MOUSE ROLL- ERS-S7.95 “MOUSE WASH 2500 FOR AMIGA 500 AND 2000-S7.95** WINDOW PRIST
11-LOAD. SAVE. PRINT' OR CLIP PART OF A SCREEN. CONVERT BRUSHES TO ICONS, POSTER SIZE PRINTER AND MUCH MORE! FOR THE 500. 1000 8c 2000. WORKS WITH IBM GRAPHICS ON THE AMIGA-SS4.95*’IJHYANS IN SPACE-A SUPER FAST SPACE WAR GAME WITH GREAT DIGI TIZED SOUND EFFECT S!-$ 29.95**
RAT PAD'. A BIG 10" x 12" MOUSE PAD $ 11.95 ------
ADD $ 2 FOR SHIPPING OR $ 3 FOR C.O.D. - , , ¦ M ¦ --------
T & L PRODUCTS ¦ ¦ ¦¦ ¦¦¦¦*¦ ‘A
2645 Wilson St. --
Carlsbad, Ca. 92008
(619) 729-4020 ~ ----------
AMIGA SOFTWARE
Over 75 disks of only the best of the Public Domain and Shareware. Tested and sorted into the following categories: Animation, Applications, Games, Graphics, Information, Music, Programming, Sound, Telecommunications, and Utilities.
For a free list, send a business size SASE to:
Micro Computer Associates, Amiga Software,
P. O. Box 5533, Katy, TX 77491-5533.
INTRODUCING. PROJECT “D”
• An easy to use, friendly & intuitive user interface.
• A powerful and fast backup tool that lets you make backups of your copy-protected Amiga software.
• A unique backup tool for duplicating other disk formats including MS-DOS PC-DOS and Atari ST.
• This product is not copy-protected in any way.
NOW SHIPPING $ 49.95 ea
TO ORDER Send check or money order to: Fuller Computer Systems Inc.
P. O. Box 9222 Mesa, Arizona 85204-0430 OR CALL (602) 835-5018
Includes shipping and handling!
Arizona residents add 6.5% sales tax Dealer Inquiries Invited
Amiga is a trademark of Commodore-Amiga Inc.
OMNI
INTERNATIONAL TRADING
The AMIGA Specialists
AMIGA Software AMIGA Peripherals AMIGA Computers
3826 Woodland Park Ave. N., Seattle,
IN HOME REPRESENTATIVES”
fcOQ QC EACH sJ coo
_ -
V
C- 1
J
(:2 Hr)
VHS BETA
TUTORIALS
DELUXE PAINT II THE NEW IMAGE
PAGESETTER 4875 TAM I AM I TRAIL '
CHARLOTTE HARBOR, FLA 33980 (VIDEO DEPT) 1 - 813) 25-9001_
WE SHIP AROUND THE WORLD
Known internationally for exceptional service Knowledgeable, multi-lingual staff
U. S. ove-seas personnel1 We specialize in APO & FPO shipping’
Ask for our Overseas Military Special Pricing!
Fast delivery, charged when shipped COD, VISA. MC. M O. Certified check WA 98103 206-547-OMNI 206-547*6664 Fax 206-547-6012
* (
AMIGA PUBLIC DOMAIN $ 5.95 PER DISK
? 01 PRODUCTIVITY (W.B. & CLI Utilities)
? 2 SOUND Ed & mini library)
? 03 SOUND LIBRARY 1 (Lots of sounds!)
? 04 SOUND LIBRARY II (More sounds!!)
? 05 BOARD & CARD GAMES I (Family Tested!)
? 06 BOARD & CARD GAMES II (Hours of Fun!)
? 07 GAMES I (Kid tested & approved!)
? 08 SIGHT (Graphic Utilities & Progs)
? 09 ALTICONS (Library, Ed., Utilities)
?010 MACPICS (View, Edit, Convert, Print)
$ 5 95 Cost Per Disk. .. S .30 Shipping Per Disk (Wa. Res. Add 7.5% tax)
- We Accept- All major credit cards
Check off selections Send ad & $ + S&H lo: Colony Mountain PD
P. O. Box 22 Bow, Wa 98232-0022 or call: 206-766-6466
LARGEST ENCYCLOPEDIA CATALOG FOR DEDICATED COMPUTERS AND GAME UNITS
DIABLO Graphic mind challenge game .....$ 29.95
Lottery Assistant Increase your odds of winning
as much as 500% .....$ 39.95
Strip Poker Digitized nudes not drawing..... $ 29.95
FAST SERVICE • BIG DISCOUNTS MANY EXCLUSIVE PRODUCTS
S&H $ 2.50 US M.W. Ruth Co. AMW1
S&H $ 4.50 CN 3100 W. Chapel Ave.
US S's ONLY Cherry Hill, NJ 08002
(609) 667-2526
II you have developed software or hardware we would be happy to sell it for you. We also Market. Publish and Manufacture.
Oriental Desk Top Art Vol. 1
¦ High resolution images
¦ Oriental artwork i IFF format
¦ Use as clipart in desktop publishing programs
Price:$ 29.95 Software Integration Solutions
16496 Bernardo Center Drive, San Diego, CA 92128 Tel; 619-451-3094
The Pull-Down Menu
AMIGAWORLD'S New Pull-Down menu is a great opportunity for those with AMIGA products to reach over 70,000 Amiga owners. AmigaWorld Is the only publication with a subscription card in the box with every Amiga computer, national newsstand distribution by ICD Hears I, and single copy sales in computer stores carrying the AMIGA as well as large bookstores such as B. Dalton and Walden Books.
To reserve your Pull-Down Menu ad call Heather Paquette on the Cast Coast at 1-800-441 -4403 or Danna Carney on the West Coast at 1-415-328*3471. Wc accept checks, money orders, MasterCard or VISA.
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from p. 92
switch(mclass)
(
case CLOSEWINDOW: * stop program *
damp_mop(); break ;
VW Images offers high quality slides and color hard-copy from your IFF files. Call or write for details. ALSO Utilities for slide presentations, and more!
VW Images • PO Box 15107*Clearwater, FL 34629
813 442-6576
case MOUSEBUTTONS: * is it ok to draw? *
* (boy, is this over simplified!) * switch(mcode)

case SELECTDOWN; draw__ok=TRUE; break ; case SELECTUP: d raw_ok = FALSE ; break;
)
break;
case M0USEM0VE: * if it's ok, draw from *
* prior location to present *
i f(d raw_ok)
f
Move(d_rast, priorx, priory);
Draw(d_rast, mmx, mmy);
}
priorx=mmx; pr i or y = mmy; break;
)
}
*------do IDCMP for the gadget window------------*
VOID hand 1e_g_window()
(
UL0NG mclass=message->Class;
A PTR maddrcss = message->l Ad dress;
ReplyMsg(message); swi tch(mclass)
(
case GADGETD0WN: case GADGETUP; gadg_id=((struet Gadget *)maddress)->GadgetID; update_prop(gadg_id); break; case M0USEM0VE;
mouse_moved=TRUE; break;
]
* gel VOID u i n t id

LONG char s t a t n utn =
n um = swi t

the value for the slider and alter color 3 * pda t e_pro p(id)
num;
text_bu f[21]; ic USHORT red, green, blue;
((struct Proplnfo *)gadget[id].SpecialInfo)
- >HorizPot;
(15* num) Ox f f f f; c h(id)
case 0:
red=num; break ; case 1:
green=num; break ; case 2 :
b1ue= n um; break ;
SetRGB4(d_v_port, 3, red, green, blue);
* writes the gadget number, R, G, and B values in the upper left corner of the gadget window * f sprintf(text_buf, "%2d %3d %3d %3dM, id, red, green, blue);
Move g_rast, 10, 20);
Text(g_rast, text_buf, strlen(text buf));
)
**THAT'S IT **
AmigaWorld is a publication of IDG Communications. The world’s largest publisher of computer- related information. IDG Communications publishes over 90 computer publications in 33 countries. Fourteen million people read one or more IDG Communications publications each month. IDG Communications publications contribute to the IDG News Service offering the latest on domestic and international computer news. IDG Communications publications include: ARGENTINA’S Computerworld Argentina; ASIA’S Communications World. Gmputerworld Hong Kong, Computerworld Malaysia, Computerworld Singapore, Computerworld Southeast Asia, PC Review; AUSTRALIA'S Computerworld Australia, Communications World, Australian PC World, Australian Macworld; AUSTRIA’S Cornputerwelt (Tester- reich: BRAZIL’S DataNews, PC Mutido, Micro Mundo; CANADA’S Computer Data; CHILE'S Informatica, Computation Personal: DENMARK'S Computerworld Danmark. PC World Danmark; FINLAND'S Mikro, Tie- toidikko; FRANCE'S Le Monde Informalique, Distrib- utique, InfoPC, Telecoms International; GREECE’S Micro and Computer Age; HUNGARY’S Computerworld SZT, PC Mikrovilage; INDIA’S Da tuques t; ISRAEL’S People Computers Weekly, People C7 Computers Hi- Weekly; ITALY'S Compuferzvorld Italia; JAPAN’S Compute)- world Japan; MEXICO’S Computeiworld Mexico; THE NETHERLANDS’ Computerworld Netherlands, PC World Benelux; NEW ZEALAND’S Computerworld New Zealand; NORWAY’S Computerworld Norge, PC World Norge; PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA’S China Computerworld, China Computerworld Monthly; SAUDI ARABIA’S Arabian Computer News; SOU IH KOREA’S Computerworld Korea, PC World Korea; SPAIN’S CIM WORLD, Computerworld Espana, Commodore World, PC World Espana, Comunicaciones World, Informatica Industrial; SWEDEN’S Compute Sweden, Mik- rodatorn, Seen ska PC World; SWITZERLAND’S Computerworld Schweiz; UNIT ED KINGDOM’S Computer News, DEC Today, ICE Today, IDTUS. PC Business World; UNITED STATES’ AmigaWorld, CD-ROM Review, CIO, Computer Currents. Computerworld, Computers in Science, Digital News, Federal Computer Week, 80 Micro, FOCUS Publications, inCider, Info World, Macintosh Today, Mac World, Computer + Software News, (Micro Marketworldilwbhar-Friedman), Network World, PC World, Portable Computer Review, Publish', PC Resource, RUN, Windows; VENEZUELA’S Computerworld Venezuela; WEST GERMANY’S Computerwoche. Information Management, PC Welt, Run. PC Woche, RUN.
Manuscripts: Contributions in the form ol manuscripts with drawings and or photographs are welcome and will be considered for possible publication. AmigaWorld assumes no responsibility for loss or damage to any material. Please enclose a self-addressed, stamped envelope with each submission. Payment for the use of any unsolicited material wiil be made upon publication. All contributions and editorial correspondence (typed and double-spaced, please) should he directed to Amiga World Editorial Offices, 80 Elm Street. Peterborough. NH 03458; telephone: 603-924-9471. Advertising Inquiries should be directed to Advertising Offices, IDG Communications Peterborough, Inc., 80 Elm Street, Peterborough. NH 03458; telephone: 800-441-4403, Subscription problems or address changes: Call 1-800-227-5782 or write to AmigaWorld. Subscription Department. PO Box 868. Farmingdale, NY 11737. Problems with advertisers: Send a description of the problem and your current address to; AmigaWorld, 80 Elm Street, Peterborough, NH 03458, ATTN.: l.isa LaFleur. Customer Service Representative, or call 1-800-441-4403.
List of Advertisers
Reader
Sendee
Number
9 A-Squared, 52 124 Abacus Software. 47
175 AbSoft, 90 5 Aegis, 61
15 Aprotek, 36
67 Amiga Public Domain Connection, 92 AmigaWorld Back Issues Ad, 82 Pull Down Menu, 93-95 163 Brown-Wagh Publishing. 19
166 Brown-Wagh Publishing, 21
143 Central Coast Software, 86 ' Cinemaware Corporation, 7 41 Computer Mail Order, 62 69 Computer Mart, 91
199 Creative Computers, 80, 81
26 Digital Creations, 42
46 Digital Solutions, 11
89 Discovery Software. 9
91 Free Spirit, 4
26 GO AMIGA. 48, 49
150 Gold Disk, Inc., 5
4 Infinity Software, 27
115 Interface Tech, 77
51 Ketek, 74
93 Lionheart, 79
73 Logical Design Works, 23 31 Manx Software, 24
16 Metacomco, 60
44 Microcomputer Services, 88, 89 138 Microlllusions, Cll
37 Microlllusions, CIV
45 Micron Technologies, Clll Mmdscape, 17
38 New Horizons Software. 15 102 Newtek, 1
215 PDJ Software, 90
107 Pacific Peripherals, 83
22 Phoenix Electronics, 65
169 Pioneer Computing, 91
159 Progressive Peripherals & SW, 57 154 RSI Systems, 79
113 Redmond Cable, 60
Reader
Senncc
Number
204
Right Answers Group, The, 92
36
S&S Wholesalers, 71
211
SoftLogik, 29
29
Software Digest, 28
134
Software Shop, 73
63
Software Terminal, 59
206
Sprite Technology, 65
116
Star-Flite, 72
157
Sunrise Industries, 45
60
The Disc Company, 69
12
Top Down Developement, 2
66
True Basic, 67
77
Unicorn Software. 4
* This advertiser prefers to he contacted directly
This index is provided as an additional service. T he publisher does not assume liability for errors or omissions.
Micron's Amiga Series: Highest quality memory boards from America's Memory Supplier
Affordable Memory Expansion from a Company You can Trust
¦ Interchangable on Amiga 2000 1000* 500*
¦ 2 Megabytes
¦ Quick Memory Diagnostics on Power-up
¦ Zero Wait-States
¦ Discrete DRAM Controller
¦ Hardware Refresh
¦ Diagnostics Included
* Recoverable RAM Disk
¦ Auto Configuring (Amiga DOS 1.2)
‘Expansion chassis and passthrough provided Amiga is a trademark of Commodore Electronics Ltd.
Full 30-day Money Back Guarantee BM
For Orders and Information, contact your local mm'
MICRON
I TECHNOLOGY, INC.
America’s Memory Supplier
Systems Group 2805 E. Columbia • Boise, ID 83706 • (208) 386-3800
f°r 0007? Mece'eQO00
pa m 't% astr P TAR' V
»,ia randy'0
latsworth
8 360*371
11 IAN
1
Superb graphic war simulations
• 1 2 war scenarios
• Animated artillery, armor, and supply units with air support
• Smooth scrolling graphics
• 3D perspective terrain maps
• All moves graphically enacted on teleconnected computer
• Digitized sound effects
• Easy to use menus and requesters
2
Each back issues cosi $ 4.50 plus $ 1 shipping and handling On j orders of 10 or more back issues, there is a flat $ 730 shipping | and handling fee. Quantifies are limited. Send your orders lo 1 AmigaWorld, Ann: Back Issue Orders. 80 Elm Street, Petcrbor ough. NH 03458. _
3
Printer Drivers Scall
• Roland Plotters Scall
• S.C.S.I. Controllers... Scall
• Sonix Speakers S70
• Quick Start $ 140
• Time Saver ...$ 60

Click image to download PDF

Amiga World Vol 04 04 1988 Apr

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